Follow TV Tropes

Following

Video Game / Ultrakill

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ultrakill.png

MANKIND IS DEAD
BLOOD IS FUEL
HELL IS FULL
Advertisement:

ULTRAKILL is a Stylish Action retro-style First-Person Shooter made by Arsi "Hakita" Patala and published by New Blood Interactive. You play as V1, one of the robotic survivors of a war where combat robots that run on blood exterminated humanity for fuel, and find themselves fresh out. But there is still one last source left to tap into: all the demons and damned souls in Hell.

Gameplay hearkens back to the lightning fast shooters of old and places emphasis on movement, dodging attacks, and unbridled aggression in arena-style levels. V1's health can only be restored by showering in the blood of enemies, necessitating damaging foes at close range. Along the way, killing foes in varied and stylish ways will grant points that V1 can spend on weapon upgrades.

The game's prologue and first act were released in Early Access on September 3, 2020, and a free demo is available on Steam and itch.io. Act 2 was fully released on August 16th, 2022.

Advertisement:

ULTRAKILL provides examples of:

  • Adaptational Heroism: In The Divine Comedy, King Minos is the nefarious judge of Hell who sentences souls to one of its layers depending on their sins. Meanwhile in this game, King Minos is a benevolent king who turned the Layer of Lust into a thriving paradise because he felt that eternal damnation is an unfair punishment for sinners who simply love another.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In The Bible, the Archangel Gabriel is an angel of pure goodness who serves as God's messenger. Here in this game, he's a ruthless zealot who murdered the beloved King Minos for showing compassion for the sinners suffering in the layer of Lust and turning it into a thriving paradise.
  • Advanced Movement Technique: Jumping out of a dash will retain the dash's momentum, sending V1 flying around the level. This can be further chained with slides, wall jumps, and bunnyhopping.
  • Advertisement:
  • Alpha Strike: The Railcannon does significant damage, but it's limited by a 16 second reload. With how fast-paced Ultrakill's combat is, this relegates its role to dealing a one-time hefty blow to certain enemies or as a panic button.
  • Alien Geometries: The layers of Hell are weird, which becomes more obvious at the end of Act I onwards. Many levels seem to exist in sprawling locations with visible skies, even though you came in by dropping down a shaft from what may have been another sprawling location with a visible sky. You can sometimes see the shaft the level entrance connects to reaching upwards seemingly infinitely, sometimes it's inside a structure you can climb to the top of without ending up back in the previous level. The entrance to Gluttony is somehow inside the mouth of The Corpse of King Minos, but it doesn't actually take place within him according to Word Of God. invoked
  • Alternate Fire: All weapons so far except the railcannon (which just zooms in the camera) have at least one. They range from relatively mundane (a piercing Charge Attack on the revolver or a grenade launcher-esque explosive projectile for the shotgun) to more creative and stylish (like the revolver's coin shot or the nailgun's magnet traps).
  • Amen Break: Many tracks use Amen Break in various tempos, cuts and sometimes even in reverse.
  • Animal Motif: As a reference to his original Dante's Inferno counterpart (who's a serpentine monster), King Minos has a snake motif, which can be seen through his corpse (the parasitic worms controlling his corpse are described as serpentine), and through his Prime Soul (each of his arms are coiled by a snake, and he uses them to enhance his attacks. He also summons a large etheral snake as a deadly homing projectile).
  • Antepiece:
    • Some obstacles are introduced in a safer environment before throwing the player into more dangerous situations with them. Examples include glass, crushers and grapple points.
    • Some enemies are introduced alone. For an example, a single Schism appears in a fairly large room when first introduced, then two more Schisms spawn after the first one is killed. The Stalker is first shown to be blown up in a caged-off area, demonstrating its interaction with other enemies. Finally, the Idol is introduced indirectly by spawning a single Filth which the Idol buffs and it's up to player to find it.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Usually when facing a boss, you have to defeat it in one go, with any deaths sending you back to the beginning of the fight. But for the rematch against V2 in 4-4, the game gives you a checkpoint upon defeating the first phase, so you don't have to start from scratch if you die during the shorter, slightly easier second phase.
    • Every secret level can be completed using cheats without consequence, meaning players that can't accommodate to the Genre Shifts, like 1-S being a horror stage with jump scares, can still 100% the game. This even applies to 4-S, which does have a stage challenge for breaking all the boxes, Crash Bandicoot style. You can enable no-clip at the end and go back to smash any boxes you missed, and that won't disqualify you.
  • The Anti-Nihilist: The unseen character in the secret dating game level rejects the idea that nothing matters, and counters Mirage's viewpoint with a speech on how the lack of inherent meaning to existence allows one to come up with whatever meaning they want.
  • Anti-Regeneration: Some enemies give anti-regeneration buffs to other enemies, like the Stalker's golden sand or the Idol's blessings. Thankfully, their parriable attacks can still heal you.
  • Apocalypse How: We don't know what happened exactly (yet) but mankind is dead and their souls are now in Hell.
  • Armless Biped: The Filth are green humanoid Husks that lack arms and eyes.
  • Artificial Outdoors Display: The reason those damned to an eternity in Limbo eventually go insane is that the apparent beauty and serenity of the place is very obviously fake. The pleasant vistas are monitors on the walls, and the sounds of birds and wind are emitted from loudspeakers.
  • Ascended Glitch:
    • You can parry your own shotgun bullets if you time it right. This were originally a bug but has since been an official feature, with parrying your shotgun being called a "Projectile Boost".
    • There's a glitch called "Slam storage" that allows you to jump to insane heights. Hakita decided to leave it in, and some later levels have secrets only practically accessible through the height you get off it.
    • Areas where you can do tricky out-of-bounds clips that can be used for speedrunning are deliberately left unfixed, with unique messages added so people stop asking to fix them.
    • Downplayed with shotgun parrying. When the Shotgun received the ability to parry enemies, it dealt increased point-blank damage to any enemy, whether it was parrying an attack or not. When the developers fixed it, the increased point-blank damage was kept in for Malicious Faces.
  • Attack Its Weakpoint: Except for certain enemies, such as Drones and Something Wicked (who doesn't need one to be killed instantly anyways), just about every single enemy and boss has a weak spot, and since a majority of them are humanoid, the head is the obvious answer. As for the other enemies, you have to aim for something other than their head.
    • Street Cleaners die instantly if you aim for the flamethrower tank behind their back.
    • The Hideous Mass enemy is almost immune to damage on its many, many faces, but takes full damage if its exposed flesh is struck. The tail is also a good weak point, as long as your aiming is good.
    • The Mindflayer's weakpoints are the machine's head and the two protrusions on the back, and attacking the tentacles counts as limb damage.
    • The Corpse of King Minos can be hit anywhere, but his eyes take the most damage, along with the parasitic worms that pop out of his eye sockets.
    • The Leviathan can also be hit anywhere, save for the armored plating on its head, but the exposed heart on its head takes the most damage.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever:
  • Attack Reflector: V1 starts off with the Feedbacker Arm, which can send opponents' projectiles back at them and heal V1 while doing so.
  • Audible Gleam: When coins sparkle, they make a sound.
  • Author Appeal: Hakita is very outspoken about his music tastes, and so the game is full of references to artists, albums and songs that he likes. Take a look at the game's Shout out page for more details.
  • Awesomeness Meter: Combat is judged by the usual Stylish Action style meter that increases as V1 slaughters enemies, increasing its rank further for doing so in unique, skillful ways (such as headshots, multi-kills, environmental kills, and weapon swapping). Doing actions while in the air or sliding adds a passive point multiplier, while taking damage slightly decreases the meter. Ranks start at D (Destructive) and go to C (Chaotic), B (Brutal), A (Anarchic), S (Supreme), SS (SSadistic), SSS (SSShitstorm), and cap out at ULTRAKILL rank.
  • After the End: According to the mission parameters, humanity is dead, and Hell is full as a result.
  • Beware My Stinger Tail: The Hideous Mass uses its tail to fire a harpoon at you.
  • Beyond the Impossible: Gabriel, just before his boss fight in Act II, explains that somehow, the machines from Earth have not only successfully invaded Hell en masse for blood fuel, but are successfully destroying it in its entirety in their ravenous need for blood; with the layers of Limbo and Lust completely obliterated and Gluttony not too far behind by the time of their fight, it's clear that the days reality itself has are numbered with the robots slaughtering everything for fuel.
  • BFG: Most of the weapons, aside from the Revolver, are half V1's size.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies:
  • Blackout Basement:
    • The prelude's secret level, Something Wicked, is a pitch-black labyrinth, meaning that the player has to navigate almost entirely by the light given off by a skull.
    • 4-3, A Shot In The Dark, which takes place in the darkened interior of the pyramid in the Greed layer.
  • Blood Is Squicker in Water: Used as a gameplay mechanic. Killing an enemy underwater creates a bloody mist that lingers for longer, but heals less, since the blood is diluted by water.
  • Blood-Splattered Warrior: Since you're playing as a Killer Robot fueled by blood, soaking yourself in the blood of your slain enemies at close range is the number one way to heal yourself, most preferably with a shotgun.
  • Bloody Bowels of Hell: The 3rd Layer of Hell, Gluttony, is a Womb Level that takes place inside of the defeated Corpse of King Minos. The layer is a visceral area whose floors are made of meat and bone, stomach acid is an environmental hazard, disembodied mouths are doors, and giant eyeballs cover the layer's surfaces.
  • Bonus Boss: Special levels called Prime Sanctums, which can only be beaten by gaining a perfect rank for the entire act, feature extremely hard boss battles for each act.
    • As of now, the Prime Sanctum of Act 1 features the soul of King Minos, aka Minos Prime, who must first be freed from the Flesh Prison. He makes Gabriel look like a breeze.
  • Book Ends: Wrath begins with V1 descending into a massive body of water. It ends with V1 ascending from the depths of the ocean.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Can only be done with hitscan weapons. They, naturally, give extra damage and a nice boost to the style meter. The revolver's coin shot always headshots.
  • Boss Banter: Gabriel really likes telling the player about how a soulless machine could never stand up to the might of an angel.
  • Boss-Only Level: With the exception of some light platforming or exploration elements, the final level of each circle consists only of a fight with that level's boss. This is also the case for Prime Sanctums.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Not only is there no reloading at all, much like the 90's shooters that inspired it, there's not even any ammo to worry about. Only the Nailgun has any restriction on how frequently you can fire, while the railcannon and some weapon alt fires merely have a cooldown.
    • Justified in-universe with the advent of "electric guns," which fire microscopic bits of metal at high speed using powerful internal batteries, allowing for "weeks of non-stop firing" before one would need to scrape some metal dust into the chamber to reload. The Revolver is one such electric weapon.
    • The Shotgun is a "heat weapon" that fires "hyperconcentrated heat projectiles." This translates to a sort of plasma weapon with onerous heat management requirements, lest the weapon melt or explode. On the upside, this means that their ammunition is "truly infinite" rather than just "practically infinite."
  • Bottomless Pits: Some levels feature pits with blackness below. Falling into them causes the player to teleport back up at the cost of health.
  • Brutal Bonus Level: The Prime Sanctums. If you manage to find them and get the P ranks necessary to enter, you deserve your punishment.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: Layer 4 (Greed) has a very prominent ancient Egyptian theme.
  • Cave Behind the Falls: A downplayed example appears in 1-1. There is a secret area behind a waterfall. In 2-3, the entrance to the secret level of Lust is hidden behind an artificial waterfall, which must be deactivated to access it.
  • Charged Attack
    • The Core Eject Shotgun's charged attack launches a grenade that travels in an arc, and the distance increases the longer the charge was held.
    • The Over-Pump Shotgun's power depends how many times it was pumped before. The first two charges increase the number of pellets fired, while the third charge creates a massive explosion that deals tons of damage (including yourself) and launches you backwards. The launch is useful for reaching hard-to-reach places.
    • The Overheat Nailgun's Heat Meter increases as you fire. The alternate fire fires a barrage of burning bullets at the cost of a Heat Sink. The more filled the heat meter is, the longer the barrage lasts.
    • Piercer revolver's secondary fire needs to be held down for a short period of time before it can shoot which is more notable for its alternate variation. When fire button is released before full charge, the charge starts to go down instead.
  • Cherry Tapping: Directly punching most boss-type enemies with the Feedbacker earns a +DISRESPECT bonus. It's one of the weakest attacks in the game. Curiously, V2 doesn't seem to care about it at all, as long as you don't punch it with its own arm during the rematch.
  • Circles of Hell: Hell is layered in the classic Dante fashion. The Early Access version features two acts, each including three circles (Limbo, Lust and Gluttony in Act I and Greed, Wrath and Heresy in act II).
  • Combination Attack:
    • The Revolver's coins which reflect Hitscan attacks with higher damage. This can be paired with the Railcannon to multiply the damage of its high singular shot even higher.
    • The Core Eject Shotgun's core grenades can be shot with hitscan from Revolvers and the Electric Railcannon to detonate them prematurely, increasing damage. Also, the Malicious Railcannon increases the damage even further and expands the explosion size if it hits a grenade, and coins will prioritize reflecting bullets into grenades if any are present.
    • The Nailgun's magnets will also attract the Rocket Launcher's rockets, making it easier to connect direct hits.
  • Companion Cube: It's noted in the lore entry for the Mindflayer that the body it is attached to is a creation of its own and serves no practical purpose (being even called a "waste of resources"), but the Mindflayer will nevertheless protect it at all costs, even if that means its own destruction.
  • Council of Angels: According to the lore entry for Gabriel, King Minos and his soul, and in the end cutscene for Act I, Heaven is run by such a council. If Minos Prime's lore is any indication, this is because God has flat out vanished. Act 2 reveals that they've actually been the ones running Heaven, as God has actually been dead for quite a while. Then Gabriel wipes the entire council out to end their tyrannical rule over Heaven.
  • Crapsaccharine World: Limbo is a beautiful and serene Grecco-Roman-Medieval inspired world that seems like it should be a paradise. However, everything here is fake—the walls are computer monitors while the wind rustling through the trees is just music. It seems that the rest of Hell is behind the fake walls, meaning the damned are waiting to pop out and wreck havoc. In essence, Limbo is a beautiful paradise just waiting to be destroyed, and a journal you can find at the climax of the level implies that the perfect stillness of the place is driving its residents insane.

    "...My mind is adrift with the eternal torments. Lurid vistas painted insidious tones, hollow walls that scream to the touch. A mocking song plays at all hours, even the sounds of birds are fake. All reminders of my enduring damnation."

  • Crapsack World: Earth is barren of human, fauna, and flora life, and the only dominant species are Killer Robots fueled by blood, and they will kill anything to survive, such as the denizens of the afterlife, and each other. Speaking of the afterlife, it's just as bad, if not, worse than post-humanity Earth. Hell is ruled by a ruthless Council of Angels that enforce draconic punishments against Husks (damned human souls), such as lifting heavy boulders in the blazing dunes of Greed, getting blown away by the fearsome winds of Lust, or losing their sanity from the fake serenity of Limbo. Heaven is barely better, as even virtuous humans are forced to serve the higher Angels by doing tedious jobs, such as being wardens of Hell as Lesser Angels.
  • Creepy Cathedral: Heresy borrows a lot of imagery from cathedrals, from the twisting window fences resembling stained glass and an early area being similar to catacombs, to explicitly borrowing real-world architecture (the first level has a pillars-and-arches room with stairs in the corner that looks like the San Giorgio Maggiore basement). The layer is also the closest thing the game has to a classical depiction of Hell. It's painted in an eye-searing red and black color scheme, it's decorated with demonic goat skulls and pools of blood and lava, 6-1's intro track is a Drone of Dread, and 6-2's Boss Hallway uses Ominous Pipe Organ music. For extra creepiness, 6-1's four-way room contains a gigantic, headless, bleeding skeleton that's hanging up-side-down.
  • Crate Expectations: The level 4-S is full of breakable crates. In sandbox mode, the player can also summon boxes with a spawner arm.
  • Cyber Cyclops: V1 and V2 just have a glowing yellow hole on their "face," which seems to be an eye.
  • Cyberpunk: The circle of Lust has a futuristic city aesthetic.
  • Deader than Dead:
    • Lampshaded with Act 1's title, "Infinite Hyperdeath"; V1 is going into Hell and killing things that are ostensibly already dead.
    • This is the fate of King Minos after P-1, when his Prime Soul is destroyed.
  • Degraded Boss: Certain powerful enemies in the game are introduced to the player as boss fights before they become normal enemies in later levels. Boss versions have more health.
  • Destructible Projectiles: The Core Eject Shotgun's cores and the Rocket Launcher's rockets can be shot with a hitscan weapon, making their explosions bigger and stronger. Magnets can also be destroyed mid-air but doing so has no effect.
  • Developer's Foresight:
    • Placing a red skull on the final pillar in 4-3 will turn on the red lights. The red skull is unobtainable in the level without cheating.
    • Entrances to secret levels that aren't complete are blocked off with signs saying "UNDER CONSTRUCTION". If you noclip through them, Hakita himself will appear at the gate and tell you that "you're not supposed to be here."
    • Most-every level has fallbacks for scripts that rely on enemies if the Disable Enemy Spawns cheat is enabled, going so far to even remove early bird cameos of some of the bosses. The biggest exception to this is the Prime Sanctum, which is likely intentional given unlocking it requires not using cheats.
    • When the player succeeds falling out of bounds most of the time, the player is teleported back with no loss of health and a message "Whoops! Sorry about that" is displayed. However, there's certain spots used for speedrunning that won't trigger the failsafe and show a custom message, such as "PIPE CLIP LIVES" and "WHAT'S UPDOOR?" in the first two Prelude levels.
    • There's a unique style bonus for when an enemy dies by falling into the underwater abyss in 5-4, where no normal enemies appear without the use of cheats. It's fittingly labelled "why are you spawning enemies here".
  • Difficult, but Awesome: The Marksman modification for the revolver. While the coin is a very tiny target that can be difficult to hit in the middle of a heated battle, it flies in a predictable arc, and the ricochet shot automatically homes in on enemy weak points (making it the quickest way to kill Street Cleaners) and subsequently does massive damage to most things it hits (and gives a big boost to the style meter to boot). Creative use of it even allows hitting enemies around corners or behind V1. Shoot it at at the very peak of its arc, or when it's falling really fast, and the projectile will even split in half to hit two enemies at once!
  • Double-Meaning Title: "Belly of the Beast" means to be in a bad situation with no alternative (like raiding hell for the last sources of machine fuel in existence), and "In the Flesh" references Gabriel's in-person appearance as the boss of the first act. They're both also Womb Levels, fitting for the Gluttony layer.
  • Drone of Dread: The first half of 6-1 has a dreadful drone as its background music.
  • Drum and Bass: The best way to describe the soundtrack is this mixed with Industrial Metal, with some exceptions here and there.
  • Early-Bird Cameo:
    • Gabriel can be seen depicted on a stained glass window in 1-4, a few hours before his boss battle.
    • The Corpse of King Minos, boss of 2-4, can be seen way off in the distance in the three levels before the stage where you actually fight it. It gets higher up and closer as V1 descends through the layer of Lust.
    • Swordsmachine spends the whole level before his first intended encounter competing with V1 for kills.
    • Corpses of schisms can be seen in a level before the one where you first start fighting them.
    • In 4-1, silhouettes of the Sisyphean Insurrectionists can be seen climbing on a vast pyramid before V1 encounters one as 4-2's sub-boss.
    • When viewing through one of the ship's windows in 5-3, the Leviathan's tail can be seen as it swims across the Ocean Styx.
  • Easter Egg:
    • Soul orbs have been placed in various out-of-the-way locations in the levels, and exist primarily as things for curious players to find, though some of them grant powerups.
    • If you use cheats to get the spawn arm, then use it to drop enemies in the void in the Boss Hallway for Leviathan, the game gives you the "why are you even spawning enemies here" bonus.
  • Easy Levels, Hard Bosses: The game developers recognized that the bosses in this game tend to be harder than the rest of the levels, thus adding the "boss difficulty override" option in the major assists menu.
  • Easy Level Trick: For a few levels, most combat encounters can be skipped even without using glitches. For example, the challenges of 2-1 and 4-1 require you to skip all combat, and 2-2 lets you skip the combat encounters in favor of racing through the level under 1 minute.
  • Energy Ball: Orbs made of hell energy are fired by a variety of enemies. Orange ones go straight, turquoise ones have homing capabilities.
  • Endless Game: The Cyber Grind, a game mode where the player must battle endless waves of enemies in a large arena with a constantly-shifting layout.
  • Establishing Series Moment: All of Ultrakill can basically be boiled down to one weapon: the coinflip from the Marksman Revolver. It's stylish, difficult, surprisingly complex and varied in use despite its simple premise, atypical of a mechanic that one might expect of a First-Person Shooter, and is probably the earliest sign to new players that Ultrakill isn't trying to be an early-90s Quake-like as its Retreaux graphics and marketing might imply, but a game that evolves that traditional formula into something new.
  • Ethereal Choir:
    • Used in Dancer in Darkness, heard in 4-3, heard most prominently in the beginning section where there are less other instruments.
    • In some parts of 4-4 boss battle, the choir can be faintly heard in the midst of other instruments.
  • The Evils of Free Will: The Testament's author at the end of S-0 considered humankind as a failure, free-will as a flaw, and humanity deserved to be destroyed by its own evil.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: The soundtrack for 1-2, "A Complete And Utter Destruction of the Senses".
  • Exploding Barrels: While not present in levels, the player can summon explosive barrels in sandbox mode.
  • Expospeak Gag: The secret level in the Lust layer opens with a long, verbose and very omnious-sounding text log, over a pitch black screen and creepy ambient sound. If you read it closely, it just describes the memetic anime-style Meet Cute of crashing into someone while being late for school.
  • Expy:
    • Gabriel is a very transparent homage to Vergil, wielding a holy light themed version of Vergil's summoned swords, and even paraphrasing one of his most iconic taunts:
    Gabriel: Foolishness, machine. Foolishness.
    • He also is one to Credo, with the angelic design, thrown spears that can be returned for big damage and saying "Behold the power of an angel!"
  • Fackler Scale of FPS Realism: High emphasis on dodging attacks rather than taking cover, lack of enemies with hitscan attacks, no reloading, no iron-sights, foes with obvious attack patterns, keycard hunting, and advanced movement systems like Rocket Jumping and bunny-hopping all contribute to place ULTRAKILL firmly on the unrealistic, "classic" end of the scale.
  • Falling Damage: Lesser Husks and Streetcleaners will splatter when their falling speed is high enough.
  • Fantastic Racism: Apparently, angels have a very low opinion on robots, considering them mere objects and the idea that a machine could overcome a wielder of Holy Light to be utter heresy. When Gabriel is defeated by V1, the Council of Angels blame him and strip him of his power and demand that he defeat V1 for good as penance.
    • If the Virtue's lore (and other lore found in Greed) is any indication, they don't have a good opinion of humans either, sinner or otherwise; What with how they ruthlessly manage Hell (King Minos, anyone?) and that angels derived from human souls are explicitly referred to as lesser angels. They generally see humanity as God's personal (failed) experiment.
  • Fire and Brimstone Hell: The Heresy layer looks the closest to the classic depiction of hell, looking almost like a rendition of the hell levels in DOOM Eternal.
  • Flamethrower Backfire: Shooting a Streetcleaner's gas tank blows them up instantly, netting an Instakill bonus.
  • Fragile Speedster: V1 is very mobile, and the player can move around the levels extremely quickly once they get the hang of the game's movement system. That said, even the weakest enemies in this game can take about a quarter of your health bar if they hit you, meaning that V1's mobility needs to be used dashing into melee range to heal as often as it's used to avoid damage in the first place.
  • Gameplay Grading: In standard stylish action faction. At the end of each level, the player is ranked on a scale from D to S for how quickly they got through a level, how many enemies were killed, and how many style points were gained, granting an overall letter grade for the level that averages out the three stats. S ranking all three categories without ever dying grants a Perfect rank for the level. There's also a large point bonus for finishing a level without taking any damage.
  • Giant Hands of Doom: The Corpse of King Minos. In his boss level, he attacks you with his giant hands before ripping the building's ceiling apart to start the real battle, and his Megaton Punch packs a wallop. And that's not getting into the black holes he summons by pointing his finger on the battlefield.
  • Glass Cannon:
    • V1 has high mobility and an arsenal of weapons with infinite ammo, but they're fragile to compensate.
    • In Stage 0-S, the skeletal monster can instantly kill V1 by mere touch, but a single shot from the revolver is enough to kill it temporarily.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: The Corpse of King Minos has a pair of massive blank eyes that glow white. Since he's a reanimated corpse, Minos combines that trope with Glowing Eyelights of Undeath.
  • God is Dead: Gabriel reveals at the end of Act 2 that God had died quite some time ago and that the rulers of Heaven in reality have been a corrupt council of angels trying to pick up where He left off.
  • God Mode: With major assists, you can set the damage received to zero.
  • Gone Horribly Right: Making robots that run perfectly using human blood as fuel was only going to end in death for someone; here, it was humanity that bit it. Goes even further when Gabriel reveals that their thirst for blood is so ravenous and their abilities so dangerous that they pose a threat to the afterlife.
  • The Good King: According to a book in level 2-2, Death at 20,000 Volts, King Minos was considered a fair ruler by his people back when he was alive, and when Gabriel killed him, Minos' people mourned for his death. According to the lore of Minos Prime, Minos felt that eternal suffering for love was an unfair punishment, so he turned the Circle of Lust into a thriving paradise out of kindness for the sinners. Even after his death, his legacy as a benevolent king is still fondly remembered by his people.
  • The Goomba: The Filth enemy type — ragged, armless demons that do little more than bum rush V1 to chomp on them in melee range. A single shot from the revolver is enough to put them down.
  • Gorn: Yep, there is plenty of blood and assorted body parts to go around. In fact, drenching yourself in the red stuff is the only way to heal.
  • Grappling-Hook Pistol: The Whiplash (green arm). It can drag small enemies towards V1, and drags V1 towards large enemies and grapple points.
  • Ground Pound: V1 can slam into the ground to crush enemies directly below it and create a shockwave that launches foes into the air at the cost of stamina, and jumping after a slam will let you jump higher than normal.
  • Gun Fu: Invoked; performing various actions whole sliding and during airtime, can grant you up to a 3x score multiplier!
  • Guns Akimbo: The Dual Wield powerup lets you wield a copy of your gun in your other hand. Or your other other hand if you pick up another. Or another. Basically, they stack infinitely.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: Chopping an enemy in half with the sawblade launcher (the alternate version of the nailgun) grants the "Half Off" style bonus.
  • Hand Cannon: The first weapon obtained is a meaty revolver capable of one-shotting basic mooks. You can later find an alternative version with lower fire-rate but much higher damage.
  • Heal It with Blood: The Killer Robot protagonist, V1, heals themself by soaking in the fresh blood of their foes, and since there are no pick-ups other than the occasional hidden power-ups (including one that doubles their health), this is the only effective way to heal. According to V2's terminal data, V1's thin metal plating allows them to refuel by absorbing blood on contact rather than using a separate refueling process, allowing them to repair damage while shedding blood on the battlefield. V1 aside, the other robots also run on blood, and because mankind is dead and Hell is full of demons and the damned, the robots invade Hell itself to find more. Blood is fuel indeed.
  • Heavenly Blue: Fittingly for an angel, Gabriel's glamorous armor is covered in white and gold with accents of silver, and his wings glow sky blue. Not that he's a good guy to begin with. The soul of King Minos is also clad in divine white and blue, and unlike Gabriel, he's a good guy to begin with.
  • Heroic Mime: It's not entirely clear whether V1 is even capable of speaking, though in an Easter Egg, V1 will make the Quake Ranger grunt every time it jumps if the game's viewmodels are centered and the HUD is set to "classic" style. A textbox reads "You're not getting away this time" when V2 tries to escape from their rematch in 4-4, implied to be V1's Internal Monologue.
  • Hitbox Dissonance: The collision does not exist for many finer level details such as trimmings and tiny protrusions on a wall. This was done so that the player does not get stuck in the scenery.
  • Hitscan: Used sparingly. V1's only hitscan weapons are the revolver and the Electric and Malicious variants of the railcannon, with even the shotgun firing physically-modeled projectiles instead. The only enemy hitscan attacks in the game is the Malicious Face's explosive beam and the Sentry's attack, both of which have an obvious wind-up and stops tracking V1 just before they fire — even V2's revolver in the Mirror Match uses projectiles and can thus be dodged. Only hitscan attacks can be bounced off the Marksman revolver's coin, and using it to reflect the Malicious Face/Sentry's beam back into it gives the "Chargeback" bonus.
  • Hit Stop: Used to make hits feel more powerful.
    • Actions that cause green style bonuses (Such as parrying, interruption, and projectile boosting) cause the time to momentarily stop.
    • Shooting a piercing shot through enemies causes multiple single-frame stops. The more enemies the shot pierces through, the longer it lasts.
    • Killing the final enemy in an arena causes a brief time slowdown. This applies only in areas where an exit gets closed off during combat.
  • HP To One: The Corpse of King Minos will release a dark energy ball that chases V1 halfway through the fight. If you touch it, your max health will be reduced to one for a while. The Flesh Prison also does that.
  • Humanity's Wake: The game takes place long after the extinction of humankind, and we don't know what exactly caused it. However, the Testament at the end of S-0 implied that humanity is responsible for its own destruction, thanks to the evils of its own free-will. Alternatively, Minos Prime claimed that humanity is killed by robots.
  • Humanoid Abomination:
    • The Corpse of King Minos is a massive Undead Abomination with the ability to summon miniature black holes with his fingers, and if enough damage is dealt, giant parasitic worms pop out of his eye sockets.
      • His trapped soul, Minos Prime, appears as a Heavenly Blue, transparent humanoid being with a hole where his face should be, and red veins inside of his body. He's significantly stronger and faster than his undead corpse, summoning glowing snakes to help him fight V1 while zig-zagging across the battlefield. Minos Prime is so powerful that the angels sealed him away in the Flesh Prison, as they're unable to fight him directly.
    • Stage S-0 has Something Wicked, a spindly humanoid creature that marks its presence with a dreadful drone, followed by a piercing screech whenever it finds V1. Something Wicked can also kill V1 by a single touch, and while the Revolver can take it down in one shot, Something Wicked will teleport to a different spot. Hell, this thing is so mysterious that its lore can't figure out its true nature.
  • Idiosyncratic Combo Levels: Destructive, Chaotic, Brutal, Anarchic, Supreme, SSadistic, SSShitstorm, and finally ULTRAKILL.
  • Idiosyncratic Difficulty Levels: Six total difficulty levels, split between "Easy", "Normal", and "Hard" categories, with two in each category: Easy consists of "Harmless" and "Lenient", normal has "Standard" and "Violent", and hard has "Brutal", and "ULTRAKILL Must Die".
  • Implacable Man: So far, V1 has continuously proven themself to be stronger than whatever the circles of Hell can throw at them. Not even Gabriel or Minos Prime are much of a match for the robot.
  • In the Style of: "Castle Vein" sounds a lot like something out of Castlevania. Fitting, given the name.
  • Just a Machine: Angels, especially Gabriel, consider all robots as mere objects rather than sentient beings in their own right. Gabriel reconsiders this after his second defeat, recognizing V1 as a living being and considering them a Worthy Opponent, though he still intends to kill them because of the threat they pose to the afterlife.
  • Killer Robot: V1 literally runs on blood to the point of healing when showering in it, and they will slaughter the entirety of Hell if it means to keep running. The other robots invading Hell, such as Swordsmachine, V2, and especially Mindflayers, are no slouch either.
  • The King Slayer: According to a book in 2-2, King Minos, the fair ruler of Lust, was undeservingly slain by the Archangel Gabriel, the latter justifying the slaying as God's Will. Now Minos returns as an Undead Abomination, with his corpse reanimated by the parasitic worms he once commanded, and his soul sealed away in the Flesh Prison by the angels. Even V1 becomes one by destroying Minos' soul as a Bonus Boss.
  • Konami Code: Using the Konami Code unlocks cheats, anytime and anywhere, and these cheats include invincibility, no-clip, infinite dashes and wall-jumps, no weapon cool-down, and so on. That being said, using cheats prevents you from getting a level rank or a Cyber Grind score, although you can still complete challenges and find secrets.
  • Last Ditch Move: When drones run out of health, they make a suicide dive towards the player. This attack can be parried. They also enter this state upon being hit by the Knuckleblaster, being sent flying in the direction they were punched, and earning V1 the +HOMERUN bonus.
  • Letting the Air out of the Band: About halfway in level 2-S, the music suddenly starts to slow down until becoming to a stop, being replaced by Drone of Dread.
  • Life Drain: V1 is powered by blood, so being showered in the blood of your foes as you kill or damage them is the only reliable source of healing.
  • Life Meter: Present in the user interface, showing V1's current health and hard damage.
  • Light Is Not Good: Archangel Gabriel is the Climax Boss of Act I, and he does not have a good opinion of machines such as you. Scratch that, just about every angel we see is a bit of a self-righteous dick. Or trying to blow you up.
  • Lightning Gun: The default version of the Railcannon, which deals a lot of damage and pierces infinitely through enemies.
  • Ludicrous Gibs: Just about everywhere; all enemies explode into showers of meat and blood, even with nonlethal blows. It's only natural for a robot that explicitly wants blood to deliver death in the messiest ways possible.
  • Malevolent Architecture: Many arenas feature environmental hazards that in many cases mean instant death if you touch them. Of course, enemies are also susceptible to falling victim to them, and you can get many unique bonuses by killing enemies this way.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: On Hard difficulty levels and above, a portion of damage taken from most enemies is converted to Hard Damage, which puts a cap on your max health. It gradually goes away after not taking damage for long enough, and higher Style rankings make you regenerate faster.
  • Megaton Punch:
    • Maiming demons with bare (if metallic) fists is one thing, but V1 goes beyond. Ever sent a bullet back to sender by punching it? Ever thought your own projectiles were too slow, and punched them to make them go faster? All are options here.
    • Played more straight with the Knucklebuster arm dropped by V2. Charging it generates a massive shockwave in front of V1 that sends most enemies and projectiles flying. The punches alone can launch light-weight enemies high in the air, assuming they don't turn into Ludicrous Gibs.
  • Mercy Invincibility: Getting hit gives some half a second or 0.8 seconds of invincibility, depending on damage received. The catch: If the damage was caused by an explosion, you cannot heal during the invincibility frames.
  • Mirror Match: The boss of 1-4 is V2, which is nearly identical to V1 except for a red paint-job. V2 also uses all of the weapon attacks that the player will have unlocked by that point.
  • Money Mauling: Coins can be punched at the enemies, dealing damage.
  • Monster Compendium: The terminal contains lore entries for all of the enemies that V1 encountered, though they must be defeated in order to unlock their lore.
  • Nail 'Em: The Nailgun is essentially a gatling gun that fires nails, similarly to the Super Nailgun from Quake.
  • Nerf: The Attractor Nailgun and the Overheat Nailgun had been nerfed so that players are encouraged to swap weapons. The former now has an ammo limit of 100 and can only fire 3 magnets at a time, and the latter has a slower fire-rate if it keeps firing. That being said, the Attractor Nailgun has reduced spread, increased velocity, and increased damage against fodder enemies (such as Filths, Strays, Schisms, and Soldiers), and the Overheat Nailgun still retains infinite ammo. Plus, both Nailguns still deal increased damage against Malicious Faces.
  • Nintendo Hard: Enemies can kill you in four hits at their weakest and you can only restore health by getting close enough to bathe in their blood. You need a mastery of the game's movement mechanics to survive.
  • No-Damage Run: The game recognizes that players can complete levels without taking damage by awarding them a significant amount of points.
  • Nominal Hero: Under almost any other circumstance, invading Hell itself would be considered a good thing, but V1 has nothing but selfish reasons for doing so: finding more blood to consume. Upon meeting other robots such as Swordsmachine or V2, they duke each other out on sight, implying that the robots don't even have loyalty to their own kind.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Cerberus, normally a three-headed dog and the Guardian of Hell, are twin statues of a faceless human here. The lore entry even notes this, as the demons are named for their role rather than their appearance.
  • Nostalgic Music Box: A music box version of "The Fire is Gone" plays whenever V1 reads a Testament at the end of a Secret Level.
  • One-Hit Polykill: Charged revolver pierces through multiple enemies. According to lore, the projectiles the revolver fires are microscopic but have very high energy.
  • One-Man Army: The title of ULTRAKILL is a very, very accurate one. As V1 accumulates more weapons into their arsenal—from revolvers, shotguns, nailguns, railguns, rocket launchers, and even additional arms—they quickly develop answers to just about every foe, every group that comes their way. The game itself directly acknowledges V1's strength in the title of Overture's 4th stage, "A One-Machine Army." It's at this point that enemy groups start to increase and Malicious Faces are introduced as regular enemies for the first time, allowing V1 to truly demonstrate their mettle before oncoming fights escalate even further.
  • Our Angels Are Different: Angels are divine winged beings from Heaven, but instead of having feathered avian wings, they have wings made of light.
    • Gabriel, the Act 1 Final Boss, is an armored angel with glowing blue wings and a cross on his mask. He also summons swords out of thin air in his battle.
    • A new type of angel called a Virtue shows up in Act 2 as an Elite Mook, and it looks far more like a Biblical depiction of an angel, appearing as a winged orb of light. Additionally, its lore tab page says that lesser angels (derived from human souls) such as the Virtue are often given more abstract shapes than the humanoid Greater/Supreme Angels (which are created in Heaven as such) like Gabriel.
  • Our Demons Are Different: Oh boy is Hell full, but its demons are far from the typical Big Red Devil or tiny horned imps with pointy tails. The game's demons are all creatures made of stone and flesh, and quite varied in shape, from apparently humanlike statues that bleed when attacked (Cerberus), to giant stone heads that also bleed supported by thin spider-like legs (Malicious Faces), to... grotesque scorpion-thingies whose flesh seems to outgrow the equally grotesque stone exterior (Hideous Mass).
  • Our Souls Are Different:
    • The Husks (Filth, Strays...) are zombie-like creatures made of fragments of souls - not enough to give them true sapience like humans, but enough to be nasty little critters. Prime Souls are extremely powerful souls whose sheer will allow them to manifest physically without a Husk.
    • Lesser Angels are abstract or animalistic angels made from human souls, making them Heaven's equivalent to Hell's Husks.
  • Overdrawn at the Blood Bank: Everything that's animate in the game is full of blood, and the Screwdriver variant of the Railcannon really emphasises this. Enemies impaled by its rotating spear turn into fountains of blood, gushing it constantly in a huge area, allowing V1 to heal off of them.
  • Overheating: Inverted. While the Nailgun does have an overheat bar, it's actually something you want to fill up, since one of the alt-fires drastically increases the Nailgun's damage at the cost of the heat bar, now that it's launching red-hot nails at enemies.
  • Pinball Projectile:
    • One of the revolver's alt fires is to toss a coin. Shoot it while it's in the air, and it'll reflect whatever shoots it to automatically home in onto the nearest enemy's weak point. Shoot a coin while there's multiple in the air, and the bullet will bounce between all of them before hitting an enemy, dealing extra damage for each coin.
    • The alternate nailgun is a sawblade launcher that fires, well, sawblades that bounce on any surface they hit.
  • Precision F-Strike: Gabriel loses his composure and calls you an "insignificant fuck" when beaten.
  • Public Domain Soundtrack: Several examples:
  • Punched Across the Room: If a punch does not gib small enemies outright, it can send them flying far away.
  • Purple Is Powerful:
    • The Corpse of King Minos shares the black and purple color scheme with the Circle of Lust, and despite his slow movement, King Minos hits hard and takes tons of hits to be killed (again). That, and he summons equally slow yet deadly purple black holes on the battlefield. Fitting, as purple is the color of royalty, and Minos used to rule the Circle of Lust as a beloved king. Ironically, his much stronger form, Minos Prime, lacks a speck of purple on his Heavenly Blue soul.
    • One of the older builds of the game had a weapon that fires purple black holes. Said black holes suck up enemies within a small radius and explode, splattering the room with blood for V1 to heal. Hell, it has no cooldown, meaning players can spam black holes to their heart's content. Since this weapon is ridiculously over-powered and takes little skill to use, the weapon was eventually scrapped in the later builds, although its model is used for the shotgun, and the black holes are kept for King Minos to attack V1 with.
    • Inverted with Drones. They're purple robots, but even with their Taking You with Me attack (which is exploitable), they're the weakest machine-class enemy in the game.
  • Pyromaniac: The Streetcleaner enemies, which wield flamethrowers, and are first introduced having torched Limbo while V1 wasn't looking.
  • Quick Melee: V1's left fist. Also works to play tennis with enemy projectiles if the player has good timing.
  • Retraux: Everything about the game's aesthetic is meant to invoke the 3D shooters of old, including Quake and Unreal Tournament. It even has PS1-style texture-warping as a toggle-able option.
  • Rocket Jump: Provided you have enough health and are close enough to an enemy to regain it, explosions provide significant boost to movement.
    • The Overpump Shotgun's secondary fire can be pumped until it detonates. Done right, this'll propel you to the ceiling - useful for finding some secrets.
    • The Core Eject Shotgun's secondary fire launches explosive cores that propel V1.
    • The explosion of an actual rocket only gives a small vertical boost, but it gives a much greater horizontal boost when combined with other jump techniques.
  • Rocket Ride: V1 can ride on rockets fired from the Freezeframe Rocket Launcher, provided they freeze the rockets beforehand. However, the rockets gradually lose power, and they give diminishing returns after V1 rode three rockets. On the bright side, underwater rocket-riding has no limitations.
  • Science Fantasy: The game takes place in a post-apocalyptic world where humanity is extinct, and Killer Robots run on blood, so they invade Hell to find more. You play as one of these robots, and you slaughter damned souls, demons, other robots, cyborg zombies, and angels, with hi-tech weapons in your descent to Inferno. Speaking of which, Hell is layered in the classic Dante fashion, and its layers can be fantastical and ancient, technological and futuristic, or even both.
  • Screen Shake: Explosions, parries, ground pounds etc. cause the screen to briefly shake.
  • Secret Level: One per layer.
    • Prelude: Found in 0-2 by finding the hidden blue skull and placing it on its podium.
    • Layer 1 (Limbo): Found in 1-1 by tossing a coin into the fountain at the start of the level.
    • Layer 2 (Lust): Found in 2-3 by destroying all hidden power boxes so the waterfall blocking the entrance is removed.
    • Layer 3 (Gluttony): The first Prime Sanctum, found in 3-1 by locating the secret passage that leads to it. Requires P ranks in every level of the Prelude and Act I to enter. Enter at your own peril.
    • Layer 4 (Greed): Found in 4-2 by finding a hidden moon totem and placing it on a special podium, causing night to fall and turning the sand harmless, and then going to a secret located in the desert behind the level start.
    • Layer 5 (Wrath): Found in 5-1 by accessing a hidden vent in the bouncing pad shaft after placing the three blue skulls. Currently not available.
    • Layer 6 (Heresy): The second Prime Sanctum, found in 6-2 by finding the hidden path that leads to it. Requires P ranks in every Act II level to enter. Currently unavailable.
  • Shifting Sand Land: The 4th layer, Greed, is a seemingly endless desert with a gargantuan pyramid in the background. The sand itself is actually superheated gold dust, which fries just about anything foolish enough to step in it, so watch your footing!
  • Ship Level: 5-3 is called "Ship of Fools", which takes place inside the gigantic ship summoned in the previous level.
  • Shock and Awe: The Electric variant of the railcannon, which is the first one you'll come across. If an enemy has nails stuck in them, you can use this variant to electrfy those nails and make them explode for extra damage and the "Conductor" bonus.
  • Short-Range Shotgun: The Shotgun's primary fire has a big spread. This is especially notable for the Over-Pump Shotgun after pumping it twice.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: Shotguns are already useful in old school first person shooters for close range combat, but given that the only way to heal in this game is by showering yourself in the blood of your enemies, the shotgun is the weapon of choice when low on health. It can also parry melee attacks from the enemies at point-blank range. Furthermore if you parry your bullets just as they come out, they travel faster, explode on impact, and are even incredibly accurate, making the shotgun useful even at longer ranges.
  • Shout-Out: Now has its own page.
  • Single-Use Shield: In 4-S, the player can collect a powerup that gives the player an additional hit point.
  • Sinking Ship Scenario: About two-thirds in 5-3, the ship flips upside-down as it sinks to the bottom of the Ocean Styx.
  • Spirited Competitor: V1 and V2. V2 bows to V1 before their faceoff, and V1 lets them go afterwards, taking their arm for use as a heavy melee attack.
  • Springs, Springs Everywhere: Jump pads, introduced in 2-1, launch stuff into the air, whether it be the player, the enemies, coins, or shotgun cores.
  • Starter Gear Staying Power: The Revolver you get in the beginning of the game is the most versatile weapon even later on, thanks to solid damage, useful alternate fire-modes, and being hitscan. It can even be upgraded into an alternate, even stronger version. The Feedbacker (your first arm) is also versatile, as it lets you parry for extra damage and health.
  • Stylish Action: A rare FPS example. This game hearkens back to the lightning fast shooters of the late 90's, placing extreme emphasis on unbridled aggression and extremely fast movement and mixing it up with more traditional character action mechanics like a Devil May Cry-esque style meter, arena-based level design, and parrying.
  • Surprise Creepy: Level 0-S, Something Wicked. The level drops the game's normal fast-paced Stylish Action for a pitch-black labyrinth devoid of any music and inhabited by a terrifying, spindly, One-Hit Kill monster.
  • Taking You with Me: Mindflayers explode violently upon death. Make sure you keep your distance.
  • Teleporting Keycard Squad:
    • While most of the time it's placing the skulls that spawns enemies, in 1-2, taking a blue skull spawns them instead.
    • Some blood orbs are booby-trapped, spawning enemies when picked up. Examples include the blood orb in 5-1 and 6-1, along with both blood orbs in 4-2.
  • Theme Song Reveal: The ambient music that plays during the first part of 4-4 includes a slower version of the opening bass riff from "Versus", V2's first battle theme, giving away that the Layer's boss fight is a rematch against them.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: Turning an enemy into mist with a point blank shotgun blast grants the "Overkill" bonus.
  • This Is a Drill: One of the alternate modes of the Railcannon has it shoot a drill that burrows into an enemy to deal continuous damage.
  • Toast of Tardiness: Seen in the secret level of Lust layer.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Let's just say that humanity essentially signed their death warrants when they thought it was a good idea to develop robots that run on blood.
  • Turns Red: Certain conditions will put enemies in an "Enraged" state, increasing their aggression substantially.
    • Malicious Face and Mindflayer: Reach half health. (Violent only)
    • Swordsmachine: Parry any of its attacks.
    • Cerberus: Kill another Cerberus.
    • V2: Keep your distance for too long. In the rematch in 4-4, hit him with the knuckleblaster.
    • Gabriel: Entering second phase. In the rematch in 6-2, he starts with this in his first phase.
    • Virtue: Leave them alive for too long.
  • Ultra Super Death Gore Fest Chainsawer 3000: If the title of the game by itself weren't enough to qualify for this trope, its first act is called Infinite Hyperdeath.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: The secret levels (barring the Prime Sanctums) are radically different from the main game's hectic violence - for example, the secret level in the prelude is a pitch black, survival horror-esque maze with a One-Hit Kill monster, the one in Limbo is a serene and relaxing pastiche of The Witness, the one in Lust is a high school-themed Visual Novel akin to Doki Doki Literature Club!, and the one in Greed is a platformer that pays homage to Crash Bandicoot.
  • Uncommon Time:
    • Requiem has constantly changing rhythm, sometimes switching into a time signature of 5/8 or 7/8.
    • Panic Betrayer's time signature switches between 5/4 and 4/4, sometimes with extra beats added.
    • Dancer in Darkness: The combat section has 5/4 time signature, whereas the calm and final battle sections have one 10/4 followed by two measures of 5/4.
    • Chaos switches between 5/4, 3/4, 7/4 and more.
    • Phase 1 against the Ferryman is in 7/4.
    • Death Odyssey switches to 5/4 midway.
  • Unnaturally Looping Location: Level 5-2 loops when going too far.
  • Utility Weapon:
    • Explosive weapons, like the Core Eject Shotgun, the Overpump Shotgun, the Malicious Railcannon, and the Freezeframe Rocket Launcher, can be used to increase mobility by Rocket Jumping. Rockets fired from the Rocket Launcher can even be surfed on.
    • The Screwdriver Railcannon is focused on survivability rather than damage, since it creates a wide rain of blood for V1 to heal from afar. Its spears can also limit an enemy's mobility, like preventing Mindflayers from teleporting or V2 from dashing.
  • Variable Mix:
    • In most levels, the background music becomes heavier when enemies are nearby, and segues back to a slightly calmer exploration mix when all enemies in the arena are defeated.
    • Level 1-4's use of "Clair de lune" progresses further as V1 collects more skull keys to unlock the door to the boss arena.
    • A more intense version of the battle song is played during the final area of 4-3.
    • The boss theme in 0-5 gets a drum layer added once the second Cerberus wakes up. The same thing goes for Leviathan when it enters phase two.
  • Video Game Dashing: V1 can dash around in any horizontal direction at the cost of energy, which recharges. It's good for clearing large gaps and dodging enemy attacks, since you are invulnerable during it.
  • Video Game Sliding: V1 can slide quickly along the floor, which makes you much faster and a smaller target.
  • Villainous Breakdown: After being beaten by V1, Gabriel loses it, unable to handle being beaten by a mere machine.
    Gabriel: What...?! How can this be? Bested by this...this thing? You insignificant FUCK! THIS IS NOT OVER!
  • Villain Protagonist: V1 is the game's Player Character and it's hard to call them the hero when they're a self-serving Killer Robot whose only motive for invading Hell is slaughtering its inhabitants for blood, and their fellow robots are fair game. In fact, V1's kind is responsible for the extinction of humanity and all other surface life, and it's likely that V1 is involved in some way.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: The first fight against Swordsmachine serves as the game's first nasty difficulty spike, demanding mastery of the game's movement system.
  • Wall Jump: V1 can slide down and jump off walls, though they can only do it three times before they need to set foot on solid ground to do it again.
  • Wham Episode: The end of Act II. Gabriel suffers another defeat at the hands of V1, except this time he walks away from it humbled and even enlightened; causing him to reflect on the untold thousands he's effortlessly condemned and slaughtered, how he's developed a taste for adversity, and how it is that an agent of God could now be challenged by a belligerent lower life form. He comes to the conclusion that God is Dead, and that the kingdom has masked their own weakness by using God's image to rule through fear and tyranny. He subsequently vows to spend his final hours waging his own battle, slays the entire Holy Council that keep order in the realms, and holds aloft the decapitated head of a councilmember in front of heaven's populace. Cue the stinger;
    To Be Concluded in... ACT III: GODFIST SUICIDE
  • Winged Humanoid: V1 and V2 are humanoid robots with vaguely angelic wings, as seen in the page image for the former. This also applies to Gabriel, since he's an armored angel with glowing etheral wings.
  • Wings Do Nothing: Averted. According to Hakita, V1's wings allow them to dash and slide, and even hold their guns, so they're more than just cool accessories.
  • Womb Level: Layer 3: Gluttony, which you reach by going into the mouth of the giant Corpse of King Minos. The walls and floor are all meat and bone, the doors are mouths, and stomach acid is a common hazard.
  • Your Days Are Numbered: After his defeat to V1, Gabriel is stripped of the Father's Light as a punishment for losing to "a mere object", and is told that in 24 hours when the embers of it die out that he will die too, unless he can atone and defeat V1. Gabriel, now utterly hating V1, takes up the task. At the end of Act 2, Gabriel willingly embraces mortality, killing all of his superiors despite knowing that he now has only mere hours to live.
    If the machines seek blood, he would give it freely; and with such fury, even metal will bleed.

 
Feedback

Video Example(s):

Top

Cancerous Rodent

A secret in 1-2 brings you to a pastiche of Civvie's Dungeon where you encounter a visiting Cancer Mouse, here called Cancerous Rodent. The fight it puts up is nonexistent, being unable to damage you and dying in one hit to even your weakest punch.

How well does it match the trope?

5 (4 votes)

Example of:

Main / ZeroEffortBoss

Media sources:

Report