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"You are blinded by the love of the office you hold, Cornelius! You place too much importance, and you have always done, on the so-called purity of blood! You fail to recognize that it matters not what someone is born, but what they grow up to be!"
Albus Dumbledore
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series. Published July 8, 2000, this was the first book in the series to be heralded in with release parties as "Pottermania" took hold.

Following the events of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Voldemort now has a loyal follower by his side and is making plans to become stronger and regain his body. Meanwhile, before school starts, Harry and the Weasleys attend the Quidditch World Cup. At school, Hogwarts is hosting the Triwizard Tournament against two other schools of magic in Europe, and Harry discovers that he has been selected to compete, even though he is below the age restriction and, contrary to popular belief among his peers, did not apply as a candidate. He begins to fear that he's a pawn in someone else's plan, whilst becoming slowly more aware of the rising specter of Voldemort...

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This book was a turning point in the series in a lot of ways.

  • It's the first book even to mention that there is a wizarding world outside of Great Britain, much less international magical politics. The scale of the story opens up in proportion to the plot.
  • It's the first Doorstopper; twice as long as the books that preceded it.
  • It's the point at which Cerebus Syndrome sets in. Voldemort returns to power due to Harry and his compatriots' failure to capture Wormtail at the end of Prisoner of Azkaban, and a significant supporting character ends up becoming a Sacrificial Lion... the first of many.
  • Finally, as stated above, it's the first book in the series that arrived after Pottermania had gripped the world, making its release a major event in the year's entertainment calendar.

Followed by Harry's fifth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

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Tropes exclusive to this book or at least especially prominent:

  • 8.8:invoked Karkaroff gives Harry's performance in the first task four points out of a possible ten, in contrast to the eight Madame Maxime gives him, the nines from Mr. Crouch and Dumbledore, and Bagman's definitely partial ten. Naturally, this provokes outrage from Ron, but Harry doesn't mind too much; he's too happy that Ron is speaking to him again. (Karkaroff's choice of score is actually something of a compliment; based on his thoughtfulness beforehand, it seems he wanted to make sure Harry's score would tie with Krum's in the first event.)
  • Academy of Evil: Durmstrang, though the school itself is more of a Dark Is Not Evil place. Their headmaster is a former Death Eater and Malfoy claims they don't admit Muggle-borns, but most of the actual students seem to be ordinary people. In some scenes, they come off as less snobbish than their Beauxbatons counterparts, and nicer than the Slytherins.
  • Accidental Misnaming: Crouch can't seem to remember that Percy's last name is "Weasley" and not "Weatherby." Fred and George have a lot of fun with this.
  • Actually Pretty Funny
    • When Fred and George try to bypass the Goblet of Fire's Age Line by using an Aging Potion, it doesn't work and the enchantment kicks in, resulting in the two of them growing long, white beards. They find it just as funny as Dumbledore and the rest of the students watching do.
    • Neville also joins in the laughter when the twins manage to sneak him a Canary Cream that causes him to sprout feathers. It helps that the feathers shed quickly and the spell is harmless.
  • Adult Fear
    • Your children become endangered and the last thing you said to them was that their school performance was poor. Small wonder that Mrs. Weasley grabs Fred and George in a tight hug when they return from the Quidditch World Cup and she read about the Death Eater activity. She can laugh freely when the twins joke about it later, however, presumably after she's had a few days to get over the shock.
    • Also at the World Cup, the Death Eaters attack Muggle children, while wizard children are nearby. The Muggle children get their memories modified, but the wizard kids...
    • Your son dies when competing in a sporting event.
  • Agony Beam: This book introduces the Cruciatus Curse, a spell with the sole purpose of causing terrible pain to its recipient.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: Harry is horrified to find out that Bartemius Crouch, Jr. was subjected to a Dementor's Kiss.
  • Ambiguous Situation: It's lampshaded in the text that Barty Crouch, Jr. may not have been guilty of torturing the Longbottoms, even though he is later established as a Death Eater, with a place in the circle. Sirius says he isn't certain that the boy was guilty, since he could have easily been in the wrong place in the wrong time like Winky was with Harry's wand. Dumbledore mentions that the Longbottoms' testimony was shaky, as the Cruciatus Curse broke their minds and Neville was only a baby. One note is that despite him proclaiming his innocence at the trial, much like other Death Eaters who avoided jail time, Voldemort calls Crouch, Jr. his most faithful servant (and it's not very likely that Crouch would have called someone he never met "my master"). He could have easily been converted in Azkaban, with the Lestranges' combined fanaticism and the Dementors' despairing influence, and tried to seek out Voldemort as soon as he was smuggled out and nursed back to health. Being under the Imperius Curse for a decade probably didn't do wonders for his sanity. On the other hand, Crouch claims that he only comforted Neville in his Moody disguise to manipulate him, and he calmly showed Neville the curse that traumatized his parents. Dumbledore doesn't ask Crouch, Jr. if he was involved while questioning him, but then his higher priority was figuring out how Crouch had broken out of Azkaban and impersonated Moody.
  • Anachronism Stew: At the beginning of the book, Harry, in writing a letter to Sirius, makes a remark about Dudley and his PlayStation in the summer of 1994. Even in Japan, the console was not released until that December. Though, given that the Dursley family is well-to-do and spoils their son dreadfully, Vernon might have pulled some strings to get one early. Or JK fucked up with numbers yet again.
  • Arc Villain: Barty Crouch, Jr., though it's subverted because his master, the series-wide Big Bad Voldemort, makes his triumphant return in the end.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: During the first Defence Against the Dark Arts lesson our heroes take from Moody, he says this as part of his speech about preparedness:
    "...You need to be prepared. You need to be alert and watchful. You need to put that away, Miss Brown, when I'm talking."
    Lavender jumped and blushed. She had been showing Parvati her completed horoscope under the desk.
  • Artistic License – Biology: After a classroom mishap enlarges her front teeth, Hermione allows the school nurse to shrink them a little further than to their original size, so she won't have to get braces. Teeth don't need braces because they're too large, but because they're positioned wrongly (usually tilted too far forward), so shrinking them shouldn't avert an orthodontic issue.
  • Ascended Extra: Many characters! Ron's two oldest brothers, Bill and Charlie, were mentioned often in the first three books, but it's here Harry finally gets to meet them. Cedric Diggory had a few sentences of mention in Prisoner of Azkaban, but was pretty much a new character, which makes his death particularly harsh. Cornelius Fudge gets a bigger role, mainly towards the end, as the page quotation implies. Parvati Patil, who was mainly a background character beforehand, is Harry's date to the Yule Ball. Her twin sister, Padma, whose existence was acknowledged during the Sorting Ceremony in the first book but otherwise never appeared, is introduced and named. And Cho Chang officially becomes Harry's present Love Interest (it was just slightly implied beforehand).
  • Asleep in Class: Harry is bored to sleep by Professor Trelawney's lecture about the effects that Mars is supposedly going to have on them. He has a vision of Voldemort directing Peter Pettigrew to kill Barty Crouch, Sr. He is woken to find Professor Trelawney convinced that he is having some sort of prophetic vision, blissfully unaware that while she's right that he did have a vision, it has nothing to do with Divination, but rather being connected to Voldemort's soul as Horcrux.
  • Asshole Victim
    • Barty Crouch, Sr., who is found in the woods insane and begging to speak to Dumbledore but then vanishes and is revealed to have been killed.
    • Tom Riddle, Sr. and his parents were seen by the residents of Little Hangleton as elitist snobs (confirmed in Half-Blood Prince), but they certainly didn't deserve to die at the hands of a burgeoning Dark wizard.
  • "Awkward Silence" Entrance: When Mad-Eye Moody arrives late to Hogwarts. He shows up in the middle of the welcome feast, and when he walks into the Great Hall, everyone falls silent.
  • Backup from Otherworld: Voldemort's most recent victims (Harry's parents among them) emerge from his wand and block him from pursuing Harry just long enough for Harry to escape.
  • Badass Teacher: Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody. The imposter acts the part extremely well, and the real one would have been one, too, if he'd been able to do the job.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Voldemort's plan to resurrect himself using Harry's blood goes off almost perfectly, aside from Harry escaping.
  • Bags of Letters: People Rita Skeeter attacks in her Daily Prophet articles, such as Hagrid, Hermione, and Harry, tend to receive large amounts of hate mail.
  • Bait the Dog
    • Crouch, Sr. defends Winky when the latter is found with Harry's wand in the woods, after someone has summoned the Dark Mark. He points out that when Amos Diggory accuses her, Amos is accusing Crouch by proxy, since house-elves wouldn't know the Dark Mark unless a human taught them. Then he fires Winky, ostensibly for being caught with a wand, but actually because she let Crouch, Jr. go free and let him have a wand.
    • Fake Moody, after showing Neville the Cruciatus Curse, invites him to his office for a cup of tea, praises him for Herbology, and lends him a book on Mediterranean water plants. It's all a ruse to smuggle information about the second Triwizard task into Harry's dorm, so that Harry won't drown.
  • Baths Are Fun: Everything about the description of the bath in the prefects' bathroom sounds like it would be amazing magical fun. It has taps that run water of all different colors, as well as taps that provide "pink and blue bubbles the size of footballs," ice-white foam thick enough to support one's weight, and heavily perfumed purple clouds. It is also massive, but takes hardly any time to fill. Unfortunately, Harry can't enjoy it properly because (A) he's concerned about figuring out the clue in his Triwizard Tournament golden egg and (B) Moaning Myrtle joins him, and he gets a nasty shock from her watching him before she helps him to figure out the clue.
  • Batman Gambit: Moody tries a couple to give Harry the solution to the second Triwizard task covertly:
    • In front of Harry, he hands Neville a book on magical plants containing the answer (to use Gillyweed), assuming that Harry is so desperate to succeed in the task that he'll ask everyone for help, including Neville, who could have told him the answer instantly. However, it doesn't work because Harry's prideful nature meant he only asked Hermione and Ron to help him.
    • He deliberately stages a conversation about Gillyweed near Dobby, knowing the house elf will immediately rush off to get some for Harry to use.
  • Beam-O-War: A rare effect (their two wands have the same core from the same specific specimen of phoenix) makes Harry's and Voldemort's wands connect and results in an anime-style beam-of-war battle. At the time of writing this, Harry and Voldemort supply the page image for the trope.
  • Beast in the Maze: During the third task of the Triwizard Tournament, the champions have to enter a magical maze with several dangerous beasts in it, including a Giant Spider, a Riddling Sphinx, and a blast-ended skrewt.
  • "Begone" Bribe: When Hermione starts the Society for the Promotion of Elvish Welfare (S.P.E.W.) and starts waving around a collecting tin, some people pay her for membership in the hope that if they do so, it'll get her to leave them alone and shut up. It doesn't work; she only becomes more vocal.
  • Berserk Button: Once again, Hagrid's is 'insulting Dumbledore.' When Karkaroff accuses him of sabotaging Krum and spits on the ground at his feet, Hagrid responds by grabbing him and slamming him against a tree.
  • Big Fancy House: In the backstory, the Riddle House was this. Since the Riddles' murder, it's fallen into disrepair and disrepute.
  • Bigger on the Inside: The tents that Arthur borrowed for the World Cup are this, and it's implied most of the others seen are as well.
  • Bittersweet 17: The legal threshold for wizards' adulthood is at seventeen years (compared to eighteen for the real/Muggle UK), as shown in this book. Dumbledore creates an 'Age Line' around the Goblet to keep students younger than seventeen from entering themselves.
  • Blatant Lies:
    • Most of Rita's 'journalism', especially that concerning Harry.
    • In order to make Hagrid look bad to Rita Skeeter, Malfoy claims that in addition to being attacked by Buckbeak, Crabbe got a bad bite from a Flobberworm, which mainly eats lettuce, has no teeth, and has an X (boring) classification from the Ministry of Magic.
  • Blood Magic: Voldemort needs an enemy's blood to take corporeal form again. It could be any enemy, really, but he picks Harry. He does so because he can finally remove the protection of Lily's love that prevented him from killing Harry and defeated him twice, and he thinks only the blood of his greatest enemy can make him come back even more powerful than he was when he had fallen. Terrible mistake — as it turns out, it also tethered Harry to life as long as Voldemort lived and thus helped to ensure his own downfall.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: Hermione finds this out the hard way about house-elves. For humans, working without pay for terrible owners is slavery and would have been called such in British history. House-elves don't view their lot as slavery. Many of them, like Winky, like having owners and working, no matter how good or bad the owner is, and losing their job means that they lose their purposes in life. Dobby is one exception, and even he prefers the status of freedom to being free.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity
    • Near the end of the story, Harry has been disarmed, gagged, and tied securely to a gravestone. Rather than simply killing Harry after using his blood to regain his body, Voldemort not only has Wormtail cut him loose and give him back his wand, but insists on fighting him in a one-to-one duel and forbids interference from any of his Death Eaters, for no other reason than to prove, once and for all, that he is the stronger of the two. The final result of this is that Harry manages to escape Voldemort's attempt on his life, once again through luck, and warn everyone of Voldemort's resurrection. It was reasonable of Voldemort to assume that Harry was no longer protected by love, but he was unaware of the twin cores. However, Voldemort does use Harry's escape to his advantage in Order of the Phoenix.
    • Averted by Barty Crouch, Jr. Not only does he masquerade as Moody for an entire year and fool Dumbledore, Moody's oldest friend, but every single aspect of his plan goes off without a hitch... until Voldemort screws it up by not immediately killing Harry, as Crouch had assumed he would.
  • Boring Yet Practical: While the other three contestants use a variety of complex spells to distract or subdue their dragons in the first task, Harry uses the comparatively simple Summoning Charm to retrieve his Firebolt and maneuver around his dragon. He winds up being the quickest to collect his egg and only suffered one easily heal able cut.
  • Both Sides Have a Point: The organizers of the Triwizard Tournament have a good reason for only allowing of-age students to participate. It ensures that the selected champions will have the necessary magical knowledge to complete the highly dangerous tasks. Their reasoning is proven sound when Cedric and Fleur can use the Bubble-Head Charm to breathe underwater in the second task whereas Harry has to use Gillyweed stolen from Snape's potion supply (given to him by Dobby, no less) because he doesn't know about that spell. Conversely, Fred and George are rightly angered that Cedric, who is in the same year as them and has had the same exact education (though his school scores were almost certainly better), is allowed to put his name in the Goblet of Fire when they aren't just because his seventeenth birthday happened to fall before the entry deadline and theirs didn't.
  • Brainwashed
    • Averted in Harry's case. Notice that Harry's Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher is eager to ensure that he can resist the Imperius Curse. This is important in two ways. First, it rules out Barty Crouch, Jr. using it on Harry in his plans for the book. Secondly, it means the reader can rest easy for the rest of the series: Harry is not and will never be under mind control.
    • At some point between the Quidditch World Cup and the Triwizard Tournament, Voldemort and Wormtail manage to put Barty Crouch, Sr. under the Imperius Curse and free his son from the same curse. Crouch spends much of his time looking ill and reaffirming that Harry must compete, while not acting out of the ordinary. He starts to resist, however, so Voldemort makes him fake being ill.
  • Brick Joke: The day classes resume, it is mentioned that a Hufflepuff girl named Eloise Midgeon tried to curse her pimples off and had to have her nose put on again. Later, when the main trio are discussing Yule Ball date possibilities, Eloise is mentioned again. Ron says he won't go with her, because her nose is slightly off-center. Mentioned again at the Yule Ball, only to confirm that her nose is perfectly fine!
    • And mentioned again in Book 5, wherein Hermione alludes to a curse she has crafted whose effect will be to "make Eloise Midgeon's acne look like a couple of cute freckles."
  • Broken Pedestal: Played with. Krum's not revealed as different, let alone in a negative way, but rather Ron gets angry about him dating Hermione. By the end, however, Ron works up the nerve to ask for his autograph. Krum obliges.
  • The Butler Did It: Subverted. Frank Bryce, the Riddles' gardener and only suspect in their killing, was uninvolved.
  • Calling Card: The Dark Mark, a spell the Death Eaters cast over the scene of a murder.
  • Capture and Replicate: Barty Crouch, Jr.captures Mad-Eye Moody and uses Polyjuice Potion to imitate him for the entire school year. His father also arranged for him and his mother to do this to get him out of Azkaban.
  • Cassandra Truth: Harry didn't enter himself for the Tournament. For the first few weeks after the fact, Dumbledore, Hagrid, McGonagall, Sirius, Hermione, and Moody (who did enter him) are the only people who believe him. Most of his fellow Gryffindors are enthusiastic about it, while the other Hogwarts students are cold towards him (the Hufflepuffs because his entry stole the spotlight from Cedric, the Slytherins because they hate him regardless, and the Ravenclaws because they think he's being a glory hound).
  • Cavalry of the Dead: The "shades" of Voldemort's victims give Harry a vital few seconds during his escape.
  • Censor Suds: The prefect bath is loaded with suds and bubbles, which come in handy when Moaning Myrtle decides to drop in on Harry.
  • Chekhov's Gun: The series has its own page. Voldemort's agent even tries planting one — the book about magical water plants he gives Neville — five months before Harry needs it. This backfires when Harry, not knowing he's in a book, has no reason to remember it.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Hermione informs us that Parvati has a twin sister, when previously there had only been mention of "a pair of twin girls" with the last name Patil in the first book — several chapters before Parvati's twin becomes Ron's date for the Yule Ball.
  • Child Prodigy: Viktor Krum has been playing Quidditch long enough to be well-known as an international star, but he's only seventeen and hasn't left school yet.
  • Chimney Entry: An accidental example — Mr. Weasley has the Dursleys' fireplace connected to the Floo Network temporarily, only to discover the Dursleys have had it blocked up. He and his sons end up piling into each other before he resorts to blasting their way out. He assures the Dursleys he can fix it, of course.
  • Christmas Carolers: As part of the Yule Ball, the Hogwarts suits of armor are enchanted to sing Christmas carols, but they only seem to know half of the words. Peeves the Poltergeist takes to hiding in them and making up his own versions to fill the gaps.
  • Complaining About Rescues They Don't Like: Voldemort never stops giving shit to Wormtail, regarding him with loathing, disgust, and total contempt, and more or less abusing him verbally and physically in every single scene they share in Goblet of Fire. Voldemort hates the fact that the instrument for his return to power is more or less a last resort for a guy who spent twelve years a rat. In the graveyard speech he gives Wormtail a Backhanded Compliment while giving the unnamed and absent "agent at Hogwarts" the Employee of the Year award.
  • Completely Unnecessary Translator: The foreign officials to Fudge at the Quidditch World Cup.
    "Vell, ve fought bravely," said a gloomy voice behind Harry. He looked around; it was the Bulgarian Minister for Magic.
    "You can speak English!" said Fudge, sounding outraged. "And you’ve been letting me mime everything all day!"
    "Vell, it vos very funny," said the Bulgarian Minister, shrugging.
  • Complexity Addiction:
    • The entire plot of the book turns out to be a scheme by the villain to deliver Harry Potter to a certain place at a certain time via portkey. Left unanswered is why the villain couldn't have just kidnapped Harry, or turned any old object in his office into a portkey and arranged for Harry to pick it up.
    • On a far smaller scale, Fred and George whip up an Aging Potion to cross over Dumbledore's Age Line, when they could have just gotten a seventh-year to drop their names in the goblet.
  • Contrived Coincidence: If Barty Crouch Jr. didn't share his first name with his dad, or if the Marauder's Map was capable of distinguishing between two people who share the same name, he would have been caught much earlier and Voldemort's scheme would've been ruined.
  • Cool and Unusual Punishment: Moody punishes Draco Malfoy by turning him into a ferret and bouncing him around.
  • Cool Teacher: Moody is gruff and demands a lot from the students, but he endears himself to Harry and several of the others for being upfront with them about the dangers of the Dark Arts and what they need to do to prepare themselves, putting bullies like Malfoy in their place, and showing kindness to students like Neville when they need it. Brutally Subverted, however, with The Reveal about who Moody really is...
  • *Cough* Snark *Cough*: Ron accuses Hermione of only liking Cedric because he's Mr. Fanservice. When Hermione claims she doesn't like people just because of their looks, he gives a false cough that sounds oddly like "Lockhart."
  • Covert Pervert: Several characters are implied or stated to be a bit less innocent than they seem at first glance.
    • Moaning Myrtle "sometimes" sneaks into the prefects' bathroom to watch them bathing. Harry finds out when he borrows the bath to decipher a clue that's only audible underwater.
    • In a throwaway line, Moody is said to track some passing girls with his magic eye. This is an early hint that "Moody" is in fact not what he seems.
    • Dumbledore reveals his brother got in trouble for "improper charms with a goat". In Deathly Hallows, we find out that Aberforth's Patronus is a goat, which makes this even more disturbing, considering that one's Patronus can take the form of somebody one loves. In his case, however, it refers to his love for his sister and his regret that he couldn't save her, rather than a romantic attraction.
  • Creepy Long Fingers: Voldemort's long, creepy fingers, once he finally regains human form, are just part of his overwhelming invokedUncanny Valley grossness.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: The Quidditch World Cup has the Irish Chasers scoring seventeen goals between them, completely outclassing Bulgaria's, who score only one. It turns into a Curb Stomp Cushion when the game ends with Ireland on top 170–160, Bulgaria only having scored that much because Krum caught the Snitch and ended the game.
  • Cut-and-Paste Note: Hermione receives a threatening one from an irate and gullible subscriber to Witch Weekly who believed Rita Skeeter's Malicious Slander portraying Hermione as The Vamp.
  • Dances and Balls: The Yule Ball is a Christmas dance attended by the students of Hogwarts and their guests from Durmstrang and Beauxbatons. Since Harry is in a life-or-death competition with them while his friends are stuck in a life-or-death love triangle, the dance provides much comedic tension and teenage angst.
  • Darker and Edgier: Though J. K. Rowling had been progressively doing this with each new installment since the beginning, this book made the series take a huge leap in this trope, taking the previous novel's dark tone Up to Eleven. Notably, it's the first to feature an out-and-out Downer Ending, with Cedric being murdered and Voldemort getting a new body. It's also the one where the franchise's Black and Gray Morality grows more evident, as Rowling begins unveiling the dark side of the Ministry of Magic.
  • Defiant to the End: Subverted by Frank Bryce, though not for lack of trying. When Nagini and Wormtail bust him, right when he's about to go to call the police, he faces Voldemort with courage and dignity. Then he demands to see Voldemort face-to-face, goes Oh, Crap!, and screams at what he sees before Voldemort kills him. When Harry later sees what Frank saw, he tries to scream but can't due to the gag in his mouth.
  • Description in the Mirror: At the beginning of the second chapter, we get this after Harry wakes from his accidental Dream Spying on Voldemort:
    Harry ran his fingers over the scar again. It was still painful. He turned on the lamp beside him, scrambled out of bed, crossed the room, opened his wardrobe, and peered into the mirror on the inside of the door. A skinny boy of fourteen looked back at him, his bright green eyes puzzled under his untidy black hair. He examined the lightning-bolt scar of his reflection more closely. It looked normal, but it was still stinging.
  • Diet Episode: The Dursley portion of the book involves Dudley being put on a diet.note  Unfortunately, Petunia decided that to accommodate Dudley, everyone else needs to participate, including Harry (who absolutely does not need such a thing). Thankfully, his friends send him enough snacks to keep him from starving.
  • Disapproving Look: Harry gets this from Fleur as he tries to clean his wand in the Weighing of the Wands.
  • Disguised in Drag: A quick gag at the beginning has an old wizard named Archie doing this by accident. He was told he couldn't wear the usual (gender-neutral) robes at the World Cup for masquerade reasons, so he picked up a nice nightdress in a Muggle shop. When other wizards try to explain it's women's clothing, he doesn't believe them.
  • Dissonant Serenity: During the Death Eater riot at the Quidditch World Cup, Malfoy is shown calmly watching the violence through a gap in the trees.
  • Distressed Dude: Harry gets kidnapped in the climax.
  • Do Not Go Gentle: When faced with a choice of dying and hiding behind a gravestone or staring down Voldemort and trying one last Hail Mary, Harry thinks of his parents who also did not go gently, and rises to try one final attempt because if he is about to die, it will be on his feet.
  • The Dragon: Barty Crouch, Jr., particularly in the movie adaptation.
  • Dream Intro: The film begins with a man checking on what's going on upstairs, only to be confronted by Wormtail, then Voldemort. Turns out it was a nightmare Harry was having. A psychic nightmare, as that was actually happening.
  • Dream Spying: Harry begins doing this unintentionally — he witnesses Voldemort killing Frank Bryce, then "overhears" a conversation he has with Wormtail.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: When Hermione mentions that the 1792 Triwizard Tournament was cancelled because of a cockatrice breaking free and injuring the judges, the Dutch and Italian editions translate cockatrice as basilisk. This should be impossible, since The Chamber of Secrets established that breeding basilisks has been illegal since medieval times, and they certainly don't want to use one of the most deadly creatures ever in a school tournament. Its gaze alone would have killed the entire audience.
  • Dude, Not Funny!: Invoked.
    • Arthur yells at Fred and George for baiting Dudley with cursed toffee, knowing that he was on a diet. Even though Harry defends the twins, Arthur is angry that they not only used magic on a Muggle but used reckless magic, period.
    • Moody demonstrates the Imperius Curse to Harry's class by performing it on a spider and making it tap-dance. All the students find this funny, until Moody notices and asks them if they'd find it amusing if he put the curse on one of them, which he later does to all of them.
    • Hermione frowns at Ron when they see Krum jumping into the lake, and he says hopefully that Krum may have to face the giant squid.
  • Due to the Dead
    • Voldemort tells Wormtail that he plans to feed Harry's body to Nagini.
    • Voldemort averts this as he needs Wormtail to open his father's grave for a piece of him, as part of the resurrection ritual.
    • Cedric's shade asks Harry to retrieve his corpse, and Harry does.
  • Dumbass Has a Point:
    • This isn't Ron's best book, due to his jealousy towards his best friends, but he does aptly point out a few things: Hermione's attempts to "liberate the house elves" are actually insulting the elves more than empowering them, that her name for her organization has a terrible acronym, and that he and his friends can handle learning about the First Wizarding War. When talking about Percy's loyalty to Crouch, Hermione adamantly says that Percy wouldn't give his family to the Dementors, but Ron darkly says that Percy would toss his family aside if they got in the way of his ambition. He ends up being proven right in the next two books.
    • Bagman is right that Fred and George are too young to gamble, though not for the reasons he states. It's that they gambled their savings, and that he repaid them in leprechaun gold.
    • The only sensible thing Fudge does in the whole book is question Percy about the letters he's receiving from Crouch, since it's odd that Crouch, a man known for never missing a day of work, has suddenly taken ill for months.
  • Dungeon Bypass: During the third task, Harry blasts a shortcut through the hedge maze when he hears one of the others being tortured. It takes a curse plus a bit of fighting to get through. He doesn't repeat it due to the effort.
  • Early-Bird Cameo
    • During a trip into Dumbledore's Pensieve, Harry sees the trial of the Lestranges, being especially struck by the fanatic — and, at this point, unnamed — Mrs. Lestrange. Bellatrix is an important villain in the later books.
      • Both she and her husband are mentioned earlier by Sirius when he talks about a gang of Slytherin students who formed Snape's social circle when he was at Hogwarts, though they aren't mentioned by their first names.
    • Many Death Eaters who become more prominent in the next book, such as Dolohov and Rookwood, are first mentioned in the Pensieve scene. We also first hear about Travers, who becomes more prominent in the final novel.
    • A much more minor one, but Cedric's father says that a family called the Lovegoods have been at the World Cup for a week. Luna is a key supporting character in the last three books and her father, Xenophilius, is introduced in the very last one.
    • This is also the first time that Dumbledore mentions having a brother.
  • The End of the Beginning: The last chapter is titled "The Beginning".
  • Eureka Moment: Ron and Harry speculating as to how Rita Skeeter could possibly have observed all the events she reports on leads to them suggesting that she's "bugging" them — Hermione shoots this down because Muggle electronics would fail around Hogwarts, but the use of the word "bug" causes her to recall a certain beetle that kept appearing, and she runs off to confirm her theory. She's right — Skeeter is an unregistered Animagus and has been spying on them with her beetle form.
  • Everyone Has Standards:
    • Dumbledore doesn't approve of using the Dementors as Azkaban guards, as he tells Moody who thinks otherwise.
    • As tough as Moody was on Death Eaters back in the day, he refused to stoop down to their level by exercising Crouch's permission for the Aurors to use Unforgivable Curses and always tried to bring them in alive to stand trial.
    • Hermione had developed a low opinion of Crouch after seeing him mistreat Winky. She becomes horrified, however, on hearing Crouch's son was also arrested and initially asks if Crouch tried to get his son acquitted.
    • Both Arthur and Mr. Crouch tell off Amos Diggory for accusing Harry Potter of summoning the Dark Mark. Mr. Crouch reminds Amos that Lord Voldemort killed Harry's parents.
  • Everyone Looks Sexier If French: The Beauxbatons students. Proving that this trope can cross gender boundaries, the Patil twins have fun with a pair of boys from Beauxbatons at the Yule Ball after Ron and Harry lose interest.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Voldemort is later shown to be an offender, but his main agent in this book is not. As he tells Harry, "Decent people are so easy to manipulate." Although the agent does have a moment. He assumes that Harry will ask everyone for Tournament help, but Harry sticks with just his closest friends. This forces the agent to play Xanatos Speed Chess.
  • Evil Gloating: Draco Malfoy gloats to Harry about Voldemort coming back and killing Muggles, Muggle-born wizards, and their sympathizers ... that is, until he, Crabbe, and Goyle get their butts handed to them by the main trio and the Weasley twins.
  • Evil Mentor: Barty Crouch, Jr. is this for Harry and his classmates more generally.
  • Evil Plan: Once again, Voldemort hatches a scheme to recover from his death pre-series. It involves dragging Harry into an isolated location and using his blood in a potion.
  • Exact Words:
    • Rita Skeeter approaches Harry after the first task and asks if she can have "a quick word". Harry responds: "Yeah, you can have a word. Goodbye."
    • When Voldemort conjures a new hand to replace the one Wormtail sacrificed as part of the spell to restore him to his body, he says "May your loyalty never waver again, Wormtail." Wormtail unthinkingly replies "No, my lord, never," not thinking that this may actually be magic on Voldemort's part. Deathly Hallows makes it clear that's exactly what it was, as the hand murders Wormtail when he attempts — however half-heartedly — to defy Voldemort's commands a second time.
  • Female Gaze: Myrtle apparently got an eyeful of Cedric during his time trying to figure out the nature of the second task.
    Myrtle: It took Cedric ages to figure that out! Nearly ALL the bubbles had gone!
  • Fiction Isn't Fair: Rita Skeeter spends the book printing outright lies about Harry and his friends. Dumbledore does ban her from the school grounds, but Harry isn't presented with any legal way of stopping the articles themselves.
  • Fire/Water Juxtaposition: The first challenge in the Triwizard Tournament requires the competitors to face off against a fire-breathing dragon for each of them. The second challenge requires them to swim to the bottom of the Black Lake and rescue one hostage each.
  • First-Name Basis
    • Unlike the last book, Sirius Black's surname is only mentioned once, when he transforms back into a human from a dog in front of Molly. This may be an indication of how close he and Harry have grown over the summer despite only being in contact through writing.
    • At the Yule Ball, Severus Snape and Igor Karkaroff address each other by their first names, which lets Harry know they have a history.
  • Fixing the Game: The Weasley twins' subplot is driven by Ludo Bagman's welching.
  • Football Hooligans: The Irish party hard after their win at the Quidditch World Cup, which accidentally becomes a very convenient cover for the riot the Death Eaters cause on the same night.
  • Foreshadowing: Has its own page.
  • Forgot About His Powers: Harry uses Accio to summon his broom during the first task; he didn't think of just using it to summon the dragon egg he was trying to get or summoning the broom to fly over the maze in the third task. In fact, the fact that none of the champions thinks to summon the egg directly to them suggests that they forget it should be possible, or that the egg had been enchanted to prevent exactly that — watching four people walk into an arena and have their eggs zip into their hands, one after another, isn't very entertaining. In either case, it goes unexplained why they don't try it.
  • French Jerk: The Beauxbatons students evince mostly disappointment and displeasure with Hogwarts' accommodations. Fleur is the worst example until Harry saves her sister Gabrielle in the second task.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Hermione starts the Society for the Promotion of Elfish Welfare.
    • It could have been worse: Stop the Outrageous Abuse of Our Fellow Magical Creatures and Campaign for a Change in Their Legal Status. It wouldn't fit on the badge, so she repurposed it as the organisation's mission statement.
    • At one point, Ron sarcastically comments that Hermione might have changed the name of S.P.E.W. to the House-Elf Liberation Front (she doesn't). He later also jokes that she can start up S.P.U.G.: Society for the Protection of Ugly Goblins.
  • Gambit Roulette: The whole Triwizard Tournament is hijacked by the scattered remnants of Voldemort's followers for the sole purpose of kidnapping Harry Potter by having him touch an object that would magically teleport him away to their supervillain lair. Their overly elaborate evil plan hinges not only on manipulating the titular Goblet of Fire to draw Harry's name — an act that immediately draws suspicion since it violates myriad Triwizard rules — but also on Harry's winning (and indeed, surviving) a dangerous, multi-stage tournament that culminates in an obstacle course through a large maze. Surely there had to be a simpler way to get to Harry. However, had Voldemort not been so arrogant as to want to fight Harry, the plan would have worked perfectly: Harry would have simply vanished, and no one except for the Death Eaters would have had any idea what happened.
  • The Gambling Addict: Bagman's Establishing Character Moment is talking Arthur into a bet on the World Cup outcome.
  • Gang of Bullies
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar
    • During the first Divination lesson of the year, Ron asks Lavender Brown if he can see "Uranus."
    • Before the Triwizard Tournament, the participants are having their wands inspected by representatives from the Ministry of Magic. One of them, inspecting Cedric's wand, asks him how often he treats it. Cedric replies (with a grin) that he polished his wand the previous night.
    • When Hagrid decides to go make it up to Madame Maxime, another half-giant, about his size, he says, "I'll show her big-boned."
  • Ghost Reunion Ending: Harry's duel with Voldemort causes the spirits of Voldemort's victims, including Cedric Diggory and his parents, to appear. They then help Harry in the climactic duel.
  • Golden Snitch: The winner of the Triwizard Tournament is determined by who wins the last of the three events. The only purpose of the previous two is to determine the order in which the champions enter the final event's maze. It works, though, as Harry and Cedric, who enter together (being tied for first), also reach the Cup first and take it together.
  • Graceful in Their Element: Viktor is graceful on a broomstick but duck-footed on land.
  • Gravity Screw: One of the obstacles Harry meets in the maze is a strange mist that acts as a local "inverse gravity" zone. It gives Harry the terrifying impression he's a second away from falling into the sky. Once he finds the nerve to take a step, the illusion breaks.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Ron shows this for both his best friends. First, he gets jealous over Harry being entered in the Triwizard Tournament. Then, he gets jealous that Viktor Krum shows interest in Hermione.
  • Gut Punch: Cedric's death is this for both the book and the series.
  • Hate Sink: Rita Skeeter is a shameless tabloid journalist who prints outright lies about Harry and outs Hagrid as half-giant.
  • Have You Told Anyone Else?: When Frank Bryce stumbles upon Voldemort and Wormtail in the Riddle house, he claims other people know he is there and will come looking for him. Voldemort knows instantly that Bryce is lying.
  • Hedge Maze: The setting of the third challenge is a magical hedge maze filled with monsters to force the four contestants to fight their way through and find the prize of the tournament, the Triwizard Cup.
  • Hello, Nurse!: Fleur Delacour is a normal example; the full-blooded Veela are the most extreme.
  • Hero Antagonist: Cedric is a mild example, as he is Harry's rival both in the Triwizard Tournament and in winning Cho's affections.
  • Heroes Gone Fishing: While wondering what his teachers do during the holidays, Harry briefly imagines Dumbledore getting a tan on a beach somewhere, while still wearing his robe and hat.
  • He Who Fights Monsters
    • Barty Crouch, Sr. is the former head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, whose job is to police the wizarding world and stop the use of Unforgivable Curses. During the war against Voldemort, he authorized the Aurors to use the Unforgivable Curses and gave them leeway to kill rather than capture suspects.
    • Averted by Moody; Sirius notes that although he was tough and uncompromising, Moody never sank to the level of the Death Eaters and attempted to bring in his quarry alive whenever possible. That said, Moody believes firmly that "filth" like Karkaroff deserve Azkaban.
  • High-School Dance: The Yule Ball. A bit classier and more formal than most examples, but it still counts. In a more realistic touch, neither Harry nor Ron gets the nerve to ask their respective preferred partners until it's too late, and Harry especially sees it as more of a chore to get through than anything else. Of course, much of that may have been due to the fact that, as a Champion, he would be in the spotlight for the start of it along with the other Champions. Also, as both Champion and Famous Harry Potter, he gets a lot of girls asking him to the dance almost as soon as it's announced, though he's socially awkward enough he keeps turning them down, and apparently the message spreads and his unprovoked invitations dry up.
  • Hurt Foot Hop: After he tries to enter the Headmaster's office without knowing the password, Harry kicks a wall out of frustration and hops on his other foot in pain.
  • Hypocrite: Draco Malfoy takes great delight in insulting Ron's mother, but apparently can't take Harry insulting his own mother in return.
  • Hypocritical Humor
    • Before the Weasleys come to get Harry, Uncle Vernon calls Molly Weasley a "dumpy sort of woman." Harry reacts with private outrage that he dares to call Molly dumpy when Dudley is the size of a small whale.
    • To an American audience, at least, Ron calling the French food gross while serving himself black pudding (blood sausage) can come across as this.
    • A dark one: Molly tells off Amos for believing the garbage Rita wrote, but she treats Hermione coldly for the Witch Weekly article until Harry tells her otherwise.
  • I Feel Guilty; You Take It
    • Harry offers the Triwizard Cup to Cedric Diggory, because (1) his entrance in the Tournament was unfair and (2) Cedric scored the most recent point in their continued 'game' of helping each other.
    • Harry offers the prize money from the Tournament to Cedric's parents, who turn it down. He then tries to give it to Molly Weasley, who also refuses, before he finally gives it to Fred and George Weasley as founding capital for their joke shop.
  • I Gave My Word: While Harry is still struggling to get a Yule Ball date, Ron suggests to Ginny that she go with him. Ginny tells them she can't because she already said yes to Neville and is clearly miserable about having to give up a chance to go with Harry.
  • I Have No Son!: Barty Crouch, Sr. He says this exact line at his son's trial.
  • Imaginary Love Triangle: Rita Skeeter invents a Harry-Hermione-Krum triangle out of whole cloth, to the annoyance of everyone involved.note 
  • Improbably Predictable: Immediately after he wakes up from his dream about Voldemort, Harry predicts how Ron and Hermione will react to the news. When he tells them, they both react almost exactly as he thought they would: Ron is confused, while Hermione encourages Harry to consult every authority figure and book he can.
  • I Need You Stronger: This is the reason for fake Moody's assistance to Harry in the Triwizard challenges. See Gambit Roulette.
  • Inevitable Tournament: A straight example. A super-dangerous and challenging tournament takes place at Hogwarts, and despite being three years too young, Harry finds himself forced into competing.
  • Interspecies Romance
    • Hagrid has been (presumably under Dumbledore's approval, considering at least one of them ends up in the last challenge) secretly breeding Manticore/Fire Crab hybrids called "Blast-Ended Skrewts". The actual creation of magical crossbreeds is forbidden in the Potterverse, specifically because it has the potential to create such highly dangerous creatures.note  The Skrewts are mentioned as being so aggressive that they eventually wipe themselves out save a lone survivor.
    • Human variants appear with Fleur Delacour and her sister, whose (presumably) human-wizard grandfather married a Veela, and Hagrid, who had a wizard father and giantess mother. Madame Maxime is also half-giant.
  • In the Back: Malfoy trying to jinx Harry while his back is turned is what sets off the ferret scene.
  • Jerkass: Rita Skeeter. Intrepid Reporter nothing, she seems to live not to tell the truth but to humiliate people! Case in point: Hermione just for criticising her, and Hagrid due to him confessing he's half-giant with her deliberately eavesdropping.
  • Jerkass Has a Point
    • Malfoy is right that it's a bad idea to keep Blast-Ended Skrewts around. Hermione admits this in a private moment. They do absolutely nothing of any use to anyone, they're exceptionally dangerous, their very existence is illegal as their creation requires breaking the Ban on Experimental Breeding, and caring for them is a complete waste of class time because they do not exist in the wild (though learning to care for a brand-new creature could be useful practical experience for the budding magizoologist, all that means is the skrewts should be assigned to a NEWT-level class, not a bunch of fourth-years).
    • The organisers of the Triwizard Tournament also have this in mind, as only allowing of-age students to participate ensures that they'll have the necessary magical know-how to overcome a lot of their obstacles, such as Cedric and Fleur being able to use charms that give them air-bubbles, whereas Harry requires Gillyweed stolen from Snape's potion supply.
    • When Hermione tells Rita off for spreading innuendo about "anyone ... even Ludo Bagman," Rita retorts, "I know things about Ludo Bagman that would make your hair curl." She reported on Bagman's trial for helping the Death Eaters after Voldemort's fall.
    • Crouch Sr. was a tough Hanging Judge, and not even merciful enough to presume innocence. As Sirius grudgingly admits, however, during the First Wizarding War a tough force like him was inevitable when Voldemort was spreading his reign of terror. The Death Eaters were murdering Muggleborns and Muggles alike, causing chaos and ruining lives. Crouch Sr.'s methods at least brought in results and reduced the collateral damage that would have otherwise ensued. It also turns out that the charges against the Lestranges were justified, as Bellatrix in the next book gleefully refers to torturing Neville's parents, and they totally deserved Azkaban.
    • Moody is nicer than Crouch, which Sirius also describes — he only has one known Death Eater casualty because he'd bring most of them in alive — but he is also tough in his approach to them. He says that "filth" like Karkaroff deserve the Dementors after they caused a reign of terror, and they can't just evade the consequences because they decide to turn traitor; whereas the question of if anyone deserves the Dementors is morally ambiguous, he is right that Death Eaters can't just escape consequences of murdering and torturing innocents. He also believes Bagman was "dim" and not truly malevolent in passing on information to Rookwood, which ended up being true.
    • The only reason Bagman investigated Bertha's disappearance after six months was because Rita Skeeter reported on it. The same Rita that humiliates people to pay for her manicures and robes.
  • Just Between You and Me: A lot of this, both from Voldemort and Moody/Crouch at the end of the book.
  • Kaizo Trap: The Giant Spider at the very end of the third task, meant to blindside champions who are focused on the Triwizard Cup ahead. It is only thanks to Harry's yell that poor Cedric survives his encounter with it.
  • Kangaroo Court: The trials in the Pensieve Flashback are stacked against the defendants. Sirius says he didn't even get that much. However, Ludo Bagman managed to get off, largely because he was a popular Quidditch player, making him acquitted by public opinion. We also find out later that the Lestranges and, to a lesser extent, Barty Crouch, Jr. did deserve to be thrown in jail.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: Alas, for Karkaroff. He was a remorseless Death Eater who got a reduced sentence in Azkaban for ratting out on his fellow genocidal wizards. Then he becomes headmaster of a prestigious school, without facing any consequences for Death Eater activities. Cue his Dark Mark getting clearer, and his worries about Voldemort executing him for being a traitor. It's revealed that he runs away after feeling the Mark return, and Voldemort tracks him down and kills him.
  • Karmic Death: Barty Crouch, Sr. is killed by his son, whom he spent years keeping prisoner in their own home.
  • Kick the Dog
    • Snape in the exchange of spells outside the Potions dungeon after Hermione is hit with a spell that enlarges her already noticeable buck teeth to a cartoonish size (and Goyle's nose having done the same). Snape tells Goyle to go to the hospital wing, and then turns his attention to Hermione when Ron points out that she's been hit with a spell, too. Snape says, "I see no difference." Hermione runs off crying. Naturally, Harry and Ron proceed to unleash a heap of verbal abuse at him. In the aftermath, however, Hermione turns that to her advantage, because she runs off to have her teeth magically fixed by Madam Pomfrey, and she lets her "carry on a bit", shrinking them to a size smaller than the original one (before the spell hit her). Thus she fixes the problem of her teeth permanently and gets a very beautiful smile.
    • Snape gets another crucial moment. When Harry's trying to get into Dumbledore's office due to Barty Crouch, Sr. appearing and raving, demanding to see the professor, Snape delays him and dismisses his claims as rubbish. As Harry points out, those few minutes cost them the time to save Crouch and he knows Snape did it just to bait him. In an ironic twist, it is also lucky that Snape appeared when he did, since Harry was already leaving to look for Dumbledore in the staffroom and would have wasted even more time had not Snape called him back, even if it was to mock him.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: Invoked; Moody at Karkaroff's trial was grumpy about how he might get a shorter prison sentence due to knowing information, after it took months to catch him. He says to just hear the information and toss him back to the Dementors. This actually makes Dumbledore argue with Moody that no one deserves the Dementors.
  • Knight's Armor Hideout: Played With. Peeves the poltergeist enters suits of armor not to hide, but to replace the carols they had been bewitched to sing with rude versions.
  • Knight Templar: Barty Crouch, Sr. staunchly opposed Voldemort and the Dark Arts, but in his effort to fight them he stooped to progressively lower levels, to the point that he became Not So Different.
  • Ladykiller in Love: Viktor Krum, who's surrounded by female admirers for his first few months at Hogwarts, asks Hermione to the Yule Ball because she's the one girl who wasn't throwing herself at his feet.
  • Land, Sea, Sky: The three tasks of the Triwizard Tournament, in reverse order.
  • Laugh of Love: As the Yule Ball draws nearer, a lot of girls in Hogwarts are prone to giggling when they're around Harry.
  • The Law of Conservation of Detail: Still played straight in this book despite being longer than the last three combined. The plot is just that complex, and if it's not part of the plot now, it's bound to come up later, such as, say, the entire first chapter.
  • Limb-Sensation Fascination: After Wormtail cuts off his hand at the end, Voldemort conjures a new, silver one for him. He stares at it in disbelief, then experiments with motion and crushing a twig between his fingertips.
  • Literal Metaphor: When talking to Pettigrew in the opening chapter, Voldemort says that he will give Pettigrew a task that many of Voldemort's followers "would give their right hand to perform." The task? Give Voldemort his right hand.
  • Literary Allusion Title: The Harry Potter Lexicon speculates that the title of the chapter "The Madness of Mr. Crouch" is a reference to The Madness of King George, especially since King George III is reputed to have mistaken a tree for the King of Prussia, whereas Crouch mistakes a tree for Percy Weasley.
  • Loose Lips: Bertha Jorkins gives Hagrid a run for his money on blabbing secrets. Hagrid at least has enough sense to realise at times that he shouldn't have blabbed; she doesn't.
  • Magically Binding Contract: The Goblet of Fire itself — even if someone entered your name against your will and without your knowledge, if it chooses you to compete, you must compete.
  • Magic Cauldron: Wormtail uses a cauldron for the spell that restores his master Voldemort to full size and strength.
  • Magic Compass: The Point Me spell causes the caster's wand to point north briefly.
  • Malicious Slander: A lot.
    • Most of the people of Little Hangleton remain convinced that Frank Bryce murdered the Riddle family, as he was the only one who had access to their house.
    • Rita Skeeter paints Harry as some kind of maudlin attention-seeker who still cries about his parents, and he has to endure weeks of taunts over it. By the end of the book, she's moved on to calling him "disturbed and possibly dangerous".
    • Hermione is accused of two-timing Krum and Harry (the latter of whom has no romantic interest in her at all). Pansy Parkinson suggests she's drugging them with Love Potion.
    • Though Hagrid's teaching does leave something to be desired, Malfoy and company paint him as an outright bully whom everyone hates.
  • Mama Bear
    • After they save him from Barty Crouch, Jr., Professor McGonagall sympathetically tries to help Harry to the hospital wing, seeing how shaken he is. She also gets righteously furious at Fudge for allowing a Dementor into the school, near children again, and for storming into the hospital wing when Harry's trying to recover from his rough night. She also defends Harry when Fudge accuses him of making wild accusations and points out that a "lunatic" couldn't have caused Cedric Diggory and Crouch, Sr.'s deaths.
    • Surprisingly, Winky is this. When she sees the Stunned body of her ward "Master Barty," she tries to rouse him and accuses Dumbledore of killing him. As Crouch, Jr. confesses under truth serum, she begs him not to tell any more for fear of getting his father into trouble. It was she who convinced Crouch, Sr. to let his son attend the World Cup, and she volunteered to keep an eye on Crouch, Jr. in the top box, despite being scared of heights. When he tried to charge out at the Death Eater rioters at the World Cup, she forcibly dragged him away, took the wand that he'd stolen from Harry, and insisted that "I was seeing no one" when Diggory questioned her. With all this, it's no surprise that she falls completely apart when Crouch, Sr. fires her for letting his son have a wand, since it meant she could no longer protect either of the Crouches.
  • Meaningful Name
    • Beauxbatons means "beautiful wands" and that school's crest shows two crossed wands, whereas Durmstrang is a Spoonerism of "Sturm (und) Drang", "storm and stress", a German cultural movement.
    • Ludo Bagman, who starts as a shifty character and whom we later learn is actually a bagman. "Ludo" also means "I play" in Latin (and is the name of the British variant of Pachisi); Ludo is the head of Magical Games and Sports. A "bagman" is also someone involved in the collection of dirty money and Ludo turns out to have been cheating his gamblers, in order to pay off his debt to the goblins.
    • Rita Skeeter is an annoying, bloodsucking parasite who thrives on human misery... and so are mosquitoes, also called skeeters.
  • Mistaken for Racist: While the Weasleys are picking up Harry from the Dursleys, Fred and George decide to have some fun by planting a toffee in the living room for Dudley to eat. They had created that and other toffees to cause people's tongues to grow as long as four feet when they eat one. Arthur chastises them for using magic to mistreat a Muggle for their amusement. Fred and George protest that they gave it to him "because he's a great bullying git", not because he's a Muggle.
  • Mixed Ancestry: This book reveals that the reason Hagrid is much larger than an average person is because he's half-giant (human father, giant mother). Because of the Fantastic Racism against the creatures in the wizarding world at large, he keeps it a secret and shuts himself in his cabin when Rita Skeeter outs him in an article. Hermione suspected it, whereas Ron believed that Hagrid's size was a result of a faulty Engorgement Charm that couldn't be reversed and Malfoy thought Hagrid had overdosed on Skele-Gro when he was a boy.
  • The Mole: Voldemort, the Dark wizard who killed the protagonist's parents, has a spy inside Hogwarts attempting to meddle with the Triwizard Tournament and Harry's life.
  • Mood Whiplash: As said in the description, the series gets dark after this book. It starts with Cedric's death and goes downhill from there.
  • More Hero Than Thou: An inverted version, where the sacrifice is to allow the other to triumph.
  • Motive Misidentification: Zig-Zagging Trope. Throughout the story, everyone and their tapeworm thinks someone put Harry's name in the Goblet of Fire in an attempt to get him killed while making it look like an accident. In the end it is revealed that his name was entered in the hope that he would win, touch the Triwizard Cup, and restore Voldemort to life. The plan was then to kill Harry and send his corpse back, playing it off as if an inexperienced fourteen-year-old died in a Tournament accident.
  • Naïve Newcomer: Harry had learned much about the wizarding world in the previous three years, but he has a moment of this when he asks Ron "So what?" that Hagrid is half-giant. (He does recognise almost immediately from Ron's reaction that it's one of those Big Deals in the Wizarding World he's clueless about.) Never having heard of wizards' antipathy to giants before, it doesn't occur to him that others would scorn Hagrid because of his heritage.
  • Narm: In-universe, Harry thinks that Professor Moody must find the whole scenario where Harry is caught out of bed trying to figure out the second clue (an otherwise dramatic and intense moment) to be quite silly, since his eye can see Harry's awkwardly-positioned body, with his leg caught in a fake stair, through the Invisibility Cloak.
  • Narrative Profanity Filter
    • At one point, the synchronised leprechaun swarm makes "a very rude sign indeed" at the Veela.
    • During the riot at the World Cup, Ron tells Malfoy "to do something that Harry knew he would never have dared say in front of Mrs. Weasley".
    • After the "I see no difference" incident, Harry and Ron unload a torrent of abuse at Snape. The narrative notes that the echoes of the stone corridor make it difficult for him to hear exactly what they're calling him, but he gets the gist of it.
    • Sirius lets out "a vehement exclamation" when Harry describes Wormtail cutting him with a dagger.
  • Never Live It Down: invokedAfter Professor Moody transfigures Malfoy into a ferret and bounces him around, several characters mock him about the incident throughout the rest of the book, much to his anger and embarrassment.
  • New Ability Addiction: There's a Running Gag that Percy's just passed his Apparition exam (analogous to getting his driving license) and keeps Apparating down the stairs just because he can. This annoys Fred and George, but by the fifth book they're doing exactly the same (and annoying Ron), albeit on the basis that "time is Galleons" rather than to show off.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!
    • Voldemort tells his Death Eaters that he has gone further than anybody along the path that leads to immortality. When Harry escapes, he recounts these words to Dumbledore. Dumbledore is clever enough to guess what this could mean.
    • Voldemort uses Harry's blood in the resurrection ceremony, even though he could have used any wizard's blood provided that he was their enemy. Although it permits Voldemort to touch Harry, it has other consequences.
  • Nice to the Waiter
    • Crouch's treatment of Winky, as Lampshaded by Sirius and Hermione, shows that he's not a very good person.
    • Hermione attempts this with the house-elves of Hogwarts. She means well, but she ends up insulting them.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished
    • Harry, when going to the Triwizard Cup in the third task, must decide whether to save Cedric Diggory from something in the maze, or go for the cup. He ultimately decides to save Diggory, and they take the Cup together. Harry really should have left Cedric Diggory behind, for Cedric's own good.
    • Cedric would not have died and Voldemort would have not have returned had Wormtail not escaped in the previous book — which only happened because Harry, who meant to give Cruel Mercy, spared his life.
    • Mrs. Crouch taking her son's place in Azkaban, to give him a chance to live while she was dying, ended up doing much more harm than good in the long run.
    • Winky also gets her moment. She would be the Parental Substitute to "Master Barty," where she would tell his father to give him rewards for good behavior. It was her idea to let Master Barty attend the Quidditch World Cup in the Top Box, under an Invisibility Cloak. Winky also volunteered to keep the seat and lie that it was for Crouch Sr, even though she's scared of heights. Due to her covering her eyes, she fails to notice Master Barty stealing Harry's wand. This later leads to her getting fired, since Crouch Sr. realizes that if Winky was holding Harry's wand, and the wand cast the Dark Mark, then Master Barty must have used the wand to summon the Mark.
  • No-Harm Requirement: Krum gets penalised for defying this in the first task of the Triwizard Tournament: to retrieve a golden egg that's been placed among a nesting dragon mother's clutch. Krum distracts his dragon by casting a spell that impairs her vision, but loses points because she crushed half the real eggs while stumbling around in pain. Ironically, Sirius was going to suggest the same strategy to Harry, but he's glad Harry went for the broom instead.
  • No Pronunciation Guide: Viktor Krum's trouble pronouncing Hermione's name serves to clear this out.note 
  • Not An Act: Mad-Eye Moody is famously averse to Death Eaters who avoided prison, as his job is to arrest them and his face is covered in scars from those who resisted. The Moody Harry meets during his fourth year is an impersonation by a Death Eater who did go to prison (and is trying to revive Voldemort), and understandably hates those who claimed they'd been mind-controlled to avoid punishment, hence his punishing Malfoy by turning him into a ferret and passive-aggressive attitude towards Karkaroff (the son of a "reformed" Death Eater and one who sold out the others to save his skin, respectively).
  • Not Cheating Unless You Get Caught: Moody mentions explicitly that cheating is a traditional part of the tournament. Harry even goes out on a limb to help Cedric when it turns out that Cedric is the one person who hasn't had any done in his favour.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: Harry's trek through the hedge maze is rather unnerving because of how few obstacles he runs into. Crouch, Jr. is making sure that he has a relatively clear path to the Triwizard Cup.
  • Not Just a Tournament: Double Subverted. Everyone thinks the tournament is a ruse to kill Harry during the contest. In fact, it is rigged for him to win — so he can be captured at the moment of victory and killed elsewhere.
  • Not Me This Time: Harry's trio did steal Polyjuice Potion ingredients from Snape two books before, but they're not the ones doing it this time.
  • Not Proven / Off on a Technicality: Frank Bryce was innocent of killing the Riddles, but the main reason he went free is that the police couldn't figure out how or why they dropped dead overnight with no sign of a struggle. (The reason is that Tom Marvolo "Lord Voldemort" Riddle killed them with the Killing Curse.)
  • Obstructive Code of Conduct: Snape accuses Harry Potter of theft and wants to prosecute, but the use of Veritaserum on students is "regrettably forbidden".
  • Oh, Crap!: In hindsight, this is Moody's (actually Barty Crouch, Jr.'s) reaction upon seeing the Marauder's Map, since it could see through his disguise and identify him for who he really is. Indeed, Harry had seen his name on the Map, but had assumed it was his father because the Map doesn't distinguish between people who share names.
  • One-Hit Kill: Although it appeared in the first book, this one gives a name to the flash of green light that Harry kept remembering. It's revealed to be the Killing Curse, Avada Kedavra. (This series has its own "Chekhov's Gun" page for a good reason.)
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Until Dumbledore calls him "Alastor", it doesn't occur to Harry that "Mad-Eye" isn't Moody's first name.
  • Only Sane Man: Wormtail to Voldemort and Barty Crouch, Jr. If only Voldemort had listened to Wormtail's suggestion that they use another wizard's blood in the resurrection ceremony...
  • Out-of-Character Alert: Crouch, Jr. (fake Moody) does well to make sure nothing overt or subtle happens to give away his role. It is when he takes Harry away from Dumbledore's presence after Harry's return from the graveyard, something the real one would never do, that he tips off Dumbledore.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: Hermione is extremely studious, and loves taking exams. When she gets her Eureka Moment on the last day of finals, she runs off to the library before the start of their exam. Ron lampshades that she must hate Rita a lot. Fortunately, she arrives well in time before exams start.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: They are horribly ugly and scary.
  • Outscare the Enemy: A group of Death Eaters runs amok at the Quidditch World Cup as the Ministry tries in vain to control them. The riot only ends once an unknown person (Barty Crouch, Jr.) conjures Voldemort's symbol, from which the Death Eaters immediately retreat. They're more afraid of the punishment they'll get for having renounced Voldemort when he lost his power than they are of the Ministry.
  • Oxygenated Underwater Bubbles: A rare non-video game example with the Bubble-Head Charm.
  • Paparazzi: Rita Skeeter is this trope. Illegal eavesdropping? Revealing private accords? Hateful and libelous words against a minor who insulted her? She does this and worse.
  • Parental Neglect: Barty Crouch, Sr. has this for his son at first, later crossing into Abusive Parent territory.This has dire consequences for him.
  • Parting Words Regret: Molly Weasley gets this when the twins have a close call with the Death Eaters.
  • The Password Is Always "Swordfish": When Harry tries to get into Dumbledore's office, he realizes that he doesn't know the password. He remembers that it used to be "Sherbet lemon", so he tries that, then other sweets, and eventually out of anger even "Cockroach Cluster", which turns out to be correct.
    Harry: Cockroach Cluster? I was only joking!
  • Pensieve Flashback: The invokedTrope Namer. This book is the first time they're used, at least directly (as Harry notes, the same concept previously drove the diary flashback in Chamber of Secrets).
  • Pet the Dog: In the middle of his angry rant towards Amos Diggory for accusing Harry Potter and his elf Winky, and shortly before he fires Winky, Mr. Crouch tells off Amos because every wizard and witch knows the boy's history of Voldemort killing his parents and trying to kill Harry. It's the only decent moment that Crouch has.
  • Platonic Kissing: At the end of the book, Hermione kisses Harry on the cheek in farewell.
  • Possession Burnout: The reborn Voldemort notes that although his spectral form could possess other creatures, doing so shortened their lifespans (presumably why he had Quirrell drink unicorn blood).
  • Properly Paranoid
    • This is Mad-Eye Moody's modus operandi, summed up in the Catchphrase "Constant vigilance!" However, the bad guys still catch him off guard.
    • Harry guesses that Voldemort might be behind his entry into the Triwizard Tournament as a means to cause his death. He's correct: Crouch, Jr., a faithful Death Eater, entered his name.
  • The Quarterback: Non-gridiron football version with Cedric Diggory, the Hufflepuff Quidditch captain and Seeker in the third book. He's handsome, kind, courageous enough to volunteer for the Triwizard Tournament (and skilled enough to become the Hogwarts champion), a good enough sportsman that he tries to get a rematch after Dementors invade the field and knock Harry out, and eventually, a Sacrificial Lion. By contrast, all the other Quidditch captains we see in the series are Slytherins (who embody Unnecessary Roughness and cheat as if their lives depend on it) or Gryffindors (Oliver Wood, for whom Quidditch is Serious Business to the point that he doesn't care that Harry's new broomstick might be cursed if it gets them the Quidditch Cup; Angelina Johnson, who is functionally a milder Distaff Counterpart to Wood; and Harry himself).
    Dumbledore: Cedric Diggory was, as you all know, exceptionally hard-working, infinitely fair-minded, and most importantly, a fierce, fierce friend.
  • Ray of Hope Ending: Cedric Diggory is killed in cold blood by Peter Pettigrew, and Lord Voldemort is given a new body of his own to begin a second wave of terror against magical Britain. Fudge refuses to listen to Harry and Dumbledore when they tell him about Voldemort's return and Harry is shell-shocked from the incident. However, Dumbledore is already making preparations to fight against Voldemort and Hagrid assures Harry that whatever may come, they'll be ready for it.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • After the Riddles were murdered, the police arrested Frank Bryce, the only other person who had access to the house at the time of the murder. They then let him go, however, because the autopsy proves his innocence, and there's no evidence to suggest Frank could murder them and leave no mark whatsoever.
    • Dudley is a lot grumpier due to the lack of his favorite foodstuffs. The sugar withdrawal is obviously getting to him. He tries to sneak doughnuts and eat his parents' share of the diet fruits.
    • Dumbledore announces that he has placed an age restriction on the Goblet of Fire, to prevent students under seventeen entering. Fred and George Weasley try to enter their names anyway, thinking they can outsmart one of the most powerful wizards of all time. They soon learn better.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: Natalie McDonald was a girl with leukaemia in Real Life, who wrote Rowling a fan letter on her deathbed. When she died, Rowling added her in Gryffindor.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Both Charlie Weasley and Hagrid are mentioned as knitting, and this is either so normal for the wizarding world or so normal for Harry that the only comment on it is the fact that they are knitting.
  • Red Herring
    • Igor Karkaroff spends all his page time acting as suspiciously as possible. For readers who know it would never be someone so obvious, Ludo Bagman is made a viable suspect due to appearing in shady situations and repeatedly trying to help Harry with advice for the tasks despite it being against the rules. In the end, he had nothing to do with the main conflict; he just wanted Harry to win to pay off goblin loan sharks due to gambling debts.
    • Midway through the book, Harry witnesses Bartemius Crouch sneaking out of Snape's office on the Marauder's Map. The Power Trio spend the rest of the book wondering why an ill rule-abider from the Ministry would do such a reckless thing. We later find out that it was not the ill rule-abider, but someone else entirely with the same name.
    • We learn about midway through the book that Voldemort has a spy at Hogwarts. A little while later, Harry learns that Snape was accused of being a Death Eater after Voldemort's fall. Is Snape Voldemort's eyes and ears in the school? No. But he was a Death Eater.
  • Reluctant Gift: Filch refuses to give Harry's Triwizard egg to Moody because it is "evidence of Peeves' treachery," but in the end he has to give it up.
  • The Reveal: The villain who put Harry's name in the Goblet of Fire, putting him in a deadly, rewarding tournament, gives a Motive Rant and reveals their crime by saying, "It was I who did that." This is spoken by Mad-Eye Moody, Harry's new mentor during the year, who also reveals that he's actually a long-thought-dead servant of the Dark Lord who magically kidnapped and impersonated Mad-Eye as part of a plan to kill Harry and restore the Dark Lord to power.
  • Rewatch Bonus: When rereading the book, many of Mad-Eye Moody's actions take on a new meaning with knowledge that he's actually Barty Crouch, Jr. Why is Moody so startled by the Marauder's Map, and why does he confiscate it from Harry? Because he realizes that the map nearly revealed and still could reveal who he really is (and would reveal who he is if Harry got a look at it at that moment).
  • Riddling Sphinx: Harry encounters a sphinx in the hedge maze and must answer a riddle to pass by it safely.
  • Right for the Wrong Reasons
    • The jury that acquitted Ludo Bagman. He really wasn't a (conscious) Death Eater, but it's clear he only got off because he was a popular Quidditch player.
    • At one point, Harry and Ron speculate that Rita Skeeter is bugging them; i.e., using electronic surveillance devices. Hermione irritably points out that she can't be doing that, since electronics don't work near Hogwarts. Hermione later discovers that she's literally bugging them — she's a beetle Animagus who uses her animal form to get near people she wants to spy on.
    • Dumbledore describes a room full of a magnificent selection of chamber pots that he stumbled into after taking a wrong turn on the way to the toilet, and laments that he never could find it again, speculating that it might require the seeker to have an exceptionally full bladder. The Room of Requirement may be easier to get into than all that, but it still would presumably only show chamber pots in particular to someone who needed them at that moment.
  • Rule of Three
    • The Triwizard Tournament is a competition between three wizards from three schools, though this is later subverted when Harry is chosen as an unprecedented fourth contestant, with three rounds.
    • There are three Unforgivable Curses.
  • Running Gag: Blast-Ended Skrewts are introduced here and become a joke for the rest of the series.
  • Run or Die: Despite the priori incantatem effect holding off Voldemort's Avada Kedavra, Harry's only chance to survive is to break off the engagement and use the portkey to return to Hogwarts.
  • Sadist Teacher
    • Snape continues the role from the previous books, but really reaches his peak in this book, not even trying to hide his favouritism for his Slytherin students or his bias against the students from the other houses. This is most notable when he not only lets Malfoy off scot-free for hitting Hermione with a hex that enlarges her front teeth drastically but then tells her he "sees no difference" between her newly enlarged teeth and how they look normally, causing her to run off crying, then has the nerve to take fifty points from Gryffindor and give Harry and Ron detention when they get angry over this. Fortunately (or unfortunately), in the next book, Umbridge appears, replacing Snape in this role and making him look not nearly as bad by comparison.
    • Moody briefly becomes this to Malfoy when he turns Malfoy into a ferret, until McGonagall shows up and rebukes him for using a Cool and Unusual Punishment.
  • Salem Is Witch Country: There is a throwaway mention of a group of American witches attending the Quidditch World Cup final. Their campsite has a sign reading "Salem Witches' Institute".
  • Saying Too Much: How Harry discovers that someone's been using Polyjuice Potion.
  • Secret Secret-Keeper: While using Dumbledore's Pensieve, Harry discovers the reason Neville lives with his grandmother is because his parents were tortured into insanity by a group of Voldemort's followers and hospitalized as a result. Dumbledore asks Harry not to tell anyone, including Neville, what he saw so that Neville can tell people himself when he's ready.
  • Secret Snack Stash: Harry starts keeping a stash of food hidden under his bedroom floorboard after Petunia imposes a family-wide diet for Dudley's benefit.
  • Seeks Another's Resurrection: Two of Voldemort's old followers put together a plan to revive the Dark Lord fully, albeit for different motives. One of them (Wormtail) was a turncoat who had been hiding for years and simply ran out of options after being discovered by the people he had betrayed, while the other (Barty Crouch Jr.) was a true believer in Voldemort's cause.
  • Self-Made Orphan
    • We learn that Voldemort murdered his father and grandparents as soon as he discovered they were Muggles and not the wizards he imagined they were, and that his father abandoned him and his mother while she was pregnant.
    • At the end, we learn that Barty Crouch, Jr. murdered his father, then transfigured his body into a bone and buried it in Hagrid's garden. Barty makes much of how both he and Voldemort had very disappointing fathers and the pleasure of killing those fathers. He also seems to regard Voldemort as a father substitute.
  • She Cleans Up Nicely: For the Yule Ball, Hermione styles her hair with liberal amounts of Sleekeazy's Hair Potion and wears a set of beautiful, floaty, periwinkle-blue dress robes. She looks so gorgeous that Harry doesn't even recognize her at first.
  • She Is All Grown Up: Again, Hermione at the Yule Ball.
  • Shipping Torpedo: Ron vehemently tries to torpedo Hermione/Viktor Krum, although at this point he Cannot Spit It Out as to the real reason why.
  • Ship Sinking: Harry/Hermione takes an early hit. Harry finds the idea of him being in a love triangle with her and Krum bewildering, and is rather annoyed that he has to keep telling people they're not together.
  • Shout-Out:
    • To Monty Python. Harry gains entrance to Dumbledore's office by trying various passwords, all of which are different kinds of sweet; the one that actually works, Cockroach Cluster, is a flavour used in the "Whizzo Assortment" sketch. Lampshaded in that Harry is amazed that it works and insists that he was kidding, which suggests that Harry is in the Muggle world a Monty Python fan. Cockroach Clusters are also shown to be a type of sweet in the Harry Potter universe, though not a popular one.
    • During the Yule Ball chapter, the Beauxbations carriage is described to look like "a giant frosted pumpkin", like the carriage in Cinderella.
  • Shout-Out to Shakespeare: The Weird Sisters provide live entertainment for the Yule Ball.
  • Singing in the Shower: When Harry opens up his egg to reveal the clue for the second task of the Triwizard Tournament, there's a screechy wailing and George Weasley says that it sounds like Percy Weasley singing, saying that Harry may have to attack him while he's in the shower. This would imply that Percy sings, albeit poorly.
  • So Proud of You:
    • Amos Diggory to Cedric. Unusually more embarrassing than supportive, despite Amos's obvious pride, since he boasts of how Cedric beat Harry before Harry's face. His saying Cedric will be able to tell his grandchildren about it turns it into a "Funny Aneurysm" Moment after Cedric's death.
    • Dumbledore to Harry after he returns from his ordeal in the graveyard.
      Dumbledore: You have shown bravery beyond anything I could have expected of you tonight, Harry. You have shown bravery equal to those who died fighting Voldemort at the height of his powers. You have shouldered a grown wizard's burden and found yourself equal to it — and you have now given us all we have a right to expect.
  • Spit Take: Just before the third task, this is Hermione's reaction to the morning newspaper.
  • Spotting the Thread: Dumbledore realises that Moody is not the real Moody when the latter removes Harry from his sight, where as the real deal would make sure Harry stayed put since being around Dumbledore is the safest place possible.
  • Spy Speak: A Subverted Trope: a Muggle who accidentally eavesdrops on Wormtail and Voldemort believes that terms such as "Quidditch", "Muggles", and "Ministry of Magic" are code names used by gangsters or spies, but these are just normal wizarding words.
  • Staging the Eavesdrop: It's revealed that The Mole staged a loud conversation with Professor McGonagall (who had no idea of the mole's intentions) about the properties of Gillyweed so that Dobby would overhear and quickly give some to Harry so he could complete the second task in the Triwizard Tournament.
  • Stating the Simple Solution: Wormtail in the very first chapter suggests that Voldemort could use another wizard's blood and resurrect himself early, without needing to capture Harry. Voldemort refuses out of pride and because he thinks that Wormtail when capturing another wizard would take the opportunity to flee.
  • Straw Character: Hermione, after seeing a house-elf fired apparently for the crime of being terrified, decides that house-elves are "uneducated and brainwashed" slaves and need to be liberated. Then she meets other, non-fired house-elves and they're quite satisfied with their way of life, claiming that virtue is its own reward. Hermione comes out looking not heroic, but distinctly foolish.
  • Suddenly SHOUTING!: Toward the very end of the book, Harry wakes up to hear McGonagall literally screaming in rage about what just happened to Barty Crouch Jr.
  • Tabloid Melodrama: As if being entered into a dangerous tournament against his will wasn't enough, Harry also spends the whole year dealing with Rita Skeeter printing outrageous lies about himself and his friends.
  • Talk About That Thing: Used by Hermione as an excuse to get her, Harry, and Ron out of the room before Mrs. Weasley blows up at Fred and George.
    Hermione: Why don't you show Harry where he's sleeping, Ron?
    Ron: He knows where he's sleeping. In my room, he slept there last —
    Hermione: We can all go.
    Ron: [catching on] Oh. Right.
  • Talk to the Fist: Malfoy's boasting speech to Harry at the end of the novel gets interrupted by Harry, Hermione, Ron, Fred, and George blasting off a variety of spells simultaneously. Also see Berserk Button. Qualifies as a Moment of Awesome.
  • Tantrum Throwing: Upon discovering that Fred and George have engorged Dudley's tongue, Uncle Vernon begins throwing things at the Weasleys and Harry, who flee the house via Floo powder.
  • Teachers out of School: After his scar hurts — which hadn't happened since Voldemort himself was at Hogwarts — Harry considers writing to Dumbledore, only to realize he has no idea where any of his teachers go during the holidays. He gets an amusing mental image of Dumbledore relaxing on a beach somewhere, still in a full archetypal wizard outfit.
  • Technicolor Fire: The Goblet of Fire lights up with blue-white fire at the beginning of each tournament. When it's about to spew out the name of an accepted contestant, the fire turns bright red.
  • Tell Him I'm Not Speaking to Him: This happens between Harry and Ron, with Hermione in the middle.
  • Tempting Fate: Bagman thinks there's no chance Krum will catch the Golden Snitch in the World Cup final and yet Ireland will win, which Fred and George bet him forty-two Galleons, fifteen Sickles, and three Knuts will happen. This is exactly what happens one chapter later.
  • There Should Be a Law:
    Giggling should be made illegal, Harry thought furiously, as all the girls around Cho began doing it.
  • Third-Person Person: Inverted: after being unmasked, Crouch, Jr. tells his story under the influence of Veritaserum. Dumbledore administers the potion, and Crouch mentions him multiple times by his name.
  • Took a Level in Badass: This is the point in the series where Harry seriously starts to improve as a spellcaster. In the first book, Harry is never seen casting a single spell successfully. In the second, he performs a spell here and there, but nothing particularly noteworthy. It takes him most of the third book just to master one spell which, though admittedly difficult to learn, is an extremely situational charm. In this book, he learns a whole arsenal of jinxes, hexes, and curses to survive the final trial, including the Stunning Spell, Stupefy, his most powerful battle spell.
    • On the other hand, the spell he uses against Voldemort most successfully is Expelliarmus, which he and his classmates learned in the second book.
  • Tournament Arc: The Triwizard Tournament, a competition between three wizards from three schools — which somehow becomes four wizards when Harry Potter's name is selected as a second Hogwarts contestant. The tournament forms the backbone of the plot.
  • Treacherous Advisor: Crouch!Moody, a Tournament Arc example.
  • Twisted Eucharist: The ritual Lord Voldemort uses for his 'resurrection' requires literal flesh from his most faithful servant, blood from an enemy, and a bone from his deceased father.
  • Ultra Super Death Gore Fest Chainsawer 3000: Mega Mutilation Part Three, a game played by Dudley.
  • Understatement:
    • Hermione says the Beauxbatons students who weren't chosen as their school's Triwizard contestant are "all disappointed". Harry lampshades it in his inner monologue, as he can see two other girls break down crying.
    • Here is Harry's reaction to Rita Skeeter painting him as "disturbed and possibly dangerous":
      Harry: Gone off me a bit, hasn't she?
  • Unscaled Merfolk: Viktor becomes half shark for the undersea challenge. It's later revealed that he messed up the transfiguration, and apparently one of the teachers had to put him back to normal. Giving himself only a shark's head was deliberate, since wizards who transform themselves completely without becoming Animagi lose their humanity. Not being able to say the incantation to turn himself back with a shark's mouth (nor to think it with a shark's brain), however, was pretty straight Didn't Think This Through.
  • Villain Has a Point
    • Fake Moody calls out Snape for having an unhealthy obsession with getting Harry into trouble. It says something that the "most faithful Death Eater" can see through the Blatant Lies of an adult determined to catch a teenage boy out of bed "for his safety".
    • Bellatrix Lestrange, while the Dementors escort her away, says that even if they throw her and her husband in prison, Voldemort will rise. She's right.
  • Wait for Your Date: Hermione Granger shows up at the Yule Ball looking fabulous with her normally frizzy and unkempt hair beautiful, coiffed, and well behaved. Hermione herself explains that she only did it for a special occasion because all the preparation, even with the magical assistance of Sleekeasy's, takes too much time.
  • Wham Line
    • "Harry Potter"; Said by Dumbledore, in relation to Harry being chosen by the Goblet of Fire as the fourth contestant. After this line is uttered, things really start to fall apart for Harry. Before this, it seemed he was just going to experience a somewhat ordinary school year while rooting for Cedric at the Triwizard Tournament. After this, he is forced to compete unwillingly in a dangerous tournament, temporarily loses his best friend Ron because the latter is jealous of him, and hints are dropped someone inside the school is planning to use the tournament to kill Harry.
    • "Kill the spare." Before this, the series has been whimsical fantasy for the most part, with thrilling moments. Once this line drops, everything changes, and shit gets real.
    • "It was I who did that," is the line with which The Mole reveals the truth to Harry.
  • What an Idiot!: In-universe. Amos Diggory gets torn a new one by Barty Crouch, Sr. and Arthur Weasley, for implying that Harry Potter conjured the Calling Card of the wizard who killed his parents and has wanted him dead his whole life. Diggory himself quickly realizes how idiotic his line of thinking was and becomes quite embarrassed at the fact he actually said it. He then gets this again when he accuses Winky, and Crouch, Sr. points out that Amos is accusing him by default, when Crouch's words and deeds show his fervent hatred of the Dark Arts and Death Eaters.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Ludo Bagman exits stage left, pursued by goblins, and vanishes utterly from the series. This may be a Disproportionate Retribution that happens offscreen.
  • What You Are in the Dark
    • Harry realizes that whereas he, Fleur, and Krum are given early warning about the First Task,note  Cedric isn't. Not telling Cedric would earn him a higher spot, but it wouldn't be fair, so he stages an opportunity to warn Cedric quickly and without his friends nearby. Fake Moody even lampshades how noble Harry can be.
    • Cedric has a chance to take the Triwizard Cup alone. Harry, with an injured leg from their brief team-up against an Acromantula, is in no state to race for the trophy. Cedric refuses, because Harry saved him from the spider and from a cursed Krum. No one else is watching them, except perhaps for patrolling teachers, and no one would know that Cedric had an easy lead. After they go back and forth about who saved whom, Harry decides they should take it at the same time.
  • White Man's Burden: Deconstructed. Hermione's house-elf liberation subplot is, in-universe, portrayed as a bad thing, and she gets called on it by practically everyone. Aside from the inherent hypocrisy of launching a house-elf freedom campaign without so much as asking for their help, she also bases her view of house-elf needs on Dobby — an individual whose views on freedom, payment, and clothing are best described as 'radically liberal.' And she completely misses the point about why any house-elves are unhappy — their working conditions, not the work itself or lack of pay. (Even Dobby recounts that, when given employment, he bargained his salary down, feeling he'd been offered too much.)
  • Why Don't You Marry It?: Percy just won't stop gushing about Mr. Crouch. Ron's waiting for them to announce their engagement.
  • Witch Hunt: The trials, or lack thereof for Sirius, of suspected Death Eaters at the Ministry.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Opposition: Harry and Ron fall out when Harry is made to participate in the Triwizard Tournament. Ron, who for three years has seen Harry be wealthier, more skilled and famous than himself, thinks Harry signed up of his own free will (Harry, meanwhile, is very much annoyed at the fame he gets for having survived Voldemort's attack and had no intention of signing up for a challenge intended for older students). They make up after the first task, when Ron realizes Harry would never have signed up for such dangerous activities.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Bartemius Crouch, Jr., whose lack of affection from his father sent him down a path of murderous evil.
  • The Worf Effect: Mad-Eye Moody has a reputation of being one of the toughest Aurors, whose mere presence puts Snape and Karkaroff on guard. The fact that Crouch Jr. and Pettigrew were able to take him down, though he put up such a huge fight that the Ministry came to investigate, shows how dangerous Crouch Jr. was.
  • Wronski Feint: The invokedTrope Namer. Harry is watching the wizard sport of Quidditch and sees one player fly towards the ground with his counterpart from the other team in hot pursuit, only to pull out of the dive at the last second and leave the opposing player to crash into the ground. Harry consults the magical binoculars he bought, which identify the tactic by name (the Wronski Feint) and let him watch a replay of the move.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: Fake Moody has to change his plans when Harry doesn't ask Neville for help.
  • You Fool!: McGonagall to Fudge when the latter refuses to acknowledge Voldemort's hand in Cedric and Barty Crouch, Sr.'s deaths.
  • You're Insane!: Harry's response to Barty Crouch, Jr.'s Motive Rant.
  • Your Mom: Malfoy insults Ron's mother and Harry responds by insulting Malfoy's mother:
    "Oh yeah, you were staying with them this summer, weren’t you, Potter?" sneered Malfoy. "So tell me, is his mother really that porky, or is it just the picture?"
    "You know your mother, Malfoy?" said Harry — both he and Hermione had grabbed the back of Ron’s robes to stop him from launching himself at Malfoy — "that expression she's got, like she's got dung under her nose? Has she always looked like that, or was it just because you were with her?"
    Malfoy’s pale face went slightly pink. "Don’t you dare insult my mother, Potter."
  • Zombie Advocate: Hermione becomes indignant at how wizards treat the servant race known as house-elves and starts an organisation preaching freedom for these elves called S.P.E.W. Hermione's incessant campaigning pushes away anyone from joining her group, especially since the house-elves want to act like servants and don't want the freedom Hermione is pushing.

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