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The perfect place to get away with it all. note 

"Our story is about a town. A small town. And the people who live in the town. From a distance, it presents itself like so many other small towns all over the world. Safe. Decent. Innocent. Get closer, though, and you start seeing the shadows underneath..."
Jughead Jones.
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Riverdale is a 2017 television series aired on The CW and based upon the Archie Comics franchise.

Set in modern times, the show is a subversive take on Archie (KJ Apa), Jughead (Cole Sprouse), Betty (Lili Reinhart), Veronica (Camila Mendes), and their friends and families living in the titular small town, which has more darkness and weirdness than suggested by the town's wholesome façade.

Over the summer, Jason Blossom dies and leaves his sister Cheryl (Madelaine Petsch) grieving. Though initially believed an accident, it's soon discovered that Jason was murdered, and the ensuing investigation causes a trove of small-town secrets to start creeping to the surface.

The series Executive Producers include Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa (Afterlife with Archie) and Greg Berlanti (Arrowverse, Supergirl). The show is also available on Netflix outside the USA and Latin America the day after airing on television.note 

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As of September of 2017, the show's success has prompted a Spinoff, Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, based around fellow Archie series Sabrina the Teenage Witch. It will air on Netflix as an original series.


This series provides examples of:

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     Tropes A to E 
  • Abusive Parents:
    • At this point, the only parents we see who aren't abusive or corrupt in some way are Fred, Mary, and Sheriff Keller. The original script also planned for Sheriff Keller to be abusive and homophobic to his son Kevin, though this was scrapped in favour of him being a Reasonable Authority Figure.
    • Both the Coopers and Blossoms in particular are nasty, the former emotionally abusing their daughters while keeping them separated so as to lie to them both, while the latter are abusive towards their daughter, and Jason evidently had enough issues with them that he wanted to run away with his girlfriend and their unborn child. Alice and Hal at least have some Pet the Dog moments to balance it out. Penelope and Clifford, on the other hand, are horrible. Penelope is extremely emotionally and verbally abusive to Cheryl, and it occasionally dips into physical territory. When she's on her best behavior, she's just neglectful. Then, she sent her daughter to a gay conversion program. How delightful! And can you believe she's the better of the two? Clifford killed his own son.
    • Hiram is a straight-up criminal with a domineering and controlling side. While his genuine love for Veronica is one of his few redeeming qualities, his shady ways nonetheless prove to be a bad influence on her, and have consequences in her day-to-day life. His behaviour finally crosses into full-on abuse in "Labor Day", when he tells Veronica that framing Archie for murder was intended as a punishment for how she "betrayed" him.
  • Action Girl: Much more subdued than most cases, but Betty and Veronica are quite willing to get involved in the dangers of Riverdale, especially given their own personal connections to them. In addition, Cheryl is perfectly capable of using her archery against a mad serial killer.
  • Actor Allusion: Borders on Casting Gag; so many of the parents' actors' breakout roles were as high schoolers.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness:
    • Cole Sprouse is definitely more handsome than Jughead's traditional cartoonish appearance, though the character is depicted as attractive in some stories.
    • Luke Perry plays Archie's father, who is tubby and bald in almost all appearances. His mother is played by Molly Ringwald. Jughead's dad is now former teen heartthrob Skeet Ulrich. Mrs. Cooper is sometimes portrayed about as attractive as her actress.
    • K.J. Apa has "incredible abs"—probably not the first attribute you associate with Archie. This one is Lampshaded, and it's a moderately important plot point that he got hot over the summer.
    • Did you ever expect the elderly Miss Grundy to be played by Sarah Habel? Well you shouldn't, because that's not actually Ms. Grundy.
    • Redheaded, pretty, curvy Shannon Purser is playing Big Ethel, who traditionally had been a homely, buck-toothed, flat-chested girl with a scrawny bodynote . She's slightly less conventionally attractive than the other girls.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job:
    • Josie goes from being a ginger to having black hair because of her Race Lift.
    • Melody has dark brown hair instead of blond, also because of a Race Lift.
    • Kevin Keller has black hair instead of blond.
    • Ethel, who usually has black hair, is a redhead due to being played by Shannon Purser (though the earliest version of Ethel in the comics was a chubby redhead).
    • Mrs. Lodge, who usually has white hair, has dark hair (though most Archie artists draw Mrs. Lodge with dark hair when her younger self is shown).
    • Moose has brown hair instead of blond.
  • Adaptational Badass: The whole core group (that is, Archie, Jughead, Betty, Veronica, and Kevin) is much more prone to action than their comic counterparts; given the gloomy and dismal nature of this continuity and their insistence on getting involved in it, it's kind of a requirement to be badass in order to not die.
  • Adaptational Sexuality:
    • Moose is portrayed as straight in the comics but in the show, he appears to be either bisexual or gay but in denial. In season 1, he propositions to Kevin during the dance and later they're shown going to the river to "do everything but kiss". As of season 3, Moose and Kevin appear to be in a relationship.
    • The comics have always portrayed Cheryl as exclusively interested in men (perhaps even a bit boy-crazy), but in the show she is now confirmed to be a lesbian, with a bisexual female love interest.
  • Adaptational Villainy:
    • In the comics, Chuck Clayton is a sweet-natured athlete and artist with one steady girlfriend and more respect for females than any of the other boys. On Riverdale he's an arrogant womanizer who slut shames his unsuspecting dates online. Beginning with Season 2, however, he reforms into a much nicer character, more closely resembling his comic self.
    • Mrs. Cooper is a gentle, loving parent to Betty in the comics, not the least bit like her TV counterpart. As with Chuck, she too slowly starts to reform as the series progresses.
    • Mr. and Mrs. Blossom are also nice loving parents in the comics, unlike their cold creepy TV versions. This is gradually turned Up to Eleven as the series goes on, culminating in the reveal that Penelope Blossom is a cruel, abusive matriarch who at best neglects her daughter, and Clifford murdered his own son for threatening his drugdealing business.
    • Mr. Cooper initially appeared to be an aversion, as he seemed sympathetic and not controlling in any way, unlike his wife, and as much under her thumb as his daughter is. It was soon played straight, where it turned out he was stealing from the police and seemingly lied to his child about her sister. He also planned for Polly to get an abortion, due to her baby being a Blossom. Throughout the rest of the series, he also shows a more prickly and aggressive side in general. He is ultimately revealed to be the Black Hood, surpassing even Clifford as the most profound case of Adaptational Villainy in the show.
    • Mr. Jones has a normal, respectable job in the comics. In the TV show, he's a gang leader for the traditionally villainous Southside Serpents, though he himself remains a pretty decent person and a good father for the most part.
    • Mr. Lodge has his faults in the comics, but crookedness isn't one of them. In the TV show, he's been prosecuted for shady business deals and is a well-known criminal.
    • The Black Hood of the comics is an Anti-Hero at worst. Here, he's an out-and-out Serial Killer.
  • Adapted Out: Played with. In the comics Betty and Polly have an older brother named Chic who doesn't appear to exist on the show ... until the first season finale reveals that Alice and Hal had a son in high school that they gave up for adoption.
  • Affectionate Nickname: Veronica, just like in the comics, occasionally calls Archie "Archiekins" as a term of endearment. Betty and Jughead call each other "Bets" and "Juggie" respectively. Veronica is often called "V" or "Ronnie" by other characters.
  • Age Lift: Miss Grundy is getting on in years in the comics, here she's being played by Sarah Habel, who is in her 30s. Actually completely averted. The real Miss Grundy died of old age seven years before the series began.
  • A Lady on Each Arm:
    • Archie's grand entrance at the dance in 1.01. Betty on one arm, Veronica on the other.
    • This is how Fred attends the Homecoming dance, with his estranged wife Mary on one arm and old flame Hermione on the other.
  • Alliterative Name: As usual, they abound:
    • Archie Andrews
    • Arthur Adams
    • Barnabas B. Blossom
    • Ben Button
    • Chuck Clayton
    • Darryl Doiley
    • Dilton Doiley
    • Evelyn Evernever
    • Fangs Fogarty
    • Jughead Jones
    • Kevin Keller
    • Laurie Lake
    • Moose Mason
    • Marty McMantle
    • Michael Minetta
    • Penny Peabody
    • Toni Topaz
    • Waldo Weatherbee
      • Later revealed to be the case for two charaters' maiden names: Mary Maiden and Sierra Samuels.
  • Amateur Sleuth: Jughead and Betty are trying to solve the mystery. Kevin and Ethel may follow suit.
  • Amicable Exes: Fred and Mary Andrews have split up, but he claims it's civil.
  • Anachronism Stew: There are laptops, but old style cars are commonplace. A local gang are referred to as "greasers", and Jughead dresses in an emo style rooted in The '90s. The football uniforms look largely dated, but the students use modern slang, and attitudes towards sexuality and race are modern as well. The dialogue even explicitly states that the timeline takes place in the present day. Really, it's a healthy mix of the 1950s and the 2010s. It’s Lampshaded with the drive-in being torn down because with the times have changed. The season 2 premiere re-emphasizes the point; we see the Riverdale General Hospital, and what the Doctors and Nurses are wearing can definitely not be seen today.
  • Arc Symbol: The crescent shaped cuts on Betty's palms.
  • Artistic License: In the Season 2 premiere, Pops is shown mopping up the blood from the crime scene himself. Such a thing is usually done by specialized clean-up crews (as seen in Sunshine Cleaning) - which the police would likely bring in and pay themselves. The reason is that the crime scene is a health hazard, and there's bound to be harmful bacteria.
  • Artistic License – Biology:
    • Jason Blossom's body had supposedly been in the water for weeks if not months, but it shows nowhere near enough signs of decay. Averted as it's revealed that his body was kept frozen, and he was not killed until the week after the 4th of July.
    • Jason's body was kept frozen for an undetermined period of time before being dumped in the river, and yet the coroner is able to determine time of death down to the day.
    • The Blossoms' annual sap-tapping appears to take place in the late fall. This is ridiculous, since maple trees don't produce the sugary sap until early spring.
    • The ways twins run in the Blossom family. In reality, identical twins like Clifford and Claudius don't run in families at all; as best as scientists can tell, the splitting of a fertilized egg happens at random. Fraternal twins like Cheryl and Jason or Juniper and Dagwood, which are a completely different phenomenon from identical twins, do run in families, but only on the mother's side.
  • Auto Erotica: Archie and 'Miss Grundy' have sex for the first time in her green car.
  • Bait-and-Switch: In 1.04, Kevin gets confronted by Joaquin (a member of the Southside Serpents, which he tried to shush earlier) who mockingly tells him he’s not so tough without Veronica. In their next scene Joaquin has Kevin pinned against a fence, giving the impression he’s throttling him. Then the camera pans out, revealing they’re really making out.
  • Bait-and-Switch Lesbians:
    • Veronica and Betty's kiss in the pilot.
    • Rare Male Example with the heavily promoted Joaquin/Archie kiss in 3x05. Many fans got their hopes up for an actual romance between the two and/or an "Archie comes out as bisexual" storyline, only to have the kiss turn out to be blatant Queerbaiting and of virtually no importance to the plot.
  • Bedlam House: The Sisters of Quiet Mercy group home is something between a Victorian asylum and an Orphanage of Fear, where teenagers are just as easily committed for mental issues, unplanned pregnancies or "willfulness" as actual problem behavior, and the facility still runs gay conversion therapy regimens. Polly and Cheryl's stays are both clearly shown as being traumatic.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension:
    • Jughead and Veronica seem to be going down this road as of season 2.
    • Archie and Veronica in season 1.
    • Toni and Cheryl until 2x14.
    • FP and Alice.
    • Reggie with both Josie and Veronica.
  • Betty and Veronica:
    • Given that they're versions of the Trope Namers, Betty and Veronica naturally play this every which way, for multiple triads. For Archie, Betty is of course the Betty, while Veronica is his Veronica; Betty is the friendly and safe Girl Next Door, while Veronica is the more dangerous seductress. Though there's a case to be made that Miss Grundy is his Veronica, Veronica is his Betty (as the safer alternative), and Betty is just an Unlucky Childhood Friend.
    • And for a Betty and Veronica Switch — considering the whole Dark Betty shebang and the fact that this version of Veronica is a loving and devoted girlfriend and much nicer person than her comics counterpart, many have argued that Betty is the true Veronica here and Veronica is more of a Betty.
    • This seems to have been the case for Archie and Veronica's parents, with Veronica's mother Hermione Lodge as either the Archie who picked Veronica (the wealthy Hiram) over Betty (Fred) or as the Veronica who dumped Fred (Archie) so he ended up with Archie's mother Mary (the Betty).
    • There's also Betty (Archie), Jughead (Betty) and Archie (Veronica). Interestingly, Jughead definitely has some Veronica traits (lone wolf, always dressed in black, criminal alcoholic father, broken family, a bit of a temper), while Archie has the classic Betty trait of having grown up with Betty and being her best friend since they were children.
    • For Jughead, Betty is his Betty and Toni is his Veronica. Similar to the Betty/Archie/Jughead triangle, there is also a case to be made that Betty is the Veronica and Toni is the Betty because, well, Dark Betty; Betty is also a rather high-maintenance girlfriend at times, can be self-centred and manipulative, and has previously done things to hurt Jughead like lying to him or breaking up with him via Archie. Toni, on the other hand, is very down-to-earth and has been kind, caring and understanding towards Jughead.
    • Alice seems to have been the Archie to Hal's Betty and FP's Veronica in high school. The triangle is revisited in season 2, but Hal is now the Veronica and FP is the Betty.
  • Big Bad:
    • Season 1: The central mystery of the season is uncovering who murdered Jason Blossom. It turns out to be Clifford Blossom, his father. Clifford also counts as a Non-Action Big Bad. As the depth of his villainy is revealed post-mortem, he remains an antagonistic force, but plots in the background for much of the season, never physically confronting the heroes and only directly committing violence when he murders Jason.
    • Season 2:
      • The Black Hood, an Ax-Crazy Serial Killer and a Knight Templar who sets off on a violent quest to purge Riverdale of all its "sinners". Partway through the season, he is seemingly revealed to be Joseph Svenson, the school janitor, although Archie doesn't believe that he and Betty caught the right man. Near the end of the season, Svenson turns out to be a Decoy Antagonist as the true identity of the Black Hood is revealed to be Hal Cooper.
      • Hiram Lodge, a wealthy and corrupt businessman whose ultimate goal is to have complete control over Riverdale, and who uses any means necessary to achieve it. His actions also stir up conflict in the relationships of other characters, as well as fuelling the ongoing rivalry between the North Side and South Side citizens.
      • The season finale gives us a Big Bad Ensemble of Hiram Lodge, Malachi, Penny Peabody, Penelope Blossom, Claudius Blossom, and Sheriff Manetta, all of whom are conspiring together.
  • Big Eater:
    • Still a part of Jughead's character, but it isn't played to the unrealistic extents that his comic counterpart is known for, nor is it given as much attention. Instead, we often see him with remnants of previously devoured food, or ordering food.
    • In the second season episode where Jughead goes on a hunger strike, Archie mentions his love of food. Later, F.P. brings a bag of burgers to where he's chained himself to the old school, and promises Jughead that he won't say he cheated.
  • Big Fancy House:
    • Thornhill, the Blossoms' mansion on the outskirts of town that later gets burned down by Cheryl. It is so big it has its own cemetery.
    • Thistlehouse, the Blossoms' new home, still counts as this.
      Jughead: This is downsizing?
    • The Lodges' apartment at The Pembrooke is pretty fancy, especially considering that they're no longer wealthy.
  • Big, Screwed-Up Family:
    • Throughout the whole of the first season, it is gradually revealed to the viewer that, with their exceedingly clannish and isolationist behavior, the Blossoms are this.
    • Furthermore, over this course of the season, it becomes clear that the Coopers are this as well. Not only do Hal and Alice Cooper send their oldest daughter away to a convalescent home once she becomes pregnant by Jason Blossom, but it's eventually revealed that Hal attempted to talk her into getting an abortion as well.
    • And, if that weren't enough, it's revealed towards the end of the first season that the latter may have been done in-part due to both families sharing a common bloodline. Yeesh.
  • Bland-Name Product:
    • In 1.07, Veronica shops from a website called "Glamazon", and her "American Excess" card is reported stolen by her mom.
    • In 1.08, Veronica mentions having been invited to a "Vanity Flair" party one year.
    • In 2.01, Veronica eats baked goods from "Bean and Beluga" and she has Smithers bought a new wallet for Archie's father at "Barnaby's".
    • In 2.09, Hermione Lodge thinks she spotted Hiram with a "Spiffany's" bag and wonders if it contains a "Glamergé" egg, while Veronica borrows her mother's "American Excess" credit card.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: Of the girls, Betty (Blonde), Veronica (Brunette), and Cheryl (Redhead). In the main trio, Archie has the redhead spot.
  • Blood Is Squicker in Water: In 1.13, the blood from Archie's bleeding fists as he punches the ice to rescue Cheryl from her suicide attempt rather gruesomely mixes with the water when he finally breaks through.
  • Briefcase Full of Money: During the pilot Hermione Lodge receives a large bag full of cash that presumably comes from her disgraced husband.
  • Broken Pedestal:
    • After defending her father being set up, Veronica is rocked to discover he really is a crook who is still pulling off a scheme to devalue Riverdale from prison. Even worse, she finds her mother not only knows but is helping him.
    • Cheryl thought her twin brother Jason was a saint only to discover how he used girls to "gain scores" with the football team.
  • Calling the Old Man Out: A very pissed-off Cheryl does this in 1.12 when it's revealed what Clifford has done.
  • Canon Foreigner: Joaquin, the Southside Serpent who makes out with Kevin in 1.04 is a character wholly original to the show.
  • Cast Full of Pretty Boys: Most of the male characters consist of very attractive guys. Examples include Archie, Jughead, Kevin, Reggie, Chuck, Joaquin, Nick, Moose. You could also add the older males such as Fred, FP Jones, Hiram, Sheriff Keller, and Hal.
  • Catapult Nightmare: Cheryl has one at the start of 1.05.
  • Celebrity Paradox:
    • Cheryl Blossom makes a reference to Mad Men. Mädchen Amick, who plays Mrs. Cooper, was on Mad Men.
    • Cheryl also calls Archie and his friends "Sad Breakfast Club", Molly Ringwald, who starred in The Breakfast Club appears as Archie's mother in the second half of the season.
  • Childhood Friend Romance:
    • Played with, Archie and Betty do love each other, and have outright admitted it to each other, but according to Archie, nothing can happen between them, because he believes he will never be good enough for her. This may be changing as of the end of season 2, if the longing gaze between the two of them from their respective bedroom windows, after having been dumped by Veronica and Jughead, is a sign of anything.
    • Jughead and Betty have this dynamic as well, as confirmed by Cole Sprouse.
  • Christianity Is Catholic: The only denomination that appears on the show is Catholicism. The Coopers sent Polly to an institution ran by nuns and Hermione goes as far as praying in actual Latin.
  • Color-Coded Characters: Betty is always dressed in baby blue or pink, while Veronica is in black or purple, to match their love triangle personas. Cheryl tends to be red but it's less consistent.
    • Best exemplified during 1.12, where for the homecoming dance Veronica is wearing a sparkling black dress with a fur shawl, Betty is wearing a satin baby blue dress, and Cheryl is wearing a backless red gown.
    • Even seen in their makeup. Cheryl is always wearing striking red lipstick, Veronica is often wearing berry toned lipstick, and Betty is usually wearing soft pink lip-gloss.
    • Cheryl is also strongly associated with the colour white, and as mentioned before Veronica wears a lot of black. To a lesser degree, whenever Betty wears a neutral colour, it is usually grey.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Pretty lucky for Not-Chic that Alice happened to have had an illegitimate son with FP, proving a convenient excuse for why Chic doesn't have Hal's "Blossom Blood" in him, huh?
  • Corruption of a Minor: Chic seems to start this to Betty at the end of "The Wrestler".
  • Creepy Good:
    • Jughead is this to some extent. The actors have a tendency to give him somewhat ominous descriptions only to say afterwards that he's attempting to solve the mystery. He's a "troubled, bullied, loner" which makes him seem suspicious to a few.
    • Betty singing Happy Birthday to Jughead. The lighting throws her face into very creepy shadows but the singing is so beautiful you actively make an effort to look past it.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • The first season starts with Cheryl's twin brother (who she has twincest implications with) Jason dying and the entire season is about solving his death. In the pilot alone, it has Archie sleeping with his teacher only to blackmail her, Archie being Mistaken for Murderer, references to the "rainbow party" urban legends, and Reggie getting underaged drunk. Most of the characters are much more miserable and depressed as well.
    • Season 2 takes this even further. There is more violence and tragedy, with less levity to balance it out, and more of an emphasis on psychological horror. The new villain, the Black Hood, is a vicious Serial Killer who is more openly sadistic and Ax-Crazy than anyone before.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Veronica and Cheryl both fit this trope, with Cheryl especially having a propensity for saying things that are either mildly insulting or inappropriate—in one episode she quickly tells Fred Andrews he looks "dilf-y", and then shortly after says she can't be in his house long because its so small her claustrophobia will act up.
  • Death by Adaptation:
    • The show starts with Jason Blossom dying, apparently by accident. The plot kicks in at the end of pilot when his body is discovered with a bullet in his skull.
    • The real Miss Grundy has been dead for years by the time the show starts.
    • And, as of 1.12, Clifford Blossom as well.
  • Death Glare: Betty delivers a hell of one to Cheryl after the latter accuses Betty's sister of murdering Jason.
    Betty: Cheryl, get the hell out of my house before I kill you.
  • Driven to Suicide:
    • Clifford Blossom seemingly hangs himself after the cops learn he killed his son. However, in the season 2 opener, the dialogue from Cheryl when she's blackmailing her mother implies there's more than meets the eye.
    • In the season 1 finale, Cheryl attempts suicide after her mother basically tells her she might as well kill herself before the family curse claims her life.
  • Establishing Character Moment: The end of 1.01 serves as this for Archie, at least in some manner. He's packed his schedule full with football, music, and apprenticing at his dad's company, all three things that normally would be full time and a potential serious future. Clearly, as we already knew given his famous love interest debacle, Archie couldn't make a decision if his life depended on it.
  • Everyone Is a Suspect: Almost. There are only three people who couldn't have murdered Jason; Hermione, Veronica, and Archie. Hermione and Veronica because they weren't in town yet, and Archie because if just hearing a gunshot which, as it turns out, had nothing to do with Jason's murder gave the poor kid that much guilt, there's no way he could survive being a murderer. Lampshaded.
    Betty: So, are you a suspect now?
    Kevin: My dad says we all are.
    Veronica: Not me, girl! I don't know these people.

     Tropes F to J 
  • Fanservice: Basically, there's a lot of it throughout the series (well, it is a show on the CW).
    • The first ten minutes of the pilot include Archie's abs and Betty's cleavage. Not to mention The Cheerleader Aspect with Betty, Veronica, and Cheryl all being in the River Vixens (the Riverdale High cheer squad). And if Betty and Veronica in cheerleader uniforms isn't Fetish Fuel enough for you, how about Betty and Veronica in cheerleader uniforms making out?
    • Special mention of Betty and Veronica in lingerie and swimsuit respectively in 1.03.
    • Reggie's shirtless scene in 1.05.
    • In 1.07, we're treated to Jughead without a shirt. He's very toned.
    • Cheryl is fond of reminding the viewers that She's Got Legs. Even if it's snowing.
    • 2.02 gives us Cheryl in some very revealing red lingerie.
    • 2.07 shows Sheriff Keller working out shirtless.
      Veronica: Archie Andrews, watch your back.
    • 2.08 gives a Lingerie Scene to both Betty and Veronica. Entertainment Weekly sums in Betty's below:
      (Betty) doesn’t just sing. Oh no. She starts TAKING OFF HER CLOTHES. And then before you know it, she’s doing a pole dance in lingerie to a room filled with her boyfriend, her mother, her boyfriend’s father, and about 50 other strangers, many of whom are ADULTS. Reminder: Betty is a teen! Also, of all the critiques in the world: “Mad World” is a terrible striptease song.
  • Fantastic Drug: "Jingle Jangle" is a notorious party drug which is commonly packaged and consumed similar to pixie sticks. What it actually does to a user or how it is manufactured is left extremely vague.
  • Feuding Families: The Blossoms and the Coopers have been blood enemies for over 3 generations, ever since Cheryl's great grandfather murdered Betty's great grandfather and stole his cut of the maple syrup business. Not only that but it's eventually revealed that the two great-grandfathers were brothers, as well.
  • Flirty Step Siblings: Inverted by Betty and Jughead, who were already dating when their parents got together. Bizarrely, this trope is also Zig-Zagged because FP and Alice were a couple in high school and had a child together, so their relationship pre-dates that of their kids even though they broke up a long time before Betty and Jughead got together.
  • Foreshadowing: In the opening to the second episode, the Blossoms examine Jason's corpse in the morgue. Cheryl collapses into her tearful mother's arms. Clifford doesn't react at all.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Archie (phlegmatic), Betty (sanguine), Veronica(choleric), and Jughead (melancholic).
  • "Friends" Rent Control: Hermione and Veronica move into a pretty fancy apartment in Riverdale despite their primary source of income being jailed, and Hermione initially only getting work as a waitress. Veronica is still seen with an Unlimited Wardrobe, which we can assume were things she owned before Hiram was jailed.
  • Gay Best Friend: Kevin Keller is this to both Betty and Veronica.
    Veronica: You're gay! Can we be best friends?
  • Generation Xerox:
    • Fred walks in to the alumni inclusive Homecoming with A Lady on Each Arm, both beautiful, but one rich and the other modest. No, his son definitely didn't inherit these Betty and Veronica issues.
    • Both Veronica and her mom had a past of being mean girls in high school.
  • Genre Roulette: Riverdale can switch easily between genres within a single episode (partly due having an Ensemble Cast with multiple, simultaneous plotlines). It can be a Teen Drama Coming-of-Age Story, a Amateur Sleuth Detective Drama, a Criminal Procedural, Horror and even occasionally a Musical. All while being a neo-noir.
  • Genre Shift: Season 2 marks a subtle but noticeable shift from the Film Noir style of the first season to an almost Slasher Movie feel. Season 3, which coincided with a new TV show Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, makes the horror vibes more overt in the side of the story that Betty and Jughead deal with, but the plot deals with things that seem supernatural and reveals that The Farm that was mentioned previously is a cult.
  • Good Girls Avoid Abortion: Not only did Polly not have an abortion, but her father pushing her to have one is treated as such a monstrous thing to do that Alice immediately kicks him out when she finds out. The show very awkwardly avoids actually saying the word abortion, using words like "appointment" instead.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Around 1.07, Alice Cooper begins to become a more positive character, once she decides to fully embrace her daughter, throw out her husband (for pressuring Polly to get an abortion—which he also made Alice do when they were younger) and soon is trying to investigate Jason's death for more than just professional reasons.
  • Held Gaze: Characters who have romantic interest in one another tend to maintain eye contact for a bit longer than usual. Usually doubles as Ship Tease, though there are platonic occurrences, too.
  • Ice Queen: Veronica was this along with a Rich Bitch. She changed after realizing what her wealth and status turned her into, but can still break out the icy glare and voice when she has to. She even says in 1.01 that her "specialty is ice."
  • Iconic Item: Like in the comics, Jughead's hat and Veronica's pearls and Birkin bag. Veronica destroys the pearl necklace her father gave her after finally coming to terms with the person he really is, but doesn't stop wearing pearls.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: Each episode takes its name from classic noir/neo-noir and drama/thriller films such as River's Edge, Touch of Evil, Body Double and The Last Picture Show. They're styled as chapters "Chapter 1: River's Edge." Exception: "Chapter 11: To Riverdale and Back Again"—which is named after the 1990 Made-for-TV Movie with the gang as adults.
  • In Name Only: Downplayed compared to most cases. The Archie Comics are almost obnoxiously wholesome and cheerful. This live action adaptation...is Darker And Edger instead but centered around a redheaded teenager named Archie Andrews (so that's similar). However, there are several non-canon one-off series set in the Archie universe (one of which was written by the show's lead writer) that are much closer in tone, particularly the horror parts of Seasons 2 and 3.
  • Incest Subtext:
    • Between Cheryl and Jason. The pilot starts with them getting into a boat together acting more like a romantic couple than siblings. Not to mention she refers to him as her soulmate at his memorial. This series also comes from the guy who did Afterlife with Archie where the incest was also strongly implied.
    • Turns out to not be subtext regarding Jason and Polly when it's revealed the Coopers are actually Blossoms that changed their surname to distance themselves from the Blossom lineage.
    • Betty's long lost brother Chic gives off a LOT of weird, creepy vibes towards her. Doesn't help that he stood over her bed while she slept, slowly inching closing to her with a rather unsettling look on his face... and later introduced her to the world of webcam modeling.
    • A bit of a stretch, but the occasional flirty vibes between Betty and Cheryl (case in point the infamous locker room scene) may count since they are third cousins.
  • It Runs in the Family: Certain traits are very recurring in some Riverdale families.
    • The Lodge women have a tendency to be vicious bitches when young, but eventually grow out of it.
    • The Coopers all tend to have deeply repressed anger issues that blow up unexpectedly. A trait they may share with their cousins the Blossoms.
    • Red hair is one of the distinguishing traits of the main branch of the Blossom family, to a greater degree than simple genetics could account for.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • As obnoxious and insufferable as Alice Cooper can be, it's hard to argue with her wanting to put a stop to Miss Grundy's actions regarding teenage boys.
    • Though in one scene she swings from calling Miss Grundy a child predator to victim blaming Archie to outright dismissing the idea that he is a victim. She cares far more about humiliating Archie and trying to convince Betty that this makes him a bad person and she should stop being his friend than anything Grundy was doing. She also seems not to mind the idea of Grundy continuing her actions as long as it's not in Riverdale, so what exactly was her point?

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     Tropes K to O 
  • Keeping Secrets Sucks: Archie carries around the fact that he heard a gunshot go off at Sweet Water July 4, but can't speak about it due to being with Miss Grundy.
  • Killed Off for Real: Miss Grundy in "A Kiss Before Dying" by the same masked man who shot Fred Andrews.
  • Legion of Doom: Season 2 ends with Hiram forming one, consisting of himself, Penelope and Claudius Blossom, Sheriff Mineta, Penny Peabody, and Malachi.
  • Let the Past Burn: In "The Sweet Hereafter", Cheryl intentionally burns down her own mansion because she sees it as the only way for her remaining family to start over.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: The entire high school aged generation of Riverdale is completely ignorant of the Cooper-Blossom Feud, even though it has been going on for the better part of 75 years and Hermionie compares it to the Hatfields & the McCoys.
  • Love Dodecahedron:
    • Both Betty and Veronica are pining for Archie, and he's attracted to both of them as well. But Archie is also pining for Miss Grundy, whom he's had sex with. Then Archie strikes up a relationship with Pussycats member Valerie after Grundy is run out of town. Around the same time Betty and Jughead also begin a relationship, which seems to make Archie jealous and has him seem to reevaluate his feelings towards Betty.
    • Cheryl, the classic Third-Option Love Interest, is entirely removed from the dodecahedron here. Until "La Grande Illusion" that is, when she makes a move on Archie. He rejects her, though.
  • Magic Ampersand: A major plotline in Season Three revolves around some old RPG called Gryphons & Gargoyles, whose cover is definitely meant to call back to the old White Box set of Dungeons & Dragons released back in 1974. The storyline itself reads like an Afterschool Special straight from the height of the Satanic Panic, with occultism and ritualistic suicides galore.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane:
    • In "The Outsiders", Rose Blossom predicts through a Romani ritual that Polly is carrying twins, which in very next episode is confirmed by doctors to be true. However, it's also implied that twins are quite common in the Blossom linage, and since Polly is also a Blossom it could be a genetic factor (since Jason, being male, doesn't impact the chances of twins, even though he is one, it would have to be through Polly.)
    • "Tales from the Darkside" is the first episode to establish that there is something off about Greendale, without outright confirming it is supernatural. To wit:
      • Penny implies there's something of a When the Clock Strikes Twelve situation about the town.
      • After Jughead drives off with Farmer McGinty, a blood covered deer walks out of the woods, crosses the road, stops, and turns to look creepily at Archie.
      • The crate Archie and Jughead drive to Greendale. The boys and Farmer McGinty are both convinced that it contains drugs, but it is secured by chains and the writing on the side points to it originating in Lovecraft Country.
    • Also in "Tales from the Darkside", Farmer McGinty seems to believe that the Riverdale Reaper and the Black Hood are one and the same, despite being active decades apart from one another.
  • Misplaced Retribution: The main reason Hal Cooper hated Jason Blossom, even before his falling out with Polly, was something that Jason's great grandfather did. Granted, that something was murdering Hal's grandfather and stealing his fortune, but Jason still had nothing whatsoever to do with it. Of course, that may be also be because Hal is technically a Blossom as well.
  • My Master, Right or Wrong: Smithers seems to have this for Hiram and Hermione. He never speaks ill of them, even to Veronica, who he treats with deference and love. It helps that the family treats him in particular well, even if they're not so to others.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • On the school tour, Betty says it was built in 1941, the year the Archie comic series started.
    • The "Welcome to Riverdale" sign describes it as "The Town with PEP!" Archie first appeared in Pep Comics #22.
    • The comic book store shown in "The River's Edge" is named MLJ Comics, the original name of Archie's publishing company.
    • Josie and the Pussycats perform "Sugar, Sugar", the 1969 Archies single that reached #1 on the Billboards top 100.
    • Kevin refers to Veronica's behavior as her being possessed by Madam Satan, a character from Pep Comics and, more recently, the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.
    • Referring to a converation that happened when they were children, Archie says Betty referred to him as "Little Archie", which was a comic about Archie's childhood from 1956 to 1983.
    • Mayor McCoy mentions that the Taste of Riverdale is a lead up to Riverdale's 75th Anniversary. Archie Comics was approaching its 75th anniversary.
    • "In A Lonely Place" opens with Jughead having a dream in which he, Betty, Veronica, and Archie are dressed like their classic comic book counterparts.
    • In "The Lost Weekend", Veronica wishes Jughead a happy birthday in Spanish, saying "feliz cumpleaños, Torombolo." Torombolo translates roughly to "pot-belly" or "chubby", which was Jughead's name in the Spanish translations of the comics.
    • The mysterious killer Black Hood is named after the MLJ superhero.
    • Archie using "Wilbur Wilkins" on his fake I.D. references the earlier character, a proto-Archie who was eclipsed in popularity and retooled decades later as Bingo Wilkin.
    • The drug Jingle Jangle is named after the 1969 Archies song "Jingle Jangle".
    • Jughead sometimes nicknames Archie "Pureheart the Powerful" for his heroic tendencies. The comic Archie's Super Teens had the cast become superheroes, and Pureheart the Powerful was Archie's superhero name.
  • The Narrator: Jughead acts as the narrator, reading aloud the book he wrote concerning Jason's murder.
  • Never Found the Body: Played with in the pilot. Jason's body was never found after he reportedly drowned in an accident, instantly putting everyone on guard for him to not really be dead. Then at the end of the pilot Kevin finds his very dead body... with a bullet hole in the forehead.
  • Non-Residential Residence: Jughead briefly lives in the projection booth of a drive-in theater.
  • Odd Friendship: Quite a few among the main cast:
    • Archie, the football player and musician, has this with Jughead, the intellectual loner. Despite their differences, they're essentially brothers in all but name. This is partially due to their fathers' respective friendship since their own teenage years.
    • Betty and Veronica hit it off quite well and quickly become sisterly, despite Betty being a middle-class and small town girl, and Veronica being a rich socialite from New York.
    • Jughead and Veronica initially don't interact, but eventually become close due to their (and Betty's) shared interest in solving the murder of Jason Blossom. Compounding this friendship is the fact that Jughead is dating Veronica's best friend, and Veronica is dating Jughead's best friend.
  • Old Flame: Riverdale loves to do this with the older generation. ''The Midnight Club'' shows how the present day couples Fred/Hermione, FP/Alice, and Tom/Sierra all had romantic history in high school.
  • Open Mouth, Insert Foot: Kevin seems to have a propensity for this.

     Tropes P to W 
  • Parental Abandonment: Mary Andrews left her husband and son behind to "follow her dreams". Jughead's mom took his little sister and left as well because she couldn't deal with her husband's drinking and unemployment
  • The Perfectionist: Alice Cooper is one and puts exceedingly high expectations on Betty as a result. At one point, the overburdened Betty mentions that she hates the word perfect, no doubt just that reason.
  • Plot-Triggering Death: Jason's.
  • Popular Is Dumb: Averted—while Cheryl's brains aren't her most obvious asset, she is not only something of a schemer, but also has a 4.0 GPA. Same thing with Veronica who was quite popular in New York, and also has a good head on her shoulders.
  • Power Walk: Josie and her friends do this in 1.06.
  • Pretentious Latin Motto: The gates of Thornhill read Radices currere abyssi ("Roots run deep").
  • Product Placement: CoverGirl is a sponsor of the show, so some episodes show characters putting on their makeup with the camera focused on the product name.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: In the comics, Jughead and Betty are usually just good friends, with Jughead usually encouraging Archie to choose Betty over Veronica. Here, Betty and Jughead have a romance together, and share a kiss in 1.06. It's the first time they're together in any adaptation.
  • Public Secret Message: On the first season score album, the first letter of every track spells out No, go and look for yourself.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!:
    Veronica: [to Chuck] Take. Thisnote . The Hell. Down.
  • Race Lift: Quite a few examples.
    • Most notably, Archie is being played by K.J. Apa, a New Zealander actor of Samoan descent. Not really a race lift, since though K.J. Apa is a quarter Samoan, Archie is presented on the show as a white character with two white parents.
    • Veronica is portrayed by Camila Mendes, a Latina actress of Brazilian ancestry.
    • Veronica's mother Hermione is played by Marisol Nichols, who is of Mixed Ancestry (Romanian-Hungarian-Mexican). This implies it may be the same case with Veronica in-universe.
    • Josie and Melody of Josie and the Pussycats are portrayed by Ashleigh Murray and Asha Bromfield, black actresses.
    • Reggie is portrayed by Ross Butler in the first season, who is half Indonesian. Charles Melton, also of Asian descent, plays him in the second season.
    • Dilton is portrayed in the pilot by Daniel Yang, who's Chinese. Afterwards he is played by Major Curda, who is half-Korean and half-white.
    • Pop Tate is portrayed by Alvin Sanders, who is black.
    • Mr. Weatherbee is portrayed by black actor Peter Bryant.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • 1.03 has Josie point out that as progressive a town as Riverdale is, it's still a small town in middle America and therefore her and her mother got a lot of hate during her campaign for mayor due to them being black women.
    • The absolutely ancient Miss Grundy is kept the same age as in the comics... and is promptly revealed to have died several years prior.
    • Related to the above, once she starts actually looking, it takes Betty roughly a day to figure out that "Miss Grundy's" entire past is a fraud and openly talks of how amazed she is that "Grundy" was even hired with no one finding this out.
    • The existence of a drive-in theater in the modern time? Veronica even points out how no one would come there anymore because of streaming sites like Netflix. The drive-in is later closed down.
    • Jughead goes to the mayor to press her about keeping the drive-in open, citing his past and how much it means to him. While respecting his feelings, the mayor points out that there's no reason to keep open a business that no one else in town is interested in attending.
    • Sure, F.P. Jones is exonerated in the killing of Jason Blossom, but, as the sheriff points out to Jughead, he still tampered with evidence, cleaned up a murder scene, and hid Jason's corpse. Regardless of his ultimate intent, that still carries the potential of heavy jail time.
    • While it was kind of Alice and Betty to take Chic into their home, that doesn't mean Chic isn't going to have years of resentment, emotional baggage, and other highly dysfunctional traits due to being given up for adoption and living as an orphan without a family for all these years that could cause serious problems for the Cooper family, like when Hal decided to move out again due to Chic's presence and a drug dealer ended up dying in the Cooper household, partly due to his connections with Chic in the first place.
  • Reckless Gun Usage: For all her horror about discovering Betty hiding the gun belonging the fake Ms. Grundy, Alice seems to not have given any thought about waving said gun at her daughter's face with her finger on the trigger.
  • Retro Universe: Zig-zagged. On one hand, there's old fashioned diners, drive-in movie theaters that would later be closed down, and vintage cars. On the other hand there's social media, night clubs, and modern pop culture references. The costumes and subcultures are a little bit of an Anachronism Stew as well: Archie is an all-American fifties cool athlete Ordinary High-School Student stereotype, the Serpents are referred to as (and affect the general style of) "greasers", and Jughead's wardrobe choices resemble 2000s era emo kids.
  • Riches to Rags: The Lodges in season 1 (and they seem to regain their wealth in season 2, due to Hiram being released from prison) and The Blossoms in season 2, due to Clifford Blossom's suicide and their mansion being burned down, forcing Penelope to become a courtesan to earn money.
  • Right for the Wrong Reasons: Reggie and Moose crack jokes about Archie "tapping a cougar" during his construction job, not knowing about his relationship with Ms. Grundy.
  • The Rival: Josie and The Pussycats are this to The Archies, after Josie turns down Archie's request to have them read his songs.
  • Saved by Canon: Jughead is narrating the events of the series at some point in the future, so until that time passes, he's gonna be safe from all the goings on in Riverdale.
  • The Scapegoat: A variation. The entire town starts to blame the Serpents for the growing drug problem rather than Clifford Blossom. The people of Riverdale know the truth, they just refuse to acknowledge otherwise.
  • Serious Business: Maple Syrup. The town was founded on the industry, and Betty's great-grandfather was killed by Cheryl's so that the latter could take over the business. It's so connected to the town's culture that even their sexual euphemisms involve maple. It's later revealed that Clifford was actually in the drug business and that the Maple Syrup industry was nothing but a front.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Near the end of 1.03, Cheryl says "Hashtag Justice for Ethel." This is a shoutout to the hashtag #JusticeForBarb which emerged on social media after the release of Stranger Things in response to Barb's death on that show. Barb and Ethel are both played by Shannon Purser.
    • In 1.03, Veronica declares she's going "Full Dark, No Stars" against Chuck, which is the name of a Stephen King story collection.
    • Jughead shows up at Betty's place in 1.06 via a ladder to her window, straight out of Clarissa Explains It All.
    • All the episode titles are lifted more or less directly from other works, such as classic (encompassing highbrow, lowbrow and in between) films (River's Edge, Touch of Evil, Body Double, The Last Picture Show, Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! In a Lonely Place, The Grand Illusion) and some seminal literature (Heart of Darkness, The Outsiders).
    • Mary Kay Letourneau (and Mrs. Robinson) are both referenced in relation to Faux-Grundy sleeping with Archie.
    • At the end of 1.12, Joaquin gets on a bus headed to a city called "San Junipero".
    • In 1.13: "To Archie Andrews, who saved the cheerleader and saved the town." After Archie rescues River Vixen Cheryl.
    • Fans of the classic rock musician Alice Cooper may have been amused to hear Betty's mom's name dramatically announced upon her appearance.
    • In 2.03, Veronica tells her father she wants to be in "the room where it happens" and influence his decision-making, a song title from Hamilton.
    • Cheryl's sleepover with Toni, Betty, Veronica, and Jossie in season two contains of scene of the girls attired in silk robes and brushing each others' hair, conga-line style, that pays homage to the music video for New Rules by Dua Lipa.
    • In 2.21 Veronica accuses Hermione of trying to turn Riverdale into Gotham City.
    • In 3.3 when asked for the password to enter the Speakeasy under Pop’s, after a moment's hesitation since they didn’t know there was one, Kevin guesses “Stonewall”, which Reggie declares to be good enough.
  • Sliding Scale of Parent-Shaming in Fiction: Pretty much every named parent on this show (with the exceptions of Fred Andrews, Sheriff Keller, and maybe Hermione Lodge ) occupies a place on this scale, with the least monstrous sitting firmly on Type I while the Coopers and Blossoms alternate between Type III and Type IV. Alice Cooper moves more towards a Type II at the end of the season when everything is revealed, meanwhile... if there was a Type V, the Blossoms would be right up there.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: 1.05 reveals that Polly Cooper and Jason Blossom were this at one point, even becoming engaged with Jason's grandmother's blessing.
  • Stereotype Flip: The show seems to be trying for this, with Reggie, a jock who bullies Archie, being played by mixed-Asian actors.
  • Sudden Downer Ending: Season 1 ends with this. The mystery is solved, the couples seem happy together, but Cheryl snapped and burned down the Blossoms' residence, and Fred gets shot in the middle of a robbery at Pop's. Bring on season 2.
  • Surprise Incest: A downplayed and then played straight example, it is revealed that the Cooper family used to be a part of the Blossom family, and that Jason and Polly's great-grandfathers were brothers. This makes them third cousins.note  The Blossoms don't think it's really a big deal; the Coopers still find it very squicky. Hal considered this to be a secret worthy of committing a crime over. Polly herself looks freaked out over the fact that her unborn child is a product of incest.
  • Sweeps Week Lesbian Kiss: While it wasn't necessarily sweeps week, Betty and Veronica kiss in the series premiere, for pretty much no reason but to draw in viewers. This was even Lampshaded immediately after it happened:
    Cheryl: Check your sell-by date, ladies. Faux-lesbian kissing hasn't been taboo since 1994.
  • Teacher/Student Romance: It is not portrayed positively.
    • Archie and Miss Grundy have at least had sex, but refrained from seeing each other afterward until school started again. Their relationship becomes strained when Archie wants to go to the police to confess about a gunshot they heard while on a date, while Miss Grundy prevents him from doing so because she's afraid of getting caught.
    • The series 2 premiere confirms that Grundy is a serial offender of this as she is seeing kissing another teenage music student of hers, Ben.
  • Ten Minutes in the Closet: Archie and Veronica are forced to spend seven minutes in a closet. Initially, it's awkward and they just ask each other questions, but they end up kissing.
  • Threesome Subtext: Veronica and Betty are both explicitly into Archie, Archie's explicitly into them both, Betty and Veronica have a lot of Ambiguously Bi moments with one another... yeah, a threesome would solve a lot of problems. In the pilot alone, the three of them attend a dance together "as friends," complete with Archie walking in with A Lady On Each Arm.
    Jughead: To someone on the outside peering in, it would've looked like there were four people in that booth. But I was there. And I can tell you, really, there were only three. A blonde girl, a raven-haired girl, and the luckiest red-headed boy in the universe.
  • Town with a Dark Secret: Jughead's narration implies Riverdale is this. As the show goes on, this becomes fairly clear, with all sorts of family feuds and crime and the like bubbling under the surface.
  • True Companions: Jughead certainly demonstrates this towards Archie within the first few episodes. Betty and Veronica also have shades of this given how important they have been (or will be) in his life.
    • Speaking of those two, Betty and Veronica have it towards one another. Word of God states quite clearly these two will be best friends even while both being in love with the same guy.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Betty's speech at the Jubilee in "The Sweet Hereafter", although well-intentioned, is ultimately what inspires the Black Hood to go on a rampage to purge Riverdale of all its "sinners", thus kick-starting much of the conflict of Season 2. It's entirely possible that someone with such murderous intentions and who could be inspired to do it so easily might have become a Serial Killer regardless, but Betty's speech was nonetheless the main catalyst for his killing spree when it happened.
  • We Used to Be Friends: Archie and Jughead have had a bad falling out. But it appears they patched things up at the end of 1.02.
  • Wham Episode: 1.12, which reveals Jason's murderer: it's Clifford Blossom and also reveals that Jason and Polly are actually third-cousins, because their great-grandfathers are actually brothers, making them incest.
  • Wham Line: Cheryl in 1.12: "Daddy, you did a bad thing and now everyone knows."
  • Wham Shot:
    • In 1.07, the episode ends by revealing that Forsythe (Jughead’s father) has Jason's jacket in his cupboard.
    • In 1.12, Clifford Blossom shooting his own son. Another one at the end of the episode: Clifford Blossom having hung himself in the family barn, with a barrel of maple syrup broken open beneath him...and filled with drugs.
    • The Season 1 finale has Jughead take a Southside Serpent jacket, Fred getting shot, and Cheryl burning down Thornhill Manor.
    • Towards the end of 2.07, Betty and Veronica see Sheriff Keller meeting Mayor McCoy romantically at a motel.
    • At the very end of 3:01, Betty is searching the house for Polly and her mother when she finds them around a bonfire on the patio, holding the twins aloft over the flames. They drop them... and the babies float upwards, unharmed.
  • Where the Hell Is Springfield?: The location of Riverdale within the US is never specified. The comics clearly indicate it to be somewhere in the Northeast or Midwest, with its original creators influenced by their respective hometowns in Massachusetts and Kansas. In the TV show, however, conflicting clues are given:
    • The flora and fauna of the area point to it being somewhere in the Pacific Northwest. (It was filmed in Vancouver.)
    • In 1.05, it is revealed that the town was founded on the maple syrup industry, placing it somewhere in the Northeast or the upper Midwest, likely northern New England, upstate New York, Ontario, or Atlantic Canada (though not Quebec, given the lack of apparent French influence in the town).
    • In 1.07, the police are also briefly referred to as "Dudley Do-Right", referring to a Canadian "mountie" stereotype.
    • In 1.08, it is close to Montreal, putting it, again, in Northeastern North America.
    • In 1.12, a bus is seen with Mamaroneck as its destination, a town located in Westchester County, just north of New York City.
    • In 2.02, Jughead claims that the town is just "a straight shot up Sweetwater River" from the Canadian border, which rules out Canada and Michigan (the latter separated from Canada by the Great Lakes) and would put the town in the far northern reaches of New England or upstate New York.
  • Your Cheating Heart: Sheriff Keller, whose wife is stationed in Bahrain, is getting frisky with Mayor McCoy.

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