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Series / Good Omens (2019)

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Welcome to the End Times.
Aziraphale: We have nothing whatsoever in common! I don't even like you!
Crowley: You do.
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Based on the book of the same name, Good Omens is a six-episode miniseries airing on Amazon Prime on May 31, 2019.

Aziraphale was the angel who guarded the gates of Eden, while Crowley was the snake who tempted Adam and Eve. After six thousand years of living on Earth, they are informed that it is time to start the Apocalypse. The problem is, they've both decided that they rather like Earth the way it is, and hatch a plan to put off Armageddon as long as possible. Some Satanic nuns, two coincidental births, and entirely too much winking later, and they've lost track of the Antichrist.

Starring David Tennant as Crowley and Michael Sheen as Aziraphale, with Anna Maxwell Martin (Beelzebub), Jon Hamm (Archangel Gabriel), Josie Lawrence (Agnes Nutter), Adria Arjona (Anathema Device), Michael McKean (Shadwell), Jack Whitehall (Newton Pulsifer), Miranda Richardson (Madame Tracy), Mireille Enos (War), Lourdes Faberes (Pollution), Yusuf Gatewoof (Famine), and Death (Death).

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See the first trailer here, and the second here.


This series provides examples of:

  • Adaptation Expansion: Several extra scenes have been added, including Aziraphale and Crowley fighting a war in The Middle Ages, and the Archangel Gabriel.
  • Ambiguously Gay: Michael Sheen plays Aziraphale as very campy, as he is noted to come off in the book, but according to the book angels don't have a sexuality "unless they really make the effort."
  • Animated Credits Opening: As seen here.
  • Celestial Bureaucracy: As in the book, the reason the Antichrist was lost was due to a mix-up with the mortal side of Hell's bureaucracy. In the series, Heaven is also bureaucratic.
    Aziraphale: Who exactly summons [the Horsemen]?
    Gabriel: Not my department.
  • Cool Car: Crowley's Bentley, which is getting some prominent focus in the advertising.
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  • Dramatically Missing the Point: The angels sometimes fail to understand that the point of being good is to be good, not just defeat evil.
    Aziraphale: There doesn't have to be a war.
    Gabriel: Of course there does. Otherwise, how would we win it? (gives "duh" look)
  • Friendly Enemies: To Aziraphale's shame, his best friend is a demon. Crowley on the other hand doesn't seem to mind.
  • Gender Flip: Pollution is a woman, making the Horsemen a Gender-Equal Ensemble. Beelzebub is a woman as well.
  • Going Native: When word comes down that Armageddon is on the way everyone is excited...except for Crowley and Aziraphale, who after six thousand years on Earth have grown fond of humanity (namely the things they come up with). The idea of no more "fascinating little restaurants and old book shops" actually causes them to work together to put a stop to it.
  • Good Eyes, Evil Eyes: Crowley has conspicuous snake eyes, which is why he normally wears sunglasses.
  • Good Wings, Evil Wings: Aziraphale has white wings, while Crowley has black wings. This is in contrast to the book, where it's mentioned that the only obvious difference between angels and demons is that demons are slightly better-groomed.
  • Mythology Gag: The use of Queen's "You're My Best Friend" and "Under Pressure" in the trailers plays on the book's Running Gag that any cassette tape left in a car for more than a week will turn into a copy of "Queen's Greatest Hits, Vol.1"
  • Odd Friendship: Aziraphale is an angel and Crowley is a demon, literally on opposite ends of the eternal conflict between Heaven and Hell. Yet they actually get along going all the way back from the days of Adam and Eve to the modern day.
  • Race Lift: Pollution is a chalk-pale man in the book, and a Filipina woman here. Famine's apparent race isn't given in the book, but he's black here. Pepper, a freckled redhead in the book, is also black.
  • Smug Snake: Gabriel is totally convinced of his moral and intellectual superiority, despite Dramatically Missing the Point of being on the side of good.

Alternative Title(s): Good Omens

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