Follow TV Tropes

Following

The Legend Of Zelda Breath Of The Wild / Tropes N to T

Go To

Use the Sheikah Slate to warp to the main page HERE!

Tropes 0 to C | Tropes D to G | Tropes H to M | N-T | Tropes U to Z

    open/close all folders 

    N 
  • Neglectful Precursors: Ten thousand years ago the Sheikah built an army of nigh-unstoppable, semi-autonomous robots and buried them underground, but forgot to install antivirus, an emergency shut off feature, or proper instructions.
  • Nerf: Parrying has been downgraded from Skyward Sword. The number of active frames has been decreased from its previous incarnation, forcing you to parry at about the exact instant when the attack should hit. While you can still reflect projectiles and block attacks without damaging your shield, the window which the parry opens for a counterattack is decreased. Also, while the only drawback from a missed parry in Skyward Sword was a bit of shield damage, in this game, a missed parry damages your shield a great deal (usually breaking it) or costs you the full brunt of an attack.
  • Never Trust a Trailer:
    • A pretty subtle example with the Nintendo Switch Presentation trailer. While there's no content that's actually missing from the final game, the cutscenes are subtly edited together so that it becomes impossible to distinguish which are from the present day and which ones are flashbacks from 100 years ago that Link remembers during his Quest for Identity.
    • The first trailer for "The Champions' Ballad" that was revealed at E3 2017 has Kass saying "There is an ancient verse passed down in this region called The Champions' Ballad." The final DLC actually involves you helping Kass complete that song that his mentor left unfinished; what little that had been composed already was less than a century old.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: Kilton, an off-beat merchant who only shows up at night and is a huge monster fanboy who squees over various beasts. He will buy monster body parts from Link in exchange for "mon", and allow Link to purchase various monster-themed gear, including Dark Link's outfit.
  • No "Arc" in "Archery": Averted; arrows drop fast in this game, making gravity compensation a huge part of the sniping process. Some bows can make arrows fly straight for longer distances than others, with the Phrenic and Golden Bows turning most engagements into a case of this. The Ancient Bow, however, plays it completely straight, as do the Bow of Light and Twilight Bow. Justified by the former being Magitek, and the latter two both being magic. You can play it (mostly) straight for yourself if you use a Phrenic Bow, which in addition to allowing you quite the zoom-in, also eliminates most of the arc.
  • No Body Left Behind:
    • Apart from enemies as per usual for the series, animals killed by Link will have their bodies disappear in a puff of smoke, leaving behind pieces of meat for him to consume right away or cook later.
    • Enemies and animals turning into harvestable materials upon death can be seen as the game simplifying what actually happens. However, this trope is subverted on Death Mountain: Even if an enemy is resistant to the extreme heat while alive, the monster parts they leave behind will catch fire from it and eventually burn away to nothing.
    • The Monks in the shrines disintegrate into green particles, clothes and all, after Link has solved their puzzles and obtained their soul orb. Likely, they have fulfilled their duty and are now ready to move on.
    • Subverted with horses, who ragdoll onto the ground upon death. In a game where every other creature disappears, seeing your once-companion in a lifeless state like this is rather disquieting.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Both in response to petitions and in tribute to them, both Satoru Iwata and Robin Williams' likeness can be found in the game in the form of Botrick and Dayto, respectively. Botrick has Iwata's glasses and center-parted hairstyle, and Dayto has Williams' facial features.
  • No-Gear Level:
    • The monk on Eventide Island's shrine wants to test Link's ability to survive in the wilderness, and so confiscates his equipment and inventory until he can solve the island's puzzles and will also give his items back should the player decide to give up. Link can still cast runes with his Sheikah Slate, but he has to forage food and find weapons in order to survive against the island's foes, which include several Moblins and a Hinox.
    • The DLC Trial of the Sword involves Link entering into a dungeon with three separate sections that in total contain 45-floors, that each get longer and more challenging as you progress. To prove he's truly worthy of the Master Sword's true power he's been stripped of all his items and Champion's blessings to test his resourcefulness by using only items he can find throughout each section.
  • No Hero Discount: Averted in many places, as most people don't even realize you are the hero of legend. There are a few places like Kakariko Village and Zora's Domain, who know outright who you are and how dire the situation is, but will still charge you for their goods and services. Also played straight with Robbie from Akkala Ancient Tech Lab, who was part of the original team created to defeat Ganon. He owns a machine that can turn Guardian parts in Ancient Gear, the best armor and weapons in the game, but specifically rewired the machine that creates the gear to charge Link an exorbitant amount of money. He even admits outright he's doing this because the lab's been cut off from government funding for a century and no one else is willing to invest in the lab, so he figures he may as well extort the Rupees from the hero.
  • Non-Indicative Name:
    • Over at the eastern end of the map is a peninsula called Talus Plateau. The miniboss it contains is not a Stone Talus, but a Blue Hinox instead.
    • The Fruitcake you can cook isn't an actual fruitcake in the traditional sense. It's more like a layer cake that has mixed fruits sandwiched between two pastry discs.
  • Non-Lethal K.O.: NPCs can be attacked by monsters, and if they take enough damage, they'll fall unconscious but will wake up minutes later. The only downside to not saving an NPC in time is you losing out on a reward.
  • Non-Mammal Mammaries: Zora and Rito women, despite being fish and bird people respectively, have noticeable breasts.
  • Nonstandard Game Over:
    • Trying to pull the Master Sword out of its pedestal if Link doesn't have at least 13 normal hearts will kill him on any attempt after the first.
    • Getting caught during the stealth segment of the Yiga Clan Hideout isn't an instant failure, but being struck by a Yiga Blademaster after you are discovered will instantly kill Link, no matter whether or not he has any fairies or Mipha's Grace. Blademasters outside of this segment won't kill in one shot, but they'll still hit hard.
  • Noob Cave: Downplayed. The Great Plateau is a secluded Wide Open Sandbox where players can get used to the huge open-world structure the rest of the game has to offer. Lampshaded with the Japanese name, Hajimari no Daichi (The Beginning Plateau).
  • Not Quite Flight:
    • Link can use the paraglider to safely glide from a high place to the ground.
    • It's possible to fly upward indefinitely (until Link hits the Invisible Wall high in the sky) by sandwiching a platform between Link and a large metal object and using Magnesis.
  • No Fair Cheating: In the shrine quest involving the test of your endurance to heat and flame, trying to cheat with heat/fire resistant clothing will have the Gorons call you out for cheating and will disqualify you. However, nothing is stopping you from using heat and flame resistant potions or just simply healing yourself to endure the test.
  • Non-Dubbed Grunts: A notable aversion; changing the voiceover language will also change the Voice Grunting to match. However, characters that do not speak in cutscenes retain their Japanese voice grunts in all versions.
  • No-Sell:
    • Lynels are immune to being frozen, electrocuted (save for Urbosa's Fury, which just stuns them instead of disarming them), or set on fire. They are also highly resistant to being stunned from explosions, though several bomb arrows to the face in quick succession will do the trick.
    • Certain articles of clothing/armor can allow Link to do this. For example, the Thunder Helm makes him immune to the effects of electricity (in ALL its forms: electric weapons, currents in some puzzles, and natural lightning bolts).
  • Nostalgia Level: Lon Lon Ranch from Ocarina of Time can be found in place, but is completely destroyed. Several locations from Skyward Sword and Twilight Princess can also be found, all in ruins.
  • Not Completely Useless:
    • The humble torch is pretty useless as a weapon, but unlike other wooden weapons, it doesn't lose durability from being lit, making it great for fire puzzles or simply carrying flames to keep yourself warm.
    • The Korok Leaf is also not ideal for direct combat, but its gusts can blow smaller enemies off balance. Perfect for if there happens to be a dropoff behind them. It’s also the only tool at your disposal that’s capable of reliably steering a raft.
  • Nothing but Skin and Bones: The monks in the shrines are completely emaciated and have visible bones under their skin. Their appearance is based on historical Buddhist monks who would sometimes mummify themselves by a method of carefully fasting to death. Since the shrine monks have similarly been sealed away, apparently for over a hundred years, with no food, it's probable that they are technically undead by the time Link meets them.
  • Notice This: Items which can be picked up twinkle intermittently. Weapons with an enhancement (increased power or durability, for example) sparkle to a greater degree, and emit an Audible Gleam if Link is close to them.
  • NPC Roadblock: A few shrines involve NPCs situated in front them in a way that you cannot access their panels, such as a Goron that refuses to move until you prove your worth in his climbing minigame and a Gerudo that has passed out on the panel itself and won't perk up until you get her a drink, which also happens to involve a minigame.
Advertisement:

    O 
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • To avoid recreating troll physics in-game, Magnesis will immediately cut itself off if the item you're manipulating comes in contact with Link. But if you sandwich a second item in between, you're fine.
    • You can't leave the Great Plateau without the paraglider. As in, if you somehow manage to get down without dying of fall damage, Link will just "void out" and warp back as though he had fallen into a Bottomless Pit.
    • The walls inside Sheikah shrines and the Divine Beasts are just so smooth that Link cannot climb them. This is, of course, to prevent Link from completely cheesing each shrine and Beast by bypassing puzzles, but it's very clear that this trope is in effect when the Sheikah walls (including grates!) are the only unclimbable surfaces in the entire game.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: There are Moblins guarding the path between Gortram Cliff and Gorko Tunnel, where your objective is to carry a Rock Roast past them. If you kill the Moblins that are there, then grab the Rock Roast, more Moblins will inexplicably be standing where the previous ones were.
  • Old Save Bonus: After completing the Cave of Shadows in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD, the Wolf Link amiibo can be used to spawn in a Wolf Link Assist Character here. In addition, the recorded number of Hearts that you cleared the Cave of Shadows with will transfer over as Breath of the Wild Wolf Link's own maximum Hearts.
  • One-Hit Kill:
    • Ancient Arrows instantly vaporize any non-boss, non-Guardian enemy, but takes their drops with it. Shooting a Guardian in the eye with an Ancient Arrow instantly reduces its health to 0.
    • Yiga Blademasters are able to do this to you with direct sword strikes, but only at their hideout. The kill will even ignore fairies and Mipha's Grace.
    • The Champions' Ballad DLC adds the One Hit Obliterator, a four-pronged wand decorated with Zigzag Paper Tassels. It saps Link down to ¼ of a heart, but when fully charged can kill any enemy in one hit... which is why it can't be used after the trial involving it.
  • One-Hit Point Wonder: The One-Hit Obliterator in the Champions' Ballad DLC gives Link ¼ of a heart so anything will kill him in one hit, and not even fairy magic or consumption of items will save him.
  • One Size Fits All: All the weapons enemies use are scaled to their size. Even if a weapon is small or huge, they'll magically change to a size suitable for Link once dropped, and any weapons an enemy picks up will also change to fit their size.
  • One-Time Dungeon: The interiors of the Divine Beasts cannot be revisited once you fully clear them, unlike shrines. You are given one last opportunity to explore them after defeating the boss of each one, though.
  • Only Mostly Dead: Whether Link was this or just in a recovering coma is arguable. But the Horse God can resurrect horses that died, even Epona or the Royal Stallion.
  • Only the Chosen May Wield: The Master Sword can only be pulled out of its stone pedestal by the chosen hero of Hyrule. Even then, in order for the player to extract the sword, you will need a lengthy health gauge, since Link's hearts gradually drain as he pulls on the sword.
  • Ontological Mystery: Link wakes up in a strange cave with no knowledge of how he got there or why he's being guided to specific locations. He has the option to hunt around and find out what's afoot.
  • Opening the Sandbox: Done in two stages. After a brief tutorial in the Shrine of Resurrection, the player is immediately thrown into Great Plateau, a sandbox that's big and wide-open but still much smaller than the rest of the game. After Link decides where to jump from the Plateau into Hyrule, the rest of the map is opened up with no restrictions.
  • Optional Stealth:
    • Breath of the Wild adds a stealth mechanic where you can sneak up on enemies to do more damage, or even to rob their camps blind with them none the wiser. The game lets you know if you're too loud with a waveform indicator showing all the sounds Link is making.
    • The game intends for you to be stealthy when infiltrating the Yiga clan's hideout. You won't get a Game Over if you're caught, but the patrolling sentries are so powerful that fighting them is practically a death sentence unless you have really good equipment. The official player's guide mentions that with luck, skill, or cheesing your way into areas with better equipment, fighting them is technically an option, but stealth is the better way to go.
    • If you play the game in the most likely order, you'll end up needing to scavenge Shock Arrows from a Lynel's camp pretty early on. While it's always the weakest variety, it's quite possible that at this point in the game you will not have the power to face it in combat. Luckily, the environment is positively littered with arrows stuck in trees and things, so you can collect as many as you need without even getting the Lynel's attention.
  • Orange/Blue Contrast: Orange and blue are used extensively throughout the game to indicate incomplete (orange) and complete (blue) objectives. It also appears in Ancient technology and shrines.

    P 
  • Painful Rhyme: Invoked. One of Bolson's jingles tries to rhyme "saw" with "job", or more accurately, "jaw... b".
  • Palmtree Panic: The southeastern coast, particularly Lurelin Village, is composed of beaches. The Sand Boots come in handy here. There are a fair number of palm trees, too.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: The monster masks you can buy from Fang and Bone, which are sloppily sewn together, leave Link's real face exposed in most cases, and obviously don't do much to alter the rest of his body (beyond changing his idle stance). Fortunately, Bokoblins, Moblins, and Lizalfos are all too stupid to catch on unless you blatantly attack one in front of the others. Not so much for Lynels, who will pick up on it the moment you do something as innocuous as pulling out the camera.
  • Pelts of the Barbarian: Link can wear a Barbarian armor set with animal skins and a horned monster skull for a helmet, with each piece increasing attack power.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • You're not allowed back into the Divine Beasts after clearing them, so make sure to open every chest before doing so. Having said this, chests in the Divine Beasts never contain anything you can't acquire elsewhere, with easy-to-reach chests usually containing supplies to save the player a trip out of the dungeon to restock on something necessary (such as Arrows), and hard-to-reach chests usually containing powerful gear, rupees, or desirable materials (such as Sapphires or Guardian parts).
    • There are nine weapons/bows/shields that can be permanently lost. They are:
      • The Forest Dweller's Sword and the Kite Shield (there are a limited number of each in the game; once those are destroyed/sold, there's no getting a replacement).
      • The Lynel Crusher, Lynel Spear, Mighty Lynel Crusher, and Mighty Lynel Spear (after you kill enough enemies all the Lynels in the game - aside from three specific ones - will turn Silver and the lower tiered Lynel weapons are rendered unavailable, save for the Lynel Sword, Shield, and Bow, which will always drop from the Lynel on Ploymus Mountain).
      • The Mighty Lynel Sword, Mighty Lynel Shield, and Mighty Lynel Bow cannot be acquired via normal means after all the Lynels turn silver (since the one Blue-maned Lynel that remains - the one in the Hyrule Castle gatehouse - doesn't normally drop its equipment); however, a glitch has been discovered that allows that Lynel to be looted (since it always has a sword/shield set-up, this cannot be used to get the Mighty Lynel Spear or Crusher).
    • Normally, if you try to get the Thunder Helm with a full armor inventory(which you'd basically have to try and do intentionally), the game will act like you haven't completed all the necessary quests even if you have. However, it's possible for this failsafe to fail and the game will try to give you the Thunder Helm anyway. It won't appear in your inventory, and there's no getting it back. If you don't reload to a prior save, you'll never get the Thunder Helm. Oddly, if you're in this situation when you try to get the Zora Armor, there will be dialogue for that situation telling you to come back when you have an empty slot.
  • Pig Man: The recurring Bokoblin enemies have this design in this game, with piglike noses, large ears, and grunting vocalizations.
  • Pixellation: Played for Laughs. If you try to cook using incompatible ingredients, the resulting "Dubious Food" is apparently so disgusting it has to be pixelled out.
  • Play Every Day:
    • You can summon the Wolf Link helper from the amiibo once per day. If he dies, you'll have to wait until the next day to re-summon him.
    • Other amiibo can give once-a-day equipment/material drops.
  • Player Death Is Dramatic: Notable in that the game does use Ragdoll Physics, but more realistically. Instead of having his entire body go limp immediately upon death, Link does fall to the ground tensed up from pain (if he's in midair, or hit by an attack strong enough to send him flying) or loses his strength and collapses (if on the ground) before dying, as it would happen in real life.
  • Point of No Return: Used very sparingly, as part of the game's freeform nature. Dungeons can be left at any point if you need supplies or a change of pace. Even certain setpieces you'd expect to have to commit to can be abandoned — in particular, before assaulting Vah Naboris, your partner makes a point of telling Link to bail if he gets hurt, and she'll meet him at the staging area when he's ready for another try. However, you can't return to a dungeon after finishing it, and after entering the Sanctum of Hyrule Castle you can neither leave nor save.
  • Post-Final Boss: Calamity Ganon is more or less the actual final boss, the Dark Beast Ganon fight that follows is the denouement, since you're given an 11th-Hour Superpower that kills the boss in eight hits and he only has one attack, a Wave Motion Gun Breath Weapon that can One-Hit Kill you, but isn't particularly difficult to avoid.
  • Powers as Programs: A nearly literal example; the Sheikah Slate acts like a tablet computer with magic powers, as it can download programs called Runes from Trial Dungeons.
  • The Power of Love: Mipha tells Zelda that when she uses her healing magic, she thinks of — well, Calamity Ganon attacks before she can say who it is, but it's heavily implied to be Link, who she's in love with. In a later memory, it's Zelda's love for Link and desperation to save him when he's in mortal danger that unlocks her powers.
  • Powerup Letdown: Hearts are capped at 30, including extra hearts. That means you can't get extra hearts if they are already maxed. This can be annoying if you like to use the sword beam, which only works at full hearts. Strangely, you can still benefit from extra stamina even if it's already maxed.
  • Power-Up Mount: Instead of a single horse, you can sneak up on wild horses in the overworld and ride them. Each horse has its own stats note , and up to five of them can be saved at stables that allow you to summon your horses. In particular there are three 'legendary' horses corresponding to the three Triforce holders:
  • Precursors:
    • The ancient Sheikah were a Magitek-based advanced civilization whose shrines can be found across Hyrule, but who were forced to give up their technology.
    • The Zonai are another ancient civilization whose name is even a pun on the Japanese word for mystery, and who left crumbling stonework ruins dotting Hyrule's landscape — most of which happen to contain Sheikah shrines. Very little is known about them aside from what was revealed in the Breath of the Wild – Creating a Champion databook: they were Triforce worshippers who viewed dragons as the symbol of courage, owls as the symbol of wisdom, and boars as the symbol of power, with the Springs of Courage, Wisdom, and Power also being sacred to them.
  • Pulling Themselves Together: Severed limbs of Stal creatures will try to crawl back to their owners, and similarly they'll stumble around looking for lost heads. They'll even replace lost appendages with those belonging to their fallen comrades. The Stal arm continues wriggling indefinitely after its owner is dispatched, even while Link is wielding them.
  • Pungeon Master:
    • Sayge, the owner of the Kochi Dye Shop in Hateno Village, provides a lot of literal color commentary.
    • Pondo, the Snow Bowling guy, peppers his dialogue with snow and ice puns. He's quite the snowoff in that regard.
    • Patricia, Riju's pet sand seal, is apparently one. However, the guard who translates her words of wisdom spares you the "painful seal puns". It's not hard to figure out what the pun was going to be.
    • Link himself becomes one when he meets a merchant who rents sand seals. His dialogue options are "Are you sealious?" "How do I set seal?" and "Let's seal the deal!" The merchant has a pained response to any of these.
  • Punny Name:
    • Most ingredients are named with a descriptive prefix in front of a word for a normal item, like "hearty radish", but some names are punny alterations of the normal term, like "armoranth" (amaranth).
    • A girl who thinks Guardians are cool and cute and has fallen in love with an Ancient Sphere and named it Roscoe is fittingly named 'Loone'.
    • The type of Yiga who disguise themselves as travelers wield kama known as "vicious sickles" (vicious cycle).
  • Precision-Guided Boomerang: Averted. Unlike previous games where boomerangs magically travel to their selected targets then back to you, they are instead treated as melee weapons like swords, spears, and axes and are throwable as such. Each boomerang has a fixed path that it will travel in after it is thrown, and if it hits an enemy, it will travel back to you. If it hits a wall, it will immediately fall to the ground and will have to be retrieved manually. Finally, you have to press the A button to catch it, and if you mistime it, it damages you.
  • Product Placement: One of the chests that appears if you bought the Season Pass contains a Nintendo Switch T-Shirt.
  • Prolonged Video Game Sequel: Breath of the Wild is larger than all the other previous Zelda titles combined. While it only has five dungeons, the world is enormous to the point that the starting area is as large as the Twilight Princess map, and there are tons of sidequests, over a hundred mini-dungeons and an endless list of collectibles. The following DLCs added even more content.
  • Punched Across the Room:
    • Some monster attacks can send Link sailing an impressive distance. One free trip to the moon, just piss off the nearest Molduga.
    • Kilton's Spring-Loaded Hammer can do this to monsters.

    R 
  • Ragdoll Physics: Both Link and enemies have ragdoll physics which kick into effect after a particularly hard hit or upon death.
  • Railroading: Downplayed. While Breath of the Wild doesn't require the player to do anything besides defeating Calamity Ganon to win and the main quests can be done in any order (or skipped entirely), it greatly encourages them to go to the Lanayru region as the first Divine Beast destination. It's the closest to Kakariko town (likely the first town the player visits as they're directly sent there) and there's several Zora around the area looking for Hylians and pointing you in the direction of Prince Sidon. Likewise, unlike other Zelda games, getting the Master Sword is entirely optional and can be done even before entering any of the Divine Beasts, provided the player visits a total of 40 Sheikah Shrines and exchanges those 40 Spirit Orbs to 10 Heart Containers.
  • Rainbow Pimp Gear: While wearing a full armor set will usually confer a set bonus, there's nothing stopping a player from equipping Link with gear from different sets together for multiple minor stat buffs, with Link's appearance ranging from just-as-fashionable to downright questionable. Bonus points if the player dyes each gear different colors for the full rainbow pimp experience.
  • Random Number God:
    • When harvesting wood as a lumberjack, no matter how tall or thick the tree is, it will yield only one or three bundles of wood.
    • When you cook a meal with compatible ingredients, there's a small chance of getting a lucky jingle which indicates the creation of a special meal that recovers more hearts than usual. If Link cooks during the half-hour leading up to a Blood Moon, the bonus is guaranteed.
    • Creatures and monsters that are not bound by predetermined locations and paths will spawn in at random intervals.
    • Breaking an Ore Deposit will yield a random quality and quantity of minerals. You can be unlucky enough to get just one Flint from a Luminous Ore Deposit. And even a Rare Ore Deposit isn't guaranteed to yield any rare minerals.
    • Rock Octoroks can be used to clean Rusted Weapons and Shields to produce a better item. Although this is not guaranteed: You could end up getting a Traveler's Sword instead of a Soldier's Broadsword.
    • A Shooting Star will spawn in at night at a random location that's far from your current position. Bad luck can cause the star fragment to appear in a place where it gets lost easily such as a cliff into a long drop or a downhill slope into a body of water.
  • Rare Random Drop: Zelda-related Amiibos have specific items and outfits related to their games. Most are slightly less powerful than end-game equipment, though the Twilight Bow with near-infinite range will always have uses. Whether you get these drops is randomly determined, but the weapons are more likely the farther you are into the game.
  • Razor Wind: The Yiga Blademasters have this ability with their Windcleaver swords. And you can too, if you manage to get your hands of these swords yourself. Unfortunately, summoning razor winds on your own costs the sword's durability on each swing, even if you're not hitting anything.
  • Readings Are Off the Scale: The thermometer on the HUD is calibrated for normal atmospheric temperatures. In extremely hot regions, like Death Mountain, it is consistently maxed out, and if Link isn't wearing adequate protective clothing, will even catch fire. Likewise, if Link gets frozen solid, the thermometer gets completely encased in ice. Also, opening the map while on Death Mountain has the temperature indication reading a red "Error".

  • Reality Ensues: Breath of the Wild goes for a more realistic approach than previous Zelda games. Thus this trope will be in effect quite a lot.
    • Link will not be able to find the supplies he needs just by cutting grass and breaking pots. Instead, he can only scavenge them from places where one would expect to find them, like taking arrows from bow-wielding Bokoblins and restoring health by eating the meat gathered by hunting animals. He also doesn't hold items dramatically in the air whenever he collects them.
    • Unlike most other Zelda games, you are free to ignore where the story tells you to go and even skip to the final boss, missing out on a lot of secrets and Link's origin. In real life, you are not restricted to follow a plot, but you won't be able to find answers to your questions unless you search them out.
    • If you're caught in a thunderstorm, your metallic sword can actually act as a lightning rod and draw lightning towards you. If you're expecting it to act as the lightning version of the Skyward Strike from the battle against Demise in Skyward Sword, you'd be sadly mistaken, as it actually does damage you.
    • Going into freezing cold environs without wearing heavy insulated clothing will be bad for your health. Likewise, wearing clothing that's too thick (or nothing at all) and letting the sun beam down on Link in a desert biome will cause him to overheat. In addition, equipping a flame weapon will keep Link warm in colder climates, and ice weapons will keep Link cool in hotter climates.
    • You can wear all of the warm clothing and use all of the cold resistance buffs you'd like, they'll be completely worthless in icy water. Even assuming that you manage to get out of it alive (which, considering how quickly it saps your health, isn't terribly likely), you're going to be left several hearts lighter.
    • As usual, Link can kick open treasure chests, but doing this while barefoot will hurt. However, it's only in the animation that Link is hurt. Doing this does not cause any damage.
    • Trying to use bomb arrows in the rain will make them useless, due to their fuses being wet. Conversely, trying to use bomb arrows in deserts and volcanoes is ill-advised, as the heat will cause them to explode in your face.
    • Weapon types play an important role in resource gathering.
      • Small blades like swords and spears will dull and break quickly if swung against trees. Swinging an axe at them or blasting them with Remote Bombs is more effective, however.
      • Trying to use bladed weapons to mine ores will be time consuming, in addition to wearing your weapons down quickly. Using blunt weapons like sledgehammers, heavy axes or Drillshafts will let you mine the resources much more quickly, and with much less wear-and-tear on your chosen weapon.
    • Gerudo Town only admits women, as per tradition, requiring Link to be Disguised in Drag to enter. This is true even after saving the town from Vah Naboris. Just because the Gerudo are thankful Link saved their town doesn't mean they'll bend the rules for him. For that matter, just because their leader Riju is okay with Link being in her town doesn't mean the rest of the town would agree with her.
  • Reality Is Unrealistic:
    • For a place set After the End, Hyrule sure is green and chock-full of wildlife, isn't it? Actually, if the ghost town of Pripyat is to be believed, this is actually a little more like what a world After the End would be like - especially with nothing like sewage or radiation to poison the environment.
    • Despite the artwork on the cover, a lot of the time Link might actually use a belt quiver instead of keeping it slung on his back. That wouldn't work - the arrows would fall right out, wouldn't they? Well, actually, on the battlefield the belt quiver was often preferred because it was easier to grab them.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: The tribe chiefs are very willing to give the amnesiac Link a chance and work against their peoples' prejudices to help save the world. Particularly the Gerudo chief, who susses out Link's crossdressing disguise almost immediately, but stops her bodyguard kicking their only hope against the Divine Beast out of the city. By the same token, she agrees to assign him a trial to make sure Link's claims are legit.
  • Reclaimed by Nature: Calamity Ganon's nigh-apocalyptic attack on Hyrule 100 years prior to the game happened while Hyrule already in a state of decay. In the present, Link finds towers, shrines, weapons, and other ruins abandoned, overrun by monsters or animals, and taken over by nature, with civilization surviving in little pockets.
  • Recollection Sidequest: At the start of the game, Link comes back to life (a hundred years after he had died fighting Ganon) with a massive case of retrograde amnesia. When the camera function on his Sheikah slate is restored, he finds some old pictures snapped by Princess Zelda herself shortly before Ganon's return, and is prompted to visit the places where they were taken. Doing so unlocks cinematic flashbacks of Zelda and Link's time together, allowing a glimpse into their relationship and the princess' personality. Finding all memories unlocks a secret post-credits epilogue scene with Link and Zelda.
  • Red Herring:
    • A seemingly dead end room in the Yiga Clan hideout contains a bow, pots that can be smashed to receive arrows, and barrels that have what look like targets painted on them. Shooting the targets does nothing, and the actual puzzle solution is entirely different.
    • In the Kakariko Village side quest involving the stolen heirloom guarded by Paya and Impa, you're tasked with finding the thief. You can encounter an old lady acting suspicious when questioned about the crime. She even admits to having a link to the item in question. Follow her, and you'll find out that she was swiping Swift Carrots to satisfy her urges to snack on them. The real thief is located elsewhere.
  • Reforged Blade:
    • The Master Sword repairs itself over time after being placed back in its pedestal. The sword also reforges itself with energy if you beat it to the point of breaking.
    • If one of the Champion weapons is broken, it can be remade by a specialized blacksmith.
    • Let a rusty normal weapon or rusty shield get sucked up by a Rock Octorok, and they'll spit it back at you good as new.
  • Respawning Enemies: Surprisingly enough, for the first time in the entire Zelda-series, this is justified in-game. Mooks will stay dead for a few in-game days, and respawn when the Blood Moon rises.
  • Ret-Canon:
  • Revisiting the Roots: One of the central objectives of the game's development as stated by Aonuma and Miyamoto is to eschew the tighter, story-driven, and sequential nature that the series slowly embraced and instead revisit the idea of unguided, free exploration that the original game was designed around. Aonuma has stated that he has desired to do this for a long time, but couldn't achieve a satisfactory result with Nintendo's hardware until the Wii U.
  • Ribcage Ridge: The Leviathan skeletons scattered throughout the world act as a down-scaled version of this. Also, there are giant rib bones on Death Mountain and around the area where a shrine is revealed by using the orbs taken from three Hinox.
  • Rock of Limitless Water: The top of Gerudo Town's palace has a large boulder suspended over it, which dispenses water constantly into a series of canals. The water disappears when it reaches the wells at the ends of these canals instead of flooding them.
  • Rock Beats Laser: For a very literal example, it's possible to make a Guardian Stalker attack a Talus. Since the Talus's weak point is on its back, the Guardian's laser can't damage it, and the Talus's boulder barrage will eventually win out. Flying Guardian drones can be easily destroyed by dropping objects, such as rocks, onto their copter blades from above, or simply smacking a large metallic crate or even treasure chests against them. Laser blasts will vaporize shields, but somehow a perfect parry will reflect the beam without damaging your shield, even if the shield in question is a flimsy chunk of wood, such as a wooden pot lid.
  • Rock Monster: The Stone Talus is a creature made up of various round boulders.
  • Romance Sidequest: Very lightly played with. The game sets up two main plot-relevant possible love-interests, Princess Mipha of the Zora, and Princess Zelda of the Hylians. Both have feelings for Link, and it's implied both girls use him as an emotional anchor to help summon their powers. His feelings remain ambiguous, but in some very rare instances, players are given some dialogue options that could lean Link's feelings in the direction of either girl—options such as telling King Dorephan that he and Mipha are now "united" after accepting her zora armor, or admitting to Teba that saving Princess Zelda is Link's motivation for his mission. However, there also nothing stopping Link from implying he is in love with neither or both, and the dialogue options don't change any cutscenes or dialogue with either girl.
  • RPG Elements: The game introduces a lot more elements from traditional role-playing games like equipping more powerful weapons and armor, scavenging for food and supplies, enemy health bars, and cooking new items. The game even has a sort of "experience" system where after obtaining Spirit Orbs from Shrines, you can cash in four of them for an extra Heart or a Stamina upgrade. The game also has a greater emphasis on damage numbers than previous games, as enemies can have HP as high as 5000.

    S 
  • Samurai Ponytail: Link's hairstyle changes according to his clothes, and he wears his hair in a ponytail when wearing the Stealth Armor headpiece, which is part of the clothing set traditionally worn by the Sheikah people.
  • Scaling the Summit: Unlike previous games, Link can climb most things, including mountains, buildings, and trees. This is limited by the stamina gauge, meaning players need to plan a route before climbing, or else Link will lose his grip.
  • Scenery Gorn: The ruins of Hyrule Castle and Castle Town, which are covered with pools of Malice and swarming with Guardians.
  • Scenery Porn: As seen in the page image. To see it animated, here's the 2014 E3 trailer. Suffice to say, Hyrule has never looked better. The E3 2016 reveal trailer took it a step further and showed various vistas and locales along with the different interactions the player could do to it (such as chopping a tree to get across a chasm, rolling boulders on enemies, and spreading wildfires).
  • Schizo Tech: Link's arsenal includes various weapons obtained from monsters, food to replenish health, clothing, and... a tablet computer. And among the monsters in this iteration of Hyrule, there are Starfish Robots with powerful laser weapons roaming the world.This technology is the remnants of a highly advanced Sheikah civilization, which thrived until they were banished from Hyrule. The DLC takes this up to eleven by giving Link a motorcycle.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: An old man Link meets early in the game reveals that 100 years prior, Ganon — now called the "Calamity Ganon" — attempted to conquer Hyrule, but was sealed away inside Hyrule Castle. However, it has only grown more powerful over the years and has begun spreading its evil influence across the ruined remnants of Hyrule.
  • Sealed Evil in a Duel: Zelda is the only thing keeping Ganon trapped in Hyrule Castle, their ongoing battle preventing him from destroying the world.
  • Selective Magnetism: Magnesis allows Link to move metallic objects.
  • Self-Botched Catchphrase: After you defeat Master Kohga and recover the Thunder Helm, Yiga disguised as banana salesmen, in place of their usual "For the boss!", will exclaim "For the banana!" before correcting themselves.
  • Self-Deprecation: The DLC includes a Tingle costume set. Wearing it makes people react to Link with fear and disgust.note 
  • Self-Healing Phlebotinum: Unlike other weapons, if the Master Sword loses all durability it becomes inert for ten minutes, then reappears as good as new.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: This game offers a much steeper difficulty curve than its immediate predecessors. The game isn't afraid to throw enemies that can one-shot you even in the first area, and the puzzles require more a lot more spatial and logical awareness. Master Mode takes it Up to Eleven.
  • Sequel Hook: In the best ending, Zelda states that Ganon is gone "for now", suggesting doubt that Hyrule has seen the last of him.
  • Sequel Logo in Ruins: The logo features the same font as the franchise logo but is more weathered-looking, signifying the After the End setting. Furthermore, the logo also depicts the Master Sword lodged through the "Z" much like in the logo for A Link to the Past, except it is chipped and rusting much like it is briefly in-game.
  • Set Bonus: Certain Armors gives a set bonus effect when you wear all parts. Most need you to upgrade them twice by the Great Fairies beforehand. Similarly, combining multiple food types with the same buff (such as the "mighty" prefix) will yield a stronger result than using multiple items of the same type.
  • Shield Bash: Lynel shields, because they have spikes attached, can be used to attack.
  • Shield Surf: Link can use his shield to slide down mountainsides. It's been noted, however, that doing so wears down a shield's durability, so it shouldn't be done too much. Link also surfs on his shield when riding a sand seal across the Gerudo Desert and during the fight against Vah Naboris.
  • Shifting Sand Land: Gerudo Desert, as usual for the series. It's very hot during the day and very cold at night, so Link has to cross the desert prepared with the right armor or consumables. The sand also slows him down unless he's equipped with Sand Boots.
  • Ship Tease: Between Link and Zelda. Their relationship is fleshed out in this game; the backstory reveals that they didn't start off on the best of terms but eventually grew close. Paya, Impa's granddaughter, privately wonders if Link is in love with Zelda, and considers the pairing an excellent match despite having a crush on him herself. A sidequest reveals that Zelda is actually in love with Link. Kass tells the story tells of how a poet was in love with her, but she couldn't accept their feelings as she was in love with Link. Her love for Link is also what activates her powers (the Triforce); the developers made jokes and hinted at this several times. Even more so in the Japanese version, where the journal entries of the Adventure Log are written by Link himself. The sub-text heavily implies that Link reciprocates Zelda, specially later in the game. This was completely removed in the Western localizations.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Eiji Aonuma has stated that the game's art style takes inspiration from Japanese animation, though unlike The Wind Waker (which took cues from the old-school era) this game portrays its world in a gouache-inspired style that is more reminiscent of Studio Ghibli's filmography. This is most obvious in Kakariko village, which looks straight out of a Hayao Miyazaki film, and Impa bears a striking resemblance to Yubaba from Spirited Away. It's also very apparent with Vah Medoh's design, as the ancient airship covered in overgrowth carries a strong Castle in the Sky vibe to it. Not to mention Link's glider, default blue outfit and the post-apocalyptic setting littered with the wreckage of ancient killer robots is one big love letter to Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind.
    • In the E3 2016 build, line of Sheikah text that appears when new rune abilities are downloaded into the Sheikah Slate translates to "NOW LOADING, DO NOT TURN OFF, ALL YOUR BASE ARE", with the "BELONG TO US" being cut off.note 
    • The North American/Japanese box art alludes to Caspar David Friedrich's "Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog".
    • One of the shields available to Link is a Sheikah artifact known as the Shield of the Mind's Eye.
    • If you step into the "lane", This is Snow-Bowling! There are rules!".
    • One of the Shrine Quests takes place around a "Mount Taran".
    • The Radiant gear set has Link in a mask much like that of a Lucha Libre, complete with a championship gold belt. At night it glows over your body like a skeleton and has the added bonus of making undead not attack you. Very reminiscent of the Mexican Day of the Dead holiday.
    • The Fire Rod shoots fireballs that repeatedly bounce off the ground, similar to Mario with a Fire Flower.
    • The fact that there's a sidequest involving two Goron named "Fugo" and "Rohan" seems too coincidental to not be a reference to Panacotta Fugo and Rohan Kishibe. For added points, Rohan is said to be a "Famous Goron Artist".
    • One of the DLC trials involves hunting down a larger, tougher Molduga known as the Molduking, which attacks by aggressively swimming towards anything in its territory and breaching (like all Moldugas do), but is distinguished by its extreme resilience, a number of lances and weapons stuck in its hide from previous attempts to kill it, and a white coloration as opposed to the usual dark brown.
    • The Master Sword glows blue in the presence of certain enemies.
    • Windblight Ganon's little flying attack organisms (AKA the spikes on its back) act a lot like the Nu Gundam's Fin Funnels, even forming an energy pyramid at one point (albeit for offense instead of defense.)
  • Shown Their Work:
    • The Yiga Clan is a group of radical Sheikah defectors who also operate as ninjas. While they do use the stereotypical flair that ninjas are known for and frequently spawn in full gear on the overworld to attack, you'll also encounter them while they are disguised as generic NPCs like a traveler or merchant, which can cause many players to be caught by surprise. This is a trait that real life ninjas actually used to assassinate their targets since no one would suspect a peddler or a peasant.
    • Lightning strikes during storms can set fire to nearby trees and grass if struck. The same goes for Guardian lasers.
    • The desert region is very hot, which will sap Link's health unless he has protection from the heat. There's a certain set of clothes Link can obtain, which looks like something a person living in a real life desert would wear to beat the heat, and the clothes in the game give a bonus of heat resistance when the whole set is worn. Not only that, but going to the desert at night causes Link to feel chilly, just like how real life deserts can get extremely cold.
    • Death Mountain has a lot of lava everywhere, which makes the area very hot naturally. However, if Link gets too close to the lava, he'll actually catch on fire, which completely avoids the Convection Schmonvection trope that most video games employ. Not only that, but if Link sails in the air over the Death Mountain region, he'll actually burn up due to the air rising from the lava being dangerously hot.
  • Sidequest: The game has a lot of them, with varying types of rewards such as food, armor, rupees, weapons, or even access to a shrine. Technically, one could count the entire game as a sidequest, since nothing is stopping you from rushing to the Final Boss as soon as you leave the Great Plateau. Even getting the Master Sword is completely optional, though it is required in order to see the full ending.
  • Significant Anagram: The monk inhabiting the Magnesis Trial shrine is named Oman Au, which is an anagram of Aonuma (the game's producer).
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer: Princess Zelda never appeared in footage until the Game Awards footage, though it wouldn't be revealed to be her until the January 2017 Switch presentation. Though her voice was heard in the E3 trailer.
  • Situational Sword: The Master Sword has an above average power of 30 at all times, and whenever it "breaks", it regenerates in just ten minutes. However, when put up against foes under the direct control of the Calamity, or Calamity Ganon itself, its strength DOUBLES and it gains unlimited stamina, which can make taking out the Blight Ganons pretty much trivial. In DLC, completing the Trial of the Sword averts this by enhancing the Master Sword, giving it a permanent strength stat of 60 and high durability.
  • Sliding Scale of Content Density vs. Width: The game takes a much Wider approach to its design compared to the previous 3D Zelda games, especially the immediately preceding Skyward Sword.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: The Hebra region, as well as the Gerudo Highlands. Indeed, travelling to any mountainous region above a certain altitude will cause Link's temperature gauge to drop, and he'll need to wrap up warmly or eat hot food to avoid losing health.
  • Snowy Sleigh Bells: The song playing during the ice bowling minigame owes much of it's wintery, Christmas-y feel to the sleigh bells that rhythm it.
  • Soft Reboot: This game acts as the point in which the three branching timelines for the Zelda series post-Ocarina of Time converge, which combined with the fall of Hyrule allows later Zelda games to start from a relatively blank slate. It's still part of the same overall continuity, but is set up to no longer have the baggage of needing to set itself into an ultra-specific point in a predetermined series of events.
  • Softer and Slower Cover: To emphasize the After the End version of Hyrule you explore, many classic Zelda songs such as the Main Theme, Zelda's Lullaby, the Temple of Time, etc., have been remixed into very slow and quiet piano pieces. Much like the ruins of Hyrule itself, the songs are so bare and skeletal that it can be somewhat difficult to recognize what they once were.
  • So Near, Yet So Far: Played with. Hyrule Castle is one of the first things the player sees upon getting out into the main game world, and it's also one of the closest landmarks relative to that starting position. But once you complete the introductory Great Plateau sequence, you can in fact run straight to the castle and fight the Final Boss without doing any other story quests if you want. Granted, not only will this be an absurdly difficult thing to do, you will also miss out on all the plot explaining who Link is, what his relationship with Zelda was like, who the Champions were, etc. And you'll also miss the Golden Ending.
  • The Southpaw: Averted, surprisingly. Despite this game not focusing on motion controls (they're optional for aiming bows and thrown weapons), Link is right-handed. Aonuma explains this decision was made because of how the controller is held, with the attack button being on the right side. With the game being available on the Switch, which allows its controller to be held Remote-and-Nunchuk style, it makes slightly more sense.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Despite how Zelda's character in this has been pretty well received, overall, some felt that she took a little too much of the spotlight this time, making it so that Link himself and the Champions don't feel as developed as they could have been since a majority of the flashbacks revolve around her (there's one when Link only appears at the end and there is even one when Link is completely absent) while only one mentions something about Link's backstory and there is only one flashback per individual Champion. The specifics that prompt this reaction go beyond what can be observed in other media, however. Zelda may overshadow the development of the other characters dependent upon your perspective, but per the non-linear structure each character becomes a footnote outside of the region devoted to them, by necessity. Link's situation is different though, as it involves the player being shilled on how important Zelda is, much more so than them, at nearly every plot-relevant opportunity. Meet Impa? Hear about Zelda. Meet Sheikah researchers? Hear about Zelda. Save the local people? Hear about how important Zelda is. It's so pervasive that even drawing the Master Sword, the weapon that is synonymous with Link, there's a cutscene that revolves entirely around Zelda and the player is then reminded again about how so important she is. Given that Zelda is stuck in Hyrule Castle fighting Ganon the entire game, it would have been difficult to explore her character or how central she is to the story otherwise, but it can still leave players wondering why Link doesn't get lauded for his heroics as much as she does.
  • Sprint Meter: The stamina gauge from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword returns. It can even be upgraded.
  • Standard Status Effects: The game has thee effects assigned to the Fire, Ice, Lightning trio. Fire burns, lightning stuns (along with causing you to drop your weapons), and ice freezes for a period of time based on the temperature of the area.
  • Starfish Robots: Guardians, walking or flying artillery that resemble a strange mix between an Octorok and a Beamos or a drone (or, outside of Zelda, a cross between Jomon pottery and the Omnidroid, an RC drone, or an anti-air gun, depending on the form), roam the world, posing a great threat to Link. Some can even be found in the starting area, though thankfully most of them are dead or at least legless.
  • Stealth Escort Mission: One Shrine quest has you following a Korok as he makes a pilgrimage to the shrine, but the catch is you can't let him see you. He gets attacked by beasts of the woods multiple times and you can't be seen if you kill them, but it's subverted in the end, because he knew about you being there the whole time.
  • Stealth Pun:
    • While Breath of the Wild may refer to either the wind or the game's emphasis on the wilderness, Breath also sounds like the word "breadth", in reference to Hyrule's massive size.
    • The Lord of the Mountain is heavily indicated by flavour text to be the reincarnation of Satoru Iwata. Supporting this is the fact that the Lord has four eyes. Iwata wore glasses, thus making him a "four-eyes".
    • The reward for getting all the Korok Seeds can also be seen as a crappy reward. And Hestu clearly gives a shit about you getting all the seeds.
  • Sticks to the Back: Zig-zagged. Swords (both one-handed and two-handed) usually have either scabbards or straps, and spears sometimes have straps, but bows, shields, axes, hammers, maces, clubs and guardian/ancient weapons all stick to Link with no visible method of attachment.
  • Stolen Good, Returned Better: A strange variation; if you hurl a rusty weapon or shield at a Rock Octorok while it inhales, the Octorok will suck it up, crunch it around a little in its mouth, and then spit it out as a clean equivalent piece of gear, as if it ate the rust right off of it.
  • Storming the Castle: The final dungeon is Hyrule Castle, where Calamity Ganon is, and Link must go in alone against the many enemies that inhabit the castle.
  • Story Breadcrumbs: Along with the main plot, the game's backstory is pieced together in various ways. Namely, along with Link's various memories, there are also NPCs that knew him from 100 years ago (such as his other Zora-born Childhood Friend, Kodah).
  • Strength Equals Worthiness:
    • Several monks' Shrine Quests make Link deal with dangerous situations to gain access to their shrines, which are just rooms where the monk rewards you for the outside challenge. Some of the Shrine Trials are literally called "Minor/Modest/Major Test of Strength", where Link has to defeat a Guardian Scout model II, model III or model IV respectively.
    • The Champions' Ballad DLC has the monk in the 5th Divine Beast testing you in combat to see if you are worthy of controlling the Master Cycle Zero.
    • The Trial of the Sword DLC puts Link through several rooms full of monsters, with no gear besides what he can scavenge within them. The purpose is to prove himself worthy of wielding the Master Sword at full power, which it normally enters only around Ganon-infected machines.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: Explosions are much bigger than they are from previous games.
  • Suddenly Voiced: This is the first main-series gamenote  to include comprehensible voice-overs (not counting Link's "Come on!" or Beedle's "Thank You!" in Wind Waker, which are more like sound effects). While Link remains a Silent Protagonist, and characters still speak in the traditional text boxes, major cutscenes include full voice acting for the main cast, including Zelda herself.
  • Sufficiently Advanced Bamboo Technology: The Sheikah Slate and the shrines where you use the Slate all have the appearance of plain stone with Tron Lines. The Slate essentially behaves like a modern tablet computer — you can 'download' maps to it at shrines and use it to execute certain abilities.
  • Super Drowning Skills: Bokoblins and Moblins cannot take to deep water very well and will die instantly if they fall in. Because of this weakness, a viable tactic is to knock them into a river or the ocean. This can backfire somewhat with silver or gold ones—they still drown instantly, but the gems they drop sink, most likely making them unreachable.
  • Summon Magic: By way of technology- equipping a horse with the DLC Ancient Saddle will allow Link to teleport it Sheikah-style to his side whenever he whistles.
  • The Swarm:
    • Keese sometimes come in big groups. They will, however, fly away if Link kills a few of them.
    • Small swarms of bees attack anything nearby if their hive is destroyed. They're fairly slow and weak, though, and weapons can be used to discombobulate them.
  • Sword of Plot Advancement: Notably averted with the Master Sword. In every previous game where the Master Sword appears, Link must acquire it at some point in order to defeat Ganon. Here, however, the sword is merely a useful accessory with unusual mechanics. Moreover, while a main quest related to the sword does exist, the game doesn't go to any lengths to lead the player to it, instead providing clues in the form of various Non Player Characters who mention the sword in passing, with some giving information toward its location. Ultimately, it's entirely possible to complete the game without ever learning the sword exists.

    T 
  • Take That, Audience!: The ultimate reward for all your hard efforts for collecting all 900 Korok Seeds seems to be Nintendo's way at poking fun at those who expect some sort of Infinity +1 Sword or other Bragging Rights Reward for obtaining 100% Completion in games. It turns out that it was all a giant poop joke at the player's expense. All you get is a larger poop-shaped Korok Seed called Hestu's Gift that smells even worse, and you suddenly realize you've actually been collecting pieces of plant-person poop the whole game...Koroks are weird.
  • Take Your Time: Even though the game makes known several times that Calamity Ganon is soon going to regain his full power and destroy what is left of Hyrule, the player is free to spend dozens of hours exploring Hyrule and doing sidequests. Zelda's power won't fail until you arrive at the final boss area. The Old Man even encourages the exploration aspect, and it's one of the key aspects of the game design.
  • Team Shot: Completing the main quest of the "Champions' Ballad", Kass gives you the group photo of the Champions. Link can hang it in his house on the upper bedroom wall.
  • Temple of Doom:
    • The Forgotten Temple at the bottom of Tanagar Canyon is filled with Decayed Guardians that will come to life as soon as Link draws near.
    • Certain shrines can contain dangerous traps such as bottomless pits, or have Guardian Scouts patrolling within.
  • Tennis Boss: Link can knock back any Frickin' Laser Beams, from Mooks and bosses alike, but he has to use his shield. It still qualifies for the trope for two reasons: if you don't time it right, said laser beam will destroy your shieldnote  (and possibly kill you as well); but if you do time it right, you can pull it off with a pot lid. Particularly noteworthy is that this is how Link killed a rogue Guardian in the backstory.
    • You can do so with regular Bokoblins here; if you time it right, you can bat away their rock projectiles.
    • When Fireblight Ganon enters its second phase, it will protect itself with an invincible barrier and begin charging a very dense fireball. One way to break the barrier is for the player to parry the fireball back with a shield.
    • As per tradition, Calamity Ganon itself treats you to this. It puts up an impenetrable shield in the second phase that none of your weapons can pierce (not even the Ancient Arrows). The only two ways to get past it are to either perfectly dodge its melee attacks to enter Flurry Rush, or reflect its projectiles with the shield parry. Or fire off Urbosa's Fury or Daruk's Protection.
  • Theme Naming: Has this in spades:
    • The Divine Beasts' names are corruptions of the names of sages from Ocarina of Time and Wind Waker: Darunia, Ruto, Nabooru, and Medli. They're even piloted by someone of the same race as the sage. Vah Ruta and Vah Naboris are explicitly mentioned as being named after Ruto and Nabooru, so the same is likely true of the other two as well.
    • Enforced by the Bolson Construction Company, whose company policy says that they only hire people whose names end in "son".
    • Several Sheikah are also named after fruit, which may explain the offshoot Yiga's obsession with bananas (hinted in the DLC to be a Sheikah trait as well).
    • NPCs in Hateno generally derive their names from plants.
    • The Zora's names' take on a more musical theme. While a bit more obscure in English, The Royal Zora family consisting of Dorephan, Mipha, and Sidon (named 'Shido' in Japanese), when combined with the word Zora, matches so closely to the solfège scale that it's likely intentional. Spelled out in full, Do-re-phan (ドレファン), Mi-pha (fa) (ミファー), Zo (so)-ra (ゾーラ), Si (ti)-don (シド).
    • One side quest has you meet up with Sesami who got separated from his friends Canolo, Flaxel, Palme, and Oliff, all based on cooking oil.
  • Theme Tune Cameo: When Kass gets to play the full version of his song in the conclusion of his personal quest, it contains a portion of the main Zelda theme. He also plays Epona's Song when met at stables. If you take the individual parts of the songs he plays for you when explaining shrine quests and put them together, it turns into the game's main theme/the first trailer theme.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: If you really want to, you can waste Urbosa's Fury or special weapons on low-level threats and wild animals. This can mess with their drops, espcially if fire weapons or Bomb Arrows are involved. Plus there's the whole Too Awesome to Use aspect of said weapons.
  • Throw Down the Bomblet: The Remote Bomb runes allow Link to create a spherical or cubical bomb that can be detonated remotely. There's an infinite supply of them, but there's a recharge time for each use.
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: Most of your weapons can be thrown at enemies to do critical hits. However, hitting an enemy this way will immediately break the weapon, meaning it's best to do this with weapons that are about to break anyway. Boomerangs (which function like short swords) won't break if used this way, but have to be manually caught on the return trip. The Master Sword is the only bladed weapon that cannot be thrown, but if Link has all of his hearts full, he can throw beams from it.
  • Thriving Ghost Town: Actually averted by many of the towns and cities Link visits, especially Hateno Village, which has many more residential homes than it does businesses and stores. Some of them lean more into this trope than others, though, particularly Lurelin Village and Zora's Domain.
  • Thunderbolt Iron: Whatever it is that ancient technology is made of, star fragments are clearly a part of it as they are needed for fully upgrading the ancient gear.
  • Time Abyss: This is the first game in the Zelda franchise to actually tell us how much time has passed between Ganon’s previous resurrection and the most recent one. It’s 10,000 years. And this is at the other end of the timeline that started with the founding of Hyrule. This means that the Kingdom has existed continuously at this point for an absolute minimum of 80,000 years.
  • Time Stands Still: Stasis causes an object to be frozen in time temporarily. Objects affected by Stasis store kinetic energy, meaning multiple weak blows dealt to an object in Stasis will be combined into a single, powerful blow, allowing heavy objects to be moved once they unfreeze. Getting Stasis+ from Purah relatively early in the main story chain lets you do this to monsters as well, albeit for a much, much shorter duration.
  • Title Drop: In the "The Champions' Ballad" DLC:
    Kass: Let not the sound leave horses riled. Breathe in the breath of the wild.
  • Too Awesome to Use:
    • Better weapons and equipment can fall into this for some, especially rare ones found in chests. Ancient Arrows can be this too. These arrows can One-Hit Kill most non-boss enemies, up to and including Guardians. However, they are extremely rare to find, and to make them, the player needs to gather ancient materials which only drop from the aforementioned Guardians. It should also be noted that using an Ancient Arrow against anything except a Guardian or a boss also destroys its loot, so you don't get anything by killing enemies this way, making you want to use the arrows even less.
    • Fortunately, not the case with Champion's Weapons, which can be reforged. All they need is one diamond, a certain lesser weapon of the same kind, and five of some common material like flint or wood.
  • Too Dumb to Live: It's possible for a Yiga Blademaster to appear before you during a thunderstorm, and he will get struck by lightning, defeating him instantly and giving you Mighty Bananas and a Windcleaver with no effort on your part. Similarly, enemies in Death Mountain can be armed with bomb arrows, which—because of the superheated air—explode in their faces when they attempt to shoot at you.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: All members of the Yiga Clan are banana fanatics; favoring the attack-boosting "Mighty Bananas" specifically (since they're the only banana item in the game). They drop bananas when defeated, and in the stealth section of their hideout, you can throw bananas to lure them out of your way. (Bringing some with you for this purpose is unnecessary, thanks to the enormous pile of bananas stashed in an upper section of their hideout.) This is apparently inherited from the ancient Sheikah they broke off from, as the monk Maz Koshia in the DLC will also be distracted by Mighty Bananas (only once, though) if you drop them in the fight against him.
  • Tragic Mistake: This drives the entire plot. King Rhoam decided to follow the same plan that defeated Ganon 10,000 years ago to the absolute letter, including the use of the Divine Beasts and Guardians. Unfortunately, Ganon was ready for this, causing the Great Calamity.
  • Trick Arrow: Ice, Fire, Bomb, and Shock arrows are available as ammo, as well as Ancient Arrows, which do massive damage to Guardians and act as a Disintegrator Ray to all organic non-boss enemies.
  • Tron Lines: Everything built by the ancient Shiekah 10,000 years ago has these. Bonus points for even being the exact same colors as the Trope Namer. The usage is different though. Orange is simply deactivated instead of "evil", and blue is just active instead of "good". Magenta is not part of the original tech's function, so if you see magenta lines on anything it means it has been taken over by Calamity Ganon.
  • Truce Zone: Monsters do not aggro near towns or stables, due to various protections on them. For example, all stables are protected by Malanya, so enemies turn away or remain peaceful near them.
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report