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The Legend Of Zelda Breath Of The Wild / Tropes D to G

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Tropes 0 to C | D-G | Tropes H to M | Tropes N to T | Tropes U to Z

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    D 
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!:
    • Zelda veterans may forget that you have to manually press the jump button instead of auto-jumping, leading to many deaths by falling. Combat abilities that involve jumping (such as backflipping and the Jump Attack) have also been moved to this button, which can cause problems for veteran Zelda players who are used to doing them with the action button.
    • The attack button also differs from all other Zelda games using the SNES-style button layout, such as the Wii U and 3DS Updated Rereleases, A Link to the Past and A Link Between Worlds. It's Y this time instead of B (to which the sprinting function has been assigned), so until you get used to it, you can expect to dash headlong into enemies when you expect to attack them. Though they can be switched through the settings.
    • Are you used to throwing bombs by pressing A while moving? Enjoy being hoist by your own literal petard over and over again, because your mind tells you that you threw a bomb when you dropped one at your feet. (You have to press R to throw now.) And just to rub salt in the wound, the bomb won't even blow up unless you command it to, which makes you feel extra stupid.
    • Starting a new game after you've gotten accustomed to using the paraglider to slow your fall from high leaps or mitigate knock back during combat. Until you've completed the initial tutorial phase, you can't do any of it.
    • Two of the main bosses (who are forms of Ganon) have an attack where they fire a slow-moving orb at you. Any long-time Zelda player's first reaction would be to try to hit it back with their sword, only to have the attack blow up in their face.
    • Used to fairies being easy pickings when they're around? You'll have to work for it this time: Fairies in this game are skittish, as they will fly off and despawn if you excitedly run up to one to try to pocket it like in every prior Zelda title. You'll have to actually sneak up on them this time around.
    • The DLC added the Ancient Saddle, which can teleport the horse wearing it to Link at any time. However, the command is the whistle button, the down-direction button. While likely to be the least-used button by players, a player using the saddle and whistling to catch enemies' attention will find their horse teleporting next to them when they didn't want it, and it can be annoying taking it back to where the player wanted it. During intense fights, with switching between runes and weapons in the directional buttons, it's easy to slip and hit the down button, which will spawn in your horse, potentially right in front of a Lynel's blade or in the middle of a swarm of enemies, possibly dooming it by accidental teleportation.
  • A Day in the Limelight:
    • This entire game serves as one for the Sheikah. Originally introduced in Ocarina of Time as the tribe Zelda's nurse/ladysmaid/bodyguard Impa belonged to and being the traditional guardians of Hyrule's royal line, she remained their only representative across the subsequent games aside from the Sheikah Stones and a few miscellaneous items bearing their eye emblem. Here they collectively play a much larger role in the plot, being the creators of the diverse Magitek across the ruins of Hyrule (including the Sheikah Slate, the Guardians, and the Shrines), and having their many ancient monks provide Link with abilities for his quest. Furthermore, they even changed Kakariko Village to give it a more unique Wutai-theme to show Sheikah of various ages and give them their own distinct culture.
    • The holiday season DLC, "The Champions' Ballad", is being advertised as one for the four Champions to the point of giving each their own amiibo; since in the main game despite being described as a group only Princess Zelda and to a lesser extent Link got any real focus while their fallen teammates were only given one memory each along with their Divine Beast's dungeon.
  • Deal with the Devil: A malevolent deity that loved to make money-for-life contracts with people was sealed into a statue by Hylia, now residing near Hateno Village. Needless to say, people don't go near it, leaving it all the more bitter and dejected, biding its time until you show up. Do you think you need more health? Or more energy? Well, they will let you exchange your hearts for stamina, or vice-versa for a small fare. note 
  • Death of the Hypotenuse: The fact that both Mipha and Zelda are in love with Link would be a lot more dramatic if Mipha hadn't died in the calamity before the story began.
  • Desperation Attack: The mini-Guardians you fight in the Test of Strength shrines start to fire off charged salvos of explosive lasers, similar to the regular Guardian's laser attack, when their health is low.
  • Death Mountain: The Trope Namer shows up once again. Thanks to the open world and long draw distances, it can be seen from any corner of Hyrule.
  • Death by Genre Savviness: The entire kingdom of Hyrule. Ganon a constantly recurring problem? Build a Magitek robot army to easily crush him. Ganon coming back 10,000 years later? Better excavate the mothballed army, get Link and Zelda into position, and then... whoops, Ganon just seized control of the army and razed the kingdom to the ground.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist:
    • For most of the game, especially anywhere outside. Die, and you can quickly recover from your last save. The game autosaves every minute or so, making this a pretty minor setback. Given the very harsh learning curve of the early game, and how easy it is to be unexpectedly wiped out even in the later game, this level of mercy is entirely appropriate. In a Divine Beast, you're sent back to the entrance, but the wide-open structure of the Divine Beasts means this is rarely a serious problem. Shrines also send you back to the beginning, but many of them are single puzzles where this doesn't matter.
    • However, this is averted in the Trials of the Sword DLC (where you have to start the current set of trials over from the very beginning) and in a few of the larger shrines, where restarting the shrine from scratch can take a while.
    • Eventide Island is another big aversion. Die, and you're sent back to the last landmass you were on before you traveled to the island. Considering you're stripped of all your gear(including your armor) and expected to fight enemies up to mini-bosses with just what you can scavenge and your Sheikah Slate, you're probably gonna be dying a lot, and the island trial itself is rather long so this is far from a slap on the wrist.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: Spear-type weapons make up for long range and high combo potential with low damage output.
  • Decomposite Character: The Rito were originally stated to have evolved from the Zora, but in Breath of the Wild, the two species are shown side by side.
  • Deconstructed Character Archetype:
  • Deliberately Bad Example: There's an NPC who is a Lethal Chef because she insists on putting monster parts or ancient parts in all her cooking. This serves to demonstrate to any players who haven't yet figured it out that this is always a bad idea. However, using her specific recipes does make failed food that restores more hearts than usual.
  • Dem Bones: There are Stal variants of the Bokoblins, Moblins, and Lizalfos that appear as enemies at night. Traditional Stalfos have thus far yet to appear. There's also a skeleton horse you can ride.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • The properties of wood, metal, and ancient technology apply for not just weapons, but for any object made of them: Wooden crates and treasure chests that catch fire will eventually burn away, and any provisions inside will be roasted (The loot inside chests, however, will be completely fine regardless of its flammablity or lack thereof), metal crates and ore conduct electricity and will draw lightning strikes, and objects made with ancient tech will neither burn nor attract electricity.
    • If you rescue a traveling salesperson on the road from monsters, they’ll give you one of their wares for free. If you check their inventory by buying something from them afterwards, the item that they gave you will actually be deducted from their stock.
    • NPCs out in the field have different lines of dialogue depending on an impressive variety of situations. If you save one and then escort them to their destination (Which is entirely unneccessary), they’ll comment on it and thank you.
  • Difficult, but Awesome:
    • Battle Boomerang-type weapons are short-ranged when it comes to melee, they need you to prepare the throw like any other melee weapon, and you need to actively catch them, as well as throw them in a direction that makes them catchable: If they hit an obstacle on the way back, you’ll be unarmed unless you either retrieve it (which may not be an option) or pull out a spare weapon. That said, they're melee weapons that also double as ranged weapons.
    • Spears have nowhere as much damage as other two-handed weaponry, a very narrow hitbox, and you can't use a shield with them. That said, they have the longest reach, much faster attack animations than most two-handed weapons, and the most combo potential of any weapon type.
    • The Parry ("Perfect Guard") mechanic requires exact timing, and you get hit if you fail. That said, anything, even a Guardian's laser, can be parried back at an enemy; it can be done with any shield, even starters; and if done right, doesn't damage the shield. Crippled Guardians require one reflect to destroy, intact ones require three.
    • The Infinite Climb glitch requires proper timing, but it makes climbing slopes a breeze when mastered.
  • Difficulty Spike: Quite a few, depending on where you go and what you decide to do. The chief ones are the four corners of the map, each which have their own debilitating environmental effects and powerful enemies.
    • The Champion's Ballad DLC is intended to be the final lategame challenge before tackling Ganon. Thusly, it's very difficult, with each part of it requiring the player to be very far in the game. Tons of supplies, lots of stamina and hearts, good map knowledge, and powerful weapons are a must. Even then, these will only get you so far, since several aspects of the challenge have "features" that make them more difficult, such as the first part turning every single attack into a One-Hit Kill for poor Link.
  • Disappears into Light: What happens to the monks upon Link completing their trial and obtaining their Spirit Orb, their duty to Hylia fulfilled.
  • Disintegrator Ray: Ancient Arrows have this effect on most enemies besides Guardians, including Lynels. Unfortunately, this also destroys all their item drops.
  • Disguised in Drag: Gerudo Town has a law that prevents males from entering, so Link has to buy women's clothes from an NPC named Vilia and disguise himself as a woman to enter.
  • Disk One Nuke:
    • Since the combat in the game is largely skill-focused, it's entirely possible to make forays into much more dangerous parts of the wilderness and come away with advanced equipment and ingredients.
    • Due to the semi-randomized loot in the treasure chests, it is entirely possible to obtain a late-game piece of equipment early in the game. However, this is balanced by the durability system, which for many will make the aforementioned Disk One Nuke Too Awesome to Use.
    • Woodland Tower is a little tricky to unlock, but there is nothing stopping a patient or skilled player to get it very soon after starting the game. Said Tower will always have a free Royal Claymore that has a base power of 52 on top of it, which will also always refresh after a Blood Moon. Unlocking this Tower early can give access to a really useful refreshable weapon that can carry the player for quite awhile.
    • The Champion's Tunic, which is hands-down the most powerful piece of armor in the entire game, stats-wise, and it's easily found early on in the game just by following the main story. Albeit the crafting materials are quite rare in theory, they have very specific spawn points, meaning they're ridiculously easy (if a bit time-consuming) to farm once you know where they are.
    • Using amiibo can result in getting better-than-average weapons early on in the game. This includes Ancient Arrows, which do massive damage to Guardians, and can instantly defeat basically anything else short of a boss at the expense of not getting their drops.
    • The Twilight Bow is a weaker version of the Bow of Light you get to use during the final phase of the final boss, which one has a chance of getting when scanning the Super Smash Bros. Zelda amiibo. Not only does it have 30 Damage, 100 base durability, and high range, it also has an unlimited supply of its own unique arrows. Since you can save before scanning an amiibo and reload if you don't get what you want for another attempt, getting one early is very easy. The only thing stopping it from being a outright Game-Breaker is that it isn't Multi-Shot, and even once you get other bows with that, it is still a worthwhile bow due to not consuming arrows.
    • Anyone who beat Twilight Princess HD's Bonus Dungeon gets Wolf Link, who's powerful, intelligent, and very, very fast. He's even more of a nuke for those who beat it with a full health meter. Wolf Link with 20 hearts not long after starting the game? You can just kick back and watch him tear your enemies to shreds. Unfortunately there's no way other way to power him up so he'll only deal Scratch Damage to later enemies, and get one or two shotted by the likes of Guardians or Lynels. Even if he has hearts, he has no armor.
    • The runes you get early on can seriously break the game if you put them to good use, as a surprising amount of enemies are weak to their effects. For example, the bomb rune is capable of knocking enemies into water or off cliffs, allowing you to kill things much tougher than you if you're smart.
    • Even if one is not willing to speed-run the game and defeat Calamity Ganon early, a skilled player can raid the underside of Hyrule Castle early on and get some great end-game items, even if they are only a few hours into the game — including extremely durable items such as the Hylian Shield.
    • The Soldier's series of armor can be bought cheaply at Hateno Village (630 Rupees in total for the whole set) and is upgraded using fairly common monster parts, yet its defense is among the highest in the game, on par with the Ancient armor set (which costs 6000 rupees and a ton of guardian parts to purchase, and yet more guardian parts to upgrade) and the Wild set (which is available only by completing all 120 shrines and needs dragon parts to upgrade). The only downsides are that it has no positive side effects besides defense and will attract lightning in a storm.
    • Just a little ways east of Hyrule Castle in the Crenel Hills area, you can find a guaranteed spawn for Wizzrobes with Thunderstorm, Meteor, and Blizzard Rods. Sniping them with a bow is fairly easy (and a Bomb Arrow can potentially kill them in one shot; by happenstance, a chest in the same area has a stock of them) and it'll get you three powerful magical weapons. And this can be done just by heading straight north to the castle as soon as you leave the Great Plateau.
    • The Phantom armor set, which was added to the game in the first DLC pack. Each piece can be found as soon as you leave the Great Plateau, and there's a book in the nearby Outpost Ruins that hints at their locations. On top of providing an attack boost, each piece has a base defense of 8, higher than the base defense of any other armor piece. Even once you find your first Great Fairy and enhance your armor, it's only matched by the Champion's Tunic. That said, the Phantom set can't be enhanced, so it's quickly outclassed once you find a second Great Fairy, get the Barbarian or Fierce Deity sets and the materials to upgrade them.
    • A certain Blue Hinox near the Faron rainforest always carries a Royal Broadsword and Royal Bow, even before Level Scaling causes virtually all Hinoxes to carry those weapons. And because it's a living Hinox, all you have to do is either glide onto its belly or shoot an arrow into its eye to get it to sit down, and you can grab those weapons and warp to safety. By returning every Blood Moon, you can have an inventory full of 36 base power melee weapons and 38 base power bows, letting you deal with stronger enemies much more easily.
  • Disproportionate Retribution:
    • Magda, a young woman standing outside the Hila Rao Shrine on Floret Sandbar, will get mad and attack you if you step on her flowers three times.
    • Some disguised Yiga Clan members won't try to attack immediately when talked to, instead offering to sell Link some bananas. Refusing will anger them and cause them to assault Link. Even if you buy all 99 of their bananas, which cost 99 rupees each to begin with, they will still attack you.
  • Distant Sequel: While vast stretches of time often pass between Zelda games, Breath of the Wild is quite easily the most extreme example. Exactly how long after the other games Breath of the Wild takes place is not stated, but 10,000 have passed since the ancient, technologically advanced Hylian civilization sealed the Calamity Ganon away in the game's backstory. This is on top of the amount of time that would have been needed for the medieval Hyrule seen in most games to develop the technology needed to create robots, Giant Mecha and other such wonders to begin with, making the amount of time that must gone by between the times of the other Zelda stories and Breath of the Wild vast indeed.
  • Divine Birds: Some of the oldest Hylian ruins, such as the Forgotten Temple, have carvings of Loftwings as introduced in Skyward Sword. Another type of ruin from an unknown civilization, mostly concentrated in the Faron region, features numerous statues of birds that are probably eagles, many of which have altars or offering bowls in front of them. And of course, one of the Divine Beasts, Vah Medoh, is a bird.
  • Double Standard: Rape, Female on Male: In order to obtain upgrades to his armor, Link has to endure various degrees of sexual assault from the gigantic Great Fairies of Hyrule. The first level upgrade is simply being blown a kiss; for the second the Fairy kisses her finger and presses it against Link's face, which garners a gesture of embarrassment from Link; the third has her full on make-out with Link, which is he very clearly is not fond of and afterwards finds him gasping for air; for the final upgrade, the Fairy grabs hold hold of Link and against his objections pulls him underwater for an undisclosed period of time, where all we hear are her laughs of delights and his screams. Afterwards he appears completely laid out and struggles back to his feet. This is all played for laughs, naturally.
  • Downer Beginning: The game begins with the latest Link waking up to a Hyrule that is After the End, with Ganon having become an Eldritch Abomination, taking over every Guardian and Divine Beast, slaying every Champion, devastating Hyrule, and is only stopped by Zelda making him a Sealed Evil in a Duel. On top of that, The Hero Dies, and has to spend a century in stasis recovering.
  • Downloadable Content: There is DLC in the form of an Expansion Pass which comes with two DLC packs:
    • The expansion pass gets you both DLC packs upon release, as well as adding three treasure chests to the Great Plateau containing a Nintendo Switch shirt and some other items. There's no other way to get the packs piece meal currently.
    • The first DLC pack, released in summer 2017, adds the Trial of the Sword, a hard mode, new armor, a new feature for the map that shows Link's last 200 hours of movement (and deaths) and how much time he has spent in each area, and one fast-travel point that can be moved to where Link is standing at any time.
    • The second DLC pack, released during the holidays of 2017, adds a new dungeon, extra story content, and more new challenges.
  • Drop the Hammer: Yet another option for melee weapons. As one can expect from such a weapon, it appears to pack a lot of power, but swings quite slow. Additionally they are effective at mining but can't cut down trees.
  • Dubtitle: Playing the game with an audio language different from the text language results in this, as the cutscene subtitles are based on the dub in that language. This can be fairly obvious if the player understands the audio language, or even if they don't, such as Revali laughing at Link mockingly in the original Japanese while the English subtitles read "Have fun sealing the darkness!".
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Even after Link saves Gerudo Town from Vah Naboris the guards still won't let Link in because of his gender. This is because while they admit that the whole Gerudo Town is deeply indebted to Link for everything he's done, their laws are iron clad and even their savior isn't exempt from them.
  • Dungeon Bypass:
    • Seemingly encouraged by the design of the Shrines. In stricter games, places you aren't intended to reach would have barriers added anyway, just in case. Here, there are gratuitously missing walls and ceilings that can be used to skip puzzles, if you can figure out some unintended way to reach them. No matter how you get to the end, the monk specifically praises your resourcefulness.
    • Closer to "puzzle bypass", but the new floating platforms — Octoroks tied to wooden platforms so they float — in Master Mode are intended to be either enemy vantage points, or gliding puzzles, and the challenge in both cases is to get to a treasure chest on them. If they are above ground, you can just shoot the octoroks with a bow to force them to drop to the ground, or wear monster masks to prevent the occupants becoming alerted and making the platforms rise up.
    • In a sense, climbing with an upgraded stamina meter. Facing a winding road filled with monsters leading up to a shrine? Just climb up the mountainside out of their side. Crossing a deep chasm? Find a bridge, or just paraglide over and climb up the far side. As one guide puts it, most players will experience the world horizontally, but upgraded stamina lets you experience it vertically. Not a pure example, as there are challenges (in particular, certain of the towers) that require you to either have upgraded stamina or several stamina-replenishing consumables.
    • Similarly, Revali's Gale allows easily skipping or bypassing some obstacles that would otherwise be very difficult or even impossible to get over (as this power, when acquired, allows the player to be launched high above ground from anywhere.)
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    E 
  • Early Game Hell: When you first start out, in a game where damage to someone with street clothes is done realistically, your initial trek through the Great Plateau will be stressful. As you get better equipment, increase your hearts, and start to learn the game's combat, it gets quite a bit more manageable.
    • As might be expected, Master Mode turns this Up to Eleven with things like making blue mooks the lowest level Link will face generally or adding things like a Lynel on the starting plateau.
  • Earn Your Fun: The game's really open-ended, to the point where you can go straight to the Final Boss immediately upon starting. If you want to experience the game's story, you're going to need to go out of your way to find it.
  • Easy Level Trick:
    • Due to the game's loose restrictions, it's easier than usual for players to find ways to cheese certain puzzles. One of the better examples of this is Eventide Island: How do you avoid being forced to scavenge for meager equipment and food to fight tough enemies after having your gear stripped from you? Drop some good weapons and food on the raft, land ashore to initiate the confiscation, and pick up the equipment afterwards.
    • Using Magnesis to drop things on enemies or smack them around is often the lowest-cost solution to a combat scenario. One room in the Trial of the Sword DLC (which deprives you of any equipment but that which is inside its rooms) includes a setup with a Lizalfos sleeping on a rock island, and a metal box that can be fished out of the water nearby. While fighting the Lizalfos is an option, you can preserve your limited weapons' durability by dropping the box on it for a One-Hit Kill.
    • Certain shrines revolve around fire or electricity, requiring you to make block flames or make circuits to progress, often at risk of damage from either hazard. However, if you have upgraded Flamebreaker Armor and the Thunder Helm or full set of Rubber Armor, these hazards are utterly nullified. You can walk right through them unharmed and make your puzzle-solving process much easier.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Ganon's newest incarnation is nothing short of this, at first seemingly having completely abandoned all traces of the fact that he Was Once a Man. His first battle form ventures more into Humanoid Abomination territory, being a large bug-like Cyborg made out of Guardian parts and other Sheikah Tech, the only trace of the original Ganondorf being the red bearded face. It's revealed that he was trying to reconstruct a physical body before the battle, but it looks like a half-rotting corpse. Ganon's final form has the title of "Hatred and Malice Incarnate", with Zelda stating Ganon has given up on reincarnating, at least in the English version. In the Japanese version, it's due to trying to reincarnate. In any case, he's the largest final boss in the series.
  • Eldritch Location: The Thyphlo Ruins and, to a lesser extent, the Korok Forest. The latter is the Koroks' home, but is surrounded by an impregnable section of woods shrouded in thick fog that can't be accessed in any way but a very specific route, lest creepy laughter and a teleport later the traveler find themselves back where they started. The Thyphlo Ruins on the other hand, directly north, is just the sort of unexplained creepy to raise dozens of questions. The entire island 100% pitch black at all times, and in fact a dome of darkness can be seen covering it from outside. You can light torches within, but nothing you do will ever bring the sunlight into the place, not even solving its puzzles and activating its shrine. There is never anything said about what these ruins are, who lived here, or who cursed the area so thoroughly to be darker than an unlit cellar at all times.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors: Fire attacks one-shot Ice-based enemies and vice-versa. More subtly, electric weapons gain a power boost around water — whether rain or in a body of water — exploding into a dome field, while wood weapons gain a power boost in fire and hot temperatures, when they are literally lit on fire. Similarly, bomb arrows instantly defuse in water, and instantly explode in fiery areas. The Master Sword, Ancient, and Guardian weapons also get a boost against Guardian enemies. Electricity, however, has no weakness. It does become more powerful in the rain or water, but this only applies to the player and so electric enemies can't be defeated by their own element backfiring, either.
  • 11th-Hour Superpower: The Bow of Light is given to you to fight Dark Beast Ganon.
  • Elite Mooks: The differently colored versions of normal enemies; the blue Bokoblin in the Great Plateau skull hideout is a standout example, wielding a shield and weapon far beyond the area standard. After you get better equipment, blue enemies cease to be this, but are replaced by black and silver variants that continue to be difficult into the endgame.
  • Emergency Weapon:
    • As you are given an infinite supply of bombs and the ability to detonate them at will, only limited by its recharge time, they serve as an effective, if weak, weapon in a pinch. Just be careful not to hit yourself.
    • Bokoblins that have no weapons will either fight with their fists, or dig up small rocks to throw at you. Moblins, if there are Bokoblins around, will pick them up and throw them at you.
    • Stal creatures without weapons will remove their arm to use it as a club.
  • Endgame+: Reloading the autosave after defeating the final boss will drop Link back outside the boss room, keeping the photos that might have been taken for the Compendium and marking the save file with a star icon. It also adds a counter to all three quest menus, showing how many in the world is left. The world map also gains a percentage completed counter showcasing how much of everything you found in the game.
  • End of an Age:
    • A major theme of the story is that traditional Zelda story features are not present. Hyrule is devastated and forever changed by Ganon. Link has moved from being a Knight in Shining Armor to an Action Survivor, and he doesn't start out as a clueless farm boy or child — even by the start, he is resourceful and trained. Zelda's innate divine sealing powers are suppressed until it's too late to prevent Ganon from unleashing destruction on Hyrule.
    • Ganon himself has truly changed from his traditional portrayal. In previous Zelda games, Ganon has always been a Sorcerous Overlord and The Chessmaster, whether he be a Pig Man demon or a Gerudo warlock, and his goal has always been consistent: Steal Triforce and Take Over the World. In this game, ten thousand years after the last Zelda game at the very least, Ganon displays almost none of those traits, as he's now a primal Eldritch Abomination with no grand ambition beyond destroying the world.
  • Enemy Scan: The Champion's Tunic allows you to see how much health enemies have.
    • The Hyrule Compendium also serves as this, allowing you to get a blurb of flavor text on most animals, plants, items and enemies in the game.
  • Energy Bow: The Bow of Light, available only for the grand finale, shoots bolts made of light and does not draw from Link's stock of arrows. The amiibo-exclusive Twilight Bow does the same and can be used freely in the main game, but deals less than one-third the damage of the former.
  • Eternal Engine: The Divine Beasts. Once he gets their maps, Link is able to use the Sheikah Slate to manipulate the entire dungeon in order to move platforms and blocks around or trigger mechanisms.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Monsters will not attack horses, nor do they abuse the horses they own. However, they won't hesitate to attack Link while he's on or near a horse, which may result in collateral damage, and horses taken from Bokoblins already have a high bond with Link, suggesting they were unhappy with their monstrous masters.
  • Evil Chancellor: Referenced and played for laughs. In Hyrule Castle, there are some books that can be found containing recipes from the royal family. One of these is the Monster Cake, which is described as the chancellor's favorite and a 'dangerous' dish that might motivate one to plan evil schemes.
  • Evolving Music: In the Champions' Ballad DLC, the music of the final dungeon adds more and more instruments as you complete its puzzles.
  • Excalibur in the Rust: The Master Sword, as seen in the logo, has seen better days. However, in the game itself, it's fine and dandy in the present day. The damage was caused by Guardians a hundred years ago, not by the passage of time, and it repaired itself magically after Zelda placed it in front of the Great Deku Tree. Nevertheless, its "true power" is only revealed in the presence of Calamity Ganon, or if one completes the Trial of the Sword DLC.
    • Unlike other weapons, the Master Sword cannot break, but when used repeatedly its power is depleted. In this state it can still be viewed in the inventory menu, where it is reduced to its broken and rusted state.
  • Exploding Barrels: These can be found throughout the world, usually near Bokoblin camps.
  • Exposed to the Elements: Averted. Link has a body temperature gauge, and if he travels somewhere too hot or too cold without proper clothing, he'll feel it and begin to take damage.
  • Expressive Mask: The Dark [Link] Hood that can be bought at Kilton's is ostensibly a mask/wig/hat piece, but when Link wears it, the face is animated like it's his own.
  • Eye Scream:
    • Shooting Hinoxes in the eyes with arrows causes them to fall over and wriggle in pain for several seconds. This is essential to killing Stalnoxes for good, as they can't be killed until their eyes are destroyed, much like smaller Stal enemies surviving as long as their skulls do.
    • The "headshot" point for Guardians is their pulsating blue eye. Hitting it with an Arrow temporarily disorients it, and firing an Ancient Arrow into it is a One-Hit Kill (but doesn't disintegrate the Guardian).

    F 
  • Falling Damage: Falling from too great of a height can kill Link, even if he's riding his shield (no, you can't block the ground). On a lesser note, if Link is stunned and sent tumbling down an incline, he continually takes damage until he comes to a stop and gets up.
  • Fantastic Fruits and Vegetables:
    • Voltfruit, the various forms of Safflina, and various supernatural species of mushroom provide buffs when cooked into food.
    • However, there is one notable downplayed example. Real-life acorns are technically edible... if you first grind them to a pulp and then put the pulp in a sack in a stream of running water for a week to leach out the extremely bitter tannins. Presumably the acorns in the game are specially bred Hyrulean sweet acorns.
  • Fantastic Racism: Hints of this at times from various townspeople. Muzu calls you a "lowly Hylian" and the gatekeeper at Hateno Village mentions that he believes Hylians are the only trustworthy race in Hyrule.
  • Fantasy Gun Control: Though Hyrule was under a state of Medieval Stasis before it unearthed the Guardians and Divine Beasts, there are dozens of 30-pounder field cannons atop strategic locations around the Akkala Citadel ruins. For whatever reason, Hyrule stopped development of gunpowder technology towards the arquebus and other portable firearms.
  • Fantasy Axis of Evil: The races under Calamity Ganon's command have characteristics and roles that make them fit loosely:
    • The Bokoblins are roughly the size of Hylians, and like them ride horses, placing them on the Humanoid role. The crude weapons they fashion and their less-than-average intelligence gives them some overlap with Savage, but...
    • Moblins and Hinoxes are the ones most closely fitting the Savage role. Bigger, dumber, and more brutal than the Bokoblins, the Moblins are much more animalistic, and the Hinoxes are monstrous cyclops.
    • The various Stal creatures are the Eldritch by default. They are undead variants of the other races that only show up at night, and although they are quite fragile, they magically put themselves back together when defeated until you destroy their heads. To top it all off, the bigger pools of Malice inside the Divine Beasts spew out infinite Stal heads, linking them ever closer to the inhuman toxicity of the Calamity.
    • The Yiga Clan are textbook examples of the Fallen, as expected from the Evil Counterpart of the Sheikah, the series' resident High Men. They are a radical sect of Sheikah that swore to overthrow Hyrule and kill the legendary hero. They have a hideout deep in a shadowy desert canyon, and their members are all ninjas skilled in stealth and disguise techniques. When not fighting or actively hunting down Link after he kills their leader, they disguise themselves as normal Hylian travelers and wander across Hyrule. While they do so, they sing praises about the brave Yiga warriors who work to defeat a false hero to anyone who'll listen, trying to morally undermine Link's quest. Interestingly, it appears their ranks are not exclusively rogue Sheikah, and they'll recruit and train anyone who wants to join in.
    • Due to their natural tendency for sneakiness, their more advanced weapons, and their funny chameleon design, this game's depiction of the Lizalfos dip more or less into the Crafty role. However, due to their size and brutality, they also fit the Savage role just as well.
    • The Lynels fit the Eldritch category. Unlike the others, the Lynels have a nonhumanoid centauroid body-type. They also have the ability to breathe fire (with the White-maned variety having even more special powers), and they use weapons made of a supernatural metal. Additionally, all Lynels encountered use elemental arrows.
  • Fastball Special: Given a Bokoblin being conveniently nearby, a Moblin may pull this tactic on you: grabbing his little buddy and proceeding to pitch him at you. A Lizalfos can also throw a Pebblit at you, though this is less common since there aren't many places where both of these enemies appear.
  • Feed It a Bomb:
    • You can trick the Moldulgas in the Gerudo Desert into eating a bomb, stunning them and forcing them to the surface so Link can attack.
    • One way of dealing with the Rock Octoroks on Death Mountain is tricking them into inhaling remote bombs and then detonating them.
    • During the boss fight with Fireblight Ganon, during the second half of the fight it'll put up a barrier and start drawing in energy for a powerful fireball attack. One of the only ways to get past the barrier is to drop a remote bomb and let Fireblight Ganon suck it up.
  • Fetch Quest: The most common type of sidequest involves someone asking for items that can be gathered in the wild, be they of animal, vegetable, or mineral origin (or even monster parts). A similar type involves taking a picture of a rare location, which naturally means dealing with or avoiding whatever monsters patrol the area. These are often less frustrating than they could be because, due to the open-ended nature of the game and ubiquity of collectible items, there's a good chance that Link already has whatever is being requested, or at least knows where to find the thing if the quantity he has isn't enough.
  • Final Death:
    • The horses Link can ride can be killed, and they don't come back unless you discover and unlock the Horse God.
    • Dark Beast Ganon also abandons his cycle of reincarnation, to muster the power for one last bid to destroy the world, bringing him his own. That's the English version, anyway. The Japanese version has that version be another attempt at reincarnation. In any case, depending on the version, it might be subverted in the true ending, where Zelda says he may return.
  • Final Dungeon Preview: Downplayed, since the player is free to make a beeline straight to Hyrule Castle to face Ganon from the moment they get the paraglider (though it isn't recommended since they will be severely under-equipped and the Final Boss fight will be a lot tougher). They are, however, encouraged to make multiple trips to the castle, both for the sake of several side quests and to grab some high-level weaponry.
  • Fire, Ice, Lightning:
    • The main elemental attacks in this game. Each has standard status effects: fire causes damage over time, ice freezes the target in place for a while, lightning can stun but also causes any weapons to be dropped. There is also Wind as a fourth element, but it acts as more of a mobility aid, with only Korok Leaves, Windblight Ganon, and Windcleavers utilizing it as an attack, and it doesn't have a standard status effect.
    • The three hazardous weather effects: heat (Fire), cold (Ice), and thunderstorms (Lightning).
    • Chuchus, Keese, Wizzrobes, and Lizalfos have fire, ice, and electric variations, and even normal Chuchu Jelly can also be turned into elemental Chuchu Jelly when the Chuchu or the Jelly it drops is subjected to the various elements.
    • The three dragons also fit this trope.
  • Flaming Sword: Besides the obvious Flameblades and Great Flameblades, wooden weapons can be lit on fire to do extra damage, though it will also wear them out rather quickly. Enemies are smart enough to ignite their clubs before attacking you if there's a campfire nearby.
  • Food Porn: The flavor text for the meals that Link can cook provide unique, succulent, and tantalizing descriptions that'll make you want to sink your teeth into them in real life. Special mention goes to the Gourmet Meat Stew:
    The meat has simmered for so long it melts in your mouth. A true bucket-list meal!
  • Forest of Perpetual Autumn: The Akkala region in the northeast is in autumn despite the rest of Hyrule being in spring.
  • Foreshadowing: The end of the first quest involves drawing a line between four shrines, which point to a ruined building where you go and meet with the King. By the end of the main quest, you have the four Divine Beasts forming a cross with their beams across the map, pointing to Hyrule Castle, where you go to save Zelda.
  • Four Is Death: The Champions are an Elite Four that pilot four Divine Beasts, and died at the hands of four Blight Ganons, that corrupted and stole those divine beasts. The stolen guardians also come in four main varieties, scout, walker, turret, and skywatcher. The scouts themselves come in models I-IV.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: If Link is struck by lightning, the thermometer will spike to what it is in Death Mountain for a split-second.
  • Freeze Ray: Cryonis allows Link to create tall blocks of ice from bodies of water that can be climbed on.
  • Full-Boar Action: Wild boars can be hunted for food. They attack on sight, but will run away if Link injures them. Ganon's final form is probably his largest pig form yet.

    G 
  • Gainaxing: The Great Fairies can be observed having this.
  • Game Gourmet: This is the first Zelda game to incorporate food as a major gameplay aspect. You can find all kinds of fruits, nuts, fish, meats, and so on to freeze, roast, or cook into full-fledged dishes.
  • Game Hunting Mechanic: Link can hunt wild animals, from birds, deer, and boar all the way up to woolly rhinoceroses. Each drops raw steak or bird meat of varying quality, which can be used for cooking or Vendor Trash. Hateno Village has a minigame in which Link can be hired by Dentz to cull deer for money in Retsam Forest.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • Respawning enemies are explained by the Blood Moon rising and reviving them.
    • The Hyrule Compendium has notes about the diets of Bokoblins, Moblins, and Lizalfos, and not only can these foods usually be found at monster camps alongside them, but by wearing a mask that fools them, you can approach and drop things corresponding to the monsters' diets and they'll eat them. It's most notable with Lizalfos, who are said to eat bugs. As bugs aren't a food for Link and can't get killed and turned into an item, they can't be found in camp hoards— they have to be caught or bought. This means the only way to see proof that Lizalfos eat bugs is to provide them and watch the lizards snack.
  • Gardening-Variety Weapon: Link can use items such as the Farmer's Pitchfork, the Woodcutter's Axe, and the Farming Hoe as weapons.
  • Genre Throwback: Designed as one to the very first Zelda game, where you're dumped in the middle of nowhere with nothing but the clothes on your back (or in this case, your undergarments), can travel anywhere you want at any time, and have to take weapons and gear where you can find them since it's dangerous to go alone.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: An In-Universe example with the Zora-made Silver Longsword, which was popular with Hylians because of its cool design.
  • Ghibli Hills: The Overworld in this game is an extensive, richly rendered spread of unspoiled nature dotted with Hylian ruins, full of lush vegetation and herds of wild animals.
  • Ghostly Goals: The deceased Champions, and the king of Hyrule, are unable to rest while Ganon continues to exist, and give Link whatever aid they can. After Ganon is defeated, they are satisfied and ascend into the heavens.
  • Glass Cannon:
    • The Royal Guard line of weapons boast the highest base attack stats in the game, yet their pitiful durability on par with Boko weapons makes one wonder if they're even worth using most of the time.
    • Guardian Weapons, while not as good as Royal, are much more plentiful and boast pretty good damage, especially with ++ versions from hard trials of might which can have damage numbers rivaling even the Master Sword at full power, and ignores the armor on overworld Guardians to let you punch outside of your weight class, but unfortunately they all have extremely low durability, you'll rarely get to keep one for more than a single fight.
    • The Champions' Ballad DLC makes Link this while wielding the One-Hit Obliterator. While having infinite attack power means he can slay anything in one hit, his health is drained to one-fourth of a heart, meaning that he takes one hit from anything no matter what defense food/potions or armor he's using, he's dead.
  • Glowing Flora: Several plants and mushrooms glow during the night, most notably the Silent Shroom. It renders them far more noticeable to the player. There are also luminescent peapods in the Korok Forest which serve as streetlights.
  • Go for the Eye: Hinoxes and Guardians are particularly vulnerable to being shot in the eye.
    • Hinoxes eventually catch on - once their health has been reduced by half, if they see Link draw his bow when they're not in the middle of an attack, they use a hand to shield their eye.
    • For Stalnoxes, the undead version of Hinoxes, the eye is their only vulnerable part. Link has to hit the eye enough to knock it loose (to then attack with melee) to defeat them unless Link has a lot of patience, arrows, or a very strong bow. Similar to their living counterparts, they will start to guard their eye at around half health if Link draws his bow and the Hinox isn't attacking.
    • Guardian lasers can only be aborted by shooting them in the eye or leaving their sight (either by taking cover or through Stasis). Fire an Ancient Arrow in the eye, however, and they break down. A shot in the eye will also stun any guardian for a few seconds, allowing the player time to either get closer or hide as they see fit.
  • Gold-Colored Superiority: The strongest possible variants of monsters are golden in color, and appear only in Master Mode. Also weapons that you were lucky enough to find a bonus on (like Attack Up) have the quality of their bonus determined by the colour. The tier is white for lowest, blue for middle (only Increased Durability appears as a blue bonus) and gold is for the best bonuses.
  • Golden Ending: There's a version of the ending that adds a bit more at the end. You get it by beating all the main story quests, completing all the main dungeons, and getting Link's memories back.
  • Goldfish Poop Gang: Yiga clan soldiers can be somewhat threatening early on, but once you've collected better equipment and gotten used to their fighting style, they become this. Their melodramatic dialog and Suicidal Overconfidence never falters, no matter how many of them you "kill" (when they run out of health, they drop loot and teleport away instead of dying). The "Blademasters" that start appearing after you defeat their boss are a bit tougher, but the weaker fake-NPC ones continue appearing, as well as archers, who are more like a Duplex Bow delivery service than worthwhile opponents.
  • Good Colors, Evil Colors:
  • Good Morning, Crono: As usual for the series; Eiji Aonuma even lampshaded during E3 2016 gameplay that for as many conventions as the game breaks, they did keep that one. Even then, Link wakes up in a much different way than usual, as he's woken up by a mysterious voice in a no less mysterious place called the Shrine of Resurrection.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress: Drop from a height and you'll sustain fall damage. Plummet from too great a height and it'll prove fatal. Even worse, if Link is knocked over by an enemy, bomb blast, etc. on a hill, he'll start to roll, and this will gradually damage him until he comes to a stop. The "gravitational cognizance" version can affect anyone on horseback that Link hits with the Stasis + rune. The horse will continue moving, leaving the magically stuck victim floating in air. Upon the rune wearing off, the victim will float momentarily with a question mark over their head before falling to the ground.
  • The Greatest Story Never Told: Several NPCs will remark on the legendary knight that protected Zelda 100 years prior or remark on the Master Sword with utmost curiosity and you're rarely ever given the opportunity to let them know that you are said knight or that you have said sword in your possession. And the few NPCs that you CAN address on such won't buy your story. Averted with the Zoras, who are Long-Lived and therefore knew you personally 100 years ago; most of the older ones still recognize you on sight; as a result, this is the only section of the Divine Beast questline where your allies actually know the full story of what's going on.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body:
    • If a Stal creature has no weapons, it will use one of its arms as one. Link can also use one himself — that still wriggles, no less. He can also carry a Stal creature's severed head and kick it as a projectile.
    • Occasionally, unarmed Moblins will pick up nearby objects and chuck them at you, including their smaller Bokoblin buddies.
  • Grimy Water: Here and there are swamps of bubbling black ooze in which Link will drown instantly (at the cost of one heart) if he is even partially submerged in it.
  • Group Picture Ending: "The Champions' Ballad" DLC ends with a memory of the Champions taking a group photo with the Sheikah Slate (complete with Daruk pulling everyone into a bear hug at the last second). Link receives a copy of the photo afterwards and can hang it up on the wall in his house at Hateno Village (provided he bought all the upgrades).
  • Guerrilla Boulders: In addition to Link-seeking magma bombs in a few areas of Death Mountain, boulders will often tumble down ravines while Link is trying to climb them; the same happens with giant snowballs in cold areas. In many cases, there are enemies nearby who could conceivably be responsible, but in others there are no living things nearby.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: Wolf Link from Twilight Princess can be summoned as an AI-controlled ally via his amiibo, effectively allowing two incarnations of Link to team up.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • The game is generally pretty good about teaching the player with the environment, but figuring out how to actually cook things (due to using a specific menu function before having anything to do with the fire/pot) can be a trick. There's also no in-game tracking of recipes, so if you don't remember how you created that spectacular dish... sucks to be you.
    • The game is a bit of a throwback compared to other modern gated/curated/laid out games. Large number of things, like inventory and armor upgrades can be easily missed if you don't happen to find the NPC who does them. The inventory upgrade NPC moves after a certain number of upgrades, and if you didn't write down his directions and/or new location... sucks to be you if you can't remember where he said he was going. And it's entirely possible to miss that NPC completely, if you don't follow the intended path out of Kakariko Village (towards Hateno), leaving you stuck with extremely limited inventory space.
    • As you progress through the game, many enemies will 'rank up' in difficulty, with them becoming more powerful variants with new attacks and better weapons. However, the game never quite explains how this aspect works, so it may surprise players that it's actually based on an extremely complicated points system that increases every time you kill certain monsters.
    • "The Champions' Ballad" has some minor story-related content that is not remotely hinted at by the game itself. Refighting the Illusory Realm Blight Ganons after completing the four Champions Songs already will give the Champions new dialogue regarding their pasts, their relationships with Link, and the current state of Hyrule. And the picture of the Champions that Kass gives you at the end can be mounted in Link's House in Hateno Village.
    • The descriptions of the locations of the items of EX gear included with the DLC pass are for the most part incredibly vague, just giving you a general area to look in without telling you any more than that. A couple of the descriptions are even outright misleading, and will likely have you looking on the wrong part of the map altogether.
    • The Ishto Soh Shrine, "Bravery's Grasp", is a little tricky to figure out. The shrine has a crystal switch that activates alternating rising platforms that allow you to reach the monk, but when you're on the platforms, there's no way to hit the switch enough times to get all the way up. There's a moving platform and a laser guarding a chest, but the platform doesn't seem to have any purpose. Bombs on the moving platform and behind the crystal won't work to trigger the switch enough times, either. It turns out that the solution is to pick up the laser and put it on the moving platform to create a consistent cycle as the laser hits the switch back and forth. The title of the shrine means you have to pick up something you otherwise wouldn't want to. However, since this is not possible anywhere else in the game, it's very difficult to come to that conclusion.
    • Attempting to find all 900 Korok Seeds without a guide is likely to make you run across Hyrule several times over and still miss a few, even with the Korok Mask equipped. Some types of puzzles can easily be seen on the map, while others will likely have you climbing all sorts of strange in hopes that a gust of leaves will appear to examine or a conspicuous lone rock can be picked up to reveal a Korok. Some puzzles like the few that require a horse to jump over a line of short fences, the empty offering trays near the Yiga Clan Hideout entrance, etc. can become very obscure.
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