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"There are no sidekicks in Titans. We're partners. We have each other's backs."
Rose: What the hell is this place anyway?
Dick: This is a place where people like you can learn how to be the best version of who you are.
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Titans is a 2018 live-action superhero series, based on the DC Comics team Teen Titans.

Produced by Geoff Johns, Greg Berlanti, Akiva Goldsman, and Sarah Schechter, Titans was created for the DC Universe streaming service after previously being in development at TNT since 2014. The first season had 12 episodes. It aired on DC Universe in the United States and on Netflix internationally.note  It premiered on DC Universe on October 12, 2018, with episodes being released weekly.

Titans is represented in the Arrowverse as Earth-9, being briefly seen in the first and fifth parts of Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019). However, despite sharing producer Greg Berlanti, the crew have Schrödinger's Canon and made it clear that while it's represented in the Arrowverse, the series itself is set in very much its own world.

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Prior to release, Titans was greenlit for a second season, which started airing on September 6, 2019. A third season has been ordered.


Titans contains examples of:

  • Absentee Actor: Very obvious in Season 2 because of the increasing of the main cast. In a similar fashion to Young Justice, almost each episode will mostly focus on 3 or 4 story-lines, while some characters will not appear at all.
  • Abusive Parents: Trigon and Slade, probably DC's most infamous examples, though none of them touch the epic-scale manipulations of their comic counterparts.
    • Lionel Luthor is no slouch in this department, he was shown being physically abusive toward Lex Luthor, in his younger years.
  • Accuser of the Brethren: The OG Titans accuse Jason for messing with their things in season 2 episode 7, despite not having any evidence against him.
  • Action Girl: Heroes or antagonists, all major female characters were shown having combat skills, often taking matters in their own hands.
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  • Action Hero: Most of the main cast prefer to solve their problems with their fists.
  • Adaptational Badass:
    • Doctor Light: In the comics he was a scientist who got his powers from his costume and never really represented a great danger, here, he is a metahuman capable of generating light from his body.
    • Aqualad: In the comics, he was considered useless by the writers, while in the show, he is a water-bending Atlantean.
  • Adaptational Consent: An important plot point for Season 1. In the comics, Raven is a Child by Rape. Here, her mother is a villain who is in a consensual relationship with Trigon.
  • Adaptational Diversity:
    • Characters like Mercy Graves, Don Hall and Wintergreen are played by black actors, whereas they were white in the comics, with the latter even receiving an Age Lift.
    • The entire Wilson family is Race Lift-ed, Slade and Adeline go from white to Latino, and respectively Asian-american, Jericho is even played by an actual deaf trans actor, and Rose instead of being half white, is half Latino now.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job:
    • While Beast Boy keeps his green hair, his skin color is natural instead of being green as well. Played with as he appears to turn green only when using his animal powers.
    • Similarly, Raven has a natural skin tone like in the classic comics, but turns grey as in the cartoon (and the comics it since influenced) when tapping into her demonic powers.
    • Likewise with Starfire, who also has a natural skin tone, but turns orange as in the comics when using her powers. The same can be said for her hair, which is magenta in her "human mode" but turns to the comics' scarlet when using her powers.
    • Amy Rohrbach is blonde here, whereas she's brunette in the comics.
    • Garth is black haired in the comics, but is portrayed as having dirty blond hair instead.
  • Adaptational Early Appearance:
    • The founding members of the Titans in this adaptation are Robin, Hawk, Dove and Wonder Girl, with Aqualad being the first recruit. In the comics, it was formed by Robin, Kid Flash and Aqualad, while Wonder Girl was the first recruit when the team was officially named. The second Titans team is formed by same Robin, but this time with Kory, Raven and Beastboy. This brings it in line with the second run of the comics titled ''New Teen Titans'' and the famous animated series, though other members are expected to join the core team later.
    • In the comics, Jason Todd made his debut as Robin when Dick is already Nightwing. Here, he debuts only over a year after Dick's split with Batman and is still using the Robin costume.
  • Adaptational Wimp:
  • Adapted Out:
    • Most likely due to his status as a Justice League founder in the post-Flashpoint comics (as well as the 2017 Justice League movie), Cyborg is not a part of the team in this series. However, he does exist, given an Adaptation Origin Connection the Doom Patrol in their own series, and is set to make an appearance here afterwards.
    • Founding team members Garth and Wally West are also absent, as is Roy Harper. Wally and Roy's absences can likely be attributed to their presence in the Arrowverse, while Garth has been announced to appear in Season 2.
    • There’s no mention of Slade Wilson’s other son, Grant. Jericho has elements of his brother in his characterization, suggesting he’s a Composite Character.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Many characters get to have their own focus episode usually named after them.
  • Adults Are Useless: Averted with Starfire, who’s both super powered and can control those powers.
  • Adult Fear: Filled to the brim with it, from witnessing your parents or surrogate parents dying horribly (Dick, Dawn, and Rachel), to waking up suddenly with no memories of your life or even what kind of person you are (Kori), to losing yourself to your inner demons and becoming a monster (Dick), to having an aspect of yourself that you can't control making you a danger to your loved ones (Gar and Rachel), abusive parental figures (Dawn, Rose, Gar and possibly Dick) and the threat of sexual abuse towards minors (Hank and Don). One way or another, these characters have hard lives and face some truly frightening things outside the typical superhero fare.
  • Aesop Amnesia: Dick Grayson's character development seemed to be going in circles the entire first season. Every few episodes the following pattern repeats: He does something brutally violent, mopes about having such tendencies and his inability move on from under Batman's influence, then does something that seems to indicate putting it behind him. Then an episode or two later he's back to being still brutally violent.
  • Age Lift: All over the place. Likely why the series is called Titans and dropping the Teen out of the name.
    • Dick and Kori are in their late twenties rather than early twenties like the current continuity.
    • Garfield is played by 23-year-old Ryan Potter when introduced.
    • Raven is actually younger than her comics and 2003 cartoon counterparts. Her actress was just 13 during filming of the first season.
    • Hawk & Dove are played by actors in their thirties.
    • Donna Troy's actress Conor Leslie was 27 during production of the first season.
  • Aliens Speaking English: Starfire and Faddei know and speak English, but shocking one is Blackfire who have never bean on Earth before, yet speaks as if she is a native earthling.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: Downplayed. Characters like Kory, Raven and Garfield, have normal skin color this time. Unlike their comics counterparts, they only change it when using their powers. A justified downplaying of the fore examples, as it would be quite difficult to keep the actors' skin painted orange, green or grey all the time.
  • Amnesiac Hero: Koriand'r doesn't even know she has powers (let alone her name!), discovering them spontaneously when pressed into dangerous situations.
  • And Starring:
  • Animal-Themed Superbeing: Nightwing, Garfield, Robin, Hawk and Dove.
  • Apocalypse Maiden: Once again, Rachel is prophesied to bring about the end of the world as we know it.
  • Arch-Enemy:
    • Slade for Titans but especially for Dick Grayson.
    • Blackfire is implied to be this to Kory.
  • Aristocrat Team: Downplayed, as Dick and Jason were taken under the wing of wealthy Bruce Wayne, same with Gar and Doctor Caulder; Donna was adopted into amazonian royalty; Rose is the illegitimate daughter of Deathstroke, who is also morbidly rich. Played straight by Kory and Rachel; the first one is an alien princess destined to rule an entire planet, while the latter is the daughter of a god (albeit an evil one). Of course, they have at their disposition a fancy base operation, latest technology, training facilities and whatever they need for fighting crime.
  • Art Major Biology: Beast Boy shifts forms by “reconfiguring his DNA.” If that was all he was doing, even one transformation could take months and kill him in the process.
  • Artistic License – Chemistry: The Melting Man describes in vivid detail what being burnt with hydrofluoric acids feels like. In reality, HF acid reacts with the nerves in a way that burn victims cannot even tell they are being burned. Moreover, because of how HF acid reacts with calcium and magnesium in the body, it doesn’t take more than a palm-sized burn (like the one Clay receives on his shoulder) to be fatal without medical treatment.
    • Somewhat averted by the writers identifying hydrofluoric acid as the acid used to murder the Haley Circus members. While the reaction is somewhat exaggerated, if you’re going to use any acid as a murder weapon, HF acid is an effective way to go.
  • Ascetic Aesthetic: "Faux Hawk" reveals Slade's mind being represented as a white room with eerie minimalistic aesthetics, but clearly full of dark secrets. It goes in the hand with Slade's stoicism and his career as a Professional Killer. It's more horrifying when you're thinking that's the place where he kept Jericho trpped for 5 full years.
  • Avoid the Dreaded G Rating: Granted, this show was always intended to be TV-MA, but the infamous "fuck Batman" line seems specifically chosen to rid unsuspecting parents of any illusion that this show was meant for kids like previous Teen Titans media.
  • Babysitting Episode: Garfield spends most of episode "Atonement" tending a wounded Conner.
  • Backdoor Pilot: The "Doom Patrol" episode is one for their own series of the same name.
  • Badass Adorable: Garfield is a video game geek capable to turn into other animals. Jericho is a Disabled Snarker with a very friendly disposition capable of Mind Control. Connor Kent is Superman's and Lex Luthor's clone, with the maturity of a young child, and the power of the first one and the intellect of the second.
  • Badass Crew: To nobody's surprise when the team is formed by super-beings and badass normals.
  • Badass Family:
    • The Wilsons; the patriarch is world's most badass and dreaded assassin, the son is a Handicapped Badass who can Body Surf anytime and the illegitimate daughter who is a McNinja metahuman with Healing Factor and enhanced physiology (Super Toughness, Super Strength, super agility).
      • Averted by Slade's wife, Adeline, of all people; in the comics she a military Action Girl, and the one who trained Slade when he served in the army, before marrying him. In the show, she seems to be just a housewife.
    • The Batfamily: Batman who is world's best detective and finest Badass Normal who can keep up against metahumans with god-like powers, and his adopted sons: Dick Grayson, former Robin, a Circus Brat who is the brave leader of the eponymous Titans; and Jason Todd, formerly a street kid who vandalized the Batmobile, now-the new more than trigger happy Robin.
      • Barbara Gordon, who is an Action Girl and a close friend of Batman.
  • Badass Normal: Dick Grayson, Jason Todd, Bruce Wayne, Hank Hall and Dawn Granger particularly.
  • Bad Future: "Dick Grayson" shows a mixed example, with all the Titans having turned out almost ridiculously well but this trope having hit Gotham hard, with every member of Batman's supportive cast dead, missing or crippled, Batman himself increasingly isolated and unhinged, and crime having risen to a point where there's no longer a bad part of town because that would imply that there's such a thing as a non-bad part of town. This is because Trigon wants Dick to willingly choose darkness over light. If he turns his back on the exaggerated goodness of his own life to wade back into the exaggerated badness of Gotham, he's implicitly admitting that that's where he truly belongs.
  • Bad Guys Do the Dirty Work: Downplayed. Dick Grayson wants the man who killed his parents, Tony Zucco, dead. Instead of killing him personally, though, he allows Maroni thugs to gun him down.
  • Bar Brawl: in 1x03, Kory fights a bunch of assholes in a cafeteria.
    • Jason Todd starts a fight in his own debut episode.
  • Battle Couple:
    • Hawk and Dove; their Establishing Character Moment together, was to show them fighting side by side some mooks.
    • Dick and Kory; they fought together against Deathstroke in order to save Jason's life from the latter.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: In first episode of season 2, each Titan has to confront their darkest inner demons, in hallucinaions induced by Trigon to take control of them.
  • Batman Gambit: Slade's plans involving the Titans. Not surprising giving that he is the evil counterpart of the Trope Namer.
  • Big Bad: Trigon, who works behind the scenes, as Titans are facing with his acolytes that try to summon him.
  • Big Eater: Raven watches in shock as Rita Farr piles a massive heap of onion rings, spaghetti, and cooked meat onto her plate, and then drowns the whole thing in gravy.
  • Bishōnen: Beast Boy.
    • Jericho too.
  • Bloodier and Gorier: Titans takes total advantage of its R rating, showing a lot of explicit violent scenes to the point of Nausea Fuel.
  • Body Horror: When not taking a human form, Rita Farr slumbers in her room as a massive, maggot-like fleshy, pulsating mass.
    • Beast Boy's transformations sometimes feature elements of this. Rather than simply be the instantaneous human-to-animal change from the comics and cartoons, it actually takes time, and is more like a werewolf transformation, complete with cracking limbs, and his body contorting into its new shape.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Is one of Deastroke's MO on his job.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Season 2 starts with everybody, but Gar being brainwashed by Trigon. By the end of season 2, Garfield himself is brainwashed by CADMUS, and the results are really not pretty for his sanity.
  • Breaking the Fellowship: It happens twice in the show.
    • In "Jericho", The OG Titan team falls apart after Jericho's death.
    • Season 2; Slade's return regroups both generations together but it doesn't last and everybody goes on a separate path once again.
  • Break the Cutie:
    • Garfield cheerfully mentions in Season 1, he never killed. Comes episode 7 where, on animal instinct, he mauls an asylum doctor to death after said doctor attacks Rachel; he winds up traumatized. Then comes Season 2, where he is almost killed by his own Brain Washed friends at Trigon's orders; then he gets brainwashed himself by Cadmus Labs and is forced by Mercy Graves to cold-bloodily murder civilians. He suffers a total emotional breakdown after this.
    • Rachel, her father is Satan-expy who created her for the sole purpose of bringing him on Earth dimension to install Hell on Earth. But in order to do that, he has to break her heart, which he does, with the help of her mother and an almost dead Garfield.
  • Broken Bird: Rose, Jason, Dick, Rachel.
  • Brooding Boy, Gentle Girl: Dawn is the gentle blondie to Hank's Jerk Jock brooding boy.
  • Brought to You by the Letter "S":
    • Both Jason and Dick (used to) wear an "R" over the left side.
    • Superboy is wearing from time to time a black shirt with the classic red "S" on the chest.
    • Donna used to sport a stylized "W" belt before moving on from being Wonder Girl.
  • Cain and Abel: Blackfire is quickly established as Starfire's older, murderous sister. She murdered her own parents to seize the throne of Tamaran for herself, and by the end of Season 2 she comes to Earth to kill Starfire.
  • Cartridges in Flight: From the slow-motion scene where a thug shoots Starfire, its clear when a bullet is fired, it clones its own casing. This new magic casing stays attached to the bullet throughout its whole travel time. The original casing is ejected from the port.
  • Casting Gag: Some of them in the Japanese dub:
  • Celebrity Paradox: Iain Glen playing Bruce Wayne. He was also in Game of Thrones, which Rachel is seen watching. What's more, she pronounces the word "khaleesi" at one point. Jorah Mormont (Glen's character in Game of Thrones) pronounced it every time he addressed Daenerys Targaryen.
  • Central Theme: Should you repress your darker impulses, or find a productive use for them? The first season shows that neither choice is without its problems.
  • Character Focus: The show has a lot of A Day in the Limelight episodes that goes in depth about the characters.
  • Character Title: Many episodes are titled after the focus character of the day.
  • The Chew Toy: Jason Todd and Garfield Logan big times in Season 2. The writers made sure to hit them both from every direction: kidnapping, torture, harsh treatment from their own friends, mental breakdown.
  • Christianity Is Catholic: Raven's mom's house has several Catholic crucifixes, crosses and icons.
  • Cliffhanger: The show has become notorious for using cliffhangers on the most tense moments.
    • The final of Season 1 ends up with two cliffhangers, with a Dick possessed by Trigon's evil magic and succumbing to his darker demons, while the second introduces a mysterious young man evading a lab, while the audience had to wait for a full year until next season.
    • Season 2 takes it Up to Eleven with almost every episode having a cliffhanger.
      • Episode 3 ends up with Jason kidnapped by Deathstroke and Gar finding just a trail of blood. Next episode is a whole flashback episode.
      • Episode 5 continues from where 2x03 was left, but also ends up with a cliffhanger with Jason falling to his death because of Deathstroke.
      • Episode 6 introduces us to Conner Kent, who is the mysterious young man that escaped from a Cadmus lab in Season 1's final. Only by the end of the episode, the show catches on from where the previous episode ended. Jason is saved, but Conner himself gets shot with kryptonite, while his dog, Krypto is taken away.
      • Episode 7 is ending with Jason trying to kill himself until Dick tries to stop him by to starting to confess why there is so much bad blood in the team. Only next episode, we learn the circumstances of what truly happened.
      • Episode 9 ends up with a Dick Grayson arrested for attacking two airport cops.
      • Episode 11 final centers around Garfield being brainwashed by Cadmus, killing a scientist in the process.
  • Cluster F-Bomb:
    • Special mention goes for Jason who cannot talk without dropping the f-bomb every 2 words.
    • The rest of the main cast too everytime they are angry or upset over something.
  • Coitus Ensues:
    • Dick and Kory sleeping together for the first time in 1x05, given they've known each other only a very short (hostile) time.
    • Hawk and Dove in their flash back episode.
    • Donna Troy and Garth.
  • Combat Parkour: Dick, Jason and Rose.
  • Composite Character:
    • Just like in the animated series, Robin is Dick Grayson, but has Tim Drake's bo staff.
    • Shyleen Lao is the name of a rather obscure Doom Patrol member in the comics with Playing with Fire powers (codename Fever). This version is An Ice Person, suggesting the better known Arani Desai/Celsius, who was both. Early publicity even called the character Arani Desai.
    • Jericho Wilson has elements of his brother, Grant, in his characterization and Grant hasn’t been seen nor mentioned, suggesting this.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: The sleeper agent mooks all have explosives implanted in their heads to keep them from talking. Their handler is implant-free, yet his organization will send a kill squad after him as soon as he’s compromised, and he knows they will do this.
  • Convection Schmonvection: In one episode Kory Anders uses her solar-powered fire bending powers to torch a bad guy and his cronies so badly they turn to ash sculptures that eventually crumble for dramatic effect. (To put this in perspective, it takes about 90 minutes at 871–982 °C (1,600–1,800 °F) to cremate a corpse.) Cue the mostly intact photo of Rachel right behind him that gives Kory her next clue on who might help her uncover her identity.
  • Cool Old Guy: Bruce Wayne and Negative Man.
    • Slade is a darker version.
  • Cool Mask: Dick, Jason, Hank and Dawn all sport masks to cover up their identities.
    • Slade too; through in Jason's eyes is rather funny looking.
  • Custom Uniform of Sexy: "Titans"? More like " We are very sexy heroes and we want you to know by wearing very body fit latex costumes".
  • Cowboy Cop: Dick / Robin in spades.
    • Inflicts life threatening injuries, which veer into manslaughter / murder territory.
    • Failure to respond to exigent circumstances in a hostage situation.
    • Failure to verify minor’s identity. When minor mentions “evil inside me,” fails to schedule psych eval, and notify child protective services.
    • Disappears while on shift.
    • Is still employed, so obviously lying on situation reports.
    • Police brutality through beating up civilians, without probable cause, nor circumstances supporting self defense
    • Allowed to operate outside of assigned precinct and state for several days without having to physically show up to work in headquarters.
  • Dark Action Girl:
    • Rose Wilson before her Heel–Face Turn.
    • Blackfire is a powerful tamaranian and Kory's evil sister.
    • Shimmer, a Card-Carrying Villain.
  • Dark and Troubled Past:
    • Raven's the hybrid daughter of Trigon. Here, she had an unhappy home and school life due to her magical powers which she doesn't understand, with her mother being the only person who cares about her. Had, because she's orphaned in the first episode by people trying to kidnap her, and she goes on the run to escape them. She also fearfully talks about "the darkness" feeling good. The first trailer also implies she will be put in a religious institution.
    • Dick's parents died when their trapeze performance was sabotaged causing both of them to fall to their deaths, a form of Death by Origin Story. Dick believed someone murdered them, but many people wrote it off as an accident. In addition, he was taken in by Batman himself, but Dick had since parted with him on a very sour note.
    • Beast Boy: His intro-flashback puts him in Congo, with what looks like a nasty case of Ebola.
  • Darker and Edgier: Unlike past versions, this setting is firmly in the R-rated territory with swearing, brutal action (including bone snaps, people getting shot, burned, and mangled), and an overall darker tone taking advantage of being on a streaming service, like what the MCU's Netflix shows are. All while also still being about superheroes unabashedly like the source.
  • Dance Battler: Both Dawn and Rose qualify.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Several characters.
    • Jason Todd combines his snarkiness with a lot of swearing.
    • Dick seems to be the sarcastic type.
    • Rachel is just as deadpan as her animated counterpart.
    • Rose is rather mocking and trolling.
    • Jericho is the resident Disabled Snarker.
    • Even Slade has his moments.
  • Decomposite Character: Raven's mother, Angela Roth, is separated into two characters in the show; her biological mother Angela Azarath and her adoptive mother Melissa Roth.
  • A Dick in Name: Richard "Dick" Grayson...
  • Downer Beginning: The first episode and entire Titansverse begins with a vision to the Flying Grayson's deaths.
  • Downer Ending: Season One ends with Trigon being summoned to Earth by Rachel's real mother, and their corrupting/brainwashing Dick Grayson with a nightmare that ends with him killing a murderous Batman, leading to him accepting the darker impulses he wanted to suppress.
  • The Dreaded: Trigon who is an interdimensional satanical God of Evil and Slade for being the most feared and skilled assassin in the world.
  • Dumb Muscle: The hitman sent to capture Raven in the first episode. He knows Raven is superpowered. He could have showed up with a group of guys, captured the mom before hand, and used her as leverage to get Raven to cooperate. Instead, he shows up alone, confuses Raven with some plot bombs about her real parents, and before Raven get get past the initial shock, he executes the mom in front of her. Obviously Raven blows up at him, and he fails to capture her.
  • Dysfunction Junction: Just about every main character has a personal trauma that messed them up, NO EXCEPTION.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Donna Troy appears in a photograph and phone contact list during the second episode of Season 1 before making her official introduction in six episodes later.
  • Experienced Protagonist: The OG Titans.
    • Jason Todd too; he was already Robin for a year before the events from Season 1.
  • Expository Hairstyle: Both Rachel and Kory sports new hairstyles as a visual cue for the 4 months time skip and personal change.
  • Evil Feels Good: In her character teaser, Raven fearfully talks about how feeling "the darkness" (likely referring to her demonic heritage) feels good.
  • Fair Cop:
    • After leaving Gotham, Dick sets up as a police officer in Detroit (instead of the fictional Bludhaven in the comics) while also protecting the city as a Vigilante Man.
    • Lindsey Gort as Dick's partner, Amy Rohrbach.
  • Fanservice: Because of course you have to clean your superhero costume gear naked from the waist up after a hard night's vigilante-ing when you have a physique like Dick Grayson.
    • Viewers get treated to some (non-frontal) nudity from both Hank and Dawn in their flashback episode.
    • Also, this goes without saying for Starfire. Anna Diop certainly isn’t hard to watch.
  • Fantastic Angst:
    • Kory feels like she is belonging nowhere for being an alien princess stranded on Earth.
    • Superboy, being the clone of Superman and Lex Luthor is more than enough to give him identity issues.
    • When your father is a powerful demonic entity, angsting over it really is a proper reaction.
    • Anyone would wonder why they are alive from incidents that usually would kill a person.
  • Fantasy Kitchen Sink: Despite being Darker and Edgier, the show doesn't try to hide its superhero roots. The main trio is a Badass Normal martial artist, an alien princess, and an empath of demonic origin. Then you have a guy who can shapeshift to any animal, an Amazonian clone, two bird-themed heroes who act as a Battle Couple, and the villains include a master of illusion, a master of blood magic, and a literal demon who's the father of said empath.
  • Food Porn: Dinner with the Doom Patrol, my god. Larry Trainor must be one hell of a cook.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: In "Hawk and Dove", there can be seen a photo for a second, of Dick, Dove, Hank and Donna being in Titans' tower. Garth not being there, kind of metaforeshadows his demise.
  • Girly Bruiser: Kory And Dawn are both very feminine and badass.
  • Greater-Scope Paragon: Batman, Wonderwoman, Superman and Aquaman are acknowledged to exist within the Titanverse, with Batman even making an appearance, but none of them play a direct role in show.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Oddly Robin, because with the number of references they make to the Nolanverse Batman, that one would have encouraged more head gear.
  • Heroes Unlimited: Season 2 expands the main cast from 4 main characters to no less than 10.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: When Jason gets kidnapped by Deathstroke, Dick tries to turn himself over to the latter in order to save his younger partner.
    • On a sadder note: Aqualad and Jericho.
  • Hollywood Acid: The hydrofluoric acid shown in the episode with the Melting Man is a glowing yellow or sickly green gel that causes whatever it comes into contact with to steam and hiss. While it is highly lethal to humans, it is actually a weak acid that doesn’t react violently with ferrous metals. Overlaps with Artistic License – Chemistry, especially when you ask yourself how run-of-the-mill mobsters are able to shoot this acid out of...(wait for it)...metal assault rifles.
  • Human Alien: Kory, Superboy and Faddei.
  • I Hate Past Me: Implied to be the reason why Dick treats Jason Todd with disdain.
  • Impromptu Tracheotomy: In a rare non-lethal example, Robin's first fight scene has him stab two mooks in the throat with birdarangs.
  • Instant Sedation: To kidnap her, Raven is nearly instantly sedated by Officer Jones at the Detroit Police station before he shoves her in a cruiser.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Quite a few prominent characters, because of the Adaptational Jerkass take on them, particularly Dick Grayson.
  • Knight of Cerebus:
    • Trigon: First season builds Trigon up upon being an inter-dimensional entity capable of destroying entire worlds. In the end, is averted in first episode of season 2. He gets easily defeated by Raven.
    • Deathstroke: Slade may not be a non-human demon, but he managed to scare most of the main characters to the point where they can barely function as human beings. Things are never light around this guy. Never.
  • Legacy Character: Jason Todd succeeds Dick Grayson as Robin, while Dawn Granger succeeds Don as Dove some time after his death.
  • Leitmotif: Played with. While no character is associated with a particular song, the Titans seem to each be associated to a certain genre or mood of music. Starfire in particular is the most blatant example, as many of her scenes are accompanied by 70's music including Boney M.'s cover of Bobby Hebb's "Sunny," and Donna Summer's "I Feel Love". Robin, on the other hand is more associated with rock music. Much of the score used in Raven's scenes also wouldn't be out of place in a supernatural horror film.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Season 2 goes a little overboard with the number of new main characters.
  • Lonely Together: Dick and Raven share a close father/daughter bond based on their shared feelings of loneliness. She also develops a similar friendship with Gar (although more of a brother/sister type), for much of the same reason.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Inverted; Raven learns that her mother is not her "real" or birth mother just before she's murdered.
  • The Mentor: Batman and Wonder Woman used to sidekick Dick Grayson, Jason Todd and respectively Donna Troy.
    • Dick tries to mentor the new generation of young Titans.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Starfire, even with her less skimpier costumes.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Dick, Hank, Slade.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: Negative Man apparently listens to AC/DC while cooking in the Doom Patrol's kitchen.
  • Mythology Gag: Has its own page.
  • My Friends... and Zoidberg: When Donna Troy is inciting the OG Titans to fight Trigon:
    Donna Troy: Titans... And new Robin. Let's go!
  • Naked People Are Funny: In Beast Boy's character teaser, he transforms into a tiger and back. It takes Dick asking an innocent question and Starfire snickering for him to realize that he's completely naked.
  • Never Heard That One Before: Dick's reaction to being called, well, a dick.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • Jason announcing on Tv Live that the Titans are back puts everyone on harm.
    • The OG Titans and Rachel bring unfounded accusations upon Jason, pushing him over the edge.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: All over the place.
    • Jason and Rose beat the shit out of some cops that were just trying to do their jobs.
    • Deathstroke basically just mopped the floor with Dick and Donna at different points of the story.
    • Dick does this several times in season 1, as he has problems controlling his violent side.
    • Hank and Dawn do this to the pedophile coach that abused the former as a child.
  • Plot Armor: All the titans, naturally. There’s a bunch of scenes where the villains noticeably have a habit of asking questions first, and shooting later, even when someone is obviously in a super hero outfit. Robin in particular seems to benefit from villains not taking head shots (where he doesn’t have armor).
  • Poor Communication Kills: The Titans are not the best at communication; they have trust issues, keep secrets from others, fight among themselves and bring unfounded accusations against each other ( most notable Jason Todd).
  • Precision F-Strike: In the first trailer, to establish this isn't a kid's show.
    Criminal: Where's Batman?!
    Robin: Fuck Batman.
  • Previously On…: Each episode begins with a recap of previous events.
  • Proud Warrior Race: Tamaranians and the Amazons.
  • Race Lift:
    • Beast Boy, who is white in the comics, is played by Ryan Potter, who is half Japanese and half white.
    • While the Acolyte usually wears makeup to appear to be a blue demon, he is a white man in the comics. Here he's played by Afro-Swiss actor J Jarreth Mertz.
    • Negative Man is also normally white and is played by black Caribbean-born Canadian actor Dwain Murphy (although this is a downplayed example, as we never get to see his face, and his voice is provided by the white Matt Bomer).
    • Don Hall, white in the comics because he's Hank Hall's brother, is played by black British actor Elliot Knight. The Halls are half-brothers here.
    • Deathstroke, who is white in the comics and all of his previous live-action incarnations (save for the Arrowverse version who Ambiguously Brown) is played by Esai Morales, who is Puerto Rican. His son and daughter, Joe Wilson/Jericho and Rose Wilson/Ravager, are also been given race lifts and will be played by Chella Man and Chelsea Zhang, who are both Chinese.
  • Rage Against the Mentor: Dick had a falling-out with Bruce prior to the series, and has been gone from Gotham for over a year when the series begins.
    Dick: I guess we had different ideas on how to do the job.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: both Old and New Titans are a bunch of freaks searching for a place to belong.
    • the OG Titans were formed by circus brat and former sidekick, two half of a bird-themed couple, former Wonder-woman protegee and an atlantean.
    • The newest generation of Titans is made-up of a half-demon witch-girl, a shape-shifter, an amnesiac alien princess, another bird-themed Badass Normal side-kick.
  • Running Gag: Cops getting beaten.
    • Jason Todd takes his anger on them at the and of his own debut episode.
    • Rose Wilson is introduced in Season 2 being chased by cops after stealing a car. She mops the floor with them.
    • Conner Kent mistakes the cops for being the bad guys and beats the crap out of them.
    • Dick Grayson randomly attacks 2 cops to get himself imprisoned.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • Training from Hell for a pair of teenage boys doesn't help them become better adjusted adults. Instead, it makes them Child Soldier types that are ready to explode at any moment. It also creates a massive amount of resentment in Dick once he hits adulthood.
    • Raven is hunted by both the good guys as well as the bad due to her role as The Antichrist and Anti Anti Christ.
    • Even after becoming Nightwing and putting up more of a fight than ever before, Dick still loses against Deathstroke because at the end of the day Deathstroke is still enhanced to superhuman levels of physicality whilst Dick is still a regular human. Only when Rose joins the battle to help does Deathstroke actually go down.
  • The Reveal:
    • At the end of “Donna Troy”, we learn that Kory’s mission isn’t to protect Rachel... but to kill her.
    • Rachel is not a Child by Rape. Her biological mother is Evil All Along.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant:
  • R-Rated Opening: The SDCC 2018 footage features a violent beatdown, a dark and moody tone and the "fuck Batman" line, presumably for the benefit of those who assume that "Teen Titans=kid friendly".
  • Sci-Fi Writers Have No Sense of Scale:
    • During Kory's introduction - which is 'Outside Vienna' - we get to see a typical Austrian/German city sign, showing the end of one city and noting the distance to the next. The issue here is that the 'next' city over is apparently 852 kilometer (about 530 miles) away. Which would put it into a neighboring country, given that Austria has only a length of almost 600 km (372 mi) and a maximum width of 280 km (173 mi).
    • In 2x03, Faddei mentions that he traveled twenty million miles from planet Tamaran. Twenty million miles from Earth is still within the solar system. The Vega system (where Tamaran is in the comics) is twenty five light years, or about 150 trillion miles, away.
  • Second Episode Introduction: Hank and Dawn made their debut on the second episode of Season 1. The same episode also has an Early-Bird Cameo for Donna Troy via photo and cellphone contact list.
  • Sexy Shirt Switch: Kory wears Dick's grey blue t-shirt in season 1 after sharing the bed with him.
    • Rose too, in 2x11.
  • Shipper on Deck: Dawn was one for Donna and Garth.
    • Kory makes a lot of comments of Gar liking Rachel.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Rachel is seen watching Game of Thrones and Full House.
    • Hank and Don made a reference to The Lion King ("Hakuna Matata").
    • In a romantic moment, Rose and Jason start to quote a song from West Side Story.
    • When Jason is staring off into the distance, Rose calls to Jason “Earth To Major Tom”, a shout-out to Space Oddity by David Bowie.
    • At some point, Garfield could be seen sporting a Toei Animation shirt, which is a Japanese animation studio that produced an animated Superman series in 1988.
    • Jason seems to be a fan of the film Escape from New York (1981) as he attempts to use the name Robert Plissken as an alias to enter a bar, which was the real name of Kurt Russell's character Snake Plissken.
    • Apparently Jason is also fan of a British folk rock band called Mumford & Sons, as he calls mockingly a guy 'Mumford', before starting a Bar Brawl.
    • In 2x02, after the training session, Gar and Rachel share some intimate moments and make fun of Dick being obsessed with training as if he was Mr Miyagi himself.
    • In 2x12, Kory and Rachel have heated quarrel, in which Rachel calls Kory 'Truth-Claw', which is a reference to 4th book "In Truth and Claw", of the urban fantasy detective series Mick Oberon.
    • When Kori tells Dick that she is working for the FBI in his hallucinations, she mentions avoiding "the guys in the basement".
  • Something Person: Wonder Girl, Aqualad, Wonder Woman, Batman, Superman, Robotman and the list goes on.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Season 1 was well balanced for focusing only on Dick, Rachel, Kory and Gar. Comes Season 2, where the OG Titans become the main focus at times, while the true protagonists (except for Dick) lose a lot of focus.
  • Super Serum: Slade received few bio-enhancements courtesy to HIVE program for creating super-soldiers.
    • Implied with Garfield Logan. It is possible that in order to save his life, Doctor Caulder injected Logan with a serum that turned him into a metahuman.
  • Team Mom: Starfire, she is the first one the young titans always call.
  • Team Title: The title shortened from Teen Titans, the original name of the group in the comics.
  • Title In: The Show does this everytime the plot moves to a new location.
  • Thou Shalt Not Kill: Played with. Starfire is the only protagonist who uses lethal force as a first resort; the rest attempt to avoid it. By the end of the seventh episode, however, Rachel and Gar have both killed in self-defense, and Dick orders Kory to blow up a building full of unconscious mooks, presumably killing them.
  • Token Romance: The romantic triangle involving Dawn-Dick-Hawk has little next to nothing in common with the main plot.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Dick’s police partner. She finds a crying stranger in her house. In Detroit. She leaves her gun out of reach before ever verifying the stranger’s intent, or whether they are armed.
  • Trauma Button: People falling gives Dick flashbacks to his parents' death.
  • Tracking Device: Batman has a thing for implanting tracking devices into his sidekicks.
  • Truer to the Text: This is the first Teen Titans series to fully embrace the maturity and grit of the comics, whereas the animated series had to be Lighter and Softer to be acceptable for young audiences, and the gag series caters solely to children.
  • Two Lines, No Waiting: Season 2 in spades. Some subplots are more character driven, while others are action driven.
  • Unskilled, but Strong:
    • Superboy, as he is barely several weeks old, has no training, but he has most of Superman's power set.
    • Rachel, her magic is clearly very strong, but she has hard times controlling her powers because of evil side.
    • Kory, she is alien powerhouse with super strength and fire-blasts, but unaware of this because of her early amnesia. As she regains her memories back, she becomes more of a Strong and Skilled case.
  • Utility Belt: The show has Batman and two Robins, need to say more?
  • Wham Line: The Reveal at the end of “Donna Troy”:
    Donna: It says here that [Kory’s] mission is to “secure” the Raven, which could mean “take control of”… or “take care of”.
    Dick: “Take care of”?
    Donna: Unless I’m reading this wrong… your friend Kory is here to kill Rachel.
  • Whole Episode Flashback: Titans has the habit of airing at least an episode full of flashbacks per season.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Gar has green hair, Rachel is literally blue-haired and Rose got mystical silver locks.

Alternative Title(s): Titans

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