Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Go To

    open/close all folders 

    #-C 
  • 8.8:
    • While many critics consider Breath of the Wild to be the best of the Zelda series, Jim Sterling gave the game a 7/10 (a good score on his scale, which goes out of its way to avert the Four Point Scale) and, despite still being a fairly positive review, criticized the weapon degradation system, the flow of puzzles, and voice acting. It was just enough to knock the game's Metacritic score down from a 98 to 97. Readers across different gaming communities tore the review apart, and the site even experienced DDOS attacks. It becomes all the more baffling when you consider that he has received far more backlash over a not-positive-enough review of a Zelda title than he did for outright negative reviews of other high-profile AAA titles like Assassin's Creed II, Mario Kart, Final Fantasy XIII and Batman: Arkham Knight.
    • Slant Magazine's Jed Pressgrove gave the game three stars out of five, which corresponds to a 6/10. This also attracted quite a bit of fanboy anger (with Slant's previous 4.5/5 for the similarly open world but less well-received overall No Man's Sky being frequently brought up), though, perhaps because of Slant Magazine's relatively lower profile, not as much as Sterling's review.
  • Abandon Shipping: A lot of fans liked to pair up Zelda with Urbosa in the main game. However, this ship started to fall apart when the "Ballad of the Champions" DLC revealed that Urbosa was actually a surrogate mother figure to the princess, and that she was around the same age as Zelda's own mother, who she was good friends with.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper:
    • Downplayed with Zelda and the Champions, who frequently chime in to tell you what to do in dungeons, but not how to do it, and generally come across as encouraging rather than patronizing. The one exception is Revali, who is quite passive-aggressive, but seeing as he blames Link for his own death at the hands of Windblight Ganon 100 years ago, he's actually being an asshole to Link rather than the player.
    • As you explore the Wetlands prior to meeting with Prince Sidon at the start of the path to Zora's Domain, numerous Zoras are patrolling the area and will stop you if you get too close to them to tell you go go meet with Sidon, no matter how many times you've heard the the same advice before from other Zoras.
    • Every single time a Blood Moon happens, Zelda phones in to tell you that "The blood moon rises once again..." and play a lengthy cutscene, just in case you didn't notice the scary music and brimstone particle effects floating around you just before this. Once you've seen a couple of Blood Moons and know what's going to happen, this just becomes irritating. You can skip the cutscene, although the game doesn't tell you how (on the Switch version, press X, then +), but it still has to load the cutscene and reload the main game. There's likely no way around that, unfortunately, since the game uses Blood Moons as a sort of garbage-collection to reduce other load times.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • Done intentionally with Master Kohga, the leader of the Yiga clan who are the Evil Counterpart of the Sheikah. Despite all the hype and praise he receives from the members of the clan the player will run into occasionally, Master Kohga himself is actually a complete joke. He's a surprisingly chubby, hyperactive Manchild who is even less of a threat than the regular Yiga clan mooks you fought to get to him. His boss fight is also suitably simplistic, being the standard Zelda style of "find the weakness in the attack pattern and exploit it". Even his death is played for laughs.
    • When you figure out the trick to kill them, Moldugas become piss-easy as far as the giant over-world bosses go. Just climb on a rock, where it can't get to you, roll a bomb downhill, wait for it to eat it, then detonate it inside the creature's body. Whack it a few times while it's lying stunned on the sand, then run away and climb back onto the rock when it flops back onto its belly. Wash, rinse, repeat, until it's dead. The Electric Lizalfos that sometimes spawn in their battlegrounds and the harsh weather of the Gerudo desert are likely to be more of a threat than the actual giant monsters are.
    • Most of the Blight Ganons, save for Thunderblight Ganon. They don't have too much HP (on-par or below most Guardians and overworld bosses) and their fights are easily cheesed by spamming arrows, and if you have the Master Sword or Ancient Arrows, you can obliterate them. Even Thunderblight Ganon is manageable if you got the Rubber Armor set or eat something to give you shock resistance before the fight. Their "Phantom" versions in the Champion's Ballad DLC try to mitigate this by making you fight the memories of each Blight with a limited inventory.
    • Calamity Ganon, if you decide to free all the Divine Beasts and acquire the Master Sword like the game suggests you should. Doing so cuts his HP to half right at the start, and while he still has a large pool of HP left, you have an extremely powerful weapon that is basically unbreakable to work with. If you've mastered parrying and reflecting Guardian beams (or just bring an Ancient Shield or two that will do it automatically), most of his attacks are easily avoided and countered. This leaves out that if you did take the time to free all the Divine Beasts and get the Master Sword, you have a large health pool and all four Champion powers, and of course you can eat a stat-boosting meal before the fight as usual.
    • Dark Beast Ganon, the actual Final Boss after Calamity Ganon. The fight boils down to waiting until the glowing weak points appear around its body and firing an arrow at them, this only needs to be done eight times, and you're given unlimited arrows to try it with. He only has one attack which is fairly slow and predictable, and the boss himself is pretty slow and makes no effort to avoid your attacks. You can probably beat him without taking damage and will have no trouble hitting his weak points.
  • Applicability: The joke behind the reward for finding every Korok can differ between Westerners and the Japanese. For Japanese people, it's a nod to, and parody of, the Golden Poo. For Westerners, it's a commentary on achievements (how they're not worth going though all the hassle for something that's basically worth jack shit).
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Thanks to complaints over the lack of dual audio options, Nintendo eventually released a multi-language option for free that enables players to choose any combination out of the game's 9 different dubs (including Japanese) and 10 languages for menus and subtitles. (Wii U players must download a separate but free Voice Pack from the eShop to use this option.)
    • Many players were let down by the fact that the Champions' backstories had so little attention given to them. "The Champions' Ballad" DLC is designed to give the Champions A Day in the Limelight.
    • Blessing shrines and combat trials are generally disliked due to being the same. Of the sixteen shrines added in "The Champions' Ballad" DLC, none are blessing shrines and only one is a combat trial, and the latter shakes things up by being much larger and more involved than any other combat trial, as well as playing completely differently due to the unique conditions you're under at the time. The rest are unique puzzle shrines.
    • In the vanilla game, once a Divine Beast has been appeased, you can never see that Blight again in that save file, which makes 100% Completion of the Hyrule Compendium more difficult than it should be. With "The Champions' Ballad" DLC, you have the opportunity to have a rematch with each one as a "Phantom Ganon", giving you more opportunities to take a picture for the compendium.
  • Awesome Art: The game's artstyle is simply gorgeous. Much like Skyward Sword, it combines the colorful cel-shading of The Wind Waker with the detailed, realistic models of Twilight Princess, which makes the Scenery Porn that much prettier and gives the characters a lot of coolness, charm and personality.
  • Awesome Bosses:
    • The battles against Vah Ruta and Vah Naboris are considered highlights of the game thanks to the fast pace brought about by riding Prince Sidon and a Sand Seal respectively, the catchy and energetic musical tracks that play during both, and because the fact that the Zora and Gerudo arcs are more fleshed out than the other two (particularly when it comes to the character arcs of Prince Sidon and Riju, who help you fight these bosses) gives the player more narrative satisfaction when fighting them.
    • The duel with Sheikah monk Maz Koshia at the end of the Champion's Ballad DLC for being a challenging, multi-phased Final-Exam Boss.
  • Awesome Music: It's a Zelda game, so it's to be expected:
    • After mostly piano and relaxed themes since the game's unveiling, the Switch Presentation trailer amping itself as it pumps the view up over the course of the video and just exploding into the series' Main Theme had most viewers cheering hands down.
    • The theme that plays when you fight Dark Beast Ganon starts off sombre and slow... before Ganon's own theme begins overtaking it.
    • Come the "Champions Ballad" DLC, the Final Shrine and Divine Trial themes are just gorgeous.
    • "Hyrule Castle", with a driving march beat on drums pounding like the footsteps of the One-Man Army Link is as he storms the castle, mingled with elements of Ganondorf's Theme played by and organ, strains of "Zelda's Theme," and the Main Theme of the series (which, let's remember doubles as Link's own theme). You will be pumped for the final showdown.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • The Calamity Ganon. Some people appreciate this unique take on the series' Big Bad, and enjoy how it breaks with tradition just like with the rest of the game by turning Ganon into an eldritch force of nature a la Cthulhu or Walpurgisnacht rather than the villainous, singular being he's always been. Others dislike how the most revolutionary game in the series cast away most of the traits that made Ganon(dorf) cool or admirable in previous games, especially in the wake of his beloved, badass Hyrule Warriors incarnation, and also cite the very lackluster final battle against Dark Beast Ganon. The latter group found it especially jarring that Ganon's last canonical appearance as an intelligent, scheming villain was in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, in 2006. Some even thought that Majora should have been a better pick for how similar they are.
    • Vilia, the biologically male Hylian who presents as a female Gerudo and sells Link the Gerudo Set. Fans can't decide if she's genuinely funny and endearing, or offensive to transgender players due to Link's horrified reaction to her face reveal. The debate isn't helped by her overly masculine nose and mouth (which aren't shown in-game), which either justify Link's reaction or cheapen the gag even further.
    • Out of the four Champions, Revali is easily the most divisive. Plenty of people can't stand him due to his arrogance and Irrational Hatred towards Link, some even claiming that he deserved to be killed by Calamity Ganon and only freed his soul because of Revali's Gale. Some however consider his egocentric attitude to be oddly charming. While some people consider him the least likable of the Champions for the aforementioned reasons and his generally sour, sardonic attitude, just as many will call him the best of the champions for the exact same traits. His striking rudeness in contrast to the other Champions is a sticking point for many, others will argue that he's the only one of them who has an actual personality beyond one-note do-gooder and an actual character arc as he learns to let go of blaming Link for his death. His occasional Pet the Dog moments have also helped saving him in some player's eyes.
    • King Rhoam has split the fanbase between those who are stuck on the way he treated Zelda in the past, admonishing her for failing to unlock her sealing power and contributing a great deal to her frustrations, and those who are more forgiving due to his aiding Link on the Great Plateau and demonstrating how much the years have changed him since then.
    • The Great Fairies. Some players find their behavior toward Link to be humorous and don’t really think anything of it, whereas others feel the way they force their affections on him without any misgivings crosses the line into being uncomfortable.
  • Best Level Ever: Each of the Divine Beast quests is well-liked for introducing Link to beloved characters of each of the game's races, and for culminating in a boss fight against a Humongous Mecha, exploring said mecha as a dungeon and manipulating it, and fighting another boss inside of it.
    • Eventide Island is usually considered to be one of the best shrines in the game, and for good reason. it is a No-Gear Level set on a secluded, tropical island in the middle of the ocean. You're given a goal (find the orb, and deposit it on a pedestal), but you're given multiple ways to accomplish this, and the fact that you don't have any of your weapons or armor means you'll have to scrounge for stuff. This is one of the few times the game actively pushes the player to use it's complex enviromental interaction systems, and as a result most players will find the challenge satisfying and difficult. There is a way to make the challenge easier, which is dropping your gear at the start of the challenge and picking it up once you set foot on the island, but the game accounts for this and will punish it by permanently taking that gear away once you complete the challenge (but hey, you can just drop it again at the end and pick it up afterwards).
  • Best Boss Ever: Again, the Divine Beasts. Have Zelda bosses ever been this action-packed and fun to fight? Take your pick:
    • Vah Medoh has you fly high into the sky with a Rito partner making an assault on an enormous bird-shaped airship, whose cannons also function as its barrier nodes, meaning a) you have to be flying the entire time and b) you have to get right in the line of fire to take it down.
    • Vah Rudania seems insurmountable, but you actually drive it back up the mountain it's been crawling over by loading a Goron into a giant cannon and using him as high-impact ammunition even a Divine Beast can't brush off.
    • Vah Ruta sees you riding the back of a motorboat, aka your friend Prince Sidon, taking on a gargantuan elephant construct that tosses giant blocks of ice at you, before you get in close, ascend the side of it at high speed, and shoot it with lightning arrows at the zenith of your jump.
    • Vah Naboris sees you assisting Riju by speeding alongside the mecha as it moves through its sandstorm, having to dodge its lightning strikes while bombing its feet out from under it. You can barely see, you're an inch away from getting blasted if you slide out of the Thunder Helm's shield, and you have to balance surfing and aiming arrows.
    • For the non-Divine Beast bosses, there's Calamity Ganon: a hideously mishapen, many-armed thing that starts its boss battle by collapsing the floor you're standing on and bursting out of a massive tumor-like growth hanging from the ceiling like something out of Bloodborne or Darkest Dungeon. And then during its fight, you get many chances to fly up with your hang glider to shoot it in Bullet Time while dodging hits from its dozens of weapons as it blasts you with fireballs and lasers. It has one of the best, if not the scariest boss designs in the entire franchise, and the whole battle is nothing but badass.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The Xenoblade Chronicles 2 quest is this by nature since it's a cross-promotion; the game doesn't even make a token effort to have it make any in-universe sense. It quite literally comes out of nowhere, mysteriously appearing in your inventory after you leave the Great Plateau without being assigned by any NPC, and never has any relevance again once it's eventually completed.
  • Breather Boss: Once one obtains a good two handed weapon, such as the Boulder Breaker or Royal Claymore, as well as (preferably) Urbosa's Fury, Talus can become these, combined with Piñata Enemy for the Rare variant. Just wait for it to chuck its arms at you, then when it leans down to regenerate, hop aboard and start whacking the ore deposit with your weapon. Since two-handed weapons spin as their charged attack, you can rip off huge chunks of the thing's health in no time flat, and when you inevitably run out of Stamina, though you won't be able to kill it in one trip on top, due to having a high damage output and activating when a charged attack finishes, Urbosa's Fury will usually finish the job. The Rare variants are easy pickings, as they only drop gems with a low chance of dropping Ambers and Opals and the occasional diamond, which is useful for reforging the Champions' weapons.
  • Breather Level:
    • Vah Medoh is generally considered to be the easiest of the Divine Beast quests, and as such, it can be this if you've already completed any of the other Divine Beasts beforehand. There's very little you need to do before you begin the assault on the beast (aside from being prepared for extremely cold weather, the only major story trial you have to go through is a simple aerial archery test), the boss fight with the beast itself is the most straight-forward of them all (the weakpoints can be simply glided towards, Teba doesn't even need to be drawing the turrets' fire for you to attack them, and said turret-fire isn't any different from those of Guardians, being easy to avoid by just cancelling your glide as soon as it fires), and the puzzles for the interior aren't quite as mind-bending as those inside the other beasts.
    • An unintentional case, strangely, Hyrule Castle can end up as this with the right equipment. Despite being full of various types of Guardians and siccing Lynels on you at the gatehouses, the second being a white-maned Lynel, the area is easily cheeseable with the right gear. With the Zora armor being the Game-Breaker that it is, you can swim up the conveniently placed waterfalls and skip large chunks of the dungeon. And even without the Zora armor, unlike inside the Divine Beasts, it's possible to climb the walls of the area, so with enough persistence and strategy, you can skip areas anyway. With the divine beast ability to launch you high into the air, you can make it to Ganon easily since he's at the top of the castle.
    • The handful of "Blessing" shrines in the game have no puzzles and no enemies: the interiors contain only a chest and a straight-shot to the Sheikah Monk. Zig-zagged in that getting to these shrines is a trial in and of themselves: you may have to swim through freezing water, or navigate your way through a nest of Guardians.
    • Among the shrines introduced in "The Champions' Ballad" DLC, there are a couple:
      • Rinu Honika's "Block the Blaze" requires zero effort if the player has the upgraded Flamebreaker armor set equipped (which is extremely likely at that point in the game). The main challenge of the shrine is to navigate a corridor full of flamethrowers, using various tools at your disposal to block the flames so you don't get hurt. The upgraded Flamebreaker set makes Link fireproof, completely negating any negative effect that the flamethrowers would have on Link.
      • Likewise, the shrine that relies on moving blocks to progress while dealing with the threat of electrocution is nullified by having the rubber armor set.
      • Shira Gomar's "Aim for Stillness" also has its challenge negated with a very easy-to-find piece of equipment. The challenge of the shrine is to use bombs with air gusts in order to blow up some bombable wall with the right timing. The whole shrine can be breezed through with just a few bomb arrows.
  • Broken Base:
    • Whether this game has taken the mantle of best game in the series from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time or not has torn the fan-base asunder. While there's absolutely no question that Breath of the Wild completely surpasses both the original and 3DS versions from a technical standpoint, many people prefer the more traditional gameplay style and more focused storytelling of Ocarina of Time over the Wide Open Sandbox and Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay of Breath of the Wild. There are some people who appreciate both games, enjoying Ocarina for its timelessness, classic characters and story and role in gaming history, and Wild for providing the biggest, most polished and most engaging evolution of the series' exploration factor.
    • Whether the changes to the core gameplay were just the overdue shot in the arm the franchise needed or, on the other hand, if they steered it around too much to the point it barely feels like a Zelda game anymore. Many fans of the Ocarina style are grimly predicting that no Zelda game that plays to their tastes will ever come out again, given that the game's runaway financial and critical success means that there's little reason for Nintendo to do anything other than double-down on moving away from the old 3D style — even losing a large portion of their old fan-base isn't too much of a threat considering the huge Newbie Boom that Breath brought on due to being so radically different. Considering that the previous 3D game was heavily divisive even among fans of this style and came out 6 years before Breath, many are resigning themselves to the idea that the last great 3D Zelda game in their minds will have been one that came out in 2006.
    • The Weapon Degradation System is one of the biggest ones. Some say it makes the game better by making sure the player gets good with and experiences all the weapon types (since all weapons break very quickly), keeps variety high, encourages careful strategy and planning for all encounters, even making you seek other tactics to deal with enemies less directly, as opposed to blindly rushing in swinging your sword wildly. Others say it's just annoying, arguing that it halts the pace of the game, takes the fun out of getting a new weapon in any scenario when it will inevitably become dust shortly, that the less direct tactics are unreliable, ineffective, context sensitive and unenjoyable, that there are other, better ways to make the player experience all the weapon types, and that forced variety isn't true variety.
    • The ease and extent to which the game in general can be exploited and skipped due to its open nature (there were so many entries under Game-Breaker that the game now has its own page just to list them all) is another area people are split on. Those who love it say that it gives players multiple options through which to traverse the game's environment, solve puzzles and overcome obstacles in general, and is better than being led around by the hand or forced to do things a certain way. Others say that it is a sign of poor balance and implementation of gameplay mechanics, devalues much of the game's content due to how easily it is bypassed or gamed, and gives a constant feeling of not being sure if you're missing something, since there's a fine line between "saving time and effort" and "sabotaging the experience by unknowingly doing things in an unintended manner".
    • The music, which forms what is probably the most divisive soundtrack in the series so far. Although everyone agrees it's good and that it fits the general tone of the game, Manaka Kataoka and Yasuaki Iwata used a subtle and melancholic style, rather than the classic epic fanfares the series is known for, as well as giving more prominence to silence and nature sounds. Many people think that they overdid this approach, and that it has given a much less memorable and less varied score as a result, way too detached from what comes to their minds when they think about music from a Zelda game. However, there is just as many people who say the soundtrack still has a lot of memorable tracks and argue that the new style is actually much more nuanced and sophisticated. Some go as far as to state that it's hands-down the best soundtrack in the entire series. There are also people who Take a Third Option and state that they think the soundtrack is just right for Breath of the Wild, but don't want its style to become the new norm in future installments.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • The Keese sometimes come in large swarms. Some bows can launch multiple arrows of a chosen type at once for the cost of one. One of the types of arrows are tipped with bombs. The high price of bomb arrows and low value of Keese drops only sweeten the catharsis.
    • Once you get the Thunder Helm, it's immensely satisfying to stand around in a thunderstorm with metal equipment, and watch Link No-Sell lightning. Even better, turning Link into a living lightning rod by equipping a metal sword or shield, then rushing at a horde of enemies to weaponize lightning.
    • Once the player gets access to stronger weapons and the powerful Ancient Arrows, fighting Guardians can be very cathartic. These enemies can strike fear and terror into the player, especially early on when they can easily one-shot Link. But later on, once Link has more hearts, more defense, and stronger means of attack, Guardians can be defeated with ease. It's an immensely satisfying feeling being able to demolish these Guardians with a well-timed Ancient Arrow shot or wailing away with the Master Sword (which doubles in power when fighting them).
  • Contested Sequel: While Breath of the Wild is the most unanimously-acclaimed Zelda game since Ocarina of Time, it is compared to its predecessors just like Ocarina and other entries. The dungeon design of the Divine Beasts, use of voice acting, weapon degradation, and narrative make it a point of contention.
  • Cry for the Devil: Many people have admitted to feeling sorry for Ganon due to being so far gone and having his reincarnation interrupted that there's almost nothing of the person he once was left in there, to the point he can't even manage a form even remotely humanoid anymore.
    D-F 
  • Demonic Spiders: This game has more than usual for a Zelda game. Since it's a Wide Open Sandbox, these creatures effectively act as beef gates for new players.
    • The Guardians all have 500+ hit points, hit hard with deadly precision, and are present throughout the whole game. Some of them are planted in the ground, but others are mobile and move fast enough to keep up with Link on horseback. It's not until you obtain the Master Sword and the Ancient Armor from the Akkala Ancient Tech Lab that they become easier to take down. Once you figure out the timing for shield-bashing their blasts back at them, they go from being demonic to being rather trivial, but you still need a durable shield and armor in case you mistime it.
    • The bears. You can't lock on to them, and they stay out of range of all but your longest melee weapons until they rush in to attack. Unfortunately, they hit hard and can take a ton of damage before they finally go down. They can be killed instantly by head shots from arrows and boomerangs, but they are intelligent enough to know when you're trying to lead them, giving you few opportunities to land a hit. And as if that's not bad enough, higher-level Bokoblins ride the damned things, and knocking the rider off means you now not only have to deal with him, but a pissed off mountain of fur and fangs at the same time! And they often travel in packs!
    • Moblins are large enough to throw enemies at Link, carry spears that have a long range, and have a lot of health. They also have a spit attack at range that can stop Link in the middle of an action, leaving him vulnerable.
    • The members of the Yiga Clan are fast enemies and very hard to hit. Their dash attack is hard to dodge and can deal heavy damage, and what's worse is that they love to disguise themselves as ordinary travelers attempting to sell you something in an attempt to lower your guard. If they catch you with low supplies and weapons, you're dead. Simply walking close enough to them can trigger their attacks, meaning you can't simply avoid them by not talking to strangers. What's even worse is that after you defeat Master Kohga, the Yiga Clan will forgo disguises and just attack you upfront, meaning not only can they appear anywhere at any time, but they can also appear while you're already engaged in combat against another enemy.
    • Lynels. These affronts to Hylians seem like a bet between the developers on who could make the most grossly overpowered and obnoxious enemy in the game. They are incredibly powerful and large in size, and they're very agile. Their attacks have a great reach, so trying to dodge will be a task. What's worse is that they have an insanely far line of sight just like Guardians. Worse still, they're much smarter than the average mook. If they spot you, they'll watch from afar for a long time until you let your guard down. If you manage to get far enough away from them, they'll snipe you with their bows with terrifying accuracy. Also, if you try to hide or use the terrain as cover, they'll just shoot over the terrain to hit you, and they have remarkable accuracy even then.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Kass, the tall accordion-playing Rito earned a pretty sizeable fan-base as soon as he appeared in the demo at The Game Awards 2016.
    • Riju, the Gerudo chieftain, also earned fans as soon as she was shown in the January 12 trailer. The fact that she signaled the return of the Gerudo certainly helped.
    • Urbosa, the Gerudo champion, was heaped on with love immediately after screenshots of her started appearing. Before the audience learned of her protective and cool personality, they were also very attracted to her muscular physique.
    • While Revali is contentious among the fanbase, the two other prominent Rito warriors, Harth and Teba, are characters who everyone agrees is cool, thanks to both of them being doubtful-yet-noble family men who won't hesitate to help Link in his quest in any way they can. And because Harth has a great haircut and Teba said a swear.
    • Purah is well liked for her neat design and perky attitude, as well as having some very funny dialogue and a hilarious backstory detailed in her journal.
    • Doesn't matter how many times you see it, it's impossible not to feel a sense of awe and wonder whenever you hear that beautiful ancient music and one of the three Great Dragons of Hyrule passes overhead, thanks to their stately benevolence and sheer elegant beauty.
    • Prince Sidon is well-liked for his personality, being a generally Nice Guy, and his design. Sounding like Joseph Joestar doesn't hurt either. If you go into the Breath of the Wild tag on Tumblr, you can find a lot of posts about Prince Sidon. Then there's his child form that appears in the DLC.
    • Paya is appreciated due to being gentle, beautiful, having a charmingly Adorkable personality, and having a not-well-hidden massive crush on Link.
    • Dorian is probably the most popular of the Sheikah after Paya thanks to having an incredibly tragic, dramatic, and fascinating backstory as a reformed Yiga Clan ninja that's easily worthy of another game all on its own.
    • Hestu, for lessening one of the game's Scrappy Mechanics, and for the sheer absurdity of how he does it.
    • Horse God Malanya is beloved for being a benevolent Creepy God shaman spirit who can resurrect your loyal steed if one of your horses gets killed.
    • The moment people realized that Link could (a) ride a bear, (b) set a bear on fire, and (c) ride a bear that was on fire, the bears in game instantly became popular.
    • Master Kohga has become quite popular for his Laughably Evil and hammy personality and for his easy, but hilarious boss battle.
    • Guardian Stalkers appear to have become this after an exploit was discovered that allowed the player to steer them while on top of their heads.
    • Satori, the Lord of the Mountain. His incredibly unique and strange-yet-wondrous design makes him a joy just to see, and having the best stats of any steed in the whole game doesn't hurt either. The first time you see him, it's hard to resist the urge to say "My God, he's beautiful."
    • Lynels went from somewhat obscure Demonic Spiders in the 2D Zelda games to being one of the most popular enemies in the franchise thanks to their upgrade to Boss in Mook Clothing in this game.
    • Brigo, despite his predictions of doom, has an undeniable appeal for his involvement in the simultaneous Tear Jerker and Heartwarming Moment that is the I'm Young But You're Even Younger event.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • While many Zelda games have heated discussions regarding their place in the timeline (at least before Hyrule Historia), Breath of the Wild has had even more debate for its place given the number of incredibly vague references to all three branches of the timeline. The fact that this game has the biggest Time Skip of any in the series (10,000 years between the events of the game and the first time the Divine Beasts were used, and likely even more time between that and whatever the previous game was) makes it even harder to pin down. There are even those who consider the game a Stealth Reboot that creates a new continuity, or connected to a new timeline split of some kind.
    • None of this is helped by the fact that Eiji Aonuma originally stated prior to release that the game took place in the same timeline as Ocarina of Time (itself a confusing statement, since- as OoT was the branching point of timelines in the first place- this could literally refer to any of the three timelines), but later later stated that Nintendo's plans had changed and they deliberately didn't specify the timeline in order to avoid limiting the possibility for further development.
    • It was also at one time stated to take place in all three timelines at the same time, which led to speculation that the timelines had merged somehow. This led to debates over how something like that would come about and what the implications would mean for the existing series (including whether or not the "single timeline" theory had renewed credibility). It was kind of clarified that the intent was that, eventually, all three timelines would have events prior to BotW would lead to a Sheikah-ruled Hyrule with advanced Magitek and Ganon being defeated but returning as the Calamity Ganon and push them back into Medieval Stasis. While this answers some questions (the timelines are still separate but eventually have nearly identical events), it opens up a lot more.
  • Even Better Sequel: To Skyward Sword, which received widespread critical acclaim when it first came out, but was heavily criticized in some circles for its linearity and Fi's numerous interruptions, especially as time went on. Breath of the Wild is not the least bit linear and Link is almost always alone. BotW also expands on previous Zelda games (including Skyward Sword) with its Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay, very high level of interactivity, and enormous yet dense version of Hyrule with tons of gorgeous Scenery Porn - that can be interacted with.
  • Evil Is Cool: The Guardians, the Mascot Mook of the game, are well-liked for being very nightmarish fantasy Spider Tank robots with intimidating, complex designs.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • It quickly developed a fierce one with Ocarina of Time, since Breath of the Wild has become the new biggest contender for the title of best entry in the series.
    • Breath of the Wild has often been compared with Horizon Zero Dawn in terms of which is the better game. Discussion on gaming sites and YouTube usually boils down to which is better, based on their similarities and their differences.
    • Breath of the Wild has one with Super Mario Odyssey, another game that took a more Wide Open Sandbox approach to its own franchise. Fans of one game will agree that the other is very good, but there's disagreement as to which deserves the title of "Best Game of 2017" and which did the most to push its respective series forward.
    • In 2018, Breath of the Wild developed one with Red Dead Redemption II. Both games are open-world, among the most critically acclaimed games of their console generation, and came out after long waits. But while Breath of the Wild is an aesthetically stylized fantasy adventure with relatively sparse storytelling and a protagonist who can perform borderline superhuman feats as he traverses and fights across Hyrule, Red Dead Redemption 2 is a gritty, realistic, story-heavy western that portrays its protagonist as a mundane (albeit highly skilled) human gunslinger. Much like with Horizon Zero Dawn, arguments about which is better also tend to overlap with console rivalry arguments due to the games being on different consoles.
  • Fanfic Fuel: More like "fanart fuel", but the cyborg Calamity Ganon being an incomplete regeneration has become this. Many fan artists have attempted to design Ganon in a hypothetical scenario where he regenerates to full completion. Most of these artists imagine him fully regenerating as a cyborg Ganondorf, based upon the Calamity's physical form resembling an undead Ganondorf.
  • Fanon:
    • Due to his theme sounding like the type of accordion music you'd associate with France, a number of people imagine Kass as speaking with a French accent.
    • Some fans theorize Link's right-handedness in this game is because of how he was formally trained to fight using his non-dominant hand in order to uniformly fit in the Hylian Knights. They use Skyward Sword as an example of how that game's (right-handed) Link was the only other Link prior to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild's that was formally trained in swordfighting, as every other (left-handed) Link in the series didn't receive such training.
    • Artists who are fans of Ganondorf sometimes draw him in the Gerudo Armor due to him being the only known male Gerudo in all of the series.
Advertisement:
    G-J 
  • Game-Breaker: So many, they ended up getting their own page.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Keese, quite literally. They're extremely weak and can usually be killed in one hit, but they tend to attack in swarms. Electric Keese are even worse, as they do much more damage and can cause you to drop your weapons. If it's raining, they border on Demonic Spiders — in swarms, they can summon lightning strikes that are a One-Hit Kill.
    • Stal enememies actually fit this the most, because they never leave. They will show up at night, wherever you are, and no place is free of them, not even the peaks of mountains or lava lakes. You will be hounded incessantly by Stals every ten feet of your journey. Chu-chus are very similar, but are easy to run from and don't scale with the player's power level, while Stal enemies do. They're easy enough to kill, but not easy to run from since they follow you at a fast pace and usually spawn with a bow. If you want five minutes of peace, you have to stop what you're doing, hack at them until they fall down and then hack at their heads while they bounce around, and then deal with whatever creature you were trying to sneak up on before three jerks decided to drop in uninvited. Hope for your sake that it isn't a guardian!
    • Lizalfos are very similar to Stals in that they are, while usually not much of a threat until they scale upwards, a humongous pain in the ass. Unlike Stals, they spawn during the day as well. You can't run from them once they've caught sight of you because they're fast and will easily close the distance, and will dance out of the reach of most weapons, meaning your journey will be coming to a screeching halt for two to three minutes at a time until they're dead. And unlike all the other enemies in the game, they scale both by difficulty and by locale, so they can potentially be hurtled all the way from this trope to Demonic Spiders if you're in the wrong situation.
    • Octoroks. While they're trivial generic enemies in most Zelda games, here they are absolute pests. Despite having only 8 HP and being very easy to kill, all Octoroks are hidden in some way, and when they spit rocks, they shoot fast and have ridiculous accuracy, often knowing to aim where Link will end up rather than where he currently is. Water Octoroks aim from water and are easy to pick off, but chest mimic type, forest type, and snow type Octoroks all will be hidden until you get close by. Although easy enough to ignore, if you're getting pegged by pebbles every few seconds while trying to do something requiring your close attention, you will Rage Quit and just blast them with something sufficiently satisfying.
    • Mounted Bokoblins are incredibly frustrating to deal with, whether you're on foot or on horseback like them. They're seemingly always out reach, but you're never out of their reach, and they usually ride in groups, making them even more of a problem. One room in the Trial of the Sword includes about six mounted Bokoblins and a Lynel, and it's not the Lynel that makes the room so difficult to survive.
  • Goddamned Boss: Thunderblight Ganon is not a hard boss overall, but the main difficulty in fighting him comes from the fact that he is blindingly fast, which makes it difficult to perform Perfect Dodges or shield parries without the aid of Daruk's Protection. Compounding the difficulty is the fact that, true to his name, all of his attacks are lightning-based, which not only stuns you, but causes you to drop whatever equipment you're currently holding. And it only gets worse when he Turns Red as he electrifies his sword and shield and starts dropping spikes from the sky to act as lightning rods. And the DLC rematch offers you no way to protect yourself from electricity during the fight. To make this worse, try challenging the Hyrule Castle Boss Rush by going straight off to the dungeon without completing any others. Thunderblight Ganon is fought right before Calamity Ganon, and since you can't save at any time during this, if you lose, you have to fight every boss all over again.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Casting Stasis+ on certain Guardians will cause them to fall right through the world's geometry once the effect wears off! This is a very effective way to defeat them without wasting any materials. However, any item drops will fall right through the world with it, and the trick only works on stationary Guardians that mobilize upon spotting Link.
    • You are supposed to only be able to get one dragon part per day/night, as once you shoot them, they'll go up into the sky to avoid any further shots. At Lake Floria, however, Farosh will come back down over the mountain he flees over even after you take a body part—sometimes within seconds—enabling you to take a second body part, which definitely saves on time and stress if you missed the part you aimed for. Sometimes he'll even come around for a third pass.
    • It's normally only possible to have four fairies in your inventory, as having that many makes them stop spawning outright. This doesn't count to any that you're holding in your hands, meaning you can actually get a max of eleven fairies by going where they spawn, holding as many as you can, and grabbing the fairies that appear out of nowhere.
    • It's a little awkward and takes some getting used to, but it's entirely possible to exploit a Guardian Stalker's AI and steer it by climbing on top of it. Let's break it down: A Guardian will move in the opposite direction of Link's position until a certain point if he's too close to them. Even if they don't see him, being on top of one counts as too close, meaning you can essentially control the game's Mascot Mook.
    • It is possible to take a mine cart, stack a crate or another mine cart onto it, and use Magnesis on the bottom mine cart to use it as a makeshift flying machine. It is precisely as broken as it sounds.
    • At the Bridge of Hylia there is a particular nook in one of the towers that contains a small zone that disables Cel Shading. As a result, Link ends up looking like a plastic doll while inside this zone.
    • Running at full tilt is meant to be time-limited by your stamina, but if you hold down the "call your horse" button (the left down-button) and repeatedly tap B, you can run at near full speed indefinitely.
    • The Eventide Island quest only removes equipment that is on your person when you walk into the parameter and trigger the cut-scene. Nothing stops you from standing just outside the parameter, dropping powerful equipment on the ground then picking it back up once you activate the quest.
    • A strange quirk in the physics causes the game to wack out whenever you land on an enemy and it ragdolls upon being hit. If one freezes a red Bokoblin with an Ice elemental weapon, then Shield Surf off a high place onto the Bokoblin, then enter Bullet Time just as you're about to hit it, Link hops off high into the air as if he were fired out of a cannon. It's tricky to master, but if done at juuust the right angle, you can perform a super powerful Goomba Stomp that will send you careening through the Hylian sky at Mach 10. You achieve such speeds that the world itself needs a breather, and when you land, your intended destination may not even be fully rendered! See it in all its glory here (courtesy of BeardBear.)
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • The Great Plateau is a rather lonely place to begin with, with the Old Man and a few Koroks being the only friendly NPCs around, but it gets even lonelier when the former turns out to be Dead All Along. It gets even worse once you notice the area around the Temple of Time exactly matches the layout of Hyrule Castle Town from Ocarina of Time. Even the fountain in the square, and the wall Child Link scales to enter the castle itself, are present. One of the central locations of Ocarina is now nothing more than a crumbled and decaying ruin.
    • The fan film The Legend of Zelda: The Sage of Darkness depicted The Skull Kid as a Sheikah warrior that came to willingly serve Ganon. This game features an entire renegade faction of Sheikah, the Yiga Clan, who roam the land of Hyrule to kill his enemies.
    • At one point, Urbosa mentions how one incarnation of Ganon took on the form of a Gerudo, which she and the other Gerudo consider to be a stain on their history, and have practically disowned Ganondorf as a Gerudo, to the point where the name "Ganondorf" has been forgotten. The trailer for the game's sequel very heavily implies that Ganondorf will be resurrected and return to wreak havoc on Hyrule and everything surrounding it.
    • Zelda's hopeful words in the True Ending about rebuilding Hyrule with Link become this when the sequel's trailer shows that Ganondorf isn't done terrorizing Hyrule just yet.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: Zelda's beautiful smile in the True Ending becomes even more heartwarming in the Japanese context, as its Adventure Log is written from Link's perspective and he wishes "to see her smiling once more" after obtaining all 13 memories.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The Viewer Gender Confusion that some fans had towards Link becomes ironic now given how Link has to disguise himself as a woman to get into Gerudo Town. Even better, after the first trailer showed Link wearing Gerudo bracers, there was rampant speculation about Link being raised by the Gerudo.
    • The various comments about Link looking more androgynous than usual, and the debates on whether or not making a female Link would be a good thing for the franchise, became particularly funny when the Hyrule Warriors developers drew up concept art for a female Link called "Linkle" and eventually developed her into an actual playable character for the Legends port (though part of that development made her into just a girl who shares some similarities with Link rather than being a female incarnation of Link himself).
    • Comparing this game with the The Elder Scrolls made even funnier that Skyrim is one of the game lineups for the Nintendo Switch, along with Breath of the Wild.
    • Promotional artwork for Bayonetta 2 featured the titular character torturing a centaur-like angel called Acceptance by riding it like a horse and wearing Link's clothes while doing so, imitating Ocarina of Time artwork of Link riding Epona. In this game, Link can attempt to ride Lynels to get some free hits on them.
    • The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt was compared to the Zelda series. That said, Witcher 3 was apparently used as research material for this game. And then things came full circle at Nintendo E3 2019 Direct, with a Switch port of Witcher 3 and Breath of the Wild's sequel both being announced in that same direct.
    • "I'm so hungry I could eat an Octorok," — one of many memetic lines from the CD-i games, is even more hilarious now that Link can cook the body parts of dead Octoroks to use in elixirs. However, attempting to cook only Octorok parts together to make a whole Octorok will get you Dubious Food, which can double as an accidental Take That!. Likewise, one of the weapons in the game is a mop, meaning that Link can "scrub all the floors in Hyrule".
    • The sidequest "What's for Dinner?" is ambiguous: Some people who are familiar with Wand of Gamelon, where the King says "I wonder what's for dinner?", say that the sidequest is an official nod to the CD-i Zelda games while others say that it's only a coincidence.
    • Joel of Vinesauce joked during his stream of The Legend of Zelda being run through a super fast emulator that he hoped Link's "chainsaw sword" (he set the attack button to turbo, which when combined with the super fast thing made it look like a chainsaw) would pop up in Breath of the Wild. Turns out Breath of the Wild really does have an Ancient Bladesaw that is almost exactly that.
    • The Ancient Sheikah technology's design aesthetic, and particularly the design of the Guardian Stalkers, comes from Jōmon Pottery, an ancient form of pottery from Japan dating back about 3000 years, which becomes absolutely gut-busting in light of the rest of the series' treatment of pottery. Not only is the pottery fighting back, but it's culled the most ancient and powerful form of itself that it can just to make this Link's life a living hell.
    • YouTuber iDubbbz infamously had a vine in which he jumped off a ledge while donning a Tingle outfit and announced that he was gay. Tingle's outfit is now DLC in this game, and since sneaking and jumping are mechanics here, players can have a field day recreating this scene.
    • The Return Of Ganondorf features a scene where Link is shown wearing a ninja outfit while clinging to the ceiling. This game has a similar mechanic with climbing on any rigid surface (albeit not the ceiling) and an actual ninja outfit patterned after the Sheikah.
    • Broiler Boiler Galaxy is a fan-composed music track for a hypothetical Super Mario Galaxy 2 galaxy, featuring a Variable Mix where a full orchestra plays when Mario is outside the cathedral and an organ solo plays when Mario is inside the cathedral. While the music itself is obviously very different in melody, time signature, etc., this Variable Mix concept matches that of Hyrule Castle in Breath of the Wild: full orchestra when Link is outside the castle, organ solo when Link is inside the castle.
    • The fact that the Zora have an innate weakness to electricity, considering that Zora Link in Majora's Mask had an electric barrier ability.
    • You know how Link was a character in Mario Kart 8, and his signature vehicle was a motorcycle? Now in this game, he actually CAN ride a motorcycle! note  It also makes the fake "A Link to the Future" leak prior to the release of Skyward Sword even more hilarious note  now that Link can ride a motorcycle in an official, mainline, canon Zelda game.
    • Several pieces of fan art made after the initial release of the base game depicted Kass wearing the Gerudo garb. "The Champions Ballad" actually has him do that off-screen so he could collect anecdotes about Urbosa from Riju and Buliara.
    • Not long after "The Master Trials" DLC was released, an image started circulating that used a Cat/Dog Dichotomy to group the major NPCs into two equivalent columns based on their personalities and how they interact with Link. In "The Champions' Ballad" DLC, Daruk, who had been put in the "Dog Friends" column, is revealed to have cynophobia.
    • This fan-made comic depicts a flashback with Mipha and a young Prince Sidon, wherein Mipha tells Sidon the importance of believing in Link, and Prince Sidon replies, "I believe in you, Link!" Later, in "The Champions' Ballad" DLC, a new flashback scene depicts Mipha and a young Prince Sidon, wherein Mipha tells Sidon, "I believe in you," giving some backstory to adult Prince Sidon saying the same phrase to Link.
    • Super Smash Bros. fans frequently joke about musical tracks being replaced by "Environmental Noises" from Pikmin. This became hilarious with Breath of the Wild, where the most background music you get in the overworld is typically minimalist piano music because the developers wanted to make the environmental noises more prominent.
    • The inclusion of Rex's salvaging suit as a promotional costume for Xenoblade Chronicles 2 (plus Monolith Soft's involvement with Breath of the Wild) is more hilarious now that the Torna: The Golden Country expansion has a Running Gag of Mythra being such a Lethal Chef that her food is Censored for Comedy, much like the Dubious Food.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Link. He came from a long line of knights and felt the pressures of living up to that responsibility, so he dealt with it by putting up a stoic and silent front. During his time as Zelda's appointed knight, he bonded with Zelda and his fellow Champions and started to open up to them, only for the Champions to be killed during the battle with Calamity Ganon and he himself getting fatally injured in a desperate attempt to protect Zelda. Now he awakens 100 years later to find Hyrule in complete disrepair and his memory gone. Also, some races, such as the Zora, remember him and resent him for his failures, hanging them over his head. And there's the Yiga clan, who actively try to murder him. Despite all that, Link never lets it get to him and keeps on fighting to save Hyrule despite being 100 years Late to the Tragedy.
    • Zelda. While most incarnations of the Princess have already tapped into the powers bestowed to them by the Goddesses, this incarnation of Zelda struggles to do so. Despite all her efforts, her father still tells her that unless she does something soon, everyone will see her as a failure. And when she finally does achieve her power, it's only after Calamity Ganon lays waste to Hyrule. However, that doesn't stop her from spending the past century doing all she can to keep Ganon sealed in Hyrule Castle and even aids Link during the final battle with Dark Beast Ganon by creating weak spots on his body.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Ganon, to an extent. In other games, Ganon tended to be a smug, intelligent King of Evil, a fairly powerful Pig Man with at least some intelligence, or a man who turned to evil because his people were suffering and he couldn't stop himself. Here he's an Eldritch Abomination that has no trace of humanity left, and has aged rather poorly as the centuries have marched on. Because his attempt at reincarnation was interrupted, we only really see him as a grotesque... creature, where the only defining features he retains from his former self are a rotting skull (complete with forehead gem) and his fiery red mane. Hard to believe that at one point, he was just a simple King of the Gerudo, many of whom — most notably their Champion Urbosa — consider Ganondorf's very existence to be a stain on their honor.
  • Junk Rare: The amiibo outfits of past Links. Almost all Legend of Zelda amiibo have become extremely rare and expensive on the secondary market, and while most Link amiibo spawn unique items that can be moderately useful in-game,note  the Link outfits have a base defense of 3 (same as the Hylian Set) and require ultra-rare Star Fragments to upgrade. Their set bonus is Master Sword Beam Up, which doesn't matter much since the Master Sword's beam doesn't deal much damage in the first place and, by the time you even get the Master Sword, Link has access to armor sets with much higher defense that are easier to upgrade. The main appeal of these old armor sets is purely cosmetic; the Fierce Deity Set (from the Majora's Mask amiibo) is an exception because it provides additional secondary effects.
    K-O 
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: As usual for most Zelda games, Link.
    • Princess Zelda and Princess Mipha (two of the most relevant characters of the game's main plot) are both flat-out confirmed to be in love with Link, and to boot the player is even able to imply with Link's dialogue options that he returns the feelings of one of them, neither of them or even both of them. note 
    • Paya, Impa's Adorkable and easily embarrassed granddaughter, is also confirmed to have a massive crush on him.
    • There's also some subtext that have drawn many fans to ship Mipha's younger brother, Prince Sidon, with Link.
    • Unfortunately, this has also resulted in some of the worst Ship-to-Ship Combat the fandom has seen yet.
  • Memetic Badass: Link is this both in and out of universe, given that he is skilled with swords, axes, spears, and bows (he can shoot down entire enemy camps in midair!), advancing to the top of his knight group, as well as wielding the Master Sword, he's essentially a One-Man Army. Let's also not forget the fact that he can defeat hordes of Bokoblins, Lizalfos, Wizrobes, Lynels, and Calamity Ganon all by himself, possibly without any weapons or even clothes.
    • The Silver Lynel, for being immensely overpowered and having more health than the Final Boss. Recurring variants of Lynels are this to a lesser extent in some circles, as many find them tougher than the main bosses. Admit it, the one in Lanayru Province killed you too.
    • Also, Teba. He had the nerve to say "dammit" in a Nintendo game.
    • Maz Koshia. Just everything about Maz Koshia is badass: his status as an exceptionally difficult Bonus Boss after sitting in the same exact spot for 10000 YEARS, or how about the fact that after seeing every single monk sit perfectly still and mummified, he's the first one that MOVES? Forget about it, Maz' badassery is completely unprecedented and unmatched. Oh, and he gives Link the Master Cycle Zero.
  • Memetic Loser: Poor, poor Chuchus just can't seem to win. Apart from having a pitifully weak and easy to dodge jump attack, their elemental effects can be completely blocked by armor and food, as well as exploited, they have painfully low HP, and they can be easily blown with the Deku Leaf (or just lured) into water, demonstrating their Super Drowning Skills. The fact that they explode into pools of slime with their eyeballs being bounced out makes taking them as a serious threat borderline impossible. Their only saving grace is that these characteristics make them cute to some.
  • Memetic Mutation: Given the game's sheer popularity before and after launch, this was inevitable.
  • Moe:
    • Zelda can be this when she shows her more Adorkable side, especially When She Smiles. Plus, look at those adorably big eyes!.
    • Purah is this Played for Laughs since she's actually incredibly old. But she's still lovable nonetheless.
    • Mipha can be considered this. Even more so with Baby Sidon.
    • Paya. Her Adorkable nature made her loved by many.
    • The Koroks in general. Their incredibly sweet and playful nature only makes them more even more cute. Particularly Oaki, a very excitable baby Korok that Link helps guide to a shrine, and Pepp, a Korok who's always sleepy and made a bed for Link to sleep in for free just because he loves him and wants to help him win.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Even after swearing their allegiance to Ganon, the Yiga Clan managed to cross a personal line long before the game started. When Dorian tried to leave them, they murdered his wife and held his children hostage to make him continue to work for them.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The music that plays whenever the dragons are nearby.
    • The triumphant chord that plays when you deflect a Guardian's laser blast.
    • The badass or gentle voiceclip whenever one of the Champion's abilities recharges.
    • The jaunty music and sizzling sound that plays whenever Link throws ingredients into a cooking pot.
    • The jingle when you clear an enemy camp with an enemy treasure chest (can only be heard once), or a floor in Trial of the Sword.
    • Kass's iconic accordion tune that means a new quest for the player along with a riddle. Also counts as Awesome Music, especially after the 1:24 mark when it starts including the original Legend of Zelda theme.
  • Narm:
  • Narm Charm: The Blood Moon has a name that sounds like something out of a bad creepypasta, as the term is only rarely used to refer to a total lunar eclipse in real life otherwise, but trust us — when it rises, you better be very afraid.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • If you ever find a conversation about Teba, the first and likely only thing people will bring up is that he says "Dammit!" in a Zelda game. Which is pretty impressive considering that the way that bit of dialogue is presented (you can only see it after you and Teba subdue Vah Medoh but before beating Windblight Ganon) means that few players are likely to come across that scenario on their own.
    • Fans who dislike Zelda's characterization in this game (usually in Ship-to-Ship Combat with Mipha) always cite Recovered Memory #5, in which she verbally lashes out at Link, as irrefutable proof of her being a rude jerk. This ignores the context of the flashback and how it fits into Zelda's overall character arc (most importantly, how she grows out of her resentment toward Link).
    • King Rhoam gets hit pretty hard with this. Most fans' opinions of him focus largely or solely on his Fantasy-Forbidding Father tendencies and his unnecessarily-strict parenting of Zelda, while ignoring his behavior on the Great Plateau, his secret journal inside Hyrule Castle, in which he confesses that he was too hard on his daughter, or his final words to Link being a desperate plea for him to save her at any cost. It even approaches Ron the Death Eater territory in certain circles, as some fans like to pin the events of the Calamity entirely on him and say that he deserved to be killed just for his harsh parenting methods.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • This was not the first Zelda game to feature voice acting; that would be all three of the CD-i Zelda games, but fans and Nintendo alike would much rather have you forget they existed. However, it's not the first time in the canon series either, since the Japanese version of Four Swords Adventures also had a full party game mode where Tetra and her pirate crew were fully voiced.
    • The more open-ended nature of the game was first seen in the first game in the series. Aonuma has also stated that they have continually tried to recreate the seamless open-ended nature of the first game throughout the years, and that it was with the Wii U that they finally had the power to do so.
    • The claim that Breath of the Wild is Nintendo's first open-world game, in a modern sense. However, since Monolith Soft is wholly owned by Nintendo and even helped with the development of Skyward Sword and Breath of the Wild, Nintendo's first modern open world game would be Xenoblade Chronicles X for the Wii U.
    • Having a massive overworld that's limited less by what items the player has collected and more by the sheer strength of enemies was present in the original but more prevalent in Zelda II. In particular, that game didn't have any secondary weapon items like bombs or boomerangs, and also didn't have a special item needed to beat a dungeon's boss — much like Breath of the Wild.
    • The game having different endings depending on your completion rate was done in the The Legend of Zelda: Oracle Games. To get the Golden Ending, you needed to complete one of the games and then link it to the second game. Story events also changed depending on which game you played first. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening also had a secret scene of Marin incarnating as an angel/seagull added to the ending if you didn't die at all. Also in Majora's Mask, you get a longer, happier ending if you complete all the sidequests.
    • Link being chased by Ganon's servants (in this case, the Yiga Clan) was originally used in Zelda II. In that game, revenge for the Dark Beast's defeat is the reason there are monsters in the overworld in the first place. In this game, the Yiga will become even more aggressive in pursuing Link after he defeats their leader Master Kohga. And just like the Yiga Clan, some servants of Ganon would disguise themself as mere villagers and attack you after talking.
    • Taking enemies' equipment and using it against them was originally done in The Wind Waker, and storing them for later use started in Twilight Princess.
    • Breakable Weapons is hardly a new idea to the series, as seen by the Deku Sticks and Giant's Knife in Ocarina of Time and the Razor Sword in Majora's Mask. Breakable shields have been present since Ocarina of Time, but Skyward Sword gave shields durability bars.
    • NPCs having a routine instead of just standing around the same place was a major selling point of Majora's Mask. Since it ran on a three-day system, some NPCs would be in a completely different area depending on what day it was.
    • Skyward Sword also had a parry move that could prevent damage to the shield while opening up the enemy for a counter-attack. The same was true in regards to deflecting certain attacks with your shield by doing a properly timed shield block.
    • Also from Skyward Sword, the player keeping and even upgrading their wooden shield even when they get the stronger metal shield because metal shields were weak to electricity and could break. Breath of the Wild evolves this system with the player being struck by lightning if they had any metal on them. Wooden shields, just in Breath of the Wild, were also good for catching arrows.
    • Collecting certain material to upgrade your current gear was introduced in Skyward Sword. The same with collecting material to create portions with different effects and even upgrading them. In that game, however, you upgraded your items, not your armor.
    • Being able to place beacons on your map so you could mark important areas was also introduced in Skyward Sword. The same with having a sensor to find certain items.
    • Enemies having a HP bar was done in Wind Waker, although you could only see it using a certain item, similar to how you can only see an enemy's HP number by wearing the Champion's vest.
    • A snowboarding mechanic was first seen as a minigame in Twilight Princess. In fact, internal data from Twilight Princess implies that the Shield Surfing idea was intended to be implemented in that game first.
    • The ability to start out of control fires originated in Four Swords Adventures. In fact, out-of-control fire was supposed to be in Link to the Past, but was dropped because of time constraints.
    • Using the environment to tell story elements, something that some of the more casual observers believe is inspired by Dark Souls, is actually something the Zelda series has always done, especially in its 3D installments. As a matter of fact, this story-telling technique is one of the biggest sources of Epileptic Trees, something the Zelda fan-base is infamously fixated with. For their part, the developers of Dark Souls responded that they learned much of what they know from "Nintendo-sensei", so the claim that Zelda copied them doesn't hold much water.
    • This isn't the first time Link is seen without his iconic hat. A hatless Link appeared in the intro of The Minish Cap. Also, in your second playthrough of Wind Waker, Link would be in his causal clothes throughout the entire game.
    • The game taking place in a somewhat post-apocalyptic Hyrule. The Wind Waker did the same thing with the Great Flood. It was that game's Wham Episode, while in Breath of the Wild it's part of the premise of the story, so casual and non-fans can easily be unaware of it. In fact, the Hyrule that appears in the original Legend of Zelda is essentially post-apocalyptic, having been ruined by years of Ganon's unrelenting control and his rampaging monstrous hordes. Ocarina of Time also had a somewhat post-apocalyptic Hyrule setting since the second half of the game takes place seven years into Ganondorf's rule over Hyrule.
    • Link failing to stop Ganon and the world becoming a monument to his failure was the major plot point of the second half of Ocarina of Time.
    • This isn't the first time that Link gets to wear women's clothing.
    • Needing a certain number of Heart Containers before you're allowed to obtain the Master Sword was a concept used in the very first Zelda game, where you also needed a lot of hearts to acquire better swords.
    • Link being an experienced warrior from the beginning instead of a kid or a farm boy is similar to Skyward Sword where Link was training to be a knight and graduated to the next class when the events of the game started, and Hyrule Warriors where he's in Hyrule's army at the start and was quickly promoted to general.
    • This isn't the first Zelda game to feature a mindless, raging Ganon. In the linked version of the Oracle games, Twinrova attempted to sacrifice Zelda in an attempt to resurrect Ganon, but when the ritual was interrupted, they were forced to sacrifice themselves instead, causing Ganon to be resurrected as a mindless beast rather than the intelligent Sorcerous Overlord he usually is.
    • This game's Link isn't the first to sport a Sailor's Ponytail; the manga adaption of Ocarina of Time gave Adult Link one as well. Also, many fan artist gave him one too back in the day, making this an Ascended Fanon of sorts.
    • The heavy use of Science Fantasy compared to most previous games except Skyward Sword isn't just Later Installment Weirdness. Miyamoto and company had planned on having such a setting for the very first game, which would have involved Time Travel between a medieval fantasy past and a high-tech future; this was eventually deemed too complex for an 8-bit game. Even ignoring this What Could Have Been, futuristic technology has still been seen throughout the series, such as the laser-firing Beamos (comparable to the Guardians) and the Tron Lines of the Tower of the Gods (which has been adopted as aesthetics of the Sheikah technology in this game).
    • The backstory for the Sheikah says that they were banished from Hyrule 10,000 years ago out of fear of their advanced technology. The manga adaptation of Ocarina of Time also mentions a similar banishment of the tribe, said to be what inspired them to add the teardrop to their eye emblem.
    • The Blood Moon provides an in-universe explanation for Respawning Enemies, but this is not the first time the Zelda franchise provided such an explanation. In the cartoon series, Ganon's minions could not be permanently killed because, upon defeat, they would reappear in the Evil Jar.
    • Many fans find it strange that Light Arrows, rather than the traditional Master Sword, are used to finish off Dark Beast Ganon. However, it is easy to forget that there was no Master Sword in the original NES game, wherein Ganon's sole weakness was Silver Arrows (the precursor to Light Arrows). Even when A Link To The Past introduced the Master Sword, the Silver Arrows were still required to deliver the final blow to Ganon in that game. Essentially, Breath of the Wild is bringing back some Early Installment Weirdness.
    • Teba's "Dammit!" is treated as shocking for a Zelda game, but other Nintendo games have used mild swearing in the past. This is most egregious with Fire Emblem, which started using mild language rather liberally in later installments. Metroid Prime 3: Corruption also had a Precision D Strike in its original Wii release that was altered for the Metroid Prime Trilogy'' version.
    • Remote Bombs first appeared in The Minish Cap, though there they were a secret item that served as an alternate option for the regular bombs.
    • Some fans tend to deify this iteration of Princess Zelda for being active, intelligent, capable, for subverting the Damsel in Distress trope by sealing Ganon away of her own volition, for helping Link fight Ganon, and even for wearing pants. These traits of hers have all been present to varying degrees in different games; she helped Link fight the Big Bad in Spirit Tracks, endured her imprisonment to contain or pacify a greater threat in both Skyward Sword and Twilight Princess, was a savvy and intelligent pirate captain who wore pants in The Wind Waker, going all the way back to her actions as Sheik in Ocarina of Time, which included aiding Link in his journey and taking steps to rescue others from danger while also remaining hidden from Ganondorf for seven years.
  • One True Threesome: Link-Zelda-Mipha. The fact that the game's dialogue options allow the player to make Link show interest in both girls helps here, even if said options only affect the dialogues they appear in and don't affect the rest of the story at all.
    • Since Mipha is dead in the present day, then there is also Link-Zelda-Paya to consider.
    P-S 
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • The Yiga Clan. They are a clan of ninjas and they are frighteningly efficient at it. Their MO is to disguise themselves as ordinary travelers and attempt to sell Link something or strike up a mundane conversation with him to lower his guard only to reveal their true selves and attack, not helped by the fact that they're some of the toughest enemies in the game. By the time you're done playing, you'll never trust a traveling NPC again, even if it means skipping out on valuable supplies and items. Sometimes they don't even wait for Link to approach, calling to him from a distance before attacking, meaning that simply not talking to strangers won't save you. And if you think that defeating Master Kohga will end the Paranoia Fuel, you're oh so wrong, as this will only embolden the Yiga Clan to throw everything at you: Assassins, Footsoldiers, and even Blademasters. They will forgo stealth and just attack you upfront. And they can show up anywhere. As Master Kohga puts it:
      Master Kohga: Coward! I shall be remembered! The Yiga Clan will track you to the ends of Hyruuuule!
    • The player will run into Guardians that may seemingly be inactive and will not attack Link. However, there are also Guardians that at first glance appear inactive, but become active once Link is nearby. If the player sees a field full of Guardians, it can be a little unnerving not knowing which ones can attack at first glance and which ones are just inactive. It's bad enough when an immobile, legless one turns out to be active, but when a fully-legged decayed Stalker wakes up...And just the Guardians in general can make the player feel paranoid due to their insanely far targeting sight. The player could be walking into a new area, and then suddenly, out of nowhere... [laser sight beeping] Doop-dooda-dooda, doop-dooda-dooda... When fighting a Guardian in a battlefield littered with Guardian hulks, a player's worst nightmare is stumbling upon another active Guardian while moving around... or have one sneak up on your from a blind spot. Nothing causes you to panic in terror like TWO targeting lasers suddenly appearing on Link's body.
    • The Lizalfos in this game are based on chameleons. Like many fictional depictions of chameleons, they can blend into the environment and use this ability to ambush Link. On top of that in sand or snow based regions they bury themselves underground to be even less obvious than the above (as the "camouflage" is limited to one solid color roughly based on their surroundings) and leap out and attack Link if he unwittingly walks into their territory. Nothing is more terrifying than finding a treasure chest in a wide-open area, only to be suddenly swarmed by a group of Lizalfos.
    • Taluses camouflage themselves as completely ordinary piles of rocks throughout the overworld. While Igneo and Frost Taluses are fairly obvious even when dormant, regular Stone Taluses often aren't. If you're not very competent at fighting them, you'll probably start to distrust every pile of medium-sized rocks you come across.
  • Player Punch:
    • Let's face it, no one is going to enjoy seeing Wolf Link lose all of his health. He follows you wherever you go, helps you hunt, and even fights enemies, just like a real dog.
    • Don't get your horses killed, you'll feel pretty lousy after. Especially if the horse is Epona, who can only be obtained by using the Smash Bros. Link amiibo; if she dies, then you'll have to start a new save to get her again. Fortunately, one of the Great Fairy Fountains is home to a Horse Fairy that can resurrect your fallen horses.
    • Finding the Ranch Ruins can be a punch in the gut for anyone who played Ocarina of Time. While they might not be the ruins of Lon Lon Ranch, they look similar enough and are located where Lon Lon Ranch could be. It's depressing to anyone who has fond memories of the place to find it razed to the ground with a Guardian stomping through it.
  • Polished Port: The Nintendo Switch version, especially after the patch, has significantly fewer framerate problems than the Wii U version and one of the stated differences between the two versions was the Switch having higher-quality sound effects. This is on top of being able to play it on the go. The Switch version also allows you to obtain free items from the Switch News page, a feature not available on the Wii U (though they're all items that are available normally in-game anyway).
  • Popular with Furries: Kass (a bird man) and Prince Sidon (fish/shark man) instantly grew popular with the furry fandom once they were shown in game. Both are popular for their good looks and likable personalities.note  It helps that they're popular even with non-furries, especially Prince Sidon. The Lynels have also become quite popular in the furry fandom.
    • Then on the female side of things we have Mipha the Zora princess who is also very popular for her sweet demeanor and attractive design. Having a canonical crush on Link and being the older sister of the similarly popular Prince Sidon doesn't hurt either.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: A significant number of fans have warmed up to Fi after her bit part in this game. Instead of being a Captain Obvious Exposition Fairy, she saves Link by telling Zelda something she wouldn't have been able to figure out herself, making her role in the game having a major impact on the plot. Kind of commendable if we keep in mind she's never called by name, is only mentioned in a couple of cut scenes referred to as "the voice/spirit inside the sword that seals the darkness", she only has a couple of seconds of screen time, and the only thing we see or hear of her is the Master Sword glowing purple and she emitting her characteristic chime from Skyward Sword. In other words, we don't hear her talking. Plus, this establishes that she is not a One-Shot Character as the Master Sword's spirit.
  • Sacred Cow: Breath of the Wild was fast-tracked to this status, joining Ocarina of Time and A Link to the Past as one of the few Zelda games to be considered an absolute pinnacle of gaming and winning many "best of 2017" awards. As such, many fans consider the game to be immune to criticism (despite the existence of such criticisms for all three games).
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Weapons have finite durability — extremely finite durability, as in, they break easily regardless of power. Most weapons will break after only a few minutes of sustained use. This means that weapons break all the time, resulting in you constantly switching out weapons for others. While this was done intentionally by the developers to encourage using different weapons and constantly trying new ones, the system quickly shows its shortcomings as the game will let you open a chest even if you have full inventory slots, meaning you see: Link open the chest, the item summary pop up, the popup reading "Your inventory space is full", then the chest closing, which takes about 10 seconds, not counting how much time you take to discard a weapon to make room for a new one. This gets tedious fast. Not even the Master Sword is immune to this! Prolonged use will render it temporarily unusable until it recharges. While Hestu can greatly lessen the problem of having not enough inventory slots, it's still a reoccurring problem. This also makes shield surfing almost useless until you increase your inventory size — shield surfing puts a constant drain on your chosen shield, burning through its durability very quickly. While shield surfing is very fun, the sheer strain it places on your equipment is too much for long sessions, resulting in the mechanic not being used as often as it should at best, and barely being used at all at worst. It's a real shame, because shield surfing is awesome. The weapon degradation causes a great deal of Too Awesome to Use, where players pick up rare weapons, but fear actually using them in case they need them later and end up having inventories clogged up with weapons for "just in case", or just straight-up avoiding battles altogether. This also ties into the inventory management of the game. The menus themselves are usually precise and clear, but you have to scroll through a lot of junk if you have a full inventory.
    • The Blood Moon. While it does offer cooking bonuses, it also respawns all enemies and loot (ore deposits, ingredients, etc.). There is no way to significantly affect its chances of occurring, although killing enemies slightly increases its likelihood. With these in mind, it wouldn't be so bad if the Blood Moon were not required to open a shrine, and it didn't instantly revive enemies without allowing you to collect their loot if you just killed it. Several players have had instances where they killed a boss enemy, only for the Blood Moon to revive it before they could gather its loot, forcing them to kill it all over again. To make things worse, before the patch the mechanic was pretty glitchy, which made the Blood Moon to sometimes appear several times in quick succession and/or at times when it's not supposed to. One of the most infamous cases was one unlucky player having Calamity Ganon respawn on him because of a Blood Moon.note 
    • Rain. It makes climbing much more difficult to the point it's impossible without a lot of stamina potions or upgraded climb gear, and even then it takes a lot longer and a lot more effort to climb anything, and it prevents you from using Fire Arrows or setting anything on fire. This means that exploration becomes much more limited, fighting Taluses is much harder since you're expected to climb them to hit their weak point, and any sidequest that demands some usage of fire is out of the question. This includes two very early quests where you have to carry fire from a forge to an ancient lab; if it starts to rain while you're in the middle of it, you have to wait for it to pass. While rain does include benefits as well — easier stealth since your footsteps are masked by the rain, certain creatures appear more often, and electrical attacks are stronger — the penalties are outweigh the advantages. Thunderstorms are even worse, since you'll end up getting struck by lightning if you have anything metal equipped, and if you don't have any wooden equipment on-hand to fight enemies, you need to be very careful as you constantly un-equip and re-equip your metal gear.
    • Sprinting still drains stamina at about the same rate as in Skyward Sword, which is to say, very quickly. Although you can upgrade your stamina in this game, the depletion is just so quick that it doesn't help much until you have at least a full extra wheel. With two extra wheels, the duration is finally legitimately useful, but you need to invest 20 Spirit Orbs. Be prepared to spend a long time getting places if you don't have fast travel to an area yet. Worse still, while there is an exploit that lets you sprint without using stamina, it's not exactly easy on the hands. note 
    • The "Apparatus" shrines require the use of motion controls to manipulate some object such as a platform, hammer or marble maze. This is (most of the time) not so bad when using the Wiimote-like Joy-Cons on the Switch, but it's very awkward in handheld mode or Off-TV mode on the Wii U, where you often have to rotate and twist the gamepad in such awkward ways that you cannot see the screen or comfortably press the buttons.
    • A minor gripe, but the fact that Link always has to dress up like a Gerudo anytime he wants to enter the Gerudo Town. While the plot point makes sense and is even found incredibly amusing at first, there are players who felt after Link has successfully saved the town he should have been given special permission to enter the city as a male (similar to how Link earned the Gerudo License in Ocarina of Time after proving himself). Instead, even if Link just wants to visit the Jewelry Shop or the best arrow shop in the game, he always need to pause, enter his gear, and find the one set of armor (among several dozen others) that will allow him entry into the town.
    • Saving is limited to only one slot. If you want to start a new game or let friends or family members play their own games, you'll have to save over the old file or use a different account (Switch) or profile (Wii U).
    • With the possible exception of Silver Lynels, Silver enemies in general are more of a massive annoyance than a threat. The main problem is that, other than their utterly massive health, they're no different from Black enemies, which are only one step down. They're exactly the same strength, and don't offer any new attacks, and since Black enemies already have maxed-out equipment, their weapon drops don't get an improvement. Their only drop improvement is that they drop rare stones, but by the time you encounter them, you should already have a lot of resources just from foraging around. Due to their massive health, you are guaranteed to waste a few weapons trying to deal with them, which becomes a problem once they start spawning everywhere.
    • The lack of a cooking book. Considering how cooking your own items is such a large aspect of the game, you'd think that the game would allow the player to save recipes for already cooked meals. However, the game doesn't have a feature like that at all. The closest thing to it are posters in some of the stables. The player is practically forced to cook from memory, which can be very tedious and a lot of attempts result in Dubious Food.
      • For that matter, cooking is an exercise in tedium. Players have to open the menu, hit the option to have Link hold items, fill his arms with ingredients one by one, then exit the menu and dump them in the cooking pot to let them cook, before finally revealing the product and its effects. The game at least lets you skip the animation of the concoction cooking, but the process is still time-consuming, even if you're just dumping five of the same ingredient into the pan and not taking the time to combine different ones. Finally, you can only cook one thing at a time; even if you have the stock to cook the exact same dish multiple times, you need to manually pick the ingredients each time. On occasions where you need to restock your food and potion supply, it can take several minutes of menu navigation.
    • Crossing any body of water can be relatively annoying, especially in the early game when the player has low stamina. Swimming is painfully slow and uses stamina quickly, so the player must either glide across water using the paraglider, raft across (which requries a specific item that isn't always easy to find), or jump across frozen blocks using Cryonis.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The Royal Guard weapons. They have incredibly high power only surpassed by the Savage Lynel weapons, have cool designs (which are dark Palette Swaps of the Royal Weapons), and are found exclusively inside Hyrule Castle. But when their descriptions say that they have low durability, they aren't kidding. They break as easily as the Spiked Boko Weapons, and Durability Up bonuses won't help much. It's a big letdown for something that's supposedly above the Royal Weapons.
    • As far as weapon bonuses go, the Long Throw bonus is by far the most useless one. There's practically no reason as to why one would want to throw a melee weapon, as the Critical Hit is also triggered on the moment the weapon breaks. The only use it might see is on boomerangs, but bows provide a much better and more practical ranged option. Once Level Scaling starts making all weapons carry bonuses, you might want to skip anything with Long Throw.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: As per use in the series. However, Breath of the Wild is somewhat unique in how the possible ships are handled, which has intensified the shipping warfare quite a bit. For starters, the fact that Link's The Stoic characterization in this game, coupled with his traditional Heroic Mime portrayal, prevents him from showing where he stands, one way or another, meaning that the room for interpretation is wide open.
    • By far, the biggest one is LinkXZelda VS. LinkXMipha, which is probably the biggest shipping rivalry a Zelda game has ever had regarding possible pairings from the same game. Part of the reason is that, unlike earlier games, this one explicitly confirms both girls are in love with Link. To further elaborate:
      • For Zelda, she's more subtle showing her feelings, more in line with her previous incarnations as an Implied Love Interest. However, all possible doubts are put to rest with Kass telling Link after a side quest how his poetry mentor fell in love with Zelda while working at the castle, only to find out that she already had a Bodyguard Crush on Link, and he admitted his total defeat after seeing Link sacrificing his life to protect her during the Great Calamity. Supporters jump in due to Zelda's massive Character Development, which makes her the most sympathetic incarnation of the character yet, and the fact that she falls in love with Link little by little, thanks to the fact that they turned out to have quite a lot in common. And of course, Link and Zelda being the de facto ship of the entire franchise, with an inferred Reincarnation Romance in addition to serving plot purposes in this story as his sacrifice acted as the catalyst for Zelda's powers to awaken in the first place to protect him. As for detractors, they find her love for Link not as "pure" as Mipha's, who when we see her loved Link 100% unconditionally, while Zelda was incredibly rude to him when they first met. There's also vocal minority who doesn't like Zelda's character at all, since they find her too mopey and whiny (see Wangst). The fact that one of the most crucial pieces of information about their relationship, namely Zelda's diary, is quite hidden and thus a lot of players may miss it, doesn't help either.
      • With Mipha, she is far more direct, both through her bold Declaration of Protection and, above all, her intention of proposing to him, including crafting the Zora Armor, which is a traditional Zora betrothal gift. Supporters join her due to how tragic her story is, and the fact that she was one of the Zora Link was friends with since he was a kid, meaning she was close to him for far longer. Even her gift, Mipha's Grace, turns her devotion for him into a game mechanic, which has a very powerful effect. Bonus points in the Japanese and non-English versions, where she repeats her Declaration of Protection every time her power is activated. Detractors, however, don't find her as compelling as a character, since she's nowhere near as developed as Zelda is, and her interaction with Link in the entire game is reduced to only two short cutscenes leaving too much of this as their relationship being bluntly told about in a single dungeon storyline unlike how his relationship with Zelda was shown to develop throughout the game. Plus, they argue that her being dead renders the whole debate moot anyway. Not to mention, given that Zora live for a lot longer than Hylians do and Mipha is explicitly mentioned to have known Link when he was a child, the ship can take on some somewhat squicky overtones to some, as the lack of evidence that Link was aware of Mipha's feelings for him come off a bit like Wife Husbandry on Mipha's end, especially since she had special armor made for Link because she intended to give it to him as an engagement present, without the player getting any sense as to whether Link liked Mipha back. At least with Zelda he's shown several times in flashbacks to be extremely protective of the princess and a listening ear to her problems.
    • To a lesser extent than the other two there's LinkXPaya fans, who also joined the fray, due to Paya's feelings for Link combined with her Shrinking Violet tendencies, Adorkable personality, and how in her diary you learn that, if Link returns Zelda's feelings for him, she thinks they would be a good match for each other. Perhaps it that last part that makes the ship rivalry between Link/Zelda and Link/Paya less intense than with Link/Zelda and Link/Mipha.
    • Then we have LinkXPrinceSidon, which has become THE non-straight ship of the game, and probably the biggest in the franchise so far. He's gotten a massive fanbase thanks to his charming personality and "I believe in you" attitude towards Link, as well as being the most charismatic of all of Link's four companions during the main storyline. Although he still has some detractors, who argue his behavior is a bit over-the-top, making him hard to take seriously. There are also people who find him irritating when he interrupts you several times on your way to Zora's Domain for the first time, and are unable to shake that first impression.
  • Sidetracked by the Gold Saucer: The Snow Bowling, or "Snowling" mini-game; a player can easily spend hours working out how to get that perfect strike every time. In fact, as it's the only repeatable source of rupees in the game other than selling Vendor Trash, the game practically encourages you to do this, what with the massive costs of the items you'll actually want to spend rupees on.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Right at the beginning of the game, the wide shot of Hyrule after Link gets out of the Chamber of Resurrection. The breathtaking landscape was a perfect representation of what's to come in the game, and leaves an image that players are unlikely to forget.
    • The crying scene from memory number 16, aptly named "Despair", based on the 12th photo in the Captured Memories quest line. It became instantly iconic when it first appeared in the Switch Launch trailer and spawned countless of renditions and fanarts, a trend that kept going after the game was released. Albeit the overall impact can vary a lot depending on when you see it in regards to the other memories (most people agree it's the most effective if you see it last, while seeing it early on may undermine it), the scene has become the most memorable cutscene in the game.
  • Signature Song: While the main theme is usually cited as this for being representative of the game as a whole, people also like to characterize the dungeon music for Hyrule Castle as this thanks to its dramatic and complex orchestral combination of the traditional Hyrule Castle theme, the main series theme, Ganon's theme, and Zelda's Lullaby. It even has the melody of the Ballad of the Wind Fish playing as part of the score in the most breathtaking way possible. It's frequently deemed the best final dungeon music in any Zelda game.
  • Special Effects Failure: Due to how much Link's outfit and weapons can be customized, shields float behind Link's back, rather than be attached to diagonal strap of his tunic.
  • Spiritual Licensee: A hero who doesn't talk much is sent into the future to fight a shape shifting evil. He often stops to help other people and is constantly attacked by giant monsters and assassins. The hero's greatest weapon, a sword forged with the purpose of defeating the shape shifting evil, is also missing, and he must prove he is still worthy to wield it after all this time. Are we talking about Link or Samurai Jack?
  • Strangled by the Red String: Some fans find that the romance between Hudson and Rhondson to be coming out of nowhere, especially when they cleared the whole From the Ground Up side-quest in one go. After joining in Tarrey Town, Rhondson only talks about Hudson to complain how much she dislikes having to fix and clean Hudson's nasty shirts all the time, and how he gets so defensive when she brings up her problems with it. But immediately after the next person is recruited in, she talks on how sweet Hudson is, and dialogue is easily missable is you go straight to clearing the next mini-quest before speaking to her. The final factor the fans asked What Does She See in Him? is given when he follows in his boss's footsteps by making "we will continue the Bolson Company Theme Naming mandate in our children" as part of his wedding vows — she outright looks like she's considering cancelling the ceremony right there and then. Some have even complained that it seems like the only reason Rhondson ultimately married Hudson is because she's desperate and Hudson was available. However, talking to them both immediately before and after the wedding has her comment on how despite him being a bit unorthodox and a little simple, she's happy to be with Hudson.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
  • Squick: Drinking cooked and crushed up bugs as potions makes a return from Skyward Sword. Now, you make them by cooking up severed monster parts with them, such as Bokoblin teeth, or even Bokoblin Liver! The latter is extra creepy when you consider Bokoblins, and several other monsters are sentient beings.
  • Subbing vs. Dubbing:
    • The inclusion of voice acting has caused a drift in the fanbase. Arguments over whether the English dub or Japanese dub are better have began. As soon as the first fully voiced trailer came out, fans began arguing over Zelda's crying cutscene. The Japanese version uses loud sobbing while the English version is far more subdued. Arguments have risen on whether the English version is poorly acted or simply realistic, against the Japanese version being either far more emotional or overacted. Also, which is more of a Tear Jerker, and which is overall better. The English dub is hotly debated in general, with factors affecting its quality such as the copious use of lesser-known American VA's,note  as well as Zelda and Mipha being voiced with Fake Brit accents rather than by actual British voice actresses such as with Xenoblade Chronicles.
    • The debate intensifies even further when you go to the communities in other languages that also received localized voice worknote  regarding their dubs against these two. Spanish and French are particularly noteworthy, since they received two different language options for each one of them. Spanish had the usual Latin American Spanish dub (made for the first time for a Nintendo game in Mexico) and European Spanish dub (made as usual in Spain by Nintendo of Europe). The decision to include a Mexican Spanish dub was highly praised by Latin American fans (See Win Back the Crowd below), and although both dubs were overall well received by their respective target audiencesnote , the Subbing vs. Dubbing debate intensified even further in the sense that Spanish-speaking fans not only compared their voice tracks to the Japanesenote  and Englishnote , but both Spanish tracks to each other. Something that is actually very common in the Spanish speaking world when it comes to dubs in generalnote . French, meanwhile, received one dub for France and one for Canada... except that it just uses differently altered versions of the same European French voice track for both its Canadian and European options. Quite a few French-Canadian fans felt cheated, especially in light of Nintendo of Canada controversially importing European French versions of series such as Pokémon, Professor Layton and Yo-Kai Watch rather than creating local translations; many of them just played with English voices, to the point that Patricia Summersett was invited as a guest to a Montreal comic convention.note 
    T 
  • That One Attack:
    • Lightning attacks. There is a reason why the Zora fear electricity. When hit by anything lightning, Link will not only be stunned for a second, but automatically drop the equipment he is currently holding, forcing the player to either pull another weapon out or scramble to pick up the dropped equipment, leaving them open for additional attacks. Also, the Lynels love using such arrows. Thankfully, this applies to enemies as well, so carrying Lightning equipment can be a surprisingly good way of easily stealing enemies' weapons.
    • Laser blasts from Guardians. Unlike in previous Zelda games, getting hit by a laser in this game results in a ton of damage, around six hearts of damage at least in a game where you start with only three. They also come out fast and are very accurate. Fortunately, they take several seconds to fire and can be parried back, although if you mess up, you will either lose your shield or get blasted. The Guardian Turrets are much worse, however, as once they have their sights set on you, they will just continuously spam lasers at you for as long as you're still in range. Get ready to have to restart from your last save if you were trying to sneak up on one, get caught, and then get trapped on the environment.
    • The Yiga Blademasters inside the Yiga Clan Hideout have a really nasty ability that their brethren elsewhere don't have: Their melee attacks instantly kill Link should they connect, even if he has fairies and/or Mipha's Grace.
  • That One Boss:
    • Calamity Ganon. The first part of the fight's not so bad, especially if you've defeated all the Ganon blights, which halves his health at the beginning of the fight. When he Turns Red, though, he becomes immune to all of your attacks except for Flurry Rush, which can only be initiated by dodging his stronger attacks, stunning him with Urbosa's Fury, or Daruk's Protection/shield-parrying his lasers. He tends to climb onto the walls and attack from afar, though, and this will render you unable to land a hit with flurry on him. He likes to stay there for long periods of time, which can seriously drag the fight out. And since his attacks tend to be tough to dodge, you're in for a tough time. Thankfully, again, he's much easier if you defeat the Ganon Blights first. If not, he's much harder. In fact, he'll be damn near impossible, as he'll have all his health and you probably won't have the Master Sword. Calamity Ganon becomes even harder in Master Mode, even if you've freed all the Guardian Beasts and obtained the Master Sword. Being Hard Mode of course the final boss will have more health, but that isn't the problem. The issue becomes when Calamity Ganon Turns Red and starts becoming invulnerable as Master Mode gives enemies a Healing Factor if you're not delivering steady damage. Many times Calamity Ganon will become invulnerable and leap up on the walls long enough to activate his regeneration before giving Link another opportunity to attack. It becomes a struggle to steadily damage Calamity Ganon, usually a puzzle of wearing him down with counters and then smart use of Urbosa's Fury to finish the job.
    • While Lynels in general are major Demonic Spiders in this game, the optional fight with the Silver Lynel is considered the hardest boss in the game for very good reason. It has more health than the final boss, is incredibly swift despite its size, absorbs damage like a sponge, has devastating attacks that cover quite a range, and even has extra attacks that regular Lynels don't. Better have some powerful weapons at your disposal and have mastered the Perfect Dodge. You will need it.
    • Thunderblight Ganon is tougher than Calamity Ganon due to it being difficult to time the Flurry Rush in the third phase of the fight, and if you miss the Flurry Rush and simply dodge, it won't do any good against his next few strikes, which are sometimes charged with electricity.
    • The Illusory Realm rematch against Waterblight Ganon in "The Champion's Ballad" DLC. You get just 10 arrows for the whole fight, which is really troublesome when you eventually are limited entirely to ranged attacks in the second half. You'll either have to aim very carefully with your bow or make strategic use of Urbosa's Fury (and maybe Revali's Gale) in order to hit it. You also have the option of using Stasis on its ice blocks to launch them back at him if you run out of arrows... but at that point you're most likely low on durability and it might not do much to help.
    • Master Mode turns Monk Maz Koshia into this. Maz Koshia is already a very intricate boss in the normal mode, but the regenerating health he gets in Master Mode turns the battle into one of the hardest in the game. The worst part is when he conjures copies of himself a third of the way into the fight; only by hitting the real Maz Koshia will you deplete his health meter, and by the time you are able to sift out the real guy, he's likely to have regained his health by then. You'll need to exploit every attack-boosting food and armor you can to make it through the fight.
  • That One Level:
    • Out of all the Divine Beasts, Vah Naboris is often considered the most difficult to navigate. It is the largest of the Divine Beasts and has some fairly annoying puzzles in it. The map controls have three different things that can be moved and each of them has four different positions they can be in (compared to Medoh and Rudania only changing between two or three different positions and only Ruta's trunk getting controlled). Some of the puzzles also involve making the controllable portions line up. And at the end, you have Thunderblight Ganon to deal with.
    • Most of the towers that are farther away from the Great Plateau are harder to scale for one reason or another. Perhaps the one aversion to this is the Ridgeland Tower to the West. The west coast is harder than the east coast, but the average player may attempt to head for the tower as you can see it from the tower in the Plateau (that, and the fact that the player is given no notification that the west is harder other than the fact that they are pointed in the other direction in the main quest). When they get there, they'll find that the tower is located in the middle of a lake, surrounded by 200~ HP Lizalfos, Electric Wizzrobes, and a few swimming Lizalfos, long before you get some bomb arrows or a weapon good enough to combat any of those. Most players found this out the hard way, and were forced to come back later — though a skilled player can certainly climb it with patience and stealth, and snag a decent spear or two for their travels as a reward.
    • Akkala Tower. First, it's at the top of a ruined citadel patrolled by flying Guardians and Bokoblin patrols. Then you get to the actual tower and find that the ruins surrounding the tower are crammed to the gills with Pools of Malice. Like other towers with Malice goo surrounding them, you have to find the Cursed Eye to clear it out. Except it only gets rid of the tiniest bit of the stuff, which uncovers a metal plank that you can use Magnesis on to bridge the gap from the top of the ruins to the Malice-covered ledge on the tower. And the beam is barely visible in the goo, which is a similar color to metal items when Magnesis is active. There are also several strong Bokoblins in the area, and seemingly arbitrary Pools of Malice in the ruins whose only purpose seems to be a minor inconvenience.
    • The closer you get to Death Mountain, the higher the temp gauge rises... and then suddenly Link bursts into flames in a spectacular aversion to Convection Schmonvection. To stop this, you need to have Fireproof status, which is made possible in potions by Fireproof Lizards, which are, you guessed it, native to Death Mountain. There is a small patch where they can be farmed before the temperature becomes too high (the Maw of Death Mountain), but thanks to the non-linear structure of the game it's easy to miss it. You can buy pieces of the Flamebreaker armor set in Goron City (and can get one piece as part of a quest in the Southern Quarry before then), and/or buy three Fireproof Elixirs from a woman in the Foothill Stable at the bottom of the mountain. The alternative is to stuff healing items down your gob like there's no tomorrow or die. Add the fact that you'll have to contend with two Guardians that are patrolling the main path up the mountain, as well as Rock Octoroks, which can be a real nuisance, more than the Water and Plains ones (they hide under their rock and become immune to attacks once you get too close) until you figure out their strategy and this becomes a very aggravating and hot trip indeed. Fortunately, there are geothermal hot springs interspersed here and there which you can rest in if your health dips too low.
    • The trip to Zora's Domain. It is a long and winding stretch of road filled with Lizalfos, Moblins, and even a Wizzrobe. In addition, the area is under a constant rainfall due to Vah Ruta, meaning that you can't cheese the area by climbing up the cliffs. And as a few very upset players will tell you, you should not use your paraglider to save time unless you know exactly where you're going. The path is winding and disorienting, so straying from it will only lead to frustration. Oh yeah, and the Lizalfos? They're packing Shock Arrows, and between the rain and the amount of health and defense that you'll likely have at that point in the game, those things will be a One-Hit Kill. While you can sneak around them for the most part, you will get spotted a few times and your only choice when you do is to run like hell. Though if a player is more patient, they can instead get to the very top of a mountain the player is sure to encounter if trying to head to Zora's Domain from Kakariko or Hateno by heading in the direction of the spot marked on the map, and Paraglide straight there, but it requires a long Cryonis climb up a waterfall. It's even worse in Master Mode, which adds numerous Sky Octorok platforms near the bridges manned by Lizalfos.
    • The trip up Death Mountain to confront Vah Rudania. It is an Escort Mission where the player needs to guide Yunobo up the mountain to fire him at the beast to drive it further into the summit. However, the mountain is being constantly surveyed by Rudania's flying drones, and when one spots you, Rudania will start raining a lot of magma bombs at your current location. To make matters worse, this causes Yunobo to stop, shield himself, and cower in fear, which can end up triggering more drones. Nintendo has thrown the player a small bone in this challenge, though, since it's possible to run ahead and destroy the drones, subverting the entire gimmick. The metal blocks that are scattered around the path can one-shot the drones, saving valuable arrows. Additionally, if spotted, the player can whistle for Yunobo to continue following despite the magma bombs raining from above, as additional drones being triggered won't cause Yunobo to stop again as long as the alarm is still active.
    • The Yiga Clan hideout, which requires you to know how to stealth properly if you want to live. Blademasters serve as the patrolling guards and if they spot you, they seal the room, summon other Yiga assassins to attack you, and other Blademasters in the room will also attack you. Said Blademasters can kill you in a single strike no matter how much defense you have and even your faries won't work to prevent death. Even if you lure them with a Mighty Banana, a Blademaster's line of sight is much wider than it appears to be since they can spot you if you're directly at their sides. To make matters worse, saving and autosaving are disabled during the stealth segment, thus you have to start from the beginning if you die. Luckily, the boss fight that comes after the stealth segment is a Breather Boss.
    • In Master Mode, Floor 10 of the Beginning Trials of the Sword. In Normal Mode, it's a relatively forgettable room with two Black and one Green Lizalfos on some narrow docks surrounded by water. In Master, it turns into two Silver Lizalfos with a Blue one standing on guard. Not only do these Silvers have an absurd amount of health for the level of gear you're granted in the Beginning Trials, but Master Mode's health regeneration mechanic combined with the room layout means that if you're forced to fight these Silvers head-on, you'll be knocking them into the safety of the water where they're free to heal off all of the damage you deal. Stopping the Blue Lizalfos from alerting his buddies by immediately sniping him with arrows is the only reasonable start to this labor; figuring out how to assassinate the Silvers afterwards either takes a lot of stamina and resources, or a lot of AI exploitation. It's to the point where people agree that the Middle and Final Trials as a whole are easier.
    • Also from Master Mode, Eventide Island. While Eventide is a rather pleasant nod to The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening in Normal Mode, it turns nightmarish in Master. The gist of the mode is that you have your equipment taken from you and you have to scavenge for resources and place three orbs into their pedestals. On paper, not bad. In Normal mode, not bad with proper hearts and preparation. In Master Mode, not so. With all of the enemies now being tankier, but the weapons on the island not changing, you are forced to avoid combat altogether because all of your weapons will break. In addition, there are two pedestals with things covering them that must be removed, and they are surrounded by high-level monsters, meaning you have to uncover them while avoiding getting hit by them. And if you die, you have to start the entire level over again, and you can't even skip the Shrine Monk's cutscene.
    • The One-Hit Obliterator trials. As the name implies, you are required to play the shrines with a weapon that causes you to die with one hit. The hardest one is Rohta Chiga, the shrine where you have to travel through an obstacle course full of spikes and moving platforms, as if you die, you have to start the whole shrine over.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • Getting all of the pictures for the Hyrule Compendium, especially certain enemies, if you don't want to "cheat" and just pay Purah's assistant Symin to unlock them all piece by piece. Trying to take a picture of the Lynel at Polymus Mountain from way, way up the peak? He can still see you, and you are probably going to get attacked. This could be bypassed by wearing the Lynel mask, but you better make it quick, because they'll catch on. Oh, and a couple of pieces of equipment can only be obtained in limited quantities, while others (like most of the Lynel and Mighty Lynel gear) eventually become unobtainable once all the Lynels are upgraded to silvers - hope you got a picture of them before that happened.
    • Finding all of Link's lost memories. Some of the picture hints are fairly obvious and there's an NPC who can give further hints to a few, but others are incredibly vague (the last one is just a forest with no other landmarks visible, good luck finding which one of the game's hundreds of forests that is) and one is in Hyrule Castle. You also need to visit most of the world to find all of them, making the quest very time-consuming.
    • The Mijah Rokee/Under a Red Moon shrine quest. The gist of the riddle is that Link needs to be on the pedestal with absolutely no clothing on during a Blood Moon (from 9:00 PM-12:00 AM). Problem is, Blood Moons are random, though they can be slightly impacted by killing enemies. As well, the only two ways to tell if one is coming are a) talking to Hino at the Dueling Peaks stables and asking the phase of that night's moon, and b) waiting till night at a campfire and checking the moon. Many a player have reported having to continue waiting at campfires for hours just for a Blood Moon to occur. There is a trick to it, however. If you're inside a shrine when a Blood Moon is supposed to happen, the game will delay it to the next night. You can play the game normally until you see a Blood Moon, warp to any shrine before midnight and enter it, let midnight pass, go back outside and hustle over to the Mijah Rokee dais, and wait until midnight. You'll only have to wait a few minutes for a guaranteed Blood Moon.
    • The Korok Seeds. There are 900 of them, but you only need 441 to open all of your inventory slots. They're sometimes in remote or hard-to-reach locations, and they're needed for 100% completion. Some of them are even in Hyrule Castle. The prize you get? A poop-shaped Korok Seed called Hestu's Gift, which lets you see his dance any time you want now that you're done with the inventory.
    • The Eventide Island shrine quest. The monk in the island's shrine strips Link of his equipment and inventory, forcing him to scavenge a limited environment for weapons and materials he can use to deal with several high-level enemies, including a Hinox. If the player finds the island early, they likely won't have enough hearts to survive many of the dangers; if they find it later, they will probably be so used to their power they'll have a hard time adjusting to having nothing. The other annoying part is that dying during the challenge bumps you back to the last landmass you were on before you set foot on the island, which means you have to slowly boat or fly your way back there every time you fail.
    • Beating all 120 shrines. Doing so grants you the Cap, Tunic and Trousers of the Wild, an armor set that's the game's version of Link's iconic green tunic. And yet it doesn't even give you the highest defense rating, as all three pieces max out at 28 defense when upgraded to 4 stars, while the Champion's Tunic, which is much easier to get, maxes out at 32 defense points. On the flipside, they can be dyed with any color, whereas the amiibo counterparts can't be dyed at all.
    • Farming for parts from the three Spirit Dragons. Since the appearance of the dragons is somewhat random, the time frame for when they do appear is very limited, and you can only get one piece of anything per appearance, you can waste a lot of time sitting around hoping that they show up. Once the dragon spawns were discovered (they spawn in the exact same place every morning, meaning you can set up a loop of waiting till morning, spawning the dragon, getting a part, and waiting again), it made the process far simpler, but good luck figuring it all out on your own.
    • "The Lost Pilgrimage" sidequest from the Korok trials. Link has to follow along behind a Korok named Oaki that will lead him to a shrine per the Korok's father's request, but Oaki insists on doing it himself, so if he spots Link, he stops and goes back to the beginning. He'll often stop moving, turn around, or double back on himself, making it easy for him to catch you if you don't stay close, but you have to stay close enough that you don't get warped away by the Lost Woods for going off the path, and it's very difficult to see him in the tall grass and dim lighting. The game will also try to trick you into revealing yourself; at one point he'll scream he saw a ghost (the same thing he says when he sees the player, except it's as an overhead caption and not a dialogue box), and when he sees a wolf he'll scream for help from "Mr. Hero", but if you actually attack the wolf to save him you fail the trial. After you finally make it to the shrine (which takes several minutes of sneaking), there's no indication as to what you're intended to do when you get there, which is actually just to speak to Oaki, who can be approached safely now that you're at the shrine. Players who manage to enter the shrine without him noticing and complete it will be taken back to the start of the trial once they leave, and the sidequest won't count as complete until they go back and finish it the "proper" way. This all makes for a long, tedious, annoying, finnicky Stealth-Based Mission that one Kotaku writer called "the worst mission" in the game.
    • The Horseback Archery minigame. Most minigames in Breath of the Wild are fairly easy to win; not this one. The minigame has you riding on horseback while firing at a series of targets. The challenge is that you need to control your horse's speed (and potentially make minor course corrections if you don't like where the "autopilot" steers you) while at the same time aiming and firing your bow. In order to get the Knight's Bridle, you need to hit 20 out of the 25 targets and to get the Knight's Saddle you need 23 - either way, your margin of error is punishingly small. Oh, and you have just one minute to complete the minigame, meaning you need to be averaging at least one hit every three seconds. And the kicker? Weapon durability and ammo depletion are not disabled for this minigame, meaning you either need to bring a LOT of arrows and replacement bows or resort to Save Scumming whenever you fail. One final bit of annoyance: you'll need to sit through two loading screens every time you start/reset the game and if you're Save Scumming you need to go through four different dialogue trees EVERY SINGLE TIME before you can start ("Yes, I want to play your stupid game", "No, I don't need any arrows", "Yes, I'll pay your 20 rupee fee", "No, you don't need to explain the rules again"). Bomb arrows (if it doesn't start raining rendering them the same as normal arrows) and multishot bows (especially the Great Eagle Bow) take a bit of the sting away, but not much - this minigame is hell, no matter which way you slice it.
    • On a similar note to the Archery minigame is the Horseback riding obstacle course. Unlike the Archery one the only real way to help your odds is picking a fast horse with a fair amount of stamina that likes you, as you will be actively fighting against your horse's AI instead of your weapons and inventory. You can also only win one piece of the Extravagant horse gear per race so beating the best time on your first go won't be enough to be done with it and both times needed to win cut it pretty close. The issue with the horse's AI is that if you don't hit the jumps at the right angle (and the horse thinks there is enough room beyond it to land safely, making the ones near the cliffs harder) they stop where they are so you need to turn them around (to get the right angle and speed) and try again, wasting a fair amount of time so you can only afford to mess up once or twice. Enemies can also spawn on the course, hitting you off your horse, requiring you to restart and pay the quest giver again.
    • "The Weapon Connoisseur" from Nebb in Hateno Village. The premise is that you have to show Nebb a series of different weapons. This can be especially challenging because it's very difficult to tell where to find those weapons. It's even worse in Master Mode, because several of the items are primarily found on low-level enemies that are much rarer than in the normal mode, and he will not accept upgraded versions of the weapon he asks for.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Continuing the trend of previous installments, the game has been criticized for changing things compared to past Zelda games simply for the sake of changing them, without considering whether or not the changes were for the better. For example, fans who enjoy finding new items that allow them to reach previously inaccessible items and areas were disappointed with Breath of the Wild's almost complete lack of it, claiming that the game goes too far towards pleasing those who enjoy Zelda for exploration (and a bone throw towards puzzle solving) over the series' other core elements, leading to a game that can only be fully enjoyed by one type of Zelda fan to the exclusion of others. The way dungeons are handled are likely to be brought up negatively in discussions of this nature.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!: With such elements like the Wide Open Sandbox nature of the world, more minimalistic storytelling, a wide variety of equippable Breakable Weapons, cooking, the Stamina Meter, enemy marking, and the nature of the collectibles found across the overworld, there have been debates over how much the game seemingly borrows from other popular games such as Skyrim, The Witcher 3, Dark Souls, Minecraft, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain and fellow Nintendo game Xenoblade Chronicles X. Whether these additions add to a series that needed a shake-up or introduce superfluous elements to a series that didn't need it is a debate in itself.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • The Champions have interesting personalities and designs that could easily bounce off one-another and Link, but they're all dead by the time Link wakes up, leaving most of their scenes to the Memories, and thus they end up underdeveloped. A lot of people see this as a huge waste of potential, as the Champions could have added to the story in a much more direct way, allowing for fleshing out what is a fairly sparse story by Zelda standards. That they all died at the same time for the exact same reason also hampers their story a bit. The DLC pack "Ballad of the Champions" only added insult to injury, since Nintendo promoted it as content that would fix this issue, but the overall fan reaction in this respect is that it wasn't enough. Overall, the expansion mostly just reiterates character traits and backstory details that were already present in the main game, and the sparse new information there is gets mostly relegated to the Champions' respective diaries.
    • The characters that help you board the Divine Beasts: Prince Sidon, Riju, Yunobo, and Teba, the latter two in particular. The main storyline seems to be building them up to be super-important characters since all of them have significant connections to the old Champions, but after you seize the Divine Beasts, they are just brushed to the side and are never brought back again. Some wish they had taken on the roles of their ancestors as new commanders of the Divine Beasts, with guidance from the Champions, rather than having the spirits take back control.
    • Epona. The game provides horses based on those of Ganondorf and Zelda, and both provide quests and a bit of lore behind either of them. But due to being an amiibo-locked extra, Epona does not get a special quest nor any lore beyond being a "legendary" horse.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Many feel that the Amnesiac Hero approach could have been a good opportunity for a Jigsaw Puzzle Plot. The Memories could have been used as a way to tell this story by slowly revealing the events of what happened in the past, using Anachronic Order to allow the audience to piece the story together. However, King Rhoam spells the whole ordeal out by the end of the tutorial. As a result, the Memories never reveal any major events and only serve to showcase the characterizations of Zelda and the Champions.
    • While it's understandable that Ganon would be too far gone from humanity to be any more than a Generic Doomsday Villain, his backstory doesn't go anywhere beyond mentioning that he's a continuosly reincarnating Ancient Evil. There's absolutely no explanation as to how Ganondorf degenerated into a smoky mass of evil energy, and the resemblance of Ganon's cyborg form to Ganondorf has no impact on the story nor is touched upon.
    • Despite the game offering several monster masks at Kilton's shop that make the corresponding enemies not notice you and each Hyrule culture and faction having a signature outfit, Sheikah included, the game does not have any kind of Yiga outfit that can be found, in their hideout or otherwise. In addition to being a really cool outfit option, it would be nice to have another stealth outfit that had a Yiga-proof effect, which could either make the hideout segment of the DLC easier or just keep Yiga from spawning on the overworld and prevent disguised Yiga assassins from attacking you. Besides, it'd be pretty funny for the Yiga to be so secretive that they don't even know each other's identities, and that's why they buy costumed Link being a member.
    • The Champions' Ballad DLC seemed determined to make bosses repeatable content within the player's save file, finding a way to allow Link to rematch the Blight Ganons and making the new boss at the end available for rematches as well. Doing so not only allows the player to fight them again for fun and challenge, but also to get another chance to take Compendium photos of them. It's a nice fix...but they didn't invent a way to rematch Master Kohga, despite one trial taking you back to the Yiga hideout. As it is, Kohga is now the only boss who cannot be rematched or photographed after the initial fight, and since the DLC otherwise seemed determined to correct this problem, it stands out more that they still left one boss as a one-time thing.
    U-W 
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Aonuma (here) and the official website both describe the Bokoblins as somehow very cute. The playerbase agrees.
    • The Lord of the Mountain is a very pretty glowing horse-like creature, it's just that its four eyes make it look like it's got two faces growing out of its head.
  • Uncanny Valley: While Yunobo's character design was generally well received, many think that his abs are rather hard to look at, since they stick out from the rest of his body.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Two of the species featured in the game are the Korok and the Rito, who haven't been seen since their debut in Wind Waker. Extra surprising considering that the Zora (whom Wind Waker implied the Rito to have evolved from) are also in the game.
    • Though not physically, Fi has an unexpected role in the story, being the one to tell Zelda that Link can be saved with the Shrine of Resurrection.
  • Vendor Trash: Rock salt, flint, amber, and opals. Rock salt's only use is seasoning in meals, which is far and away not a worthwhile use as there's a myriad of better ways to improve a dish. The second-most common after is flint, which you can use to start fires, but you'll be finding way more of it than you'll ever use. Opals are an odd case; they supposedly have the power of water, while sapphires have the power of ice. You'd think opals would therefore carry an effect that makes the desert heat more tolerable, rather like hydromelons, while sapphires could be used to stave off volcanic heat. Instead, the latter has the former use, and opals just increase swim speed—an effect easily replicated by the only story-mandated armor. Amber is an especially embarrassing case—it literally carries no special effect or use whatsoever, so it's only use really is to earn small chunks of money.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • Intentionally with Link's design because he needs to disguise himself in drag to enter the Gerudo village during his quest. A lot of people got the impression that Link was a woman in this game because of the game's first trailer. Especially during a brief period when Aonuma said "Nobody said explicitly that that is Link". The next day, he admitted that he was just joking, and that the character was indeed (male) Link.
    • Malanya the Horse God. It's easy to assume that Malanya is female, given that he's revived in the same way as the Great Fairies and has the same hands, but this isn't the case. It's easy to miss, but the NPC that tells you about him refers to him as male.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: It is the first original HD Zelda game, and it looks pretty, especially during a sunset. While there were some doubts during development about whether or not Nintendo would be able to pull off the level of sheer beauty that was shown in the reveal teaser back in 2014, the game lived up to it and then some, elevating the Scenery Porn to the absolute extreme.
  • What an Idiot!: You can stand just inches right in front of the Gerudo Town guards, change into your Gerudo Vai disguise and they still wouldn't suspect anything as you go right past them!
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • For Zelda fans who considered exploration the main pilar of the series. This group was by far the most vocal when it came to criticize the series in the decade or so previous to Breath of the Wild for the increasing linearity and lack of meaningful exploration in the series, reaching its peak with Skyward Sword. The most extreme critics went as far as to claim that the only entry that "got it right" was the original NES Zelda, and that the series had basically walked the wrong path for 30 years. Nintendo took these criticisms to heart and created the most open Zelda game ever using the original 1986 game as main point of reference. Needless to say, that group of the Zelda fandom was delighted... even if the rest was a bit more polarized, to say the least.
    • After a good deal of negative backlash from constant delays and the lack of footage, Nintendo's E3 2016 demo managed to impress a good deal of the audience with the sheer size and variety offered from just one small part of the game's expansive overworld. This game singlehandedly did more to repair Nintendo's battered reputation in the video game industry than anything else Nintendo has done in the past few years.
    • The game did this for Nintendo as a whole, and ended the Dork Age that they suffered during most of the Wii U era. Not only was the Wii U a failing console, but Nintendo's software titles at the time were either considered too "safe" or too controversial to make much of an impact, with even beloved titles such as Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and Fire Emblem Awakening attracting their share of base-breaking. For many people, BotW was the breakthrough game that brought Nintendo back to greatness, especially alongside the very popular console that released at the same time.
    • After years of being neglected by Nintendo of America by not having Latin American dubs in their games, having bad subtitles in many of them, or odd name choices, or only having either the European Spanish dub or a LATAM dub made in Los Angeles (which had enraged many Latin American Nintendo fans), finally for this game, Nintendo made an official Latin American Spanish dub for BOTW made in Mexico. Latin American fans are rejoicing over this.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Link's wardrobe has been massively expanded in this game, but not all of them are winners among the fandom.
    • There is a significant number of people who find the Tunic of the Wild set (i.e: Breath of the Wild's own take on the traditional green clothes) underwhelming, which leaves a special bitter taste on the mouth after having to complete all 120 shrines to get it. The short pants receive a special amount of flak, and the brown undershirt looks kind of off, as if it was a couple sizes too small for Link. Thus, many people only use the cap, and combine it with the Hylian Trousers and either a green-dyed Hylian Tunic instead for the "classic" Link look or the Champion's Tunic with the cap dyed blue to match it. It's supposed to be reminiscent of the tunic from the original NES Zelda game, but these people argue that the game already has that available through the 30th anniversary amiibo, thus finding the Mythology Gag redundant and unnecessary.
    • The Ancient Helm, which looks like a Guardian's head and covers Link's eyes. Some people find it a bit ridiculous, particularly because of how tall it is, and prefer to use the Diamond Circlet instead, even if that means losing the Ancient Proficiency Boost. Something similar happens to the Rubber Helm, which is also considered too ridiculous, and it's often changed for the Topaz Earrings.
    • The Radiant Armor set also can be accused of this as it's a Lucha Libre inspired set with a glow-in-the-dark skeleton motif, complete with a champion's belt, wrestler boots, and an awkward looking luchador mask.
  • Wangst: Albeit Zelda's Character Development was overall well-received, there's still quite a vocal minority that disliked her portrayal. Although many of them concede that she had good reasons, they still think she came across as overtly angsty, mopey and even whiny. The memory where she lashes out at Link for following her is usually the main (albeit not only) example they use to illustrate their point.
  • The Woobie:
    • Muava, a lonely and elderly Gerudo who can be found lounging near the Goddess Statue in Gerudo Town, happily chats with Link and tell him her backstory. She used to be a beautiful traveler who caught the eyes of men wherever she went. One day she heard about the Lover's Pond and believed it to be a perfect place to meet her true love. She searched for years to no avail and found that she had grown so old that men no longer found her attractive. Now she spends her days taking care of the Goddess Statue, as both are neglected by the people around them. Link is so visibly saddened by her tale that she has to assure him that she is content with her life.
    • Koko of the Sheikah Tribe, gives Link several sidequests to bring her the correct cooking ingredient and beats herself up for not remembering it herself, calling herself a bad sister and saying she'll never live up to her mother's standards. This implies that, unlike her sister Cottlia, she's aware her mother is dead. This poor little kid tries so hard to take up the responsibilities of her mother, despite being about the same age as her sister (it's not made clear but given how similar they look, it's implied they're twins) and she never cuts herself any slack for making mistakes. Fortunately Link can make her feel better by helping her out, but it's still sad to see, especially as Dorian is too busy guarding Impa's building day in and out to notice.
  • Woolseyism: The most notable example, by far, is uttered by Zelda right before the Final Battle:
    Zelda (English): But courage need not be remembered... for it is never forgotten.
    Zelda (Japanese): But I believe in you... in your courage!
    • At the end of a flashback where Revali is talking to Link, as Revali flies away he sarcastically shouts at Link "Good luck sealing the darkness!" in the English dub. In the Japanese version, Revali simply laughs.
    • In some EU versions the Stalhorses are given the Punny name of Stallions.
Advertisement:


Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report