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Breather Boss

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There are some bosses in gaming that are more difficult than the creators expect...and then there's this guy. He's not quite pathetic enough to go down in one hit from any old attack, and there's no story significance to him being easy, or indeed, any story significance to him at all. In fact, the developers expected people to actually find said character a challenging opponent in some way, but failed.

This is the Breather Boss, the boss enemy that lacks any semblance of challenge or plot importance. They may just have had a predictable and easy-to-exploit weakness, or they may just be easy due to attack pattern. Nevertheless, they are easy and weak. Simple as that.

Note: Only list bosses not intended to be beaten without fail; any bosses created just to lose easily should go under Zero-Effort Boss.

Compare Warm-Up Boss, a boss of this difficulty that's fought early in the game; Zero-Effort Boss, which is when the boss is so easy that it's hard to lose (and sometimes it may not even be possible to lose); That One Boss, which is more difficult than expected for that point in the game, possibly unintentionally; Anti-Climax Boss, when the easy boss is critical plot-wise; and Hard Levels, Easy Bosses, where every boss is this way in relation to the stages. If the boss has its own theme and wasn't meant to be so easy, Long Song, Short Scene may ensue.


Examples for the series below:

Other Examples:

  • The Addams Family has an optional giant bird boss you can beat for an easy extra Heart Container and since the player has the freedom to roam around the house at any order that they desire it can be this or a Warmup Boss instead.
  • Advance Wars: Dual Strike: Due to a glaring oversight on the dev's part, the battle "Two-Week Test" becomes laughably easy if you just do nothing. The goal is to survive for 14 turns, but if you do nothing the enemy can't win by routing your forces since you have no forces to destroy (you start with none and have to deploy them yourself via factories), and the enemy won't be able to capture your HQ since their infantry will be blocked by their own faster vehicle units which will swarm all over your properties.
  • Angry Birds Epic starts to get more challenging around the third tower, with undead pigs showing up more often and requiring more strategy and stronger weapons to defeat. As if to apologize for this, the boss of the third tower, Wizpig, is a complete pushover. Unlike Prince Porky, he doesn't have Dodge to prevent your heavy hitters like the Blues from whaling on him, and he's also not a Flunky Boss. His only attack is a 2-turn Charged Attack that drains HP from all your birds, so Red can greatly weaken his damage with Defensive Formation, and the Blues can easily dispel the attack buffs he gives himself.
  • Ar tonelico II: Melody of Metafalica has plot-related battles that force extremely weak but destructive Reyvateils to fight, or has only The Hero fight alone with a boss, both with no defensive ability you normally have. Instead of hard battles you may expect, these battles are far easier than most enemies group in the same area. Some can even be considered as Zero Effort Bosses as they can hardly damage you at all.
  • The Joustasaurus from Backyard Skateboarding. You can lose your juice meter by bumping into him and it only comes out of the gate for a limited time, but those are easily fixed: you don't need the juice meter because you can just jump over him each time.
  • In Balatro, the Mark causes Face cards to be drawn face-down. Not only are there plenty of strategies that don't rely on (or even discourage) using Face cards to be effective, but the face-down Face cards are still fully playable. Face-down cards are only a serious problem for forming straights and flushes, which Face card strategies rarely rely on to begin with, and Face cards comprise of just three ranks, making it easy to score a Two Pair, Three of a Kind, or better simply by repeatedly discarding Aces and Numbers, sorting by rank, and just blindly picking five face-down cards in a sequence. Best of all, you don't have to worry about this Boss Blind at all if you're playing the Abandoned Deck, which starts without any face cards, and you haven't added any yet; even if you did add a few face cards to that deck, it's still easy to pick out which of them were drawn.
  • The Demon Knight at the end of Durlag's Tower in Baldur's Gate: Tales of the Sword Coast. It's a fairly straightforward melee oriented boss that appears at the end of a dungeon full of traps, Demonic Spiders, and puzzles. It does carry an item that unlocks the fight with the True Final Boss of the TOTSC expansion, Aec'letec, who is a legitimately challenging fight.
  • Abazigal in Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal. Of the bosses before him, Illasera is a Warm-Up Boss you could beat while asleep (if you've transferred a character and party from Shadows of Amn), Yaga-Shura is a Marathon Boss involving a fairly lengthy dungeon and an army to fight through before you can beat him, Sendai is an annoying Puzzle Boss, and his 'doorman' Draconis is That One Boss who will pummel you if you're unprepared. Abazigal is simply a Damage-Sponge Boss with less tricks up his sleeve than the dragons you fight in Shadows of Amn (never mind Draconis), and will fall after a minute or two of concentrated fire.
  • The first Bangai-O has a fair amount of these, but the green orbs are the most harmless ones (especially the Core Division AI people, whom the manual even admits they're useless). Even if they don't have any enemies or guns defending them, the only thing they have is the ability to regenerate health. A good thing, considering how hectic the levels can get.
  • Banjo-Kazooie:
    • The Zubbas in the first game can be defeated easily with either a continuous use of the Rat-a-tat Rap, or the Gold Feathers. In comparison, the boss before them (Boss Boom Box) and the one after (the Final Boss, Gruntilda) are more challenging.
    • Old King Coal and Mingy Jongo in Banjo-Tooie. The former's only attack is raising the temperature of the battlefield, and while he does it at a permanent basis after 150 seconds, the battle can be finished long before half that time passes. As for the latter, despite being the boss of the second-to-last level, he doesn't have much health, he's easy to hit, easy to dodge, and poses relatively little threat.
  • Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean has, in a particularly severe case of Gameplay and Story Segregation, the first fight with Malpercio. Compared to the hell that Fadroh, the Angel of Darkness, and the two dog-golems likely put you through, Malpercio is no problem at all. He doesn't hit particularly hard for most of the fight, and when he Turns Red, all he does is use Soul Drain every three turns or so, which restores a maximum of 1100 HP. On a good turn, one character can easily do more damage than that. Justified, in that that form of Malpercio is just a collection of divine limbs haphazardly stuck together; he isn't fully complete, so he's not anywhere near his full potential.
  • Baten Kaitos: Origins has Giacomo. The three battles with him go from a cruel Wake-Up Call Boss to a moderately difficult Wolf Pack Boss to a rather pathetic example of this trope where he is actually less of a threat than the surrounding enemies. Giacomo Forgetting To Level Grind was very much intentional since it is what drove him to become the difficult opponent he is in the sequel.
  • Batman: Arkham Asylum has the very first boss. It's a random mook who is exposed to a prototype version of Titan, and seems like it'll be a fair challenge... but he suddenly dies from heart failure after a fairly brief amount of time, no defeat necessary. He's more there to serve as Foreshadowing for future fights with Titan-infused goons... of which there are many.
  • Bayonetta series:
    • Iustitia in the first Bayonetta. Whereas the other Auditio get a lot of buildup in the chapters leading up to their fights, Iustitia is barely seen and so the player likely isn't going into the fight with any expectations. The fight itself has the most repetition of all of the Auditio, where one giant face-tentacle has to be attack until Bayonetta runs along it and slices it off. She runs to the next face and does it again. After this, Iustitia enters its climactic final phase... which is just the same as the rest of the fight. It's the only Auditio to do this, too, as the other three all feature dramatic changes once they enter their last phase. To top it all off, this is coming after the two Paradiso levels "A Remembrance of Time" and "A Sea of Stars", either of which may be considered That One Level.
    • Valor in Bayonetta 2. For a giant, high-ranking angel that single-handedly destroys the bridge you've spent the entire last chapter building and was preceded by Glamor, he goes down easily. His attacks are blatantly telegraphed and his Boss-Only Level is the shortest chapter in either of the two games.
  • Saltim from Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg which is a hard game with hard bosses, yet Saltim is much easier than the levels and bosses before him, which is odd because he is fought rather late in the game, and until now the bosses have only been getting harder.
  • Gurdy from The Binding of Isaac looks pretty intimidating, but for a mid-level boss is very easy to fight. Unlike other bosses who have a habit of trying to leap on you or zooming after you like a coked-out bat out of Hell, Gurdy is entirely stationary. Unlike other bosses who can summon dangerous and aggressive enemies, Gurdy is limited to only being able to summon the weak Attack Flies and Pooters, and the immobile Boils. If that's not enough, it's pretty easy to get Gurdy into a groove by hanging out at her side shooting, which will bait an attack in that direction every time, which can easily be dodged before getting back into that exact same place, lather rinse repeat. Heck, the smaller Gurdy Jr. is a far bigger threat as she can actually chase Isaac around and has enough randomness that she can't be lured into a pattern like Gurdy.
  • Bloodborne: The Celestial Emissary, located in the Upper Cathedral Ward, is basically just a Giant Mook with a couple new attacks. He's slow, his attacks are telegraphed, his health is fairly pathetic for this late in the game, and he can be staggered and knocked down fairly easily. The only reason the fight takes longer than a minute is because he's accompanied by dozens of smaller versions of himself, but even then, they pose little threat. This is despite him coming after one of the game's toughest areas. He's almost a Bait-and-Switch Boss, because after you beat him, you can break the window in his boss arena to a secret path leading to the area's real Optional Boss, Ebrietas.
  • Boktai:
    • The second, or third if you chose poorly, boss Muspel is considerably easier than even The Count owing to just how easy it is to damage him and how slowly he moves about the large open arena. All it takes to inflict tons of damage is to stand near the edge, let him roll toward you, dodge at the last minute, and shove him into the lava with a blast from your gun, and his rolling move is his most common attack. Only occasionally will he do anything else, like trying to sucker-punch you or splitting into four smaller slow-moving rolling golems, but these attacks pose little threat.
    • The purification battle against the fourth boss Carmilla is considerably easier than that of Muspel or Garmr before her, as she lacks the ability to temporarily disable pile drivers. Instead she'll frequently hide inside her coffin, forcing you to temporarily cover the solar sensor to lure her back out, which does nothing but give you a free chance to charge your gun before resuming the fight. Even her counterattacks are considerably easier, being a low-damage petrifying ray that lazily tracks you and and occasionally firing them in all directions, which are much more easily avoided than Muspel's fireballs or Garmr's ice breath.
  • Brave Fencer Musashi has Relic Keeper as a deliberate example. Before it, you had to fight Skullpion, a rather brutal wake up when compared to Steam Knight who is very hard to damage, as well as fought off the rather deadly One-Hit KO onslaught of Vambee Soldiers. Relic Keeper kicks off the fight by accidentally pinning itself under rubble and being forced to use a flaming spirit avatar to attack you, which has next to no attacks and can only really float around on a two-dimensional plane while you douse it with water. Enjoy it while it lasts, because after this you fight the finicky Kojiro, and then The Frost Dragon.
  • Captain Commando have the boss of the tube level, Dr. Tea Water (also a Breather Level) where he's a "Get Back Here!" Boss who spends the whole battle fleeing from you, and his attacks limited to dropping easily-avoidable projectiles behind on his speedboat that deals pathetic damage. Water is also hilariously weak (having 1 life bar, while the first boss, Dolg, have at least three) and barely any defense capabilities, although you do need to defeat him in 40 seconds (if you fail though, nothing happens, save for you being denied the bonus for taking out bosses).
  • Castlevania:
    • The Water Magician from Castlevania: Bloodlines is incredibly easy. His only "attack" is to slowly (very slowly) raise the water level. Oh, he'll teleport to the other side of the screen when you hit him, or if you take too long to do so when you get close, but once you get the pattern going, he's pitifully easy, and otherwise incapable of harming you.
    • Castlevania: Symphony of the Night:
      • Karasuman/Malphas. As Dawn of Sorrow showed, he would have been more challenging if he didn't "flinch" with each attack. Even in a game full of relatively easy boss fights, he stands out as way easier than he should have been.
      • Galamoth, yes, that Galamoth, becomes one of these if you swing by the castle entrance and grab the Beryl Circlet which absorbs lighting to restore HP first. (Allow Youtube to demonstrate.) Even if one of his few non-lighting attacks touches you you'll immediately recover fully from his next lighting attack, turning an absolute nightmare into a prolonged game of jumping and mashing square. According to an interview with Koji Igarashi this was wholly intentional, as he intended for Galamoth to be so overwhelmingly difficult that you'd search the castle for an easier means to defeat him rather than enduring his harsh and overwhelming powers, possibly making him one of the few examples of a boss that's both a breather and a nightmare at the same time.
    • Dracula Wraith's first form in Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance.
    • Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin:
      • Whip's Memory goes down quick with the help of fully mastered Shurikens. Or how about Cream Pies, which uses only 3 MP per throw and is darkness-based, something that the Memory's vulnerable to? Yes, that's right, you can defeat Richter Belmont by throwing pies at him.
      • Astarte is a bit of a subversion. She's often cited as beatable in less then a minute using the recently-acquired 1,000 Blades skill. However, this is not because she's easy, but because 1,000 Blades is a horrendous Game-Breaker, and she's in the worst position of any boss to handle it. Without 1,000 Blades, she's much more respectable. In fact, in Richter mode she's almost That One Boss since her Temptation attack might as well be a One-Hit Kill.
      • Medusa can be this as well, as mastered Axes have just the right trajectory against her, like they do half of the game's bestiary.
    • The Wallmaster in Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia, who dies the second Shanoa absorbs the glyph he uses to travel through the wall. Very much a pushover, considering that he's the first boss you fight once you reach Dracula's castle.
  • Puu Black in Cave Story. Unless you're doing certain challenge runs. The fourth fight with Balrog comes in between what many agree to be the two hardest bosses in the game. Two bosses after Balrog is Ironhead, who you need to do no damage for 100%.
  • In Chicory: A Colorful Tale, the fight against the manifestation of Blackberry's inner thoughts is a lot more straightforward than the climactic bosses before and after.
  • Krawlie/Sir Krawlie from Chrono Trigger. He's the boss at the end of the Abandoned Sewers dungeon, but due to his low difficulty many players actually had no idea he's supposed to be a boss. If you fight Krawlie when you first enter the 2300 AD time period, he at least stands a ghost of a chance against you with his HP to 1 attack. However, if you decide to enter this dungeon much later in the game, he pretty much becomes a Zero-Effort Boss.
  • City of Heroes has an example of this when you go back in time to ensure the fall of the 5th Column on a weak pretense. The task involves turning several key Column higher-ups over to the Council side, but the pacing of them is terrible. The first one is Nosferatu, one of the toughest enemies in the game. He is followed by Burkholder, who is not only one of the weakest bosses of his rank, but whom you also fight with the help of Nosferatu now on your side. You can basically walk away from the keyboard and Nosferatu will still destroy Burkholder on his own.
  • Scissorwoman from Clock Tower 3, despite being the 4th boss and one who can not only teleport but also disables your auto-aim ability for the entire fight, is by far the easiest boss in the entire game. She has a very small health bar, tends to appear and run straight at you making no attempt whatsoever to dodge (and no auto-aim tends to become a blessing in disguise as you can manually aim where she is running to), and has one attack that leaves her wide open for a solid 10 seconds or so. Somewhat justified in that you face Scissorman immediately after who has much more health and is a lot harder to bring down.
  • Contra:
    • The Stage 2 boss of Contra 4 takes craploads of damage from the laser, which penetrates enemies and hurts them so long as it's touching them; the boss's big head certainly helps to compound the damage. In fact, when you fight his second form, if you continuously fire lasers at him, he'll go down before any of his shots have a chance to hit you.
    • In Contra III: The Alien Wars, the first boss of the last level is quite simple if you have the Spread Gun, as it's possible to shoot at its mouth and destroy the small aliens before they even come out.
  • Crash Team Racing has Papu Papu, the second and easiest boss in the game. Unlike Ripper Roo before him, who uses TNT crates on a track with no shortcuts, Papu Papu wields the considerably less dangerous beakers on a track that has two downright devastating shortcuts that he will never attempt to use. And while other bosses tend to be all over their tracks making it tricky to hit them with crates or beakers, Papu Papu drives straight up the middle of his track which conveniently has a line going down it. Drop anything on that line anywhere the track is remotely straight and he will hit it every single time without fail.
  • The third boss of Crisis Beat, Duke, is a surprisingly easy fight compared to the previous ones. He fights you alone without any flunkies or backup, and his sole attack is an easy-to-dodge Diving Kick. And upon landing, he actually pauses for a while, allowing you to pummel him with ease, a surprisingly easy fight after a level full of tough enemies.
  • In Cuphead, after the Difficulty Spike in Inkwell Isle II and bosses like Rumor Honeybottoms and Captain Brineybeard in Isle III, you battle Sally Stageplay. Unlike those other bosses that require difficult platforming sections (Honeybottoms or Grim Matchstick) or attacks which can easily trap you (Brineybeard or Wally Warbles), Sally gives you a wide open arena with no blind spots and telegraphed attacks that are fairly easy to dodge. Granted she can deliver a pretty solid beatdown (nothing in this game is exactly "easy") but she'd be right at home among the Isle I bosses. Likely intentional, as she seems more focused on putting on a show than actually putting up a real fight.
    • Werner Werman is also this, combined with Best Boss Ever. Similarly to Sally, he's a Isle III boss that'd fit in great with the Isle I bosses, and doesn't require much other than decent enough jumping/dashing skills, which at that point in the game the player would have already likely mastered. The arena you fight him in is simple, small, and has no stage hazards at all, and even if the ending phase with the cat is easily the hardest part, it pales in comparison to middling-difficulty bosses like Cagney Carnation. He seems to be in the game more for comedic value (as well as the ridiculous plot twist at the end) than an actual challenge.
  • DanceDanceRevolution has a few of these. For starters, there's Xepher on the console port of SuperNOVA. On the Stellar Joint "THE LAST", there are only 5 songs to play: 4 boss songs, and Xepher which is the easiest, but still the toughest non boss song. After that, there's On The Bounce in X, which is usually played right after Trigger. There's also Kimono Princess and Roppongi Evolved in the console port of X2. They're actually somewhat hard songs, but considering what 2 songs come before it... note 
  • Dark Souls:
    • The Moonlight Butterfly. It spends most of the time flying about, telegraphing its relatively easy to dodge attacks, and for a melee character, resting its head on the walkway for a while before engaging in another highly telegraphed charged explosion. Summoning the Witch Beatrice for the battle makes it even more of a cakewalk. The Butterfly is made even easier by the fact that it's much less psychologically daunting than most of the other bosses. Even its arena (a partly grown-over walkway) and theme are rather peaceful. Unlike the typical twelve-foot-tall horrifying undead abomination charging towards you and delivering a furious melee beatdown in a dark and enclosed room while ominous choral music roars, the Moonlight Butterfly is a pretty jade-colored spirit creature found on an old bridge over a wide-open forest. It attacks slowly and predictably with shiny, low-damage Beam Spam, while drifting peacefully overhead to a quiet piano melody. As such, it's much easier to concentrate and remain calm while fighting it.
    • Pinwheel also qualifies as this. His fight takes place in-between The Catacombs (which is filled with resurrecting skeletons and skeleton wheels), and The Tomb of the Giants, and the fight itself is a complete joke. He has only a handful of highly choreographed attacks, his health is just barely higher than the second boss in the game, and he's cripplingly weak to melee characters. His magic attacks actually do a fairly high amount of damage if they connect, but most players end up killing him before he can even fire one.
    • The Gaping Dragon isn't a particularly tough fight either. It's enormous, can instakill you by slamming its maw onto the floor, landing on you, or running over you, and has an AOE vomit attack that destroys your equipment, but it's very slow and leaves its back end wide open. If you take off the tail (not hard to do), then the fight devolves into constantly attacking his back end while he's recovering from the slam attack.
    • The Demon of Song in the sequel comes at the end of the controller-smashingly frustrating Shrine of Amana, while the area beyond it contains the memorably challenging fight with Velstadt. The Demon of Song itself has very simple, telegraphed attack patterns, and the only trick to the fight is knowing when you can damage it, which isn't too hard to figure out.
    • For Faith build players in the third game, Aldrich is a cakewalk. Why? Vow of Silence. It's a Faith spell that prevents any and all magic attacks from activating for about twenty seconds when cast. Almost every single one of Aldrich's attacks are magic-based, meaning this spell completely shuts him down except for one or two relatively weaker physical attacks.
    • The Iron Golem is infamous for being possible for Iron Tarkus, who is summonable inside the arena, to defeat solo.
    • Yhorm the Giant, once the player figures out his gimmick. You have to use the Weapon Art of the Stormruler sword found in his arena, which can kill him in five hits. He's even easier if you've completed Siegward's questline, as Siegward will join the battle wielding his own Stormruler. Trying to fight Yhorm without the Stormruler, while doable, turns him into a Marathon Boss that will take forever to take down, as Yhorm has the highest amount of health in the game (yes, far more so than the Final Boss, and even far more so than any of the DLC bosses).
  • In Demon's Souls, a game so hard that beating it once is a godlike feat and twice or more makes you a god of gods, Maiden Astraea can be this if set up right. You can make her very, very sad and she will give up her soul without a fight, at least from her. You still have to kill her loyal guard, Garl Vinland, who has sworn his life to her first, who you can make nearsighted and then just spam a cloud of poison, counter intuitive seeing as the level they are on is a deadly swamp but it works on him until he finally dies. That is the entire level if you go that route, because her stage is one big arena to fight in and the guard is on a side path free of any other soul, then talk to her and she will put a knife into herself. Easiest boss in the game.
  • Devil May Cry 3: Dante's Awakening:
    • Gigapede. While it can hit hard, it doesn't hit hard as other bosses, has a limited area of attack, a predictable pattern and is a large target. Be quick enough and you can avoid all of its attacks, and with enough skill you can deflect some of his attacks back on it for a Flawless Victory. That is, if you are someone who can pull through the extremely difficult game.
    • Two more Gigapedes are encountered inside the Leviathan who give more challenge but are still pretty easy compared to other bosses.
    • Lady. While she provides more challenge than Gigapede, be careful and you can waltz through her as well.
  • Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest has Kudgel, who's nestled comfortably between Kleever and King Zing. Unlike the boss before him who requires tricky jumping from hook to hook, and the boss after who is just bullshit all across the board, Kudgel has a very simple and predictable attack pattern that actually gets easier to dodge as the fight goes on, as all he does is speed up which makes timing your dodging easier. In fact he may even be easier than Krow the first world boss: you run to the left, dodge his ground pound, run to the right, dodge his ground pound, throw a TNT barrel at him, repeat until dead.
  • Furi: The Beat is the last warden you face and the easiest boss in the game. All you have to do is avoid the straightfoward stage hazards and her easy attack patterns. She's the least experienced warden of the bunch and was reluctantly accepted in the first place. You fight her right after the hardest boss in the game, the Edge, who is a Lightning Bruiser that hits like a truck even with a paddle.
  • Although using the term "breather" to describe anything in God Hand is something you should be wary of, Dr. Ion is noticeably easier than many of the other bosses in the game, mostly because he doesn't block and his attacks are slow. Demon Shannon is another contender for the game's official Breather Boss, seeing as her whole stage is essentially a Breather Level after the monstrously hard 5th level.
  • Godzilla: Monster of Monsters!:
    • On the Kaiju side of the fence is Moguera and Hedorah, who both have the trait of "can be helplessly stun-locked in the corner". With Moguera it's by crouching and tail-whipping, and with Hedorah it's by punching as swiftly as possiblenote . Neither character will be able to retaliate at all, making for easy level-up fodder and a good breather to restore health in later levels when you're being swarmed by multiple enemies at once.
    • On the Mini-Boss side of the fence is the parked Planet X Battleship, a very rarely-encountered foe that appears as early as Neptune but is most likely to be first encountered on the Swamp Terrain stage of Planet X. You can just walk past it since the thing has no hit detection and can't block you like any other boss in the game. The polite thing to do is to wave to them as you pass.
  • Gunstar Heroes has a few of these too, the ease usually comes from predictable patterns and infrequency of attack. "Seven Force" and "Black Beat Stepper". And of course "Melon Bread" takes so long to attack that you'll have to stop firing to wait for its first one. Ironically the tough bosses tend to be the unarmoured humans.
  • Heavy Weapon:
    • War Wrecker, if you know how to beat him. Even though his only attack is a One-Hit Kill, it is very easy to avoid once you find the right strategy. It comes between the somewhat annoying War Blimp and the Wake-Up Call Boss Kommie Kong.
    • There's also Bustczar/Head Zeppelin, who comes after two bosses with One-Hit Kill moves (Kommie Kong and Eyebot) and before another two bosses with one hit kills (Mechworm and X-Bot). As for the boss itself- it uses a Macross Missile Massacre and a carpet bombing attack, which means that all its attacks are destructible. Even if one of it's attacks do hit you if you have shields, neither of them lands a dreaded One-Hit Kill. His level is also relatively easy compared to the levels before and after.
  • Hellfire's stage 3 has you fighting two midbosses that are unusually difficult due to their seemingly random movement easily cornering the player and costing them countless lives; the first one is a single cycloptic alien with Floating Limbs and the second is a trio of three smaller eyeball monsters that each move independently. So it's a relief when the endboss of the stage fires relatively simple patterns and has an easy-to-reach weakspot, and can be downed in about five seconds.
  • The Poacher in Jade Cocoon. He shows up in each of the forests (Except the first), and fights you with Mons that are barely stronger than the regular enemies running around, and it's easy to kill them in one hit if you have a Mon with a good water-elemental attack. He even lampshades it after the third encounter, sounding as if he's on the brink of crying, when he says this:
    Poacher: I can't believe I just lost to a little kid. I guess I'm over the hill. Maybe I should just retire. See ya around, kid.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • Captain Hook in the first game. Despite being one of the last Disney bosses fought before Maleficent, he is the Badass Normal of the Disney Villains, so he doesn't have a One-Winged Angel form or even any special powers aside from being a competent swordsman, making him much easier to take down... as long as you use your ability to fly to be out of his reach.
    • Chain of Memories has the second fight with Larxene, which might be vaguely challenging, but she is fought right after one of the hardest bosses in the entire game, making her easier by comparison.
    • Saïx from Kingdom Hearts II is not an easy boss per se, but he does feel like this in comparison to the other Organization members.
    • Demyx as well. While some fans consider him to be That One Boss material, he is a pretty easy boss to defeat after getting rid of his water forms in time.
  • Wing-Chun Dummy, one of the World Bosses in Kritika can't attack the player and doesn't have any defenses. It's basically just an easy way to earn gold in 90 seconds.
  • La-Mulana:
    • The first boss, Amphisbaena, goes down easily enough if you have shurikens... And then the other bosses in the game kill you a zillion times. Amphisbaena may have been an attempt to lure the player into a false sense of security.
    • Because you don't necessarily need to take the bosses in order as you find them, Sakit can range from vicious to pathetic. He's a massive boss, deals out a lot of damage, and is immune to all subweapons, but he's slow and has a simple pattern. If you have the Knife, he's not bad at all.
  • Mappi, the first boss of the second disk of The Legend of Dragoon. While he does have two thieves alongside him, he only uses a weak physical attack and his two flunkies can be easily dispatched.note  He even has less HP than the preceding bosses. The fact that he comes right after Doel, who was That One Boss, makes it even more egregious.
  • Legend of Grimrock 2 has the Wormbound brothers. The game world is non-linear as soon as you leave Shipwreck Beach, but Wormbound Catacombs is expected to be one of the last areas, since getting to it requires solving a puzzle with the clue on the opposite side of the map. And yet both brothers are much easier than bosses like Herder's Den and the Ratling Boss that you probably encountered much earlier. The ghoul pit and the Trickster encounter are the real dangers in Wormbound Catacombs.
  • In The Legend of Tian-ding the second-to-last boss, Ding Peng, is the only boss who doesn't have gimmicks or devastating special moves. His only shtick is running all over the place while ringing his bell to summon easily-defeatable mooks as backup. Which works against his favour, because weapons dropped from mooks can be used on the boss.
  • OD-10, the boss of the Distant Future chapter of Live A Live, is so incredibly easy that it would be a Zero-Effort Boss if not for the fact that it's theoretically possible to lose to it if you don't figure out the very obvious tactic to beating it: take out the Stabilizers that heal the boss, then stand beside it and spam your heal ability while the boss fruitlessly attacks and triggers your Counter-Attack over and over until it dies. Even without this strategy, OD-10 has no attacks that damage Cube a lot and will eventually go down if you just keep attacking it and healing.
  • The final bosses from Lufia & The Fortress of Doom, for the most part. Gades is reasonably challenging - though he can only hit one character at a time, he does fairly good damage. However, Amon, Daos, and Guard Daos all suffer from a significant flaw - all their attacks are magic. While it's not weak magic, there is a spell that Jerin learns called Mirror that causes spells cast on an affected hero to be reflected back at the caster. By casting it and maintaining it for all the heroes, those bosses can't harm you and do extra damage to themselves, allowing all your remaining characters to wail away at them until they die.
  • Mega Man:
    • If you reach Fire Man from the first game with enough HP, he can be easily taken down by just firing on him repeatedly through his attacks with the regular Mega Buster, which is, in fact, easier than trying to exploit his weapon weakness. As demonstrated here by Lets Player raocow.
    • Mega Man 2:
      • Knowing a boss's weakness in any game gives you a tremendous advantage, but none more than the fight with Crash Man in Mega Man 2. Equip the Air Shooter, jump and fire at the right time and he goes down with one hit, before he can even get a shot off, in less than two seconds.
      • Even without his weakness, Heat Man from 2 is incredibly easy. It's possible to time your shots so he never throws more than a single volley of fire, and even if you don't, all but the very first volley are a cinch to dodge. Heat Man himself follows a simple pattern, and he takes double damage from the Mega Buster compared to most Mega Man bosses. However, many people save him for late in the game, simply because he comes at the end of That One Level.
      • Metal Man's pattern is even easier than Heat Man's, even for a first time player. When you meet him again in Wily's Castle armed with his weakness he becomes a complete joke. The only reason you can't use this weakness in the first encounter? His greatest weakness is his own weapon.
      • For a non-Robot Master breather, the Guts Dozer, one of the endgame bosses of 2, rolls onto the stage as a massive hulking giant, taking up a big chunk of the screen... and it's a complete pushover. Its damage output is surprisingly low (its shots deal only 2 damage, while contact or the spawning Metools deal 4, but the thing is so slow that it'll rarely make contact), and it has a gigantic hitbox and a distinct lack of Mercy Invincibility. If you're good at mashing, you can feasibly kill this thing in about two seconds, especially if you use its weakness, the rapid-fire Quick Boomerangs. This stands out, since the other endgame bosses in 2 include the genuinely terrifying Mecha Dragon and Wily Machine 2, and the near-broken Boobeam Trap.
    • Like with Fire Man above, the ironically-named Hard Man in Mega Man 3 can also be utterly tanked if you go in with full health. So long as you just keep shooting him and avoiding his slow, lumbering headbutt attack, you can let every single one of his fists connect with you and still finish the fight with about 1/8 of your health. It doesn't even require good timing; just mash that B button like you're late for a meeting.
    • Another weakling-Robot Master is Toad Man from Mega Man 4. All you have to do is shoot Toad Man, while dodging his jumps, and he'll NEVER use his Rain Flush attack. One could say that the dissection (no pun intended) of this boss is too easy.
    • The Wily Star from Mega Man V is a long, tough level, with multiple branching paths and rematches against the Mega Man Killers, some of the toughest bosses in the Game Boy series... and Quint. He was already a borderline Zero-Effort Boss in his debut game, and he's even more embarrassingly weak now that you have the Mega Arm. Quint's section of the Wily Star is also the shortest and easiest, which makes it a nice breather before the later, harder parts.
    • Chill Penguin from Mega Man X is generally considered the easiest boss in the game to beat without his weakness, which is good, because the weapon he gives you makes another boss a complete joke. That boss is Spark Mandrill, who, when equipped with Shotgun Ice and with proper timing, can be effectively stun-locked to death.
    • The Colonel from Mega Man X4 is a rare example of both this and That One Boss, depending entirely on if you engage him as X or Zero. As X, you can cheese him by simply hugging the far wall and taking pot-shots at him which will connect even when he's off-screen, he's so far away that his huge slow-moving attacks will be seen coming a mile away and could be dodged by a drunken snail, and he goes down with no real effort making him a nice reprieve after that levels difficult Mini-Boss and before the big man Sigma himself. As Zero you have to engage him the proper way, by jumping from his rocket fists and getting up in his face where his huge slow-moving attacks are suddenly a huge issue, making him one of the most difficult bosses in the game.
  • Sniper Wolf's second encounter in Metal Gear Solid. Her first encounter is actually quite challenging, as the only thing you can use to fight her is the PSG-1 sniper rifle. During her second encounter, Col. Campbell says that you're supposed to fight her with the sniper rifle, but the player will usually have a full supply of Nikita missiles at this point. Just hide behind the ledge and fire them off, slowly guiding them right up to her. You'll kill her off without her ever firing a single shot back, or wising up about your tactics.
  • Most of the bosses in Metroid Fusion are freaking hard such as the Nightmare and SA-X. Ironically, Ridley himself (as Ridley X) is really easy as you have two easy means to steamroll him by now. The first is you'll have the plasma beam by then which means a charged shot will reverberate right through him and do insane damage, and the second is the simple act of letting him grab you and pounding as many missiles as you can into him before he lets go. Of course, you'll get hit a lot both times, but he'll go down long before you do. Lovely after Nightmare and Yakuza, and before SA-X.
  • Metal Slug practically have one of these in every game, mostly in the third or fourth missions.
    • The first game has Shoe and Karn, the fourth boss; while being Dual Bosses that attacks together, their cannons are only dangerous on their respective elevations, with their missiles being the only threat (which players can avoid by jumping). Players can easily target one of the two (preferably Karn on the bottom), destroy it while crouching to dodge its cannons, and then spam their grenades on the other (most likely Shoe on top; what's even better is that there's a platform right underneath Shoe for players to stand on and lob grenades).
    • Dragon Nosuke from 2/X. A Stationary Boss whose attacks — 70% of them — can be dodged by taking cover underneath the boss, and if it retaliates by releasing it's slow-moving flamethrower players can just run to the other side of the screen (doesn't help that Nosuke can use only one attack at a time). Just rush in and out of cover, rinse and repeat until it's finished.
    • Big John from 4 attacks with a single descending claw, and then a fireball launcher, both which are easily-destroyed obstacles compared to earlier bosses who can spam attacks everywhere. In the later half it attempts to sic zombifying bubbles on the players, but that works against Big John's favour since zombified players can use the bloody zombie puke to cause severe damage on Big John himself instead.
    • Fall Mecha from 7/XX. A simple, basic boss that uses fragile turrets and the occasional bazookas from its bottom hatch. It doesn't fill the entire screen with its attacks either, and there's plenty of spaces to dodge its attacks, especially compared to the next boss, The Union — where players must constantly jump between its three segments to avoid certain attacks.
  • Minecraft adventure maps:
    • Areita from Herobrine's Mansion takes less to kill than any of the other bosses and has relatively few dangerous attacks — she may be able to summon cave spiders, but those go down in a single hit, and the webs in her lair are pretty easy to play around. She's fought right in the middle of a very hard section.
    • Tarov is the easiest boss in Herobrine's Return (despite him being allegedly powerful, and killing Thannos earlier), as even after he transforms into a Wither, he has little health and no special abilities, and can be killed in seconds by blindly wailing on him with your sword. However, the part before his fight was quite difficult, and after him is the much harder final stretch of the map.
  • In Monster Hunter:
    • Monster Hunter (2004): Gravios can be this - especially if you are a gunner. Gravios has large hitboxes, has a predictable attack pattern, and is slow. While blademasters may have weapons that bounce off all the time, gunners can use pierce shots and Gravios is a very easy monster to kite since it gives far more warning than most enemies do.
    • Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate: Volvidon comes off as a mercifully easier than its predecessor, Duramboros (it also helps that its fighting style isn't too different from Arzuros and Lagombi; the only major difference is that he jumps like a rubber ball instead of doing brief charges or sliding). But it is also followed by the fast, aggressive Nibelsnarf.
    • Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate: Ukanlos at the end of High Rank. The preceding boss, Dalamadur, is a Background Boss and a Gimmick Level rolled into one, plus a Marathon Boss that is very difficult to defeat for solo players. Ukanlos's gimmick feels far more familiar and intuitive, especially to a newer player, and combined with such large hitboxes (Gunners delight!) and it easily feels like a Breather Boss whose only hard trait is the burrowing chase attack. The following bosses? G Rank monsters.
  • In Ninja Gaiden: Dragon Sword, a good portion of the bosses were tough on their first run through. However, towards the end a good deal of the ones that weren't Space fleas from nowhere were considerably weaker; the boss of the black spider clan was actually a palette swap of an earlier demon, without any new tricks. after the sea of trees and the island before hand, it was much easier. Similarly, vigoor at the end of Chapter nine was way easier than Ishtaros from eight, and the final boss itself could be taken out quite easily once you got your timing in for it's attacks. Of course, in that last case, getting hit by the attacks really hurt, and if you rushed in to deal the finishing blow too quickly, you run into an utterly sadistic one hit kill, but once you know the pattern, it's a minimal effort boss.
  • Ninja: Shadow of Darkness: The Sumo mercenary that shows up halfway through the game, during the beach level. The first few bosses includes a fire-breathing Cerberus, a winged T-Rex, three different dragons and all kinds of humongous abominations that towers over you, and by this point of the game you'd no doubt be surprised to face a Badass Normal Sumo wrestler. Granted, he's surprisingly Acrofatic and his Kevlard can absorb plenty of hits, but he lacks the ranged attacks most previous bosses has, attacks you unarmed and his ground-pound is quite easy to dodge. Not really a challenge for a badass ninja warrior who had slain plenty of behemoths by that point.
  • Ni no Kuni surprisingly has, of all the bosses, the Optional Boss Guardian of Worlds. It doesn't have the usual cinematic attack that you would expect from all the previous bosses (and we mean all of them), so it's easily predictable as to when it's going to attack. Sure it becomes stronger whenever you challenge it again, however its attack pattern is the same as before, so you can wallop at it with gusto. Over and over again until you're bored.
  • No More Heroes: Destroyman is very easy, especially if you purchased (and powered up) Tsubaki Mk. II before that level. Despite this, he's got Cutscene Power to the Max, having shocked the living Hell out of Travis several times before the battle actually starts.
  • No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle has Cloe Walsh who combines slow and predictable attacks with the lowest HP of any boss in the series. She's preceded by the difficult Matt Helms and followed by the annoying Dr. Letz Shake.
  • No More Heroes III: Midori Midorikawa follows up the surprisingly difficult fight against OHMA in the Rank 6 stage, and is easier to defeat thanks to Travis' newly-acquired Mini-Mecha powerup, which grants him a lot of mobility and power to outmatch his rival. The following boss? The difficult Destroyman, who not only has many tricky attacks but is also preceded by an army of pestering Destroyman robots.
  • One Piece: Unlimited Cruise:
    • Wapol in Episode 1 is kind of a breather, coming after Gecko Moria. He's slow and most of his attacks are short range, making him fodder for your crew's sharpshooter. His only threatening move is his super, but even that can be avoided without much trouble thanks to the large size of the arena.
    • Wapol is even less threatening in One Piece: Unlimited World Red where his only real threatening move is charging at you while biting which can be easily avoided using the handy reaction command which will come up. He even takes more damage when hit than other bosses. The game acknowledges this and will replace him with Blackbeard once he is low on health.
    • Episode 2 has Oz on Island 3, who comes after a couple of nasty Dual Boss battles. He's incredibly slow and majorly telegraphs his moves. If he does hit, though, kiss your current character goodbye (especially in Hard mode). Although, by this stage of the game, you shouldn't have any trouble dodging his swings. He seems even easier when compared to the next two bosses.
  • Paper Mario:
    • Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door:
      • Rawk Hawk, the reigning champion of Glitzville and Disc-One Final Boss of Chapter 3, is a relatively simple boss whose attacks are easy to block or avoid. His most powerful attack can be interrupted with a Hammer Throw or Flurrie's Body Slam.
      • The actual end boss of Glitzville, Macho Grubba. Despite having a whopping 60 HP, the most out of any enemy until Chapter 7, and getting the ability to boost his stats at will, all of his attacks are extremely telegraphed and incredibly easy to super-guard, something most bosses in the game don't let you do at all.
      • Doopliss is also fairly easy to beat compared to the other chapter bosses. He only has 40 HP, not much attack and few special abilities. Note that this is done to lull you into a false sense of security before you realize that while you won the fight, he got the prize and now you're all alone and left to try and stop him again. The challenging part is getting back to him for a second fight.
    • Super Paper Mario:
      • O'Chunks is fought repeatedly, "enhanced" each time. The pattern is very simple and barely changes between fights. This is in contrast to every other Recurring Boss, whose attack patterns change radically and require completely new strategies.
      • The Chapter 7 boss, Bonechill, is ridiculously easy, to the point of nearly being a Zero-Effort Boss, if you use Luigi's super jump. Otherwise, he can be a little challenging.
  • Persona 3:
    • The game has the floor bosses in Tarturus, and most of them will wipe the floor with your face. Some however are easy enough to keep pinned to the ground with their elemental weakness. As an example, there are the three Golden Beetles on floor 47. Although they're weak to lightning attacks, they take very little damage from them...except that since they're weak, hitting them with one knocks them over. Hit all three with Zio, do an all-out attack, and you've knocked off something like 80 percent of their health.
    • The Magical Magus trio from the 98th floor aren't very hard to bring down. Sure, they utilize Mabufula and Bufudyne, can cast Makarakarn to deflect any magical attacks, and have Mind Charge at their disposal, but they're weak to Fire and Koromaru can safely get rid of their Makarakarn thanks to his immunity to fire.
    • Hermit can be beaten without any worry whatsoever, even if you have bring party members with weaknesses to its elemental attacks. It would just either spam Zio spells or waste three turns charging up for its Giga Spark attack, which can be negated by dealing enough damage to it for an All-Out Attack. For a Full Moon boss, it's pretty tame. However, considering the next one...
    • The Phantom King of the 190th Floor is one of the easier, albeit a bit more annoying Tartarus Guardians to beat compared to the previous ones you've fought. It only has two methods of attack: attmepting to finish you or your party members off with (Ma)Hamaon (which can easily be negated with either a Homunculus or a Persona/Accessory that blocks Light) and spamming a Mind Charged Megido. While it's immune to all status ailments except Panic and can inflict Fear, it thankfully doesn't have Ghastly Wail and would end up becoming a sitting duck if you've successfully casted Pulinpa or Tentarafoo on it.
  • Persona 4:
    • First is the fight against Shadow Rise. The first phase of the fight against her is pretty straightforward, and she doesn't hit particularly hard or use any nasty attack combinations. Then, her second phase becomes a Hopeless Boss Fight where the only real option is to survive long enough to progress to the next cutscene. Again, this isn't difficult if you have a party member on dedicated healing duty. You even get a full HP and SP recovery at the end. Unfortunately for you, the breather is quite short indeed — you are then immediately forced to fight the real boss of the dungeon, Shadow Teddie.
    • The game also has Shadow Naoto. After the hell of a boss that was Shadow Mitsuo, Shadow Naoto comes off as relief for many players. She doesn't have any minions or battle-prolonging barriers, and, if you have means of healing the entire party (which you should have for every boss anyway), her worst attack, a Ma-dyne spell, isn't that big of a deal; even if she gets an extra turn, she'll simply follow up with a stat-raising spell, easily negatable with Dekaja.
    • There's also Lost Okina, which has a trick to make it completely immobile: Use Ice Break and hit it with ice attacks, and it will be "bewildered" and unable to move for that turn.
    • Kusumi-no-Okami (aka Marie) is both this and Goddamned Boss: between deflecting all attacks (Almighty excluded), her Cast from Hit Points spell, and the items you've gathered in the Hollow Forest such as SP-restoring and Breaker items as well as the Repel Joue armors, the boss fight is very simple and straightforward.
  • Persona 5:
    • Shadow Kaneshiro and Piggytron are definitely no pushovers, but they're nothing special either. They lack any gimmicks that would keep you from hurting either of them, and they don't have any support skills at all. Piggytron's March of the Piggy skill would also take two turns worth of preparation and can be easily interrupted by throwing a rare item on it as the Special Order of this boss fight, rendering it defenseless for two turns. They did get buffed up in Royal but otherwise, they're still not that difficult.
    • Shadow Sae too. While she has a lot of heavy-hitting physical attacks, Desperation, and the Royal-exclusive Elemental Punishment, the boss fight is way more straightforward. The only attack you'll have to watch out for is Berserker Dance, which can easily finish you off in one-shot if you're underleveled or not at full HP.
    • Kasumi/Sumire from Royal is this. You fight her with just Joker alone, but she's only capable of dealing Physical and Bless damage. Equip a Persona that has Null or Drain to both and she can't touch you at all, and if you get a Persona who can Reflect both she becomes a Zero-Effort Boss as she lacks immunity to either form of damage.
  • Pikmin 2:
    • The Giant Breadbug is pretty easy to deal with. All you have to do is grab whichever treasure or pellet the monster is trying to carry to its silo; as soon as the Breadbug is hit by the ship's treasure retriever, it will lose half its HP, so repeating the tactic with another treasure or pellet will be enough to kill it (throwing Purple Pikmin at it also works, but it's preferable to only bring yellow Pikmin to deal with the electric hazards more easily).
    • Despite being a troublesome chaser during the first four sublevels of the Submerged Castle, Waterwraith becomes pretty simple in the last floor. As soon as you manage to harvest Purple Pikmin, you'll be able to defeat it by brute force (just make sure the front stone wheel doesn't squash anyone), and the second phase is even easier as the boss cannot perform attacks anymore and will just run out of desperation.
  • Pikmin 3: After the Armored Mawdad, Vehemoth Phosbat, Sandbelching Meerslug and (optionally) the Shaggy Long Legs, the Scornet Maestro is an absolute pushover with highly telegraphed and easily avoidable attacks (which are even more easily avoidable if you've gotten the Dodge Whistle) and is left completely helpless after one of these attacks. All you have to do is bring Winged Pikmin and nothing but Winged Pikmin, avoid the attacks and swarm it four times and you win. Savor it now, because the next boss is the Quaggled Mireclops, which in turn is followed up by the Final Boss (Plasm Wraith).
  • Plants vs. Zombies 2: It's About Time has a few (Zombot Plank Walker, Zombot Tuskmaster 10,000 BC, Zombot Aerostatic Gondola), but the biggest example is Zombot Tomorrow-tron. You're given really powerful plants (Citron, Laser Bean and Infi-nut), and you're also provided with Power tiles that can provide even further power to your plants. Any attempt to send Demonic Spiders results in a plant food boost on a Citron to One-Hit Kill it effortlessly, as well as two more if used on a power tile. Even without plant food, Citrons can terminate the machines pretty easily. You can also plant food boost an Infi-nut to bring in a barrier that can stop even the strongest zombies, and even Zomboss's ramming attack. To add insult to injury, the single update that affected it nerfed it note , making it an even bigger joke than before.
  • Racrock Force, the boss of Racrock Forge in the Sega CD version of Puggsy, is a bad early-generation FMV sequence underlay that you simply have to jump over a few times before it gives up and dies for no reason. View it here.
  • Super Macho Man in the Wii Punch-Out!! is largely considered a Breather Boss in both Contender and Title Defense. This isn't to say he's a pushover, but his position in the WVBA ranks is cushioned right between two of the hardest opponents in the game, with Bald Bull before him and Mr. Sandman after him (this is further noticeable in Title Defense, considering the infamous respective gimmicks used by Bald Bull and Mr. Sandman there).
  • In Chapter 6 of Rakenzarn Tales, the next boss after Naneal and the Shadow Wind is a muck creature called the Pellaidh. It's statistically weaker than the previous two bosses and has a weakness to fire, one of the most common elemental attacks.
  • Salazar was this in the original Nintendo GameCube release of Resident Evil 4. In that version, Salazar "head" would never attack the corners of the platform where the tentacles came out, so if you got a tentacle to retreat (easily done by simply shooting it a couple times from a distance) you could go into that corner and wail on him unperturbed (until the tentacle came back out, but then you just had to shoot it again). This was fixed in the PS2 and Wii versions.
  • The last boss of Return to Castle Wolfenstein has no ranged attack, is very slow and is fought in a huge area where you can just run circles and pump him full of minigun bullets. The twin minibosses you face two levels earlier as a warm-up are at least five times harder since they have miniguns, rocket launchers and tesla coils.
  • The original Rygar has one on one of the middle stages. The final boss is a giant spider, who is easy to beat, by merely grappling to the ceiling so he can't drop on you.
  • Salt and Sanctuary:
    • The easiest boss in the game is widely considered to be That Stench Most Foul, thanks to its low poison damage, propensity to just summon extremely weak minions, huge hitbox and ridiculous weakness to both Holy and Fire damage, which means it goes down extremely quickly to both applied Pitchfire/Blessed Pages and fire magic spam without a chance to retaliate with anything more than harmless knockback or underwhelming poison. Players are usually thankful, as the preceding boss is always the Disemboweled Husk, which is a giant pain in the ass.
    • The Untouched Inquisitor doesn't have the glaring elemental weaknesses of the above, nor the giant hitbox that makes melee characters shred through, so he's not quite as much of a pushover. But his damage is fairly low, his attacks are samey and predictable, all a variation of throwing his blades at the floor, and his HP is nothing to write home about, so he doesn't pose too big of a threat. This serves to catch your breath right before the very next boss just a little further up, the Third Lamb, which is the complete opposite: Unpredictable as all hell, tanky and terribly dangerous.
    • Carsejaw the Cruel is an enormous pushover, thanks to being a slow Glass Cannon who can't even put out that much damage to begin with. If you're powerful enough to reach him, and have something with a little fire or holy damage, you will shred him in seconds, and even with weak damage you're bound to destroy him in less than a minute. Rather pathetic for a Optional Boss, but when the entire rest of the level is ripped straight from the Third Circle of Platform Hell, it's quite welcome. Even more so when you consider the next story-relevant boss is the Witch of the Lake.
  • Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice: The Folding Screen Monkeys is a Puzzle Boss that plays like a Stealth-Based Mission, where you have to sneak up on and kill four monkeys in a large arena. The monkeys themselves will only run away and never try to attack you, and the only things that are remotely a threat are the invisible fourth monkey that sometimes attacks you, the occasional ghostly fodder monkeys, and fall damage. They count as a major boss and drop a Memory for improving your attack damage, which means any enemy you fight after will be slightly easier.
  • Shantae series:
    • Shantae (2002) has the Wheel Beast. To wit, the boss battles in the first game follows a patter where you use the animal transformation you gained in the dungeon in some way to beat the boss. In the case of the Wheel Beast, the wall-crawling ability of the Spider transformation not only allows you to hit the switches that damage the boss a lot, but it also lets you completely avoid all of his attacks with impunity.
    • Shantae and the Pirate's Curse has the Steel Maggot. It has two easily avoided attacks: One where it slowly crawls back and forth across the screen, and another where it fires a fan of widely-spaced projectiles if you hit the wrong buttons on its back. You do have to guess what sequence of buttons to hit on its back to damage it, but this is easier than it sounds since there are only three buttons you need to hit. There's a reason why it's one of the easier bosses to defeat without taking damagenote  despite its placement in the penultimate dungeon.
    • Shantae and the Seven Sirens:
      • Of the major bosses, the Octo Siren of the Squid Pit is notoriously easier than all the other bosses, even the first one. She's more of a Puzzle Boss than anything, where you need to either guess or use Seer Dance to determine which order to destroy her weak points and then attack when she's stunned, and not only are her attacks telegraphed and easy to avoid but you can temporarily knock them out of commission altogether with Spark Dance. In fact, the Mini-Boss battle against Risky Boots is considerably more difficult than the Octo Siren.
      • Of the minor bosses, the four energy collectors are complete pushovers. Their weak point is immobile, unguarded, and their only means of attacking is with lasers that are telegraphed with targets that appear on the floor and can be avoided with the Newt Dash. They're such a non-threat that they might as well not be in the game.
  • Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne:
    • The game has two bonus bosses that are almost laughably easy with the right Nakama: White Rider and Red Rider. You see, they summon angels to assist them, and you can bring a demon with Stone Gaze to effectively knock both of the bosses adds out of commission without killing them, which would cause him to resummon them. There are other fights that end up feeling this easy with the right set up, but these two stand out due to the overwhelming power of every one of the fiends, especially Dante. The thing that makes that such an absurdly effective tactic is that the petrified Angels will eat the boss's turns.
    • Black Rider isn't much better. He lacks the skills to remove buffs or debuffs, which are commonly found and put into use by the time he is fought. He does have Megidolaon though, which can trip you up.
  • The "Egg Genesis" boss during Sonic's storyline in Sonic the Hedgehog (2006). Not so much easy as just... reasonably well designed. Ends up feeling positively excellent after Radical Train.
  • Sonic Unleashed has the Egg Dragoon. It seems the developers were feeling merciful, and wanted to give players a break after braving the infuriatingly difficult Eggmanland and before throwing them into the Final Boss fight with Dark Gaia.
  • In The SpongeBob Movie Game, there are challenges called Combat Arena challenges that require you to kill a total of 120 enemies. There are a total of 4 in the game, and the first 3 get progressively more difficult (with the 3rd one being controller-breaking hard). Then there is the 4th one, which is called "the ultimate combat arena challenge". What it contains is... a single jellyfish, the easiest enemy in the game. While it's still possible to lose by falling into the bottomless pits or having the jellyfish sting you multiple times, it's nowhere near as difficult as the ones before it.
  • Spyro: Year of the Dragon gives us Scorch. While the developers were smart enough to make him fairly challenging because he's intended to be a Climax Boss, he comes after Spike and the Twin Dragons. The next Sparx boss you can fight, the Giant Stingray, is That One Boss for Sparx, and after THAT is the Final Boss... out of all of them, once you get all of these bosses' patterns down, Scorch is the easiest.
  • Star Fox:
    • Star Fox 64 has the lower-path boss of Corneria, Granga, who pilots a Humongous Mecha. Shoot one of his legs off to immobilize him, then blast away at his back. What's even more pathetic is that Corneria's alternate boss (the Attack Carrier from the original Star Fox) is even easier, since you're still on rails for that fight and you don't even have to get behind it to Attack Its Weak Point.
      I will not be defeated by this—NOOOOOO! NOOO-NO-NO-N-N-NOO— [boom, HIT +10] MY EMPEROR, I'VE FAILED YOOOOOOOUUUUUU!!
    • In Star Fox, Professor Hangar on Path 2 is a straight out Damage-Sponge Boss. However, he has easy to avoid attacks, never moves, and can be attacked anywhere. The large amount of health does NOT balance it all out. The next boss is Plasma Hydra. Also, in Path 3, all the bosses except the Great Commander can be either this or That One Boss.
    • Also, while still quite competent, Andross is a piece of cake compared to the improved version of the Star Wolf team you have to beat to get to him, and probably no harder than the Gorgon at the end of Area 6. Also, Fake!Andross is tougher than Brain!Andross. Both battles are the same until you blow up the face. After that, the former is a giant robot head that, while it is vulnerable all over, has an attack that cannot be dodged. The latter must first have its eyes, tethered by lightning and capable of laser fire, blown off before you attack a noticeable weak point. The eyes are the toughest part, as the main brain has no distance attacks. In a shooting game. In All-Range mode. Its best attempt at a distance attack is the particles that are released when you hit its weak spot, but these, like the brain itself, are slow and easily avoided.
  • Sunset Riders have it's second-to-last boss, Paco Loco, fought after Chief Scalpem, a lightning-fast Amerindian Warrior who can spam a Flechette Storm on players, deflect most of their shots, and keeps moving all over the place lightning-fast. Paco Loco in comparison is a Dumb Muscle and Stationary Boss who fires easily-avoidable attacks from a fixed position, with a convenient ledge on the arena's right that players could reach (via the slide move) and use to dodge 100% of Paco's attacks. He's just a quick and easy fight for players to take a break between two hair-pullingly difficult bosses.
  • Lee Linjun in Super Robot Wars: Original Generation 2 has poor accuracy and evasion and doesn't regenerate. You fight him after yet another battle with Axel and Alfimi and before the nightmarish Boss Rushes of the next few stages. In a game where half the recurring enemies are That One Boss, this is refreshing.
  • Tales of Symphonia:
    • The three dragons in the Dragon Nest, who come a mere minute after having fought a rather difficult Dual Boss. They do have some annoying attacks and the big dragon head likes to use Ground Dasher, which can easily kill a party member at this point in the game, but they are much easier than the preceding bosses and the previous dungeon gave Lloyd a weapon that deals extra hard damage to dragons.
    • In the Tower of Salvation, the fight against Remiel. Not very fast, a pretty predictable attack pattern and the only really damaging attack, Holy Lance, is rarely used when the boss reaches half HP. A very simple boss at a very dramatic point in the game and a breather, before two more boss battles come. Fortunately, the first one doesn't have to be won and the second is a Hopeless Boss Fight.
    • Strangely enough, a breather boss just before a difficult one is the duel against Kratos in the Treant Forest. The boss is pretty easy and, while technically already fought two times before, is much easier as he lacks using the more heavy-hitting attacks and spells and has only a fourth of his usual HP.
  • Tales of Vesperia has Ryabgaro, in that vein.
  • Tales of Xillia 2:
    • The first battle against Rideaux. Has a lot less HP and doesn't hit very hard, which is quite nice compared to the last two bosses fought, with both easily going into the that one category. Rideaux is made especially easy, because he comes right after Muzét (Fractured) and the player has not had a proper chance to heal yet.
    • Majority of the bosses in the Character Episodes tend to be much easier than the story bosses, unless the Character Episode subverts this and actually has That One Boss in it.
  • Terraria: Golem is fought after the difficult Mechanical Bosses and Plantera, summoned at the end of the Jungle Temple (which you have to trek through the brutal Underground Jungle just to reach), and is right before a lengthy endgame event that begins with the Lunatic Cultist fight. Compared to the other Hardmode bosses, Golem's attacks are easy to avoid and the fight is extremely easy to cheese by virtue of it being one of the two bosses in the entire game unable to pass through blocks. It says quite a bit about Golem in that the other boss unable to pass through solid blocks is King Slime, intended to be the weakest boss in the game.
  • In Threads of Fate, after facing off against several rather frustrating battles against Duke or Belle (who exactly you fight depends on whether you play as Mint or Rue), and then a tricky fight against both of them at once and their Hexagon Machine, you get challenged to a rematch by Blood and Smokey who sick their boss Trap Master on you. He talks a big game but he goes down in about five good hits, has a very predictable pattern that's easy to dodge, has no powerful attacks, and your biggest threat during the fight is accidentally wandering off of a platform. Rue and Mint actually call him out on how he's no real threat to them.
  • Nearly every boss in Thunder Force III goes down in under 30 seconds, especially if you have Sever. And thanks to the extensive amount of extra lives that the game gives you, you can BS the last two bosses with as many as 9 lives left, even if your weapons are reduced to the default Twin and Back shots. Meanwhile, Iron Maiden in V goes down even faster if you use the Free Range Over Weapon. If you positioned yourself at the right distance, he won't even be able to let off a single attack.
  • Natla in Tomb Raider I. Tomb Raider III features bosses in every location of the game except Nevada, making the breather boss a lack thereof in this case.
  • Touhou Project:
    • In the eighth game, Touhou Eiyashou ~ Imperishable Night, the fifth boss, Reisen, comes after both a brutal fight against either Reimu or Marisa in the previous stage, followed by a challenging stage portion with a fairly tough midboss. Reisen herself, however, is the epitome of a Puzzle Boss. Her spells may throw you off the first time you see them, but after you spend some time in Spell Practice and learn the best way to move while the bullets are out-of-phase, her battle becomes much easier (particularly her last card), and makes her one of, if not the easiest stage five boss in the series. Which is good, because after her is a tough battle against Eirin or Kaguya.
    • Stage four in the tenth installment, Touhou Fuujinroku ~ Mountain of Faith, has hellish waterfall sections followed up by the super-fast Aya. Then comes stage five, which is mostly just filled with simple streaming sections. Sanae's spellcards have some tricky micrododging elements, but her final card is a cakewalk even on Lunatic.
    • Parsee in Touhou Chireiden ~ Subterranean Animism has the rather unique distinction of being both That One Boss and a breather boss. Like the aforementioned Reisen, she's a pure Puzzle Boss— until you learn the tricks to all her spellcards, she's a Stage 2 show-stopper. Once you do, she's easy.
  • An interesting example, the chapter "Fallen Heroes" in Trauma Center: Second Opinion has you operate on four different GUILT types, one after the other, in the one operation. Three of these are Triti, Deftera and Paraskevi - all types that, to different people, would be considered That One Boss (Paraskevi can kill a patient instantly if you let it, Deftera can hit vitals really badly if proper care isn't taken, and Triti is the Puzzle Boss in a puzzle game). But between Triti and Deftera, the player faces Kyriaki - the first, and most common, GUILT type. The player's faced it over a half dozen times at this point, only a few times with differences. It seems there for no other purpose than to let you catch your breath.
  • Warframe has the Sergeant, the fifth boss who is essentially a King Mook who lacks Contractual Boss Immunity and his only real trick is to turn invisible (which is ruined by the fact that he's still marked by a permanent objective icon like all bosses). Back when he was still the same character as Nef Anyo, he got all kinds of Fan Nicknames because of this.
  • Wild ARMs 3 has one of these in the form of a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere boss called Gespenst. It is normally fought as a Puzzle Boss, but the player can take a shortcut and kill him in one hit just by casting Requiem.
  • The difficulty of the bosses in Winnie the Pooh's Home Run Derby generally increase in an exponential fashion, the first few being cakewalks and the final ones outdoing their immediate predecessors in massive leaps... save for Rabbit, who comes right after Kanga & Roo but whose pitches are arguably easier to hit, because their initial slowness gives you plenty of reaction time before speeding up. Kanga's & Roo's pitches oscillate vertically, making it trickier to judge their trajectory and speed. However, after Rabbit comes That One Boss Owl, whom few pass.
  • The Ohdarko of 004-C in The Wonderful 101. With easy to dodge attacks, it's more likely you'll die of old age because of how long the fight takes before you'll ever lose all your health.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! The Duelists of the Roses has Tristan, only spared from being a Warm-Up Boss by being the second fightable opponent on the White Rose campaign when the first one (Tea) is a Wake-Up Call Boss. His absolute strongest monster has only 2000 ATK, he has no archetypal focus and is fought on varied terrain (meaning he doesn't get the field boosts of most enemies), and his only Spells are two cards with random or situational effects and an Awesome, but Impractical Ritual he will never be able to activate. On top of that, since many of his cards have inflated but still-poor stats, his Deck Cost is among the highest in the game, meaning you'll be able to bring your best cards to fight him. Players who started with the Red Rose campaign and therefore have all the cards and experience won through that route will find him to be even more pathetic.

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