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Something about a tropes page.note 
Something About[...], also known as the Something Series, is a series of parody animations made by a certain Jeremy Chinshue, also known as TerminalMontage. The episodes are often condensed over-the-top parodies of video games, with lots of strange events, running gags, and the occasional sensory abuse... and a bit of Memetic Mutation, too!

The playlist for the videos is located on the TerminalMontage channel here.

Not to be confused with the There's Something About series by Mashed.


This series provides something about:

  • Abnormal Ammo: Wiz sends a car, a train, and a full-sized cargo ship at the Kirbs in "Something about Kirby & the Amazing Mirror".
  • Action Survivor:
    • The "Save" ending of "Something About Super Metroid" reveals that Slippy Toad has been surviving on Titania after getting shot down in "Something About Star Fox 64". He shows up to save Samus from Goras with a BFG fashioned from his Arwing, and the two cobble together their ships' debris to escape the planet.
    • At the start of "Something about the Photon Aerospace Control Engineer", only the titular engineer seems to have survived the Ghosts; corpses litter the ship at every turn. The ending reveals that Ms. Pac-Man survived too, and was much more prepared.
  • Adaptational Abomination:
    • "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" turns the cute ghosts of Pac-Man into utterly terrifying, monsterous aliens that all tower over the Engineer and are near impossible to stop.
    • YouTube's spam bots are just that, spam bots, and while annoying, are easy to deal with and ignore. "Something About Spam Bots" interrprets them instead as a large mass of wires and metal, the ends of which are connected to deformed copies of whoever it's trying to immitate, all speaking in the same lifeless voice.
  • Adaptational Badass:
    • While the canon heroes are certainly formidable, their power in the series is ridiculously exaggerated, to the point where they can easily down most bosses in a single attack.
    • The monsters in "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" are still weak to the effects of the power pellet, but instead of turning them into weak Cowardly Mooks, it only stuns them momentarily and removes their Nigh-Invulnerability, allowing the Engineer's weapons to damage them. Even while under its effects, they continue to chase after the Engineer and remain a threat until he escapes.
    • In the SAVE ending of "Something About Super Metroid", as opposed to having to be saved by his team, Slippy repurposes his Arwing into a shield/gun/axe hybrid you'd expect from Monster Hunter, and takes down the Goras on foot.
    • In "Something About Street Fighter II", the Bonus Minigame Car turns out to be sentient, as it ends up fighting back against Ryu, and even comes back at the end to wipe out M. Bison in Akuma's place to try to (and seemingly) finish off a crippled Ryu.
  • Adaptational Context Change: "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror" has the Kir Bros directly chase Dark Meta Knight around the Mirror World instead of collecting fragments of the Dimension Mirror to rescue Meta Knight. As a result, the heroes never visit Radish Ruins, since Dark Meta Knight was the original boss of the area.
  • Adaptational Dumbass: While Yoshi's intelligence is described as being "a high I.Q. from a very early age", according to Super Smash Bros. 64, here, he's stated to be illiterate.
  • Adaptational Dye-Job: Referenced. Super Metroid infamously depicts Ridley being colored red on the cover, while in-game he starts in his usual purple but Turns Red as the player damages him. In Something About proper, the color change is caused by the glow from his arena's lava pits and visibly fades as he gets further from them.
  • Adaptational Early Appearance:
    • Magma Dragoon, Mac, and Green Biker Dude are the other badasses posing next to Zero in Something about Mega Man X.
    • Rico is one of the civilians seen during Storm Eagle L's invasion. Douglas and the saveable generic Reploids from Mega Man X5 and X6 also cheer X during the epic music battle.
    • While Super Sonic is chasing down Eggman in "Something about Sonic the Hedgehog 2", he sends out various iterations of Mecha Sonic from the Death Egg to attack Sonic, with one of them being the version from Sonic 3 & Knuckles.
  • Adaptation Explanation Extrication: In "Something About Pokemon Legends Arceus", Volo confronts Akari and reveals that they possess the Ghost Plate, but the significance of such a reveal is missing because any mention of the other Plates beforehand had been removed.
  • Adaptational Heroism: The Baby instantly recognizes Samus and drains a Space Pirate about to attack her, instead of only realizing it's her after nearly killing her.
  • Adaptational Jerkass:
    • Generally, the heroes are depicted as much more destructive and violent than they are in their home series, especially when Kirby is involved.
    • After X loses to Vile on the highway in canon, Zero tries to comfort him and encourages him to get stronger. Here, he acts a lot more condescending about it, telling the "little baby boo bop" to just go back to the base and let "the big boys" handle everything, though The Stinger implies that he's just trying to sound tough in front of the other Maverick Hunters.
  • Adaptational Karma: Lardna Minch from EarthBound (1994) gets away with being an Abusive Mother to Porky and killing Buzz-Buzz. However in "Something About Buck Bumble", she is utterly terrified trying to escape the titular bee and ends up crashing the family car within the garage, all while Buck is dancing to his own theme music.
  • Adaptational Superpower Change: In "Something About Kirby 64", Miracle Matter forgoes the Elemental Powers Barrier Change Boss abilities it used in the game proper and instead uses Gravity Master powers to incapacitate the party.
  • Adaptational Villainy:
    • In "Something about Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", while the Kirbo Gang are at Olive Ocean, they are stalked (and later attacked) by a shark that seems to heavily resemble Baby Shark, complete with a Instrumental Dark Reprise of the aforementioned shark's Leitmotif as it tries to eat them.
    • The Ancient Minister in the Subspace Emissary is an Anti-Villain who is revealed to be R.O.B. In "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", the Ancient Minister is instead Duon, with the reveal of his identity just being an extension of him fighting the heroes rather than a Good All Along twist.
    • Storm Eagle is canonically the most noble of Sigma's mavericks, often depicted as being either Forced into Evil or being an outright mole for the Hunters. In "Mega Man X: Storm Eagle's Revenge", he becomes more openly malicious and spiteful towards X, though this is likely due to being reprogrammed by Serges.
    • In Ocarina of Time, Dampé's ghost doesn't bother the villagers much, although he is seen by the Blue Juggler, and challenges Link to a race before giving him the Hookshot. In "Something About Zelda Ocarina of Time PART 2", however, Dampé's ghost is outright malicious, stealing the Blue Juggler's soul with his lamp and cackling, with the subtitles revealing that it was the 428th soul he'd stolen.
    • In Undertale, Undyne is incredibly persistent hunting Frisk, but has strong beliefs about Monsterkind and would never harm any of them — she chews out the player if they've killed anyone before facing her and will rescue Monster Kid if Frisk doesn't, getting hurt in the process. In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", Undyne carelessly throws spears towards Frisk, impaling many Monsters in the process (Monster Kid included), and after a spear misses So Sorry, she intentionally throws another to hit him.
  • Adaptational Wimp:
    • Most of the penultimate or final bosses are taken out by a single attack by the hero. A Running Gag involves Meta Knight preparing for a dramatic showdown like in the games, only to be immediately destroyed by Kirbo with ease ("Super Star" has Kirbo simply throw his sword into Meta Knight's face to kill him at the start of the fight, and "Adventure" has Kirbo use a pistol, a bazooka, and a nuke before Meta Knight can even do anything). Bowser probably gets this the worst, since he's always slapped around with little resistance from his part.
    • In Undertale, Flowey acts as the game's Big Bad, being a cunning and genuinely threatening opponent despite his small size, manipulating events in his favor through deception and Save Scumming before ultimately stealing the six human souls (and the souls of all the other monsters in the True Pacifist Route) to become the final boss of both the Neutral and True Pacifist Routes (as Photoshop Flowey and Asriel Dreemurr, respectively). In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", he immediately dies at the start when Frisk lands on and crushes him.
    • Link from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time seems to be becoming this as of "Something About Zelda Ocarina of Time: The FIRE TEMPLE", as he ends up bumbling through the titular dungeon, getting constantly crushed by rocks, getting stuck (and subsequently incinerated multiple times) in the fire maze (with one route he takes resulting in a firewall on all four sides), getting pelted by the spinning floor tiles until he runs out of the room, and being completely inept at facing the Fire Dancer until Navi pulls out the Hookshot and has him use it. He doesn't even defeat Volvagia himself. Instead, Volvagia dies due to the cucco in Link's pocket getting caught in the former's fire breath and proceeding to summon the infamous cucco swarm that literally eats Volvagia alive and reduces it to a skeleton.
  • Adaptation Expansion: Surprising for a series known for abridging video games, "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog" adds in the seventh Chaos Emerald and Sonic's super form during his final battle against Dr. Robotnik, both of which weren't introduced until the second game — the Chaos Emeralds did exist in the first game, but there were only six of them, and they were merely bonus items that unlocked a slightly better ending.
  • Adapted Out: A lot of these tend to omit key elements, locations, and characters/bosses from games, even if they were essential to the plot.
    • The Great Cave Offensive is completely absent in "Something About Kirby Super Star", despite being one of the key modes.
    • Some of the bosses are absent in "Something About Smash Bros World of Light," being reduced to Bowser, Dracula and Marx. The final battle between Galeem and Dharkon is also skipped, as they're both dead once the World of Dark is cleared.
    • Similarly, Ganondorf is completely absent from both "Something About Smash Bros World of Light" and "Something About Smash Bros. The Subspace Emissary" despite being a major antagonist both times.
    • The only boss other than King K. Rool that appears in "Something About Donkey Kong Country" is Very Gnawty.
    • Roy, Wendy, and Larry are all missing from "Something About Super Mario World" due to Mario destroying their castles without going inside. Mario kicks Roy's castle into the Valley of Bowser entrance, then hurls Wendy's castle into the gaping hole so it destroys Larry's castle.
    • "Something About Kirby's Adventure" skips over the boss fights for Paint Rollernote , Heavy Molenote , and Nightmare Orbnote . Since the video only mentions the Star Rod once at the beginning, the plot relevance of the bosses is largely overlooked.
    • G, The Tower, and The Magician are all absent from "Something About The Typing of the Dead", with the latter not even getting a meme replacement like The Emperor does.
    • Starlight Zone is completely omitted from "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog".
    • Shadow Kirby and the entirety of Cabbage Caverns and Radish Ruins are absent from "Something About Kirby and the Amazing Mirror." Candy Constellation is also reduced to just the iconic Master Hand and Crazy Hand battle, which takes place on Final Destination instead.
    • "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" is based on the True Pacifist Route (indicated by Frisk successfully freeing the monsters from the underground), but skips over all of the befriending sequences, the True Lab (and consequently the Amalgamates), and the final battle with Asriel, the latter of which is owed to the fact that Flowey immediately dies at the start when Frisk's corpse lands on him. The video also omits the detail of seven human SOULs or six human SOULs and all of the monster SOULs in Underground, as per the actual True Pacifist Route being needed to fully destroy the Barrier, a major plot point in the original game; instead, Asgore does so by tossing Frisk's corpse at it.
    • "Something About Kirby 64" omits the game's prologue, leaving Ripple Star's fate unknown until Kirbo and company arrive there. The boss fights against Adeleine and King Dedede are skipped over: for the former, Kirbo destroys Adeleine's canvas and thus her method of attack, so Dark Matter sees no need to possess her, and for the latter, Kirbo scares Dark Matter off before it's able to take full control of Dedede. The events of Aqua Star are also completely skipped over due to Kirbo swallowing the planet whole. In Shiver Star, Kirbo destroys HR-H before it can transform into HR-E.
  • Alternate Continuity: As given away in the title, "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", despite going through the motions of a True Pacifist Route, is set in a different timeline from the one depicted as canon in the game's supplementary material, with the key differences being that Frisk is dead the entire time and that the world of Deltarune coexists with it, including the two different versions of Alphys; Sans lampshades this by remarking about how weird it is compared to the events normally depicted in-game.
  • April Fools' Day:
    • "Monster Hunter World Part 4" was released on April Fools 2019. It's an endless parade of "Bird Up!" gags, topped off with fake celebrity guest star credits.
    • While 2020 was skipped over, April Fools 2021 was met with "Melee Fox & Marth ASMR", an 11-minute video consisting entirely of Fox and Marth wavedashing in place while whispering their kiai, underscored only by the sound of GameCube control sticks clicking. The video even has a low sound warning in the title.
    • April Fools 2022 had "Adult Conversations with Carl and Perry - Medicine Commercials", a return of the featureless grey boxes from "Something About COPPA" as they discuss over-the-counter medication and its harmful consequences.
  • An Arm and a Leg: X taking Zero's Z-Buster in "Something About Mega Man X" is interpreted as X ripping Zero's arm off to his intense discomfort.
  • Art Shift:
    • Kiibo taking a dump in "Kirby and the Amazing Mirror" is represented with live-action footage of a dump truck being unloaded.
    • During the Something Versus, Speedrunner Mario and Melee Fox start looking like a character straight out of Jojos Bizarre Adventure whenever they speak. The gag returns in "The Subspace Emissary" during the fight between Speedrunner Mario and Super Sonic.
    • When Papyrus first bumps into Frisk in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", his resulting excited rant briefly sees him shift to a realistic skeleton drawing at one point.
    • "Something about COPPA," and later "Adult Conversations With Carl and Perry," use a very geometrical, monotone artstyle, so as to help add to the blandness of it all.
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Boshi appears in the "Yoshi's Island", "World of Light", and "Yoshi's Story" episodes, despite not appearing in any of those games. In said episodes, he gets more screen time than Yoshi himself.
    • In a meta example, Carl and Perry only existed in the main series to make fun of COPPA and its guidelines. They later got another video on April 1st, 2022, and with the unconditional creation of "Stay Out Of Your Lane/Work Performance," it appears that their new spinoff "Adult Conversations With Carl and Perry" will be a legitimate series running alongside "Something About."
  • Ascended Fridge Horror: Two examples of this are found in “Something About Kirby 64.”
    • First, it posits that Magman, the boss of Neo Star, is actually the living embodiment of Neo Star's core, inspired by the whole area around it turning solid once it's defeated. Kirbo killing it results in the planet's core dying, leading to the planet's magnetic field disappearing alongside its atmosphere, quickly killing off everything on it and leaving Neo Star as naught but Magman's tomb as it floats endlessly through the universe. The pterosaur that grabbed Waddle Dee earlier somehow survives this and the vacuum of space.
    • It later takes the implications of Shiver Star being a post-apocalyptic Earth and explores it through the human Adeleine, with her becoming more uncomfortable and frightened the longer she explores the mall, which should be familiar to her but isn't due to it being long abandoned and infested with enemies.
  • Ass Kicks You: Mario rapidly smacks his buttocks against Fox while preparing a BLJ to different parallel universes to destroy him in each and every one of them in "Melee Fox VS Speedrunner Mario", leaving him a broken mess that can barely even stand up.
  • As the Good Book Says...:
    • In "Something About Kirby's Adventure", holding a crucifix up to Nightmare causes an apparition of Jesus to appear and recite John 14:6, which causes Nightmare to burst into flames.
    • In "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", Kirbo recites Psalm 59 in response to Dark Mind showing him a comment criticizing his Religious Bruiser Running Gag. The Kir Bros then summon Jesus again, who recites Matthew 19:26 before disintigrating Dark Mind.
  • Back from the Dead: Like in Rockman X Mega Mission, Storm Eagle is brought back with the Limited as Storm Eagle L. This time, Serges was responsible for this. It could be a nod to Isoc doing the same thing with the successor to the Limited, Extreme. In a sense, this could be a nod to the Serges and Isoc are Dr. Wily theories.
  • Backstab Backfire: King Boo tries to sneak up on Luigi after he obtains Mario's painting from Satan. Luigi cuts him in half with said painting.
  • Badass Cape: The cloak Slippy wears on Titania certainly gives off that impression, especially after he solos the Goras on foot, a monster it took Fox using the Landmaster to take down.
  • Bait-and-Switch:
    • "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" appears to be based on Dead Space, but the engineer picks up power pellet, revealing his suit is actually yellow before "PACMAN" is shown on screen.
    • "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" directly adapts Undertale's use of this trope for Sans' introduction. Right after Frisk exits the Ruins, the viewer hears footsteps approaching before an ominously deep voice utters "Human, don't you know how to greet a new pal?" This initial creepiness immediately gets turned on its head with the reveal that it's actually Sans, with an excited Papyrus in tow.
  • Battle in the Rain: The Battle of the Bands between X and Storm Eagle L becomes this, as rain and tornadoes occur while X chases Storm Eagle in the Hyper Mega Man form his Classic-series counterpart used in Marvel vs. Capcom.
  • Battle of the Bands:
    • In "Mega Man X", the Spark Mandrill boss fight quickly turns into a guitar duel, because the music is just that damn good. Alas, there's no real victor; X pulls out a gun and shoots Mandrill at the end of his solo.
    • X gets another go at this with "Mega Man X: Storm Eagle's Revenge". The entire episode is just X and a reconstructed Eagle having a big synth VS. keytar music-off (though one that involves a whole lot of explosions and laser beams) to the sound of a Genesis style remix of Storm Eagle's theme.
  • Berserk Button: In "Something About Kirby 64", Kirbo gets extremely pissed upon seeing the pyramid spaceship in Rock Star, because it reminds him of the Israelites' time as slaves in Egypt as depicted in The Prince of Egypt.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • None of the Dark World bosses are defeated against who they initially fight. Dracula looks like he's going to fight Samus and Olimar, but instead he gets defeated by Yoshi. In turn, Marx initially fights Donkey Kong and Simon, but gets defeated by Olimar when his battle gets dragged to Dracula's castle.
    • In the "SAVE" ending of "Something About Super Metroid", Samus crash lands on Titania thanks to the X-infected animals. She's almost immediately confronted by Goras, and is about to be killed by it when Slippy saves her, having survived his own encounter with the beast in "Something About Star Fox 64".
    • In "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer", the Engineer is on the ropes, moments from being devoured by the monsters. Cue a female Engineer meant to be Ms. Pac-Man with a BFG.
    • In "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", the Speed Demon's last-ditch attempt to possess Sonic after being exorcised from Mario is stopped by the Star Variance Authority, who unleash a Curb-Stomp Battle on the demon and take it into custody.
  • Big "NO!":
    • Mario lets out one once Fox destroys the Scuttlebug before he can in "Melee Fox VS Speedrunner Mario".
    • Bowser gives a viscerally terrified one in "Something About Super Mario World" when he sees Mario flying towards him during his attempted escape.
    • Robotnik lets out one once Sonic takes all seven Chaos Emeralds back, which were conveniently placed on a table right next to the piston.
    • Falco lets out one in one of the stingers from "Something About Super Metroid" after Slippy rejoins the team.
  • Bilingual Bonus: King Golem in "Something about Kirby & the Amazing Mirror" does nothing but constantly cuss everyone out in French.
  • Bitch Slap: A running gag in the series is the heroes (with one exception) slapping their opponents — with Bowser being a frequent target — silly:
    • "Something About Yoshi's Island" has Yoshi slap Baby Bowser, spank him, and then throw him out a window.
    • In "Something About Kirby Super Star", Kirbo slaps the sun and moon and scolds them for fighting.
    • In "Something About Super Mario 64", Mario slaps Bowser hard enough to outright paralyze him.
    • In "Something About Super Mario World", Mario backhand slaps Bowser so hard it actually leaves Bowser's eyes bloodshot and echoes pretty loudly.
    • In "Something About Smash Bros World of Light", Mario and Yoshi slap Bowser back and forth after Samus cuts off his growth to eclipse the galaxy. The last slap turns him into Dry Bowser.
    • "Something About Kirby's Adventure" has Kirbo defeat Mr. Shine, Kracko, and King Dedede by slapping them.
    • Subverted in "Melee Fox VS Speedrunner Mario", where Mario tries to backhand Fox, but he dodges it.
    • In "Something About Super Metroid," Mother Brain kills the Baby Metroid by slapping it. Samus didn't like that and kills her with a Hyper Beam.
    • In "Something About Mega Man X," Vile slaps X with his Ride Armor.
    • "Something About Yoshi's Story" has the entire Yoshi Clan slap Baby Bowser after he shatters the Super Happy Tree, reducing him to a puddle.
    • "Something About Super Mario All-Stars" has Bowser show up in Peach's room after Mario has already left, but Luigi suddenly warps back in with his Time Machine to slap him instead.
    • In "Something About Smash Bros The Subspace Emissary," in the recreation of the Super Mario All-Stars segment after Bowser is dunked into the lava, Mario dives in to deliver several of these to him. And later on after Tabuu shoots the Great Fox with his Eye Beam in retaliation to its laser, Peppy gives Fox a Dope Slap.
    • In "Something About Kirby 64," Kirbo slaps Ribbon's hand so hard that he launches her into the Sun. In addition, he destroys a green Pix by slapping it during his rampage in the pyramid.
  • Bland-Name Product: In "Something About Buck Bumble", a panicking Lardna Minch tries to get rid of the titular cyborg bee with a can of Raid: Shadow Legends.
  • Bloodless Carnage:
    • "Something about Donkey Kong Country" has, among other things, a Kritter being turned inside out with no blood or guts whatsoever.
    • Averted in "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer". The monsters' rampage across the ship has left notable splashes of blood everywhere, including a the message "CUT OFF THEIR LIMBS" written in blood.
  • Brick Joke:
    • In "Something About Yoshi's Island", the Brown Yoshi is arrested along with Burt the Bashful, protesting that he "didn't do nothin'". In the after-credits scene of "Something About Yoshi's Story", the judge determines that Brown Yoshi is not Burt the Bashful and orders that Brown Yoshi be released and compensated for his wrongful conviction.
    • In "Something about Ocarina of Time PART 1," The Great Deku Tree asks for Navi to go get the Pepto Bismol, which she responds to by fetching Link, indicating that Link's name in this series is actually Pepto Bismol. Later on in "Something about Ocarina of Time PART 3: Fire Temple," Link meets a Goron named Pepto Bismol. In the original game, this Goron is named after the player.
  • Bring My Brown Pants:
    • In "Something About Yoshi's Island", Baby Mario's diaper bursts and releases a torrent of diarrhea.
    • In "Something About Ocarina of Time" Part 2, Link shits himself after he's almost crushed by a Descending Ceiling trap.
    • After being impaled by one of Undyne's spears, Monster Kid screeches while releasing his bowels.
  • Broken Bridge: Parodied in "Something about Ocarina of Time PART 1". Darunia states that the Gorons are starving because Dodongo's Cave is blocked by a boulder and they can't get rocks to eat. Link just asks "Why don't you eat the boulder?". All the Gorons immediately swarm the cave, eating the boulder along with all the Dodongos inside.
  • Butt-Monkey: In "Something About Star Fox 64", Slippy is beaten senseless by Goras during the Titania briefing and subsequently left for dead as the rest of the crew just goes to Macbeth without him. During the Macbeth briefing, Goras is gone and Slippy is lying motionless on the ground.
    Peppy: [Beat] Slippy's dead.
    Falco: Nice!
  • Button Mashing:
    • In "Donkey Kong Country", a button makes a Kremling run towards DK if set to 'Go' or puts it into hibernation if set to 'Stop'. When DK mashes the button, the Kremling quickly alternates between the two states until it explodes.
    • Fox mashes the A button in "Star Fox 64" to skip through General Pepper's lengthy exposition.
    • Link mashes the A button in "Something About Ocarina of Time PART 1" to skip through Kaepora Gaebora's extremely long lecture... only to cycle back around to the beginning of it all.
  • Call-Back:
    • In "Something About Super Mario 64", when Mario slaps Bowser, Yoshi appears for a split second, using the frame of him slapping Baby Bowser from "Something About Yoshi's Island".
    • In The Stinger of "Something About Smash Bros World of Light", Link crashes through the floor of the Super Smash Bros. Brawl menu like he did in "Something About Smash Bros" to admit that he misses The Subspace Emissary story mode and beg for it to come back, having previously been so disgusted by it that he had vomited on sight in the latter video.
    • In the "Save the Animals" ending of "Something About Super Metroid", Samus crashes on Titania and teams up with Slippy to escape.
    • In "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", when encountering Master Hand and Crazy Hand, Kirbo recalls how Donkey Kong was able to escape imprisonment from the hands on his own in "Something About Smash Bros World of Light", and inspires him and his buddies to fly into an Unstoppable Rage, quickly ripping both hands to shreds.
    • The chainsaw Kirbo used in "Something About Kirby's Adventure" and forgot about is still racing aimlessly across the countryside in "Kirby & the Amazing Mirror".
    • "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY" reveals that Luigi uses a Scuttlebug in his time machine, similarly to how Mario used them to align parallel universes and escape a black hole in "Speedrunner Mario vs Melee Fox". "The Scuttlebug is the key to the Multiverse," indeed!
    • Also in "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", much like how the first Something Versus episode was made for the one million subscriber special, a second episode of Something Versus takes place in the (belated) two-million subscriber special as part of the episode's plot.
    • Yet again in "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY" when Mario completely no sells Sonic's attempt to get the drop on him by going back in time. Luigi and Kirbo had already learned this was futile the hard way by the time of the "Super Mario All-Stars Speedrun" episode nearly three months earlier.
      Luigi: No matter where or when in time we go... he's always a parallel universe ahead of us! No matter how far back we go... he always sees us coming...! [...] It's no use, Kirbo...
    • Marx blows a hole through Pop Star in Something About Kirby Super Star with his mouth laser. Every video taking place afterwards featuring Pop Star shows that it still has the hole in it, which a space slug appears to have taken up residence in.
    • When confronting 0² in "Something About Kirby 64", Kirbo calls the other Kir Bros from "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", but they're too busy to help this time.
  • Call-Forward: "Something About Kirby's Adventure" ends with a shot of Marx walking up to Kirbo's house and laughing ominously, setting up "Something About Kirby Super Star".
  • Canon Welding: The garden from Pikmin is actually the Minch family's backyard. It's also the garden where Buck Bumble takes place, Buck taking a detour to hunt down Lardna.
  • The Cameo:
    • Geno sometimes appears as a Freeze-Frame Bonus.
    • Jill Valentine appears from a door once a ghost appears and flies around the mansion in "Something About Luigi's Mansion".
    • Leon Kennedy from Resident Evil 2 and Kirbo appear while James and Gary drive through and run over some zombies in "Something About The Typing of Dead".
    • Mallow appears among the clouds once Pichu and Elekid create a thunderstorm in "Baby Pokemon Battle Royale".
    • RiCO appears in "Mega Man X: Storm Eagle's Revenge" as a pedestrian as Storm Eagle's carrier arrives over the city. As well, during the battle, X uses the Hyper Mega Man form his Classic-series counterpart used in Marvel vs. Capcom.
    • "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" includes cameos from the Mystery Man and Mad Mew Mew as a portrait in Sans' house and a drawing by So Sorry, respectively, playing on them being more out-of-the-way than most other characters in the gamenote . Also, Quote is seen among Toriel's picture frames and Fox is part of Papyrus' Gauntlet of Deadly Terror.
    • Doomguy is shown briefly going to Kirbo and Luigi's Christmas party, and just as people say, he is a Christian, with a copy of the Holy Bible strapped to his armor. Mallow also appears alongside Geno.
    • In "Something About Street Fighter II", the passengers on the flight to the USA are Capcom characters Amingo, Air Man, Athena Cykes, Accel, and another Ryu.
  • Character Shilling:
    • Played for Laughs in "Something About Yoshi's Island" with Boshi, who isn't even in the game. He gets an extended fight sequence with Raphael the Raven and randomly obtains the helicopter bubble so he doesn't have to hand Baby Mario off to the Purple Yoshi.
    • In "Something About Yoshi's Story", Boshi gets a (notably solo, given that the Yoshi's are traveling together this time) extended fight sequence with Cloudjin, where Boshi gets a Black Mage outfit, no sells Cloudjin's attack and one-shots him with Ultima.
    • Parodied with Sans in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", who gets introduced with a sitcom-style intro where he recites catchphrases from other sitcoms to a loudly cheering audience, riffing on his memetic popularity.
  • Christmas Episode:
    • Played straight in "A Very Kirbo Christmas", in which Kirbo decorates his house, gives presents to an orphanage, and volunteers at the soup kitchen. He even exchanges presents and with Simon and Luigi and gives thanks to God. It's much Lighter and Softer than the usual madcap animation and zany plotlines.
    • Once again played straight in Another Very Kirbo Christmas: Christmas At Luigi's Mansion, which features a large number of Cappies, in addition to Luigi and Kirbo, and even some of the Boos and the ghost that possessed Professor E. Gadd in Something About Luigi's Mansion helping to get the mansion decorated for Christmas. The episode also features guests flying in from all over the Something Series, ranging from Bill, Bogues, and BIRD UP!!! from the Monster Hunter videos to even more unlikely characters such as Castlevania's Dracula, Ganondorf, and SEPHIROTH! Finally, the episode ends with a magnificent spread made by an army of Chef Kawasakis and Kirbo giving thanks to God once again.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Fox, who makes odd decisions such as teleporting his crew into a vaporwave dimension, yelling about making mac 'n' cheese, blowing up Solar, and randomly crashing his Arwing around in the Venom escape sequence.
  • Clothing-Concealed Injury: "Something About Kirby 64" reveals that Bandana Waddle Dee's iconic blue bandana was originally just a makeshift bandage Kirbo wrapped around his head to cover the injury Bandana Dee sustained from the elevator crashing.
  • Composite Character:
    • The playable Yoshis of Yoshi's Story are young Yoshis implied to be the children of the Yoshi's Island Yoshis. "Something About Yoshi's Story" has the same cast as "Something About Yoshi's Island".
    • Within Kirby, there's no indication the Waddle Dee from Kirby 64 is Bandana Waddle Dee, and they are implied to be separate characters due to being slightly different colors. In "Something About Kirby 64", the Waddle Dee becomes Bandana Dee after Kirby gives him a rag to cover a bump on his head. This is then lampshaded when him being Bandana Dee is revealed to the audience with the "here comes the boy" audio playing over it.
  • Cover Version: Phantom Ganon performs his own (text-to-speech) rendition of "Suavemente" by Puerto Rican singer Elvis Crespo in "Something About Zelda Ocarina of Time PART 2: The FOREST TEMPLE"; a full-length version of Phantom Ganon's performance was given its own video the following day.
  • Creator Cameo: Jeremy's Author Avatar appears as the owner of the chili dog stand in "Something about Sonic the Hedgehog." He later appears in the Pokémon universe in "Something About The Subspace Emissary", along with his wife Vanessa.
  • Cross Attack: Kirbo often uses a cross to immediately destroy his enemies.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: In "Something About Kirby Super Star", King Dedede dies by having his innards sucked out through his mouth and eye sockets, courtesy of Kirbo. His spirit later makes his way back to his body, bringing him back to life — fittingly, he starts screaming the moment he revives.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Almost every fight ends with the villains being eradicated with ease because it's funnier that way. Ridley is a notable exception, having a rather equal fight with Samus. Conversely, Link winds up on the receiving end of several of these courtesy of the denizens of the Forest Temple in "Ocarina of Time Part 2", including Phantom Ganon, who Link is only able to defeat by taking all of the portraits off of the walls of the boss arena while Ganon is inside, and setting them on fire using the torch of Amy's (the green Poe) painting.
  • Cutting the Knot: A Running Gag in the series is that characters frequently bypass difficult areas and bosses by just brute-forcing their way through, tying in with each episode's rapid-fire nature.
    • Yoshi manages to skip the entire final boss fight in "Yoshi's Island" by just throwing Baby Bowser out the window to his death, much to Kamek's shock.
    • In "Kirby's Adventure", Kirby simply chainsaws Whispy Woods down instead of fighting him and barrels his way through the rest of the game instead of going through the areas level-by-level. Whispy's Mirror World counterpart, King Golem, faces a similar fate in "Kirby and the Amazing Mirror", where the Kir Bros bulldoze him out of the way.
    • In "Super Mario World", Mario skips the entire Forest of Illusion— where the only way out is through finding several hidden exits— by sucking it all up with a massive keyhole.
    • Link skips all three of the dungeons in "Ocarina of Time PART 1" by, in order, setting the (already terminally ill) Great Deku Tree on fire, having the Gorons eat their way through Dodongo Caverns, and blowing up Lord Jabu-Jabu to get to Princess Ruto right away.
    • In "Ocarina of Time PART 2", after struggling against the Stalfos, Link opts to steal the Fairy Bow from the chest and cut his way through the door to escape. Then, after being overwhelmed by Phantom Ganon's Tennis Boss attacks and ability to hide in paintings, Link kills him by piling his paintings together and setting them on fire with Amy's torch.
    • In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", Frisk manages to cut through most of Snowdin when Papyrus' bridge trap collapses, and skips the entirety of the True Lab and New Home by being launched straight from the CORE to the last corridor.
    • In "Something About Kirby's Dream Buffet", Meta Knight opts to eat through the ice cream mountain instead of rolling over it.
  • Dance Battler:
    • Something About Zelda: Ocarina of Time Part 2 has Phantom Ganon singing Suavemente in Robo Speak and deflecting his Tennis Boss projectiles back at Link while fluidly dancing.
    • As in the original game, "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" depicts Mettaton EX fighting mostly through an elaborate, ratings-boosting dance.
    • Something About Buck Bumble has the eponymous bee fly about while dancing to his theme. He only ever really attacks when shooting some wasps in the backyard, as he stays dancing while chasing Lardna while not making any attempt to attack her.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • The original Luigi's Mansion is a horror comedy with Luigi being scared out of his wits being Played for Laughs. "Something about Luigi's Mansion" lacks much of the comedy, including things like a disturbingly detailed ghost that scares Luigi, possesses E. Gadd and kills the professor by making him slam himself repeatedly into the walls, and has King Boo perform a Satanic ritual with Mario trapped in a painting as a Human Sacrifice, with Satan himself nearly succeeding in dragging Mario off to hell.
    • The original Yoshi's Story is a very lighthearted game. "Something About Yoshi's Story" begins with baby Bowser and Kamek gunning down the Yoshis to steal the Super Happy Tree, and at the end of the short thousands of screaming damned souls burst out of the ground after baby Bowser smashes the Super Happy Tree, which as Yoshi puts it, is The End of the World as We Know It. Baby Bowser then gets Dragged Off to Hell shortly after getting slapped by the Yoshis.
    • The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer's episode is basically Pac-Man in the style of Dead Space, but instead of a yellow circle eating ghosts in a blue maze, it's the engineer of a space station who has to survive attacks from demonic aliens. No part of it is played for laughs, as the colors are mostly dark, and the "ghosts" are heavily detailed abominations with skull-like faces, sharp teeth and huge murderous intent, and their handiwork can be seen in the form of the numerous corpses scattered throughout the ship.
  • Darkest Hour: The "SAVE" ending of "Something About Super Metroid" has Samus attacked inside her ship, as the animals she rescued were X-Parasites in disguise. The scuffle leads to her crashing on Titania, destroying her ship and her Power Suit, as well as severely injuring her. She gets ambushed by Goras almost immediately, who she has no way to reliably fight against. With no other options, she just closes her eyes and accepts her fate.
  • Dark Parody: "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" is Pac-Man as a Sci-Fi horror, with Pac-Man being a human engineer and the ghosts being demonic aliens. Compared to the usual fare of the Something Series, it is played completely seriously.
  • A Day in the Limelight:
    • "Something About Donkey Kong Country" follows the titular ape, who is normally very minor in the grand scheme of the Something Series.
    • "Something About Star Fox 64" is one for Fox McCloud, who is usually a running gag in the Smash Bros episodes.
  • Death by Adaptation: Several in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route":
    • Frisk, the game's protagonist, dies at the start by falling down Mt. Ebott, with their corpse being dragged through the events of the game entirely by happenstance. Sans' judgement near the end of the run confirms that Frisk didn't have any Determination in this timeline, and therefore couldn't persist after death.
    • Towards the beginning of the video, Frisk's corpse crushes Flowey; he doesn't appear for the rest of the video, implying that this actually killed him.
    • Midway through the video, Undyne's reckless spear-throwing kills Monster Kid, River Person, the snowman, So Sorry, and everyone at Grillby's barring Sans. Sans' judgement of Frisk doesn't hold them accountable for it, since they weren't the ones doing the killing (and therefore didn't gain any EXP or LV out of it).
  • Decomposite Character:
  • Decoy Protagonist: Guile serves as this, being the main face of the thumbnail of 'Something about Street Fighter 2', and almost being selected as the playable character… Up until Ryu was quickly chosen as the main protagonist, serving as a reference to when Guile was being put as the main character in the 90s, up until Ryu re-took his role as the protagonist. When the airplane going to the USA isn’t able to land, it’s revealed that Guile is standing in the driveway, awaiting Ryu’s challenge and serving as his ultimate opponent up until he softlocks the game, causing the game to need a reset.
  • Defeat Equals Explosion: If a character dies or is otherwise neutralized, half the time they will explode.
  • Delayed Ripple Effect: In "Something About Pokémon Legends: Arceus", the effects of Akari killing Volo don't catch up to his descendant Cynthia until The Stinger, at which point she gets Ret Goned.
  • Demonic Possession:
    • Mario's bizarre speedrunning-obsessed behavior is a result of him being possessed by a literal Speed Demon. It was seemingly sucked into a black hole in "Melee Fox vs. Speedrunner Mario," but it continues to possess him up until "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", where Luigi and Kirbo finally manage to exorcise it out of him.
    • When Sonic goes Super in "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog", he is seemingly possessed by a demon as his flying past Pop Star in The Stinger causes Kirbo to wake up in terror. The Nightmare Face he puts on before destroying Eggman resembles a fusion of the Fleetway version of Super Sonic and Sonic.exe, both of which are actually demons. He seems to be in control of himself in "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY" when he battles the Speed Demon in Mario, at least.
  • Denser and Wackier: The series is much more out there in comparison to every video game it parodies, a few exceptions aside, thanks to the abundance in memes and other comedic moments.
  • Destination Defenestration: Yoshi holds no qualms with throwing Baby Bowser out a window to his death.
  • Destructive Savior: Most of the heroes recklessly destroy everything they're trying to save. This is highlighted in "Something About Star Fox 64", where various citizens thank Fox for saving them, right before they're crushed under the buildings that are being destroyed or randomly exploding by Fox's shooting. Falco in particular seems to enjoy the devastation.
  • Determinator:
    • The protagonists will generally stop at nothing to achieve their goals. Special mention goes to Simon Belmont, who basically blows through the entirety of Dracula's castle without breaking a sweat, no matter how many monsters get thrown at him.
    • Parodied with Frisk in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route". While they successfully manage to go through the entire game unfettered, Sans abruptly reveals during his judgement that Frisk doesn't have any Determination to be a determinator— meaning that they were simply a corpse that just happened to get flung through the necessary motions.
  • Deus ex Machina:
    • In "Something about Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", the Kir Bros recite a prayer, causing Jesus Christ to appear and make Dark Mind explode.
    • In "Something About Smash Bros The Subspace Emissary", Masahiro Sakurai himself suddenly appears (in the exact same manner as Jesus, no less) to upgrade Meta Knight to SS Tier following a beatdown by a bunch of Primids.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: How do Gary and James manage to defeat the godlike Ultra Instinct Shaggy at the end of "Something About The Typing of The Dead"? Why, type an even more powerful meme into existence: "whomst'd've".
  • Downer Ending: "Something About Street Fighter II" ends with the bonus game car ramming into an already badly beaten up Ryu.
  • The Dreaded: "Something About Kirby Super Star" and "Something About Kirby's Adventure", Kirbo inspires fear in Meta Knight's crew on sight, and Nightmare is reduced to begging for his life when Kirbo not only overcomes his temptations, but also beats him easily.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: In "Something About Street Fighter II", Both Guile and M. Bison serve as this. Guile, who was briefly considered to be selected before Ryu, is the last of the regular fighters, but the player has to reset the Super Nintendo after the game gets soft-locked from Guile's glitching. M. Bison makes his grand entrance after Ryu has defeated Sagat, rephrasing his infamous lines from the Street Fighter movie. Soon after breaking Ryu’s kicking leg however, his time is cut short by the Bonus minigame car, who has come to finish off Ryu.
  • Dull Surprise: Invoked voiced-wise with the general majority of Yoshi's appearances throughout the series, on account of the text-to-speech software used to provide his dialogue being incapable of delivering anything outside of a flat, monotonous inflection. Consequently, no matter what emotion Yoshi is meant to be expressing, he will deliver his lines in the exact same Ben Stein-esque drone every time.
  • Dungeon Bypass: Often the protagonists will just blow through levels and ignore the intended obstacles.
    • "Something about Star Fox 64" has Fox beat Aquas by dumping waste into the ocean to kill Bacoon, polluting the planet and turning it into another Zoness. Immediately after, Fox blows up Solar with a bomb.
    • "Something About Super Mario 64" has Mario use exaggerated versions of actual speedrun tricks to skip the regular courses and do just the Bowser levels for a "zero Power Stars" run, to Bowser's frustration.
    • "Something About Zelda Breath of the Wild" basically goes like this: clip into the dungeon entrance, get the next Sheikah Slate upgrade, smash straight into the chamber containing the Spirit Orb, rinse and repeat.
    • Zig-zagged in "Something About Super Mario World" where Mario uses the Star Road shortcut to Bowser's Castle, then Bowser tries to buy time by telling Mario to rescue the Yoshi eggs from the other Koopalings. Mario still blows through their castles in record time and gets back just before Bowser can finish preparing for the final boss fight.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Sans can be seen in the background of Prince Froggy's Fort in "Something About Yoshi's Island", well before he actually shows up in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route".
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Brown Yoshi, who we wouldn't see since he was arrested in "Something About Yoshi's Island" gets his during The Stinger of "Something About Yoshi's Story". The court had mistaken him for Burt The Bashful, and proceeded to release him from the joint, give him a whopping 500 million compensation dollars for every year he spent in prison, and is regifted access to social services. The last we see of him is reuniting with his son and wife as the other Yoshi's cheer for him.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness: In "Something About Monster Hunter World", the backgrounds are not colored. This would no longer be the case with the second MHW episode, complete with the subtitle "Now in Technicolor!"
  • Easter Egg:
    • A number of videos have a subtitle option that's actually a Developer Commentary.
    • In "Something About Luigi's Mansion", during Luigi's prayer said in "tongues," using the Spanish subtitles has the subtitles translate the tongues to "En el nombre de Jesucristo, libera a mi hermano!," which means "In the name of Jesus Christ, liberate my brother!"
    • Parodied in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", where a poster can be seen in the Deltarune version of Alphys' classroom that literally just reads "An Easter Egg".
  • Even the Subtitler Is Stumped: Kirbo confronts Meta Knight near the middle of "Kirby Super Star," leading to their climactic battle. Before this happens, this exchange occurs:
    Meta Knight: This is it, Kirby. Prepare to Die!
    Kirby: [incoherent yelp] (which the subtitles translate as "???")
  • Explain, Explain... Oh, Crap!: After waking up Link in "Something About Zelda Ocarina of Time PART 2", Rauru explains that he sealed Link away for 7 years so he would be old enough to face his destiny, before realizing that giving Ganon free reign in the meantime was not exactly the best plan.
    Rauru: So I sealed your spirit away inside the Sacred Realm while Ganondorf took over everything unopposed!
    [long pause]
    Rauru: Hm... wait, that doesn't sound right. [beat] Oh no... OH NO... I think I messed up the prophecy!
  • Extreme Omnivore: Kirbo is depicted as willing to eat anything, keeping in-line with the conventions of the Kirby series, but here it's taken even further, being shown as capable of sucking his enemies' organs out of their bodies (among other things); "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror" even features the four Kirbos coming together to cook and eat Dark Meta Knight (though it does unsettle their stomachs).
  • Eye Scream:
    • In "Something About Star Fox 64", Fox defeats Andross by flying into his eye so that he can fire directly at his brain.
    • In "Something About Kirby's Adventure", Kirbo defeats Kracko by slapping his eye out of its body.
    • In "Something About Kirby and the Amazing Mirror", Kirbo defeats Kracko again by inhaling his eye out of its body— which sends Kracko directly to Heaven.
  • Fake-Out Fade-Out:
    • Much like the game it's based on, "Something About Donkey Kong Country" has the credits begin to play before the video cuts back to the Kongs by King K. Rool's unconscious body, who tries one last (unsuccessful) ditch attack.
    • "Monster Hunter World 3" has a fake YouTube recommendations screen midway through the video after a particularly extensive "Bird Up!" gag before cutting back to the video proper.
  • Fingore:
    • In "Super Smash Bros. Ultimate: World of Light", Donkey Kong manages to escape the clutch of the Master Hand clone holding him, and violently rips it to shreds.
    • Taking inspiration from Donkey Kong, Kirbo, Korbo, Kiibo and Kirb go ape and tear Master Hand and Crazy Hand apart in "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror."
  • Flash Step:
    • In "Zelda: Breath of the Wild", when Ganon escapes from Hyrule Castle and reappears outside it as Dark Beast Ganon, Link suddenly appears right before him.
    • Fox uses this in every episode he features in, to play off of his mobility in Smash Bros. Melee. He zips around too fast for most of his opponents to keep up, complete with the classic teleporting sound from Dragon Ball Z.
  • Formula-Breaking Episode: Halloween Special "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" is almost completely devoid of the series' standard humor, opting for a much more atmospheric Survival Horror feel (until The Stinger).
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus:
    • A common Running Gag has a character's face become incredibly Off-Model for a moment before the scene cuts away.
    • A briefly-seen pair of Badniks in Sonic The Hedgehog bear a striking resemblance to Peppa and George.
    • In "Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", Monster Kid can be seen briefly peeking out from behind a tree before the Kir Bros enter Moonlight Mansion, and when Kirbo summons his warp star to fight Kracko, Coalossal appears for a split second.
    • When the camera first pans out to reveal dead bodies in The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer, the assassinated corpse of an Among Us crewmate can be found among the deceased.
    • In the scene in the Fire Emblem world during "Something About THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", the Colossal Titan can be seen peeking over the wall.
    • As the Maverik Hunter Base scans Storm Eagle L, the viewer gets a hint at what's going to happen.
      Music: Really good.
    • In "Undertale Alternate Pacifist Route", after Toriel rescues Frisk, her picture of Asriel hanging on the wall shows Flowey's Slasher Smile for a split second.
    • In "Super Metroid", the lava trap room has engravings on one of the platforms in the Microsoft Wingdings font which, translated back into plain text, read "All endings are canon".note 
    • At the end of "Something About Kirby 64", two lines of text in the Wingdings font briefly appear on screen before the video cuts out. When translated, they read "Game Genie Time Locations: Still At Large" and "THREAT LEVEL: MULTIVERSAL".
    • In "Something About Street Fighter 2", when Ryu looks back at M. Bison after the latter telepathically threw his stage's giant bell at the crowd, Akuma can briefly be seen lifting the bell.
  • Funny Background Event:
    • In "Star Fox 64", during the banter with Granga, a building in the background literally stands up and walks away.
      • After being swatted down by the Spyborg in Sector X, Slippy crashes in Titania. During the briefing, he's seen screaming in agony in his cockpit as the Goras finds him and beats him to a pulp. While the team leaves him for dead and prepares to land on Macbeth, Slippy is still lying unconscious, Falco is looking at his phone, while Peppy is the only one concerned for his teammate.
    • In "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog", Scratch and Grounder's mutilated corpses can be seen in the trail of Badnik carnage Sonic left behind.
    • In "Something About The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time PART 1," every time Hyrule Castle is seen, Yoshi and Pikachu can be seen engaged in a Smash match on top of it.
    • In both "Something About Super Mario All-Stars" and "Something About The Subspace Emissary", when Mario BLJ's out of the room Peach is in, one of the hills in the distance can be seen eating another one through the hole in the wall. This is a Call-Back to the same thing happening in "Something About Yoshi's Island".
    • In "Something About The Subspace Emissary", as the Halberd flies over Saffron City, Celibi can be seen flying out of a portal right behind the Halberd, looking horrified for an instant, and then flying right back into another portal.
    • In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", Lesser Dog's ever-growing neck can be spotted in the background when one of Undyne's spears kills the snowman.
  • Fun with Acronyms: "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer", or P.A.C. Man for short.
  • Fun with Subtitles: Part of the comedy is just from seeing what the subtitles say.
    • Inverted in "World of Light". With the subtitles turned on, Marth's single line is apparently the same as his line in the game proper. What he says out loud, however, is "Harakiri tsunami, kamikaze banzai".
    • Having subtitles on for "Super Mario World" translates King Boo's laughing at Mario's speedrunning tricks, though it goes by so fast it's practically a Freeze-Frame Bonus.
      King Boo: Looks like he's already possessed!
    • "Speedrunner Mario VS Melee Fox" has proper subtitles for the Gratuitous Japanese appear on screen in the video, but the Closed Captions themselves are instead filled with mondegreens copied from the auto-generated closed captions, which was trying to fit English words onto the Japanese dialogue.
    • The Crabmeat in "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog" that speaks binary also has its subtitles in binary, though they don't match up to what it says. While it says 'ye' aloud, translating the subtitles reveals them to spell BIRD UP.
    • The high-pitch child screaming heard when the Kir Bros start rampaging through a castle is described as [Inside voices].
    • In "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", King Golem quotes lines from Monty Python and the Holy Grail entirely in French. The subtitles also translate what he's saying.
    • In "Something About Super Mario All-Stars", when Mario gets caught on the 7-1 level transition in Super Mario Bros. 3, the subtitles quote Ansem, Seeker of Darkness when he introduces Kingdom Hearts to Sora. Mario then shoots the level transition to free himself, at which point the subtitles read "RIP Kingdom Hearts".
  • Gainax Ending: "World of Light" has Dharkon defeated by Mario turning into Master Hand and flying into it. And then peace returned to all the land, the end. Even the characters are confused as to what happened.
  • Gasshole: According to "Monster Hunter World PART 3," the effluvium of the Rotten Vale is apparently comprised of the farts of the Girros and Vaal Hazak.
  • Goomba Stomp: Link's shown to utilize bouncing off enemy heads to get around in Breath of the Wild, shield surfing off a cliff or something and then bouncing off a Bokoblin, sending him careening into the sky at Mach 5. He even uses it to cross Hyrule Field in its entirety once he nabs the Paraglider!
  • Gosh Darnit To Heck: Parodied in "Something About Donkey Kong Country", where King K. Rool attempts to say "you damned dirty ape!", only for his "damned" to be replaced by a "darn" said by a text-to-speech device that doesn't match the voice from the rest of the sentence. A picture of Kirby shows up on the bottom with the text "Kirbo Says; There will be no swears in my Christian channel!"
  • Gratuitous Japanese:
    • "Something About Star Fox 64" has Slippy speak a line of Japanese during the Vaporwave-inspired Meteo warp sequence.
    • "Speedrunner Mario VS Melee Fox" features spoken dialogue between the two title characters, spoken entirely in Japanese as part of its parody of Fighting Series anime.
  • Gratuitous Spanish:
    • When Mario learns that Bowser has re-kidnapped Peach and stolen Yoshi's eggs in the otherwise English-language "Super Mario World" episode, his internal rage is represented by Spanish-language audio of a mother chastising her kid for telling her to shut up.
    • The second "Ocarina of Time" episode features Phantom Ganon randomly prattling off the Spanish-language lyrics to Elvis Crespo's "Suavemente", both to tie back to the Ronaldinho Soccer 64 joke from part one and as a reference to part two's release during Hispanic Heritage Month.
  • Heel–Faith Turn: At the end of "Something About Kirby 64", Zero-Two has a vision of Jesus Christ via His first conversation with Saul, then Kirbo baptizes him and he proceeds to fly away to spread the Word of God.
  • Heroic Comedic Sociopath: Many installments portray the heroes as heroic as saving the day while doing not at all heroic things.
    • Kirbo holds no qualms about violently vacuuming up Dedede's innards while he's still alive, shoots down and completely overkills the Meta Knights, and wrecks havoc through Carrot Castle completely unprovoked (along with Korbo, Kiibo, and Kirb in the case of the latter), all while spouting the Lord's good word.
    • The Yoshi clan casually snap Shy Guys' necks and commit cartoonishly over-the-top acts of child abuse on their journey to get Baby Mario home.
  • High-Tier Scrappy: In-Universe. Peach in "World of Light" pleads for Mario and Yoshi to rescue her because she's top-tier now. The two pause, then go on without her.
  • Hints Are for Losers: During the loading screen in Resident Evil 4 mocks Leon for the game's Artificial Stupidity.
    Player Tips: If you want to save the President's daughter, how about you don't shoot her. Leon. DUH!
  • Holy Burns Evil: Even the most wicked foes are laid low by the presence of crosses, often accompanied by a chorus of "Hallelujah!": Simon Belmont dissolves crosses in water flasks to create his Holy Water, and Kirbo silences Marx simply by holding up a cross, then later banishes Nightmare with one instead of the Star Rod. Luigi doesn't carry a cross, but a Latin chant repels Satan with a cross-shaped flash on the screen.
  • Horrifying the Horror: After literally everything gets thrown at Calamity Ganon, he takes a bunch of arrows to the eye and becomes so terrified of Link that he actually ends up backing away from him in the end. Even in his Dark Beast mode, he's frightened by Link's presence alone.
  • Humanoid Abomination: Mario and specifically, the Speed Demon possessing him is capable of violating reality and does so hilariously. He's even capable of turning into Master Hand as a Heroic Sacrifice and him coming back is poked on later.
  • Hurl It into the Sun: In "Something about Kirby 64", Kirbo launches a Dark Matter that possessed Waddle Dee to the Sun with a Warp Star. Then, when Ribbon tries to clap Kirbo's hand, he smacks her so hard that she launches into the Sun (she got better, albeit covered in soot). And finally, after defeating Pix, Kirbo lifts the entire pyramid and throws it into the Sun.
  • Hydra Problem: When Jeremy reports the spam bot abomination in "Something About Spam Bots", more spam bots simply rise up out of the wirey mass for every one removed, and the "head" of the spam bots laughs at Jeremy's failed attempt to get rid of it.
  • Hyperspace Is a Scary Place: In "Something About Super Mario All-Stars", Mario activates a speedrun glitch in Mario 3 that involves using a fake pipe that takes him straight to the ending. The actual game doesn't show what happens in the transition period— but this video does, and naturally it's not pleasant, with Mario screaming in fear and/or pain throughout.
  • Implacable Man: Nothing [[Video Game/Earthbound Lardna Minch]] does affects Buck Bumble when he comes after her, implicitly to avenge Buzz Buzz. Not even spraying him with a can of bug spray puts him down.
  • Incoming Ham:
    • Mettaton's introduction in "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" consists of him bursting through the wall of the lab and giving the loudest "OH YES!" imaginable, readily establishing that even in the outrageously over-the-top world of Something About, Mettaton is still one of the biggest hams in the entire Undertale cast.
    • M. Bison in Something About Street Fighter II makes his entrance floating down from the sky, with Raúl Juliá's last line from the infamous Street Fighter film, just as hammy as it was there.
  • Inexplicably Preserved Dungeon Meat: In "A Very Kirbo Christmas", Simon gives Kirbo a Wall Chicken as a present. He later feeds it to the Nipper Plant that Luigi gives him in order to help take care of it.
  • Informed Attribute: In "Something About Kirby Super Star", Marx accuses Kirbo of "sucking everything up like a fat boy at a Golden Corral." Unlike most fan depictions of Kirby, the only times he's actually shown using his inhale ability here are when he eats King Dedede's insides and when he vacuums up some of Meta Knight's soldiers just before the Halberd takes off.
  • It Makes Just As Much Sense In Context: The Final Boss of "Something About Monster Hunter World: Iceborne" is an otherwise normal Shara Ishvalda...except he has massive, tattooed arms and he raps.
  • It's Personal: In "World of Light", Mario stops Kirbo and everyone else from joining in to fight Bowser for because the beef is between them alone. He still drags Yoshi along.
  • I Want to Be a Real Man: This turns out to be Mega Man X's main motivation for going on a rampage against the Mavericks. Zero can get really, really patronizing.
  • Joker Immunity: Invoked with Bowser, who's repeatedly seen dying through the series only to come back alive and well in time for Mario and Yoshi's next adventures.
  • Jump Scare: In "Something About Super Mario 64", Mario fighting Bowser the second time has him advancing towards a progressively-more afraid Bowser that suddenly cuts to a close-up of Mario's face with tons of sharp teeth and flashing eyes, complete with a loud roaring sound.
  • Just Eat Gilligan: In "Ocarina of Time", the Gorons are starving since they can't get into King Dodongo's Cavern to harvest rocks to eat due to a giant boulder blocking the way. Link points out why they can't just eat the boulder, which the Gorons promptly realize and start chowing down on the boulder, the cave, and even King Dodongo.
  • Kevlard: In "Yoshi's Story", Light Blue Yoshi winds up morbidly obese after eating too much fruit in the first page. When Piranha Plants attack the Yoshis on page three his fat ends up saving his life as he's too heavy to pick up and so tough that the Plants end up breaking their teeth biting him.
  • Large Ham: Marx spends a significant chunk of screentime simply shouting at the top of his lungs.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: Sans' judgement of Frisk in the last corridor was originally a major twist in Undertale that revealed the fact that EXP and LV were actually measurements of their capacity to kill. "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" uses it as the thumbnail, owed to the Genocide Route variant's memetic popularity. Likewise, the actual scene in the video depicting Sans' judgement casually mentions EXP and LV while assuming that the audience is already familiar with what they represent.
  • Laughing Mad: Marx is an insane megalomaniac with a visible God complex who near-constantly cackles like a hyena.
  • Laugh Track: Follows Sans around throughout "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", riffing on his memetic popularity with the Undertale fanbase.
  • Limited Animation: Played for laughs with the yellow Yoshi in "Something About Yoshi's Island", whose trip through the castle doesn't give him a walk cycle and just has him slide along the screen, squishing his animation frame at one point to dodge some hazards.
  • Made of Explodium: When something dies or is destroyed in this series, it uses the same stock explosion effect, then completely vanishes. Bonus points to "Something About Super Metroid", where the space station doesn't explode once the self-destruct sequence completes. It just vanishes completely, and then the space it was occupying explodes. The one time it doesn't happen, when Tabuu vaporizes Pit, it comes across as serious and everyone is terrified.
    • Likewise, "Something About Mega Man X: Storm Eagle's Revenge" uses actual hand-drawn explosions instead of the usual stock effect.
  • Man on Fire:
  • Męlée ŕ Trois: "Something About The Subspace Emissary" features the hero cast, who all eventually come together, the Subspace army (alongside Tabuu) and Mario as separate, warring parties. Two thirds in, Mario begins stealing Tabuu's power, only to be cut off by Super Sonic's arrival, which ends up snapping his neck and killing him, leaving it a two-way battle.
  • Mook Horror Show: If the hero of any episode behave like they're possessed by a speedrunner or meta gamer, expect cannon fodder, bosses and final bosses to visibly and audibly freak out as they're being steamrolled.
  • Multiple Endings: "Something About Super Metroid" has three different endings, all regarding whether or not Samus rescues the animals in her escape from Zebes:
    • KILL ending: The animals attempt to escape on their own, but die off one by one, the sole survivor just missing Samus's ship taking off. Samus retires from bounty hunting to join the F-Zero circuit.
    • SAVE ending: Samus escorts the animals to her ship, only for them to transform into hostile aliens due to being X parasites in disguise. During the scuffle, Samus crashes on Titania, where she's saved by Slippy, who crashed there during "Something About Star Fox 64". Together, they patch the remains of their ships into one ship and escape. "Something About THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY" follows this ending.
    • TOOK TOO LONG ending: Samus stands around being indecisive before deciding to just leave. However, a Zebesian Space Pirate beats her to the ship, and takes off with it. Samus tries to take the ship back, but she's blasted off of it and left to die. At the last second, with a little help from parallel universes, she pulls off one last speed boost to ascend and escape Zebes' destruction.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • In "Something About Mega Man X", Zero is always drawn with Black Dot Pupils and is given multiple close up shots where he's drawn with a nose and a pointed chin, referencing his design in TerminalMontage's previous series NoPUNintendo.
    • "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" has a number of them, owing in large part to the in-depth nature of the source game.
      • In Sans' house is a pillow with the shopkeeper Temmie's face embroidered on it, nodding to a Running Gag in the game surrounding Temmies having detachable faces.
      • When Sans prepares to judge Frisk in the last corridor, his left eye briefly glows like in his Genocide-exclusive boss fight.
      • The Stinger ends with Sans giving a laugh that deliberately mimics his in-game Voice Grunting.
    • "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" also has a few nods to Deltarune, Undertale's sister game:
      • Jigsawry can be spotted in the Ruins when Toriel "rescues" Frisk.
      • C. Round and Rabbick can be seen residing in the stairway in Toriel's house.
      • Sans' house in Snowdin features a vase designed after Lancer's head.
      • The stinger sees Frisk's corpse barrel through Alphys' classroom in Hometown. The latter features an additional layer in the fact that Frisk's body immediately mows down Berdly, who the player— through fellow SOUL-controlled human Kris— forces Noelle to kill in the Weird Route of Deltarune's second chapter.
      • Also in Hometown Alphys' classroom is a chalkboard diagram about "the neuroscience of free will," a not-so-subtle nod to how Kris in Deltarune deconstructs the Audience Surrogate trope by having their own thoughts and desires separate from the player, disliking their control over them as a result.
  • Nightmare Face: The Speed Demon is shown to be able to give its vessels this ability. What makes it particularly nasty is that it can cause severe psychological damage to its targets or even kill, as shown in the scene with Super Sanic in "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog."
  • No-Nonsense Nemesis:
    • In "Something About Star Fox 64", Goras mauls Slippy the moment it finds his crash site on Titania.
    • In "Something About Super Mario 64", Mario wastes little time rushing through Peach's castle, including breaking through walls, to defeat Bowser as fast as possible. When Mario actually gets to Bowser, Mario just offs Bowser in one way or another without giving him the chance to talk or retaliate.
  • Non Sequitur: As Link is about to leave the Kokiri Forest in "Ocarina of Time", Saria appears to wish him off. Saria asks if he's leaving and Link just belches in response.
  • Non-Standard Character Design:
    • Kracko's eye in "Something About Kirby's Adventure" is a stock photo instead of being animated, though the rest of him is. Subverted with his appearance in "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror".
    • Dharkon in "Something About the World of Light" is made up of a single eye and a bunch of crab legs, all of which are stock photos as opposed to being animated.
  • Not-So-Harmless Villain:
    • Ridley, unlike just about every other boss encounter in the Something About series, actually puts up a fight against Samus and gets in a few good hits on her. He still loses, but he lasted against a Something About player character much longer than most other bosses.
    • Ganondorf in "Something about Ocarina of Time PART 1" actually gets the chance to abuse Link with fireballs, and then gets access to the Triforce, like in canon.
    • In "Something about the Photon Aerospace Control Engineer", the cartoonish Pac-Man ghosts are reimagined as alien Blob Monster Eldritch Abominations that are NOT played for laughs. Justified as the video itself is a Darker and Edgier Sci-Fi Horror retelling.
  • Nuke 'em: Kirbo in "Something About Kirby's Adventure" uses a nuke to take out the Meta Knights and later to deal the finishing blow against Meta Knight.
  • Oddball in the Series: "Something About the Photon Aerospace Control Engineer", the Halloween Special, eschews the series' conventional fast-paced and loud humor (aside from The Stinger) in favor of a fairly quiet, serious, horror-oriented retelling of Pac-Man in a style similar to Dead Space.
  • Of Corpse He's Alive: "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" runs entirely on Frisk's dead body being thrown through the events of the game, with the Monsters either not realizing or ignoring the fact that Frisk is dead.
  • One-Man Army: Kirby, Simon Belmont, and Donkey Kong are portrayed as absolutely curb-stomping everything in their path.
  • Only Sane Man: Adeleine in "Something About Kirby 64". While the rest of the main five see the entirety of the mall in Shiver Star, including the enemies, as cute and saccharine, Adeleine sees them as how it actually is, with the mall being worn down and the enemies being Eldritch Abominations.
  • Out-of-Genre Experience: Vaporwave Dimension | LÜNE - Rêve Lucide, a vaporwave music video based on a segment from "Something About Star Fox 64". It's played (almost) completely seriously and is surprisingly heartfelt, a far cry from the Rapid-Fire Comedy nature of the rest of the "Something About" series.
  • Overly-Long Gag:
    • Bowser's transformation into Giga Bowser in "Something About Smash Bros World of Light". He keeps getting bigger and bigger, going past the size of the galaxy, before Samus shoots the Master Hand controlling him.
      Bowser: Today you meet your DOOM. But don't worry. I'll make this quick.
    • Used as a Brick Joke in "Breath of the Wild" where Link repeatedly says a very drawn out version of the iconic "Well, Excuse Me, Princess!" line from the cartoon.
    • At the start of "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", Frisk's fall down Mt. Ebott lasts over half a minute, looping footage and repeatedly cutting to a still frame of Flowey waiting in the Underground.
  • The Pearly Gates: After being sucked up by Kirbo, Kracko find himself before the gates, which then opens up for him.
    God: Eye forgive you.
  • Person as Verb: When Tabuu gets his head smashed in "Something about Smash Bros The Subspace Emissary", the subtitles say he was "Million Dollar Baby'd".
  • Pet the Dog: Sephiroth of all people does this in "Another Very Kirbo Christmas", after previously maiming Geno and stealing his Smash invite prior, The Stinger has Sephiroth deciding to give Geno another Smash invite as a present.
  • Physical God: Rosalina is not only the leader of an interdimensional space force that fights demons, she fixes the multiverse with just a snap of her fingers.
  • Pit Trap: Subverted. Dark Meta Knight tries to pull the rug under the Kir Bros in Moonlight Mansion so they fall in the hole underneath, but since they can fly, it has no effect and he resorts to making the mansion collapse on top of them instead.
  • Played for Horror: "Something About Pac-Man" (originally titled "Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer" to keep its game a surprise) turns out to be a Dead Space-esque Sci-Fi Survival Horror reimagining of Pac-Man. As an interpretation of the original game's simplistic arcade graphics and nonexistent storyline, Pac-Man and Mrs. Pac-Man are forced to navigate a dark space station, full of mutilated corpses and haunted by terrifying ghostly abominations.
  • Poor Communication Kills: In "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", Fox radios in to the Star Fox team, but they ignore his call. As a result, after Fox takes over the Halberd and meets up with the Great Fox, Star Fox and Samus immediately open fire.
  • "Pop!" Goes the Human: In "Something About Super Metroid", Samus defeats Ridley by piercing her Arm Cannon into his stomach and firing until he explodes.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    • Delivered by Jesus Christ to Nightmare in "Something About Kirby's Adventure".
      Jesus: I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.note 
    • And another one against Dark Mind in "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", in response to his This Cannot Be!
      Jesus: With man, this is impossible, but with God, all things are possible.note 
  • Quote Mine:
    • King Dedede is voiced using quotes from his Right Back At Ya! incarnation, with his only line in "Something about Kirby's Adventure" being stitched together from various quotes.
    • Sonic is also voiced almost entirely by quotes from Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog, save for his iconic "You're Too Slow!" quote from Super Smash Bros. Brawl and a voice clip from Sonic Adventure of him grunting.
  • Race Lift: In Undertale, Frisk's skin is yellow, with their ethnicity left ambiguous. In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", their skin is a light tan.
  • Rapid-Fire Comedy: The series specializes in chaotic humor like this, keeping jokes going at breakneck speeds and making use of lots of cuts. Breathing room here tends to be something of a myth.
  • Religious Bruiser: An odd recurring theme in some installments.
    • Simon Belmont fights with anointed weaponry, which isn't out of question for the Castlevania series.
    • Luigi defeats Satan in "Something About Luigi's Mansion" by literal prayer and repels his possessed brother the same way in the stinger of "Something About Super Mario World".
    • Kirbo in particular is made into one on a mission from God to spread The Good Word, and always tries to defeat major villains with nothing more than a holy cross or a prayer. In "Something About Kirby's Adventure", delivering The Good Word outright vaporizes Nightmare. In "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", Dark Mind holds up a YouTube comment that complained about the Running Gag of Kirbo being a devout Christian, so he starts to recite Psalm 59, then the four Kir Bros put their crucifixes together to summon Jesus Christ in full majestynote  to obliterate Dark Mind.
  • Reset Button Ending: At the end of "Something About Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", Rosalina resets the timelines because the heroes have gone past what their worlds should allow while chasing the Speed Demon, but Luigi has vague memories of the other timeline and in The Stinger is given a tape from another Luigi labeled "EVERYTHING".
  • Right Behind Me: In "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog, Robotnik crushes Sonic with the Checker Wrecker, but while he's laughing, Sonic somehow teleports behind him, laughing in the same way he was, and performs a Neck Snap on the good doctor.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: In "Something About Donkey Kong Country", Donkey Kong's whole motivation for going ape-wild against the Kremlings is to get back his stolen banana hoard. Discovering they built Kremkroc Industries on his island just fuels his rage even further.
  • Running Gag:
    • Things getting flung around and exploding, leaving holes in the backdrop. Sometimes used by characters to shortcut difficult parts of their game.
    • Characters that appear in multiple shorts often carry jokes from past episodes, like Mario doing Backwards Long Jumps, or Fox dash dancing, complete with the sound of a GameCube analog stick for the latter.
    • "Bird Up!" shows up at least once every other short, usually with a drawing of a Kulu-Ya-Ku from Monster Hunter World. In "Something About Kirby Super Star", the audio is associated with Dyna Blade instead.
    • From the Monster Hunter World series, whenever Bill (the white hunter) whistles for Mernos to transport him and Bogues, Mernos uses its talons to grab the hunters by their heads and then take off, while shrieking through the whole scene. Another Monster Hunter World gag is Nergigante appearing (Usually dropping out of the sky) and roaring at the hunters.
    • Characters drawing a photo-realistic gun to shoot someone with, which happens about every other short and usually replaces any character's personal firearm.
    • If Bowser appears in a video, he will get slapped.
    • Kirbo summons his Warp Star by farting it out. Sometimes he cuts short his own "Kirby dance" after beating a boss by doing it.
    • Jeremy is a big fan of Geno, and likes to sneak in cameos of the star spirit-possessed doll in nearly every short.
    • Whenever a transition between multiple locations happens, scenes from other previous episodes appear for brief instants, most recurringly Kirby's house.
    • Oftentimes, completely unrelated characters from other video games or sources show up in the background of scenes, disappearing just as quickly as they appeared.
    • Every episode covering a Kirby game will have a scene where a Poppy Bros. Jr. is Fortnite dancing in the background.
  • Running Gagged: In "Something About Kirby 64":
    • Adeleine draws Kulu-Ya-Ku on her canvas, but Kirbo smashes it before the "BIRD UP!!" gag can occur.
    • A Poppy Bros Jr. appears behind Kirbo doing the Fortnite dance as per usual, then Kirbo inhales him and uses the Bomb ability to defeat Waddle Doo.
  • Satanic Archetype: Nightmare appears as a face in the tainted Fountain of Dreams who tries to tempt Kirbo with a smooth, compelling voice, and is destroyed by the power of the Lord.
    Nightmare: Kirby. Throw [King Dedede] into the fountain. Throw him into the fountain, Kirby, and I will make all of your dreams come true.
  • Savage Wolves: Link gets mauled by a pair of Wolfos in "Something About Ocarina of Time: The Forest Temple". Twice. He then gets mauled by a pair of White Wolfos at the end of "Something About Ocarina of Time: The Fire Temple".
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here: In "Something About Star Fox 64", Samus flies in, takes one look at Andross' forces attacking Corneria, and hightails it out of there. She does so again when she sees Dark World trying to absorb Dream Land.
  • Self-Disposing Villain: The Shy-Guy Pirates in "Yoshi's Story" end up killing the Piranha Plants threatening the Yoshis, and then cause the tower on the page to collapse... Right onto their ship. The Yoshis didn't even need to do anything.
  • Sensory Abuse:
    • There's a reason why most of the videos have a "Loud Noise" warning. Many characters will scream with no warning, with the worst offenders being Marx (who loudly shouts every other word, has an incredibly loud evil laugh, and his deaths in his two appearances are quite ear shattering) and Mario (who shouts incredibly loudly, especially if he's in speedrunner mode, especially in the Super Mario World video, where he screams very loudly when he uses a keyhole to suck the Forest of Illusions up).
    • Most of the videos also contain a "Flashing Lights" warning as well, although most of it is usually from sudden lightning. However, the Donkey Kong Country video is probably one of the bigger violators as the "Stop and Go Station" segment includes Donkey Kong rapidly switching a barrel from green to red, creating a ton of flashing.
  • Sequence Breaking:
    • "Super Mario 64 Speedrun" has Mario abuse glitches to be able to beat Bowser all three times without collecting a single star. Bowser calls him out on it the second time.
    • "Zelda Breath of the Wild Speedrun" has Link use glitches to clip out of the Shrine of Resurrection when he wakes up and clip into each of the Great Plateau shrines, allowing him to skip the opening cutscene and the tower activation.
    • Inverted in "Super Mario World"; when Mario sequence breaks into Bowser's Castle, Bowser tells him to collect all the eggs around Dinosaur Land. Mario goes back to do exactly that, quickly enough to get back to the castle before the Koopa King even gets the chance to get on his Koopa Clown Car with Peach for his boss fight.
  • Shout-Out: Constantly such that it has its own page. The Kirby Super Star video parodies this by having a sign that says "pop culture reference".
  • Shown Their Work: Frequently, techniques used in real-life Speed Runs of the games will be implemented into the animation.
    • In "Something About Super Mario 64", Mario's frequent used of rapid-fire long-jumping is a common technique used in tool-assisted speedruns of the game. In fact, the video itself is a surprisingly accurate recreation of an existing speedrun.
    • "Something About Zelda Breath of the Wild" shows Link following the route used for BOTW speedruns at the time: clipping out of the Shrine of Resurrection and into each Great Plateau shrine, using a Stasis Launch on a tree log to reach the Temple of Time rooftop, and finally using a specific setup of axe swings to allow him to use a "Bullet Time Bounce" note  on the Bokoblin below at just the right angle to send him flying towards Hyrule Castle at high speeds.
    • "Something About Super Metroid" is a self-indulgent showcase of the many techniques and glitches that break the original Metroidvania over their knee — up until the Ridley fight. Unlike the other bosses in the game, Ridley does not have an Easy Level Trick and always has to be fought as intended in speedruns. The result in the video is a fast-paced slugfest between Samus and Ridley that actually looks fair, contrasting the usual treatment bosses get in this series.
    • "Something About Super Mario All-Stars" has Mario perform the Flagpole Glitch in 1-1, and use the pipe clip to access the 1-2 warp zone, bouncing off the right wall before entering the pipe to avoid entering the Minus World. Then, in the Super Mario Bros. 3 part of the video, he does the steps needed to trigger the 7-1 Wrong Warp and immediately appear at the credits.
    • In "Something about Street Fighter II", Guile flinging Ryu into a loop is a real softlock exploit in early versions of Street Fighter II commonly known as Guile's Handcuffs, by attemtping a Flash Kick and a throw at the same time.
  • Smoke Out: Subverted in "Something About Zelda Ocarina of Time PART 2". Sheik attempts this after getting stabbed by Link, but when the smoke clears, they instead collapse from the injury.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Surprisingly for a series that usually results in its antagonists facing a brutal, humorous demise, "Something About Kirby 64" ends with Zero-Two seeing the light of Jesus and being baptized by Kirbo before going out into the galaxy to spread the word of God, rather than dying as it canonically did.
  • Special Guest:
    • Sr. Pelo provides the voice of Baby Bowser and some extra voice clips for Andross in "Star Fox 64".
    • Spoofed in "Monster Hunter World Part 4" (the April Fools' 2019 video) where the ending credits claim the characters were voiced by Hugh Jackman, Denzel Washington, and Jack Black.
    • In the "Pokémon Battle Royale" series:
      • Stuart Zagnit reprises his role from the 4Kids dub of the Pokémon anime as Professor Oak.
      • Lockstin from Gnoggin guest stars as himself, given that the episodes are the product of his research on Pokémon if their Pokédex entries were serious indicators of their powers and abilities.
    • "Mega Man X" has Zero voiced by Lucas Gilbertson, the actual voice of Zero in several of the official games.
    • Sean Chiplock provides the voice of brothers Sans and Papyrus in "Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route".
  • Staredown Faceoff: This trope occurs in the episode Storm Eagle's Revenge. It plays out as a Battle of the Bands between two Musical Assassins, to the tune of Storm Eagle's Leitmotif, and midway through the climax both Megaman and Storm Eagle get very close during their duel despite their sound-based weaponry having plenty of range.
  • Stealth Pun: The entire joke of "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" is that Frisk died from falling down Mt. Ebott, but still manages to go through the entire True Pacifist Route by having their corpse flung all over the Underground. In other words, it's a Passive-ist Run.
  • Stealth Sequel: In "Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY", a second episode of Something Versus starts between Speedrunner Mario and Super Chili Dogs (AKA Super Sonic) as a part of the episode's plot. The segment even got a separate upload after the fact to hammer the point home.
  • The Stinger: Every episode has a short extra scene after the credits. For example:
    • "Castlevania" has Death make another punny joke for Dracula to laugh at while they're both literal talking heads.
    • "Monster Hunter World PART 4" has a Behemoth appear and use an attack called...Cataclysmic BIRD UP.
    • "Sonic the Hedgehog" has Super Sanic speeding by Pop Star, causing Kirbo to alert Luigi.
    • "Donkey Kong Country" has King K. Rool try to enact the fakeout ending from the original game; keyword being try, as Donkey Kong finishes him off for real, throws him into the ocean, and drives the Gangplank Galleon around at ludicrous speeds with Diddy Kong while wearing K. Rool's crown.
    • "Kirby's Adventure" has Kirbo return home, with Marx rolling into the scene to tie into "Something About Kirby Super Star".
    • "Super Mario World" has Luigi step in to protect Princess Peach from the speed demon-possessed Mario.
    • "Storm Eagle's Revenge" shows Serges and Sigma watching the battle between X and Storm Eagle L before Sigma uses a Chaos Emerald to open a portal.
    • "Pikmin Speedrun" expands upon Ness' cameo earlier in the episode, showing him in his room the night the meteor strikes in EarthBound.
    • "Pokémon Legends: Arceus" ends with Akari using Abra to teleport Volo off the side of the mountain to his doom. The stinger shows Cynthia being painfully erased from time because her ancestry no longer existed.
  • Stripped to the Bone: Kirbo slapping the top of Mr. Shine several times is enough to reduce him to a skeleton.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: For the sake of comedy, the series loves to make many things explode in every episode with a realistic-looking pixilated explosion effect. It doesn't matter if it's for enemies, bosses, backgrounds, or even the main characters— they explode just because it's funny.
  • Stylistic Suck: The series uses sketch-like drawings and similar effects throughout all of its episodes. Some of the voices are made by a voice-generating computer program, the same sound effects are frequently used, characters frequently go Off-Model for no reason, and there's a lot of Big Lipped Alligator Moments and Non Sequiturs. However, it's all intentionally done this way for the sake of being funny.invoked
  • Suddenly Shouting: Marx tends to end most of his sentences by revealing his true colors. His first scene has him start with a cutesy voice before the last word of his sentence becomes much louder and he gains a Nightmare Face to go along with the distorted pitch of his screaming.
    Marx: Hahahahahahaha! FOOLS! While you were sucking everything up like a fat boy at a Golden Corral, I gathered all the Star Power in the universe and became G O D!!!
  • Surprisingly Creepy Moment:
    • The thumbnail for "There's Something About Pac-Man" (formerly "There's Something About The Photon Aerospace Control Engineer") makes it look like a straightforward rendition of the game, but the video itself is a Dark Parody of Pac-Man in the style of Dead Space.
    • Used comedically when Marx is talking to Kirby in "Something about Kirby Super Star".
      Marx: Kirby, ya gotta do S O M E T H I N G!
    • In the otherwise goofy and lighthearted "Something About Kirby 64", Adeleine's view of the abandoned mall in Shiver Star is shown to be a lot darker than everyone else's perspective (implied to be the result of her Token Human status). Rather than seeing the sugary landscape seen in the original game, Adeleine sees it as the more realistic and unnerving ruins of an abandoned urban hotspot, full of dust and debris, the skeletons of former workers, and broken machinery inhabited by strange, grotesque creatures.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome:
    • The opening of "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" readily establishes that Frisk dies from falling into the Underground, which Sans confirms in the last corridor when noticing that they don't have any Determination to make use of, a sharp deviation from the original game's depiction of humans being able to survive the long fall and journey through the Underground without a hitch.
    • The adult portions of the Ocarina of Time sub-series take the idea of Link having been asleep for seven years — from childhood into late adolescence — and milk the implications of that for all they're worth, depicting Link as a frightened little kid in a teenager's body, out of his league and constantly on edge because of all the life-threatening work he has to do to defeat Ganondorf.
    • Once the Kirbies finish their eating competition in "Something About Kirby's Dream Buffet", the Kirbies don't lose their weight magically like in the games. That means they have to actually lose it themselves, which shows Wii Fit Trainer getting them to lose weight in The Stinger.
  • Symbolic Baptism: In "Something About Kirby 64", 0² is baptized by Kirbo after receiving a vision from God, and flies away peacefully.
  • Synthetic Voice Actor:
    • Whenever Yoshi has to speak, he's rendered using text-to-speech.
    • Used in "Something About The Typing of the Dead" to simulate the original game's crude voice acting. Every character except for the overweight fedora-wearing man and the meme version of The Emperor uses it.
    • The narrator in "Something About Super Metroid" is also voiced by text-to-speech.
    • Link, Zelda and the Kokiri in "Ocarina of Time" are all voiced by TTS from AcapelaBox. Phantom Ganon meanwhile is voiced in a Spanish-language text-to-speech program, most of which is dedicated to prattling off the lyrics to "Suavemente" by Elvis Crespo.
  • Take That!:
    • Among the trash in the dumpster Yoshi is eating from in "Something About Yoshi's Island" is a Wii U.
    • In "Something About Super Smash Bros", Link vomits upon seeing The Subspace Emissary, though "Something About Smash Bros World of Light" has him admit he now misses it.
    • Amongst the corpses in the Rotten Vale from "Something About Monster Hunter World Part 3", an Applebee's can be seen.
    • In "Pokémon Battle Royale", a copy of Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! is wedged in Garbodor's body.
    • When Link enters the third shrine in "Something About Zelda Breath of the Wild", there's a zoom-in on a caption saying "Reaction vids are lazy and bad."
    • "Something About COPPA" is a massive one towards COPPA's policies related to YouTube and how it has created more harm than benefit, which it gleefully demonstrates by turning the normally colorful world of Dreamland and its inhabitants into a dull world by draining the background color and turning Kirbo into a black square, while having a conversation with a rectangle discussing uninteresting topics.
    • In "Something About MHW Iceborn ANIMATED", Shara Ishvalda was causing havoc by rapping to Xavy Rusan's "Ga$ Money."
    • In "Something About Sonic the Hedgehog", one of Eggman's attempts to stop Sonic was to drown him in Totino's Pizza Rolls. While this may seem random for some, more avid Sonic fans would recognize this as a subtle jab at the disastrous Sonic 25th Anniversary stream that just so happened to have Totino's as a sponsor.
    • In "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", the mirror Dark Meta Knight throws the real Meta Knight into is labelled "Florida".
    • In "Something About Kirby and the Amazing Mirror", the Kir Bros are attacked by Baby Shark, and later kill it.
    • The subtitle track in "Something About Smash Bros The Subspace Emissary" takes a couple jabs at Meta Knight's overpowered status in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, calling SS Tier "his cheapest form" and transcribing his No-Holds-Barred Beatdown of a Primid platoon as "*cheese cheese cheese*".
    • In "Something About Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route", some of the objects included in Waterfall's garbage dump are Balan from Balan Wonderworld (a game whose reception was infamously poor) and a calendar page for 2020 (a year widely considered one of the worst of the modern era).
    • "Something About Kirby 64" depicts Mark Zuckerberg as one of the grotesque experimental specimens bottled up in Shiver Star's factory. When Kirbo sees him, his face goes from amazement to disgust.
    • The short "Something About Spam Bots" is a large jab at YouTube's spam bots and the company's inability to deal with them properly, depicting the spam bots as a large Mechanical Abomination wearing the deformed skin of whoever they're trying to copy, in this case Jeremy himself. When Jeremy attempts to report the spam bots, more crop up to take their place.
  • Take That, Audience!: In "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror", Dark Mind holds before Kirbo and his buddies one particular Youtube comment that complained about the Running Gag about Kirbo being a devout Christian. Kirbo begins reciting Psalms 59, to which Jesus Christ shows up to Deus ex Machina Dark Mind into oblivion.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: "Something About Kirby's Adventure" has Kirbo use a pistol, a bazooka, and a nuke to defeat the Meta Knights. Then he uses all of the same weapons just to take out Meta Knight in a Curb-Stomp Battle.
  • Threatening Shark: In "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", Baby Shark attacks the Kir Bros in Olive Ocean, with all the Kir Bros being absolutely terrified by it.
  • Time Machine: Luigi assembles one in The Stinger to "Amazing Mirror", and he and Kirbo use it in "Super Mario All-Stars" to travel back to Super Mario Bros. 3 in an attempt to stop the Speed Demon early.
  • Toilet Humor: Used very frequently, to say the least. Baby Mario's diaper bursting into a constant stream of brown in "Something About Yoshi's Island", a Toad having soiled pants in "Something About Super Mario All-Stars", Kirby pooting out his Warp Star every single time he uses it, and a bank called Wells Fartgo.
  • Tone Shift: In contrast to the Adaptational Wimp treatment of other bosses in the short and the series in general, Samus' fight with Ridley in "Something About Super Metroid" is played completely straight, with a long buildup, fast and intense action, and an absence of jokes until Ridley's death. Ridley's status as Metroid's recurringly-awesome boss fight may attribute to this.
  • Too Spicy for Yog-Sothoth: Kirbo, depicted in the series as an unstoppable death god, will eat anything he feels like eating, but "Something About Kirby & the Amazing Mirror" establishes that Dark Meta Knight is just too evil for him to digest; cooking him up into a curry medley results in the Kir Bros immediately developing stomach problems. Kiibo in particular gets a bad case of the runs.
  • Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny: The purpose of the Something Versus side series, featuring 1 v 1s between characters of the series. While there is only one official episode, a second episode between Speedrunner Mario and Super Chili Dogs (AKA Super Sonic) was shown in "Smash Bros THE SUBSPACE EMISSARY".
  • Unexplained Recovery:
    • Mario sacrifices himself to defeat Dharkon in "Something About World of Light". He returns just fine in "Something About Super Mario World".
      Luigi: So Mario, how did you come back after defeating Dharkon?
      Mario: [In pannenkoek2012's voice] To answer that, we need to talk about parallel universes.
    • A door in Bowser's Castle crushes Mario, taking away his power-ups and turning him into small Mario. In the next scene he's suddenly Cape Mario again.
    • The flames on Boshi after crashing into a wall earlier in "World of Light" disappear the next time he appears on-screen.
    • "Yoshi's Island" ends with a gag strongly implying that Baby Bowser was flat-out killed from being thrown out of his own castle; by "Yoshi's Story", he's shown to still be alive and well for no reason. Even then, he gets Dragged Off to Hell at the end of that, but somehow manages to come back in time for his adult appearances throughout the series, where he dies again during "World of Light" and again comes back fine and well for "Super Mario World" (which is established as taking place after "World of Light").
    • Meta Knight is not only impaled clean through the face and out the back by Dark Meta Knight in "Something About Kirby & The Amazing Mirror", but is also thrown into a mirror leading to Florida. Somehow, he survived this to give Kirbo his sword for the final battle.
  • Unreadably Fast Text: Used in a lot of episodes as a Freeze-Frame Bonus. The most egregious example is when Kaepora Gaebora begins speaking to Link in "Ocarina of Time PART 1" and the latter utilizes Button Mashing to get through the former's lengthy diatribe. If you slow the video down, you'll see that there is a shit-ton of said text; most of it isn't even about any part of Link's adventure! This leads to Link smashing the owl's face in with the Fairy Ocarina.
  • Unwanted Revival: In "Something About Pokémon Legends: Arceus", Akari's Vaporeon is less than pleased to be revived after having been brutally stomped to death twice by Giratina.
  • Verbal Backspace: In "Something About Kirby 64", the world select text for Shiver Star briefly introduces it as Earth before the menu corrects itself.
  • Villains Want Mercy:
    • In "Something About Kirby's Adventure", Nightmare pleads for Kirbo to go away after escaping to the moon.
    Nightmare: [looks behind to see Kirbo flying towards him] Oh no. Leave me alone! I'll give you anything! You want a planet? I'll give you a planet! Heck, I'll give you your own Solar System! No, I'll give you a house, in Boca Raton! Just please, SPARE ME—!
  • Waiting Skeleton: During what is supposed to be the "Sheikah Slate upgrade" cutscene from Breath of the Wild, Link waits so long he turns into a skeleton, with his jawbone dropping off at the end of the gag to represent how needlessly long and annoying the cutscene is to some players.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: In "Something About Pokémon Legends: Arceus", after cutting down most of Akari's Pokémon, Noble Kleavor is dispatched with a single Water Gun from her shiny Psyduck. Both Noble Arcanine and Volo's Arcanine are similarly dispatched by Vaporeon.
  • Wham Shot: During "Something About Street Fighter II", during Ryu's fight with Guile, Guile performs a Game-Breaking Bug that softlocks the game... however, as the American rep is in a Laughing Mad state, a single frame shows a Speed Demon along with a ton of distorted code as the game glitches out.
  • What the Hell, Player?: Played for laughs in "Something About Super Mario 64". Mario uses glitches to skip to each Bowser fight without collecting a single star, and Bowser tells him that he's "ruining everything" when he reaches him the second time.
  • Wins by Doing Absolutely Nothing: "Something about Undertale - Alternate Pacifist Route" starts with Frisk breaking every bone in their body in the fall to the Underground. And then, through a series of absurd shenanigans, their corpse somehow still manages to complete a full run of the game.
  • Wipe That Smile Off Your Face: Inverted in "Something About Kirby Super Star", where Sailor Waddle Dee screams so hard, he rips open a mouth.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: While Meta Knight is normally depicted as the same Zorro-esque figure as in Kirby: Right Back at Ya!, being upgraded to SS Tier in "The Subspace Emissary" results in him becoming a shrieking, high-energy beast obsessed with beating the tar out of everyone in sight.
  • Woman Scorned: Upon seeing that Link's replaced the Fairy Ocarina with the Ocarina of Time in "Ocarina of Time Part 2", Saria throws the Forest Medallion at Link angrily.
  • You Fool!: The Yoshis collectively have this reaction in "Something About Yoshi's Story" when Baby Bowser smashes the Super Happy Tree and winds up unleashing the unholy hordes of Hell upon the world. Fortunately, they stop when they drag baby Bowser down with them.

 
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Let's Go Pikachu

Lockstin talks in length about how the starter Pikachu in Pokemon Let's Go Pikachu is extremely overpowered given its constant no selling, powerful attacks, and buffed stats. He makes it a point that GameFreak doesn't allow this Pikachu in particular to be transferred.

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