Follow TV Tropes

Following

Vocal Evolution / Western Animation

Go To

Click here to go back to the main page.

  • Blinky Bill: Marcia Marsupial Mouse had her voice pitch-shifted in the 1992 movie, but that was removed when the series came along. However, as the shows progressed, her voice started to get higher and raspier.
    • Flap's voice was raspy, too, but earlier on.
    • Splodge's voice progressed into lower registers, but it was still consistent since the franchise started.
    • From series 2 onward, Keith Scott began voicing Nutsy's father in a deeper rougher voice than in the penultimate episode of series 1.
  • Family Guy has had conspicuous vocal changes for several characters;
    • This is especially noticable with Lois' voice actor Alex Borstein, who nowadays could give even the best Fran Drescher impersonator a run for their money. This was lampshaded in the episode "Petarded" when Lois, speaking at a microphone, says, "I'm sorry folks, this... Oh God, is that my voice? God, it's all whiny and nasally and... egh."
    • Advertisement:
    • In an early episode, actors are hired to replace the Griffins on a reality show... and Lois is played by Fran Drescher.
    • Her Hungarian voice actress does actually voice both her and Drescher, giving the joke an all new layer. And yes, even her voice has risen over the seasons. As did Peter's, for that matter.
    • Lois used to sound exactly like she was born and raised in Cranston, RI. Key term, used to...
    • Stewie sounds significantly less like a Rex Harrison impression than he did originally, mainly he's less over the top and lost his faux-British accent completely by the sixth season and now talks like a normal gay guy instead. Interestingly, the opening sequence briefly rerecorded Stewie's lines to match the Vocal Evolution during Season Three, though reverted back shortly after the Uncancellation, making the difference all the more noticeable.
    • Advertisement:
    • Hungarian Stewie started out sounding nothing like the original. His actor focused too much on the evil part, turning his sentences into barely intelligible mumbles and growls, and every line sounded the same. After a while, he began using his normal, speaking voice... well, he should have done that from the start, because now he's a fan favorite.
    • Everyone speaks much more quickly, especially Brian and Lois. Pitch has generally slid upward, as well.
    • Chris' voice was originally a Buffalo Bill impression, but as time has gone on, it has gotten much higher in pitch.
    • Herbert the elderly pedophile originally spoke in a slow, soft, effeminate voice with a whistle and a lisp, after about his fourth appearance he talks faster and more flamboyantly, and the whistle and lisp have vanished.
  • Compare Tony Anselmo's performance as Donald Duck in the first episode of DuckTales (1987) to his performance in Kingdom Hearts II (2006). It was rather rough around the edges when he originally took over from Clarence Nash, but has improved considerably in the past 30+ years. And in DuckTales (2017) he is much more comprehensible and can pull of an impressive range of emotions with it.
  • The Simpsons has several examples of this;
      Advertisement:
    • Dan Castellaneta's original performances of Homer Simpson sound almost nothing like the current character — in fact, the difference is so pronounced that it's hard to believe it's the same voice actor. But this is decidedly a case of evolution rather than decay, as Castellaneta found the original voice (based on Walter Matthau's) difficult to sustain or put force behind, so he changed the tenor deliberately.
    • This is parodied with the M.U.G.E.N character based on him. One of his intros has The Tracey Ullman Show version declaring, "Let's all go out for some chocolate frosty milkshakes" - and then transforming into the modern Homer, who promptly screams, "OH MY GOD!"
    • Homer is also an in-universe example, as a flashback of Grandpa Simpson's reveals that young Homer had an incredible singing voice as a choirboy, right up until he hit puberty in mid-solo.
    • Julie Kavner distanced Marge's voice from her natural tone as seasons progressed, gradually making her higher and wackier-pitched.
    • Nelson's voice has changed considerably over the years. It used to be higher pitched before becoming low and gruff sounding.
    • Police Chief Clancy Wiggum originally had a much deeper, more gruff sounding voice, closely mimicking that of Edward G. Robinson. Hank Azaria gradually found him slipping into a more high-pitched, whiny sounding voice.
    • Harry Shearer gave Mr. Burns a pretty gruff and menacing voice in the first season, which combined with his humorless demeanor, made him into something of a Knight of Cerebus. He softened it up over the years, and Burns in turn, while still corrupt and evil, became a lot goofier as well.
    • Yeardley Smith's Lisa voice is noticably a lot less high-pitched than it was in the earlier seasons.
  • Shimmer and Shine: Leah's voice became deeper and more adolescent as the series progressed, because her voice actress, Alina Foley, aged during production. Notice in the first season she sounds like a little girl who's between 6-8 years old; in the later seasons, especially the third, she now sounds at least thirteen.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants:
    • While Tom Kenny has always been the voice of SpongeBob, starting in the movie, Kenny has made him ridiculously more high-pitched and effeminate, adding to that ever-present "SpongeBob is gay" notion.
    • Patrick and Squidward's voices have also changed over the years, though not as noticeably as SpongeBob's. Patrick's voice is more oafish sounding and Squidward's voice is more resonant and less nasal.
    • Patrick's original German voice actor Marco Kroeger started out very breathy, but eventually settled.
    • Plankton's voice changed from a gruff, low voice to a higher pitched one, akin to his Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain persona.
    • Karen's voice is deeper and more monotonous now than in her early appearences.
    • Pearl's voice has gotten raspier over the series.
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender:
    • Aang has a voice actor who started off around the same age as him (twelve), and the recordings were mostly done in a linear order. This meant that as the episodes continued, his voice deepened and broke naturally with Zack Tyler Eisen's. Listening to anything from the first season to anything from the third season — especially "Day of Black Sun" onward — will really throw this into light. Because of the production lull, by the end of the series they actually had to start pitching Zack's voice up a little.
      • The same happened to his German voice actor. Started off as a child, and it ends with him entering puberty.
    • Zuko has a distinct lisp during the first season, which made him an odd mixture of sinister and somewhat childish. The lisp goes away with time, and by the third season Zuko had developed a more confident, almost parental voice. (Particularly effective when giving rousing speeches.) Of course, this was probably a deliberate creative decision than just evolution, as his voice actor was already an adult when he started. He's also a rare exception of a high-school age character in a western cartoon who gets less whiny-sounding over time.
  • Kim Possible:
    • Many a cartoon that takes place in a High School setting feature boys whose voices become whinier as time goes on... when it should be the exact opposite. Ron Stoppable is a prime example of this.
    • Come season four, Kim herself has become quite nasal and her pacing at times feels intensely rushed.
    • Drakken is a similar example, and there's a major difference in his voice later in, mostly getting higher.
  • As are Danny, Tucker and Dash in Danny Phantom. Danny is the least apparent simply because his 42-year-old voice actor David Kaufman barely sounded like a 14-year-old boy to begin with. Granted, Butch Hartman did hold auditions for actual 14-year-olds, but didn't find any to sound "heroic" enough. Alas, Reality Is Unrealistic.
    • Vlad has this, too. Watching his first appearance in Bitter Reunions is always a bit strange. His voice is more nasal, and has an American accent. Later on, Mull hits his stride with Vlad's voice, no more nasality and he even adds in a slight British accent.
  • Futurama has a few examples of this;
    • Over time, Billy West's voice for Fry became closer to his natural voice. He once said that he initially modeled Fry's voice after his own when he was around twenty-five. As Billy got closer in age to Fry in-universe, his voice naturally became more accurate.
    • Professor Farnsworth's voice has gotten deeper and less nasal from the early episodes. It was initially intended to be very similar to Fry's voice, as a nod to the two being distant relatives, but was quickly changed after the producers realized that viewers with impaired eyesight wouldn't be able to tell whether Fry or the Professor was meant to be speaking.
    • Leela's voice has gotten slightly higher pitched since "The Beast with a Billion Backs". In the earlier episodes, Leela sounded more like a pitched-down version of Peg Bundy (which is actually Katey Sagal's voice in real life and how Peg sounded on the first season of Married... with Children back when Peg actually cooked and did housework, even though she was bad at both).
    • While John DiMaggio's Bender voice remained pretty consistent throughout the series during its original run, in the feature length films (made four years after the end of the series), Bender's voice is somewhat less raspy; it's probably closer to the voice he used to play Elzar (or Bender from the very early episodes of series one - it sounds a bit gruffer in series two).
    • After the first season, Hermes' voice became much higher and less nasally, while still retaining the Jamaican accent.
  • Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends both have Mac and Bloo's voices change during the course of the show:
    • About halfway through the first season, Bloo's voice gets more high-pitched and whiny, probably to better reflect the changes in personality he went through at that time. He has been getting progressively screechier ever since.
    • On the other hand, Mac's voice became a bit deeper towards the end of the first season and goes even lower during season three due to his voice actor going through puberty. Works good enough.
  • DC Animated Universe:
    • Kevin Conroy's voice for Batman is much different now than it was when he first started. In spite of Conroy being famous for creating a stern, effective and iconic Batman voice without resorting to Guttural Growling, his initial Batman voice was deeper and had a bit of a growl to it. Starting around the time of The New Batman Adventures, his voice became higher and lost most of the growl, with Conroy later confirming that he changed the voice due to the strain it put on his vocal chords. Unfortunately, he also stopped bothering to differentiate between Batman and Bruce Wayne's voice. (On the commentary track for Batman: Gotham Knight, Conroy stated that he was requested to do so at the producers' behest.) Bruce originally had a lighter and more playful tone than Batman's dark and foreboding tone. Conroy made the differentiation for at least one episode of Justice League ("Maid of Honor") where Bruce Wayne had to make a public appearance. Other than that, Conroy's stance is that Bruce Wayne is the act, and his performance reflects that.
    • Also, Mark Hamill's version of The Joker? If you watch Batman: The Animated Series (higher pitched and wasn't very consistent, changing pitch and accent occasionally) then Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker (much smoother and more sinister) and then play Batman: Arkham Asylum (gravelly and older sounding) it is completely different especially with the laugh.
    • Loren Lester spoke with a lower voice when portraying Dick Grayson as Nightwing.
  • South Park: Keeping in mind that the vast majority of the voices are Trey Parker and Matt Stone, with the pitch increased in Pro Tools for the four main characters, the individual voices have still shown considerable evolution:
    • Cartman's voice has gotten lower and less raspy over the years. He was often nearly incomprehensible in the early seasons, but now his dialogue is quite clear.
    • Stan and Kyle's voices have also become lower in pitch since the first couple of seasons. Stan kind of sounded like Gohan as a kid until about season 3.
    • After taking over for Mary Kay Bergman following her death, Eliza Schneider gradually evolved her initially near identical take on Wendy, similarly making her deeper and less shrill sounding. By the time Schneider left and was herself replaced by April Stewart, the child-like tone in Wendy's voice was completely gone. April Stewart would later state that Parker and Stone encouraged her to make Wendy sound more "mature", and that they decided to use less pitch-shifting for the character. A notable difference between Bergman and the later actresses is that while Bergman was able to naturally produce the high-pitched childish voice, Schneider and Stewart had to have their voices digitally tweaked.
    • Clyde originally started out with a higher voice, almost like Butters' (although still voiced by Trey Parker). His voice would gradually deepen as he became used more.
    • The cast as a whole has also gained a much more impressive vocal range than before, better for conveying neuroses or hammy moments from the characters, compared to the earliest episodes, which had a much stiffer, almost Peanuts-esque lack of enthusiasm.
  • The voices in Ed, Edd n Eddy have changed over the years:
    • Ed's voice sounds goofier and less like a frat boy, Edd's voice used to sound quiet, less emotional, and raspy, Jimmy's voice was slightly incoherent throughout season 1 and early season 2, and Rolf's voice used to have a thicker accent.
      • Ed's voice is noticably higher and more raspy in the earlier seasons, and is more restrained compared to the later No Indoor Voice.
    • The most interesting case was Nazz, who had 3 different voice actresses throughout the course of the series. It's similar to the Wendy example above, except that Nazz's original voice actress is still alive.
    • It is notable that Jimmy was voiced by an actual young boy whom surprisingly was not replaced after he had gone through puberty, the change in his voice in most noticeable in the Holiday specials.
  • The Venture Bros.:
    • At the beginning, the Monarch used to sound a lot more subdued compared to the loud shrill he has now. Not really a bad thing as the shrill is a lot funnier.
    • Dr. Girlfriend's voice was made slightly more feminine after the first season, making it a little more believable as a woman's voice.
    • In Jonas Jr.'s first appearance, he sounded like a raspier version of Rusty. In his later appearances, he sounded much more like his father, Jonas Sr.
  • Looney Tunes:
    • Some of Mel Blanc's voices had very different tones before settling in their more familiar ones;
    • A few evolved into being softer and more like his normal speaking voice as the years wore on, though the fact that at least three of them (Daffy, Tweety, and Speedy) were originally pitch-shifted probably didn't help. In Daffy's Quackbusters it's very noticeable, especially if they played a clip from an episode then switched back to the main story his Daffy and Porky Pig noticeably sounded older and less high-pitched. This was perhaps most noticeable with Yosemite Sam, who by the 1970s, basically sounded like Mr. Spacely from The Jetsons, who Mel Blanc also voiced.
      • One of the most striking cases is the early short "Elmer's Pet Rabbit," which was recorded earlier but released after Bugs' official first appearance. Bugs Bunny doesn't have a hint of his trademark Brooklyn voice and instead speaks in a very loud, baritone voice. Were it not for the fact that Blanc was known for several different voices, you'd almost think they'd originally cast a completely different actor.
      • Blanc's voice for Marvin Martian started out sounding like a bad Droopy Dog impression before evolving into the deep squeaky voice he's known for.
    • Jeff Bergman's voice for Bugs Bunny has noticeably changed since the 90's to the point that it sounds almost nothing like Mel Blanc's Bugs.
  • Nearly everyone in the cast of Daria did this to some extent over the years:
    • The most noticeable is Jane Lane's Wendy Hoopes who originally gave the character a sly, high pitched tone which would eventually evolve into a deep, round tone by season five.
    • Jake, Kevin and Brittany were also much lower pitched earlier on, and Mr. DeMartino was a lot quieter. And of special notice is that Daria's voice became more monotone as the series went on. Overall, it's pretty fair to say that almost everyone's voice is unrecognizable as their later incarnations in the first season or so.
  • Jim Cummings' performance as Darkwing Duck is noticeably lower-pitched and less hyper in earlier episodes.
  • Winnie-the-Pooh:
    • Tigger:
      • Jim Cummings' voice has gotten more breathy, almost like an old man, from The Tigger Movie onward.
      • His original actor Paul Winchell also evolved throughout his three decade run, his lisp worsening, his baritone fading and becoming much more high pitched and raspy as he aged. This was the alleged reason Disney retired Winchell from the role completely by The Tigger Movie, believing Winchell's voice had worn so much he sounded less like his original Tigger than his stand-in Cummings did.
    • Peter Cullen's interpretation of Eeyore evolved into a near perfect replica of Ralph Wrights' rendition (originally being somewhat breathier and higher pitched).
    • John Fiedler's Piglet voice became raspy and breathy as he aged.
    • Ken Sansom's Rabbit voice was noticeably gruffer in the early episodes of New Adventures, before getting a bit higher and effeminate sounding.
  • Most of the main cast on Animaniacs:
    • Wakko (Jess Harnell) more closely resembled Ringo Starr earlier on before going higher-pitched.
    • Yakko (Rob Paulsen) originally had more of a "tough guy" tone to him.
    • Dot (Tress MacNeille) started to lose her cute squeak and started to sound more like Tress's natural voice toward the end of the run.
    • Also, in the earliest Pinky and the Brain shorts, Pinky's voice (also Rob Paulsen) was a little deeper and had more of a speech impediment, while The Brain (Maurice LaMarche) sounded more like Orson Welles.
    • Skippy Squirrel's voice deepened over time, due to his voice actor (Nathan Ruegger, the then-preteen son of writer/producer/director Tom Ruegger) hitting puberty in the later seasons. A couple episodes near the end of the run have him pitch-shifted.
  • George Lowe began voicing Space Ghost very straight, much like the superhero Space Ghost was supposed to be. As time went on and the show became more surreal and anarchic, he gradually loosened up until he was essentially voicing Space Ghost with his natural speaking voice, although he would drift back towards the archetypal hero-voice if the script called for it. Zorak changed too, keeping the gravelly insectoid rasp but losing the stiff robotic inflection.
  • Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog has examples featuring both Scratch and Grounder;
    • If you watch some of the earliest episodes, you'll notice that they talk quite differently from their later performances— Scratch is voiced with a New York-influenced accent, whereas Grounder has a lower, stupider voice. These attributes disappeared over the course of the series. (Grounder still sounded dumb, but less so.)
    • An odd case in the German dub: Gerald Paradies and Oliver Feld had already adopted voices for the henchbots right from the get-go, but during the flashback in the first episode, Feld's voice for Scratch was really his own (up to the line "Mein zwillingsbruder? Bin ich so haesslisch?!"); then when he first interacts with Grounder, Feld switches back to the previous voice. Also, Paradies' Grounder also got slightly higher over the episodes.
  • In the pilot episode of Sonic Sat Am Princess Sally's voice sounded more younger and shrill. For the rest of the series, Kath Soucie used her natural speaking voice, albeit with occasional slight fluctuations between lower and higher pitched.
  • Roger Craig Smith's performance as Sonic in Sonic Boom is a noticably lower and more natural pitch than his voice for the games incarnation.
  • Tiny Toon Adventures:
    • Danny Cooksey's voice for Montana Max was noticeably higher in earlier episodes. Not surprisingly, he was the most prominent child voice actor on the staff.
    • Also, Charlie Adler's voice for Buster is a tiny bit higher in some of the earlier episodes. This is especially noticeable in "Cinemaniacs", one of the first episodes to be recorded; he sounds pitch-shifted.
  • Phineas and Ferb:
    • Phineas got a little lower after the pilot. Compare how he sounds in the title sequence to how he sounds on the show proper. Once again, this is the result of the voice actor aging, as Vincent Martella was 14 when he first started voicing Phineas. If you're comparing later eps to early eps, the age is the main reason. If you're comparing the present voice to the title sequence, though, remember that Phineas lightened up after the first few eps. The way he sounds in the title sequence is more in line with that earlier characterization.
    • In addition, Ferb's voice has gotten lower, Isabella's and Baljeet's became higher pitched, and Buford's is less gruff than it was in the early episodes.
  • Chowder:
    • In another case of child voice actor equalling changed voice, Nicky Jones started voicing the title character when he was 11. Come the third season, he sounds noticeably older.
    • Panini, too, for that matter. In fact, her voice actress started voicing the character at age 13.
    • Mung Daal, in the Pilot, had a high pitched, cracking voice, much like a stereotypical elderly man. As the series goes on, his voice deepens and has traces of some kind of accent. Truffles' voice also gets progressively lower and grumpier, which is ironic since her high-pitched shrieking is flanderized in-show at one point.
  • The Fairly OddParents!:
    • Cosmo's voice was always provided by Daran Norris; though his voice went from deep and intelligent sounding to extremely high-pitched and whiny. It may sound like Norris was replaced, but he wasn't.
    • Timmy's voice was a little lower in season one than in the rest of the show.
    • Jorgen's voice was more of a threatening monotone in his first few appearances, but eventually got more higher, expressive and gruffer.
  • Ralphie and Carlos on The Magic School Bus have much deeper voices by the third season since their voice actors were going through puberty during the run. But Tim's voice (since season 2) got higher as the show progressed.
  • Time has been very good to Peter Cullen in his Optimus Prime roles between The Transformers (1986) and the Transformers live-action film series.
    • This is also apparent in the G1 show itself. Slag of the Dinobots is probably the most notable example; his voice was very gruff and low, but starting in the movie, Slag started to lose some of his lower quality. Even Neil Ross, his voice actor, is unsure of how Slag got so off track, since the voice director would usually give play a sample of what the character sounded like if they got off track. Skywarp is another example; his voice seemed to fluctuate in every episode he appeared on. Mixmaster's first line in Heavy Metal War is very different-sounding from his later lines, being lower and less crazy.
    • When Frank Welker returned to being Megatron in Transformers: Prime and the video games based on the movie series, his voice had become much quieter and more sinister rather than "screechy". It was very deliberate on Welker's part: the G1 version, higher, screechier, and even a little ill-sounding, was always pushing his voice so Welker couldn't emote properly with it. By pulling it back in, Megatron isn't permanently shouting—it has more impact when he does shout, and the rest of the time he can be in, as Welker himself put it, "more of an acting place". While recognizable enough that you don't say "why'd they bother getting him back if the voice is totally different?" they fit the more formidable Megs of this decade.
      • His performance as Megatron in Transformers Prime is also much lower in pitch than his performance as the Generation One Megatron, including the latter's appearance in Transformers Devastation.
    • Similarly Corey Burton's take on Shockwave (confirmed to be an imitation of David Warner) evolved slightly between interpretations. In G1, he is hammier and bordering on No Indoor Voice. When he reprised the role in Animated he sounds more soft spoken, the allusions to it's inspiration more evident.
    • Starscream's Hungarian voice from the same show changed drastically from the beginning of the series to season 2. At first, he sounded like a somewhat younger and less raspy version of the original (the same as Hungarian Beavis). Now, he talks in a near-constant high-pitched, shrill tone, making him sound exactly like his voice actor's performance as Gollum from The Lord of the Rings.
    • Grimlock in Transformers: Robots in Disguise. For the first few episodes, Khary Payton's voice for him was indistiguishable from his Cyborg voice. As the series progressed, though, it became alot more gruff, similar to Gregg Berger's portrayal from G1 and Fall of Cybertron.
  • A few examples in Metalocalypse;
    • In a Music/Animation crossover, compare the singing on Dethklok's The Deth Album to that on Deth Album II. Brendon Small has gotten more versatile with Nathan's singing voice - it's still 98 percent death grunt, but there are moments of flexibitly.
    • Additionally, Toki's voice appears to have gotten higher and squeakier as the series has gone on.
  • Arthur:
    • Muffy has been voiced by the same actress since day one, unlike most of the kids, but her voice has gotten higher throughout the seasons.
    • Binky's voice was a bit deeper in the early episodes.
    • Luke Reid, the first voice actor to portray Brain, got really deep before they replaced him. As did Michael Yarmush, the first Arthur.
    • Molly's voice was higher in the early appearances as well.
  • King of the Hill:
    • Hank Hill originally spoke like Tom Anderson, later developing a less gruff voice.
    • Peggy Hill originally spoke in a more reserved tone, before developing a more excited way of speaking as her ego got out-of-control.
    • Dale Gribble's voice also got higher as he became more of a goof. His Texas accent also disappeared in favor of an almost Yankee sounding one.
    • Also Bobby's voice has become more higher pitched in later years.
    • Bill's voice in the first season was lower and gruffer before developing into a higher dopier voice in the second.
    • Luanne had a lower huskier voice before developing into the ditzy Valley Girl voice.
    • Breckin Meyer's voice for Joseph originally had the exact same tones and inflections as Brittany Murphy's voice for Joseph did (essentially sounding like a deeper version of Murphy, which of course was the intention), but as the series progressed, Meyer's Joseph developed a harsher, almost angry sounding tone, probably to show how his voice continued to evolve post-puberty.
    • Kahn's voice was slightly lower in the early episodes.
    • Connie's voice is softer and slightly accented early on as well.
  • KaBlam!:
    • Many characters had their voices go lower as the series went on. The Off-Beats, Loopy, Larry, and most recognizable are Henry and June. This was due to them all being played by actual kids at the time. Unlike most examples of shows with kid voice actors, both Henry (Noah Segan) and Larry's (unknown) voice actors were kept even after their voices broke.
    • The Flesh in Action League Now! sounded more heroic in the earlier shorts (though note that a few of them aired Out of Order), including the ones that aired when the short was still on All That
    • Bob's voice was lower in the first few Prometheus and Bob shorts.
  • Rugrats:
    • Tommy's voice sounded a little higher and rougher in earlier episodes than what he would sound like later on.
    • When Joe Alaskey first took over the voice of Grandpa Lou after the death of David Doyle, he was very high-pitched, like Daffy Duck on crack. Over the next few years he lowered the pitch to the point where it was a passable imitation.
    • For the first couple episodes David Doyle's Grandpa Lou's voice was gruffer and raspier.
    • Angelica's voice was always Cheryl Chase's own voice tweaked a little bit, but in Seasons 1-6, it was more noticable that it was Cheryl's own speaking voice. In the Kimi era, her voice gets slightly higher. However in the Tales from the Crib DVD movies, her voice noticably reverts back to Cheryl's and sounds noticably more like Cheryl than she did in the show's entire run.
  • ChalkZone:
    • Rudy's voice was a lot higher in the first two shorts on Oh Yeah! Cartoons (sounding similar to Tommy Pickles, who E.G. Daily was also playing at the time, but slightly lower). When he was aged up from eight to ten in the second season of Oh Yeah! Cartoons (following a request from Nickelodeon to age him up for when the short became a TV show), his voice lowered a bit, but was still higher than his voice in the show itself.
    • Snap's Brooklyn accent got thicker as the show went on; some earlier episodes (especially the original shorts) have a few cases of Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping regarding it.
    • Penny originally had a lisp in some of her earlier appearances in the Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts, but Hynden Walch dropped it in season one.
  • Total Drama has noticable examples of this;
    • While this is very subtle, both Noah and Cody have deeper voices in the second-season special and the third season than they did in the first season. They've also grown noticeably taller.
    • In the first few episodes Owen sounded like a buff jock character and in Phobia Factor from here on his tone sounds a lot goofier.
    • Just about everyone's voices became higher to some extent.
  • All the preteen characters in Jacob Two-Two suffer from this to some extent or another, but none moreso than Buford. In his first appearance, he sounds younger than ten-year-old Jacob, but this doesn't last long. By the end of the fifth season, his voice has aged so much that the producers pitch it up to make it sound younger, particularly noticable in the episode "Jacob Two-Two and the Too Big Tomatoes."
    • Just the oposite applies to resident janitor Leo Louse's mother, whose voice is provided by the same actor as Leo himself. In her first episode, her voice was pitched up to make it sound more feminine. However, in all subsequent appearances, the processing is left out and the actor applies a high-pitched old woman sound to his own performance.
  • Bob the Builder:
    • Lofty has several examples of this:
      • For the American dub, Lofty was performed by a female voice actor during the original series. The feminine quality in his voice is more noticeable in earlier episodes such as "Wendy's Busy Day" and "Muck Gets Stuck", although it gradually becomes more masculine in later seasons. (Despite this, he remained a male character in both US and UK dubs.) Starting with the "Project: Build It" era, the character (unlike the rest of the machines) gets a second voice actress (Emma Tate) and starts to sound more childlike. When the series switched to CGI for the third era (Ready, Steady, Build!), Lofty completely loses the feminine quality in his voice, and, while still sounding younger, now sounds more raspy.
      • In the UK, Lofty (played by Neil Morrissey) sounds more like a high-pitched adult compared to the American dub. (However, his voice is a bit deeper the earliest episodes of the first season, noticeably in "Muck Gets Stuck".)
      • Compared to all this information, Lofty's voice is actually more deeper in the Spanish (both Latin American and especially European), Catalan, Cantonese, and Welsh dubs.
    • Like Lofty, Bob has received several voice actors in the American dub. While Neil Morrissey voices him (and Lofty) in the UK dub, Bob's American voice has been provided by William Dufris, Greg Proops, and Marc Silk.
    • In the American dub, most of the characters, aside from Lofty and Bob, receive voice changes starting with the second half of the "Project: Build It" era and then again for the CGI era.
    • Also for the US dub, Spud was originally voiced by Alan Marriott during the original era, but starting with "Project: Build It", his UK voice, provided by Rob Rackstraw (which is a bit deeper, compared to his original American voice) remains unchanged. (In earlier episodes, his UK voice sounded more nasally.)
  • VeggieTales:
    • Some of the characters have come to sound more like each other, most notably Archibald, the tall Scallion, and the "Silly Songs with Larry" narrator. This is eventually lampshaded, when Larry says he always thought Archibald was said narrator (even though they were clearly separate characters from their first appearance).
    • When comparing Larry's voice in earlier episodes to those in his more recent appearances (take "The Water Buffalo Song" versus "Sport Utility Vehicles") he has a much higher-pitched voice and sounds far less dopey than he originally did.
  • Beavis And Butthead:
    • Butthead's voice became slightly higher (but still much lower than Beavis' voice) and gained a distinctive lisping accent as the show progressed. The lisp became especially obvious in the movie ("Hey, Beavisth! Thisth sucksth!").
    • In between the end of the show, and when Mike Judge would start breaking them out for special appearances, Beavis' voice has gotten noticeably lower.
    • Before she got her own spin-off, Daria's voice was higher and more expressive in her earlier appearances on Beavis and Butt-head. As the show went on, she started sounding closer to how she does in her own show.
  • In Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Meatwad's voice became lower after a season or two, compared to his squeakier original voice.
  • Scooby-Doo:
    • Don Messick's voice for Scooby was originally more high-pitched and less raspy before transitioning to the voice everyone's more familiar with today.
    • Frank Welker's performance of Fred Jones became more goofy and comical since the late 90s. And occasionally developed a Minnesotan accent. As of Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!, Welker's Fred voice has returned to a style reminiscent of his early portrayal of Fred.
    • While on the subject of Frank Welker, his version of Scooby in recent years has almost completely lost his speech impediment and speaks both clearly and more frequently.
    • Casey Kasem's Shaggy became slower and rougher as he aged.
    • Kasem's successor, Matthew Lillard, sounds less like Kasem now than he did when he portrayed Shaggy in the live action films being higher-pitched and more goofy since playing Shaggy in animated form.
  • Teen Titans:
    • Beast Boy had a deeper voice the first season, most likely the lowest of the Titans. His voice became more high pitched, likely to accentuate his goofy personality and because he is the youngest Titan.
    • In contract to her low and deadpan voice, Raven had a high-pitched voice in the first season. Interestingly enough, most if not all of Tara Strong's other roles on the show are in a completely opposite tone, opting instead for a chipper, Starfire-esque voice. Kitten and Kole are two such roles appearing in the same show. Raven's voice in Teen Titans Go! sounds noticeably less deadpan than she did in the original series. It's unknown how much is due to how different the character is and how much is due to the fact Go came out almost ten years after the original.
  • Code Lyoko has several drastic examples, and these are just from people who kept the same voice actor:
    • First, and most unfortunately, is Jeremie, voiced by an adult woman, Sharon Mann. He began with a very high voice at the beginning of Season 1, which gradually deepened over the course of the season and stayed deep through the next. Then, in Season 3, it switched abruptly back to a higher tone, sounding just a twitch deeper and more nasally than early Season 1, which he keeps for the rest of the series.
    • Aelita's voice is lower and matronly near the beginning of the series, but after she leaves the supercomputer, her voice slowly becomes higher-pitched and girlish. Thankfully, she and Jeremie never start sounding like each other.
    • Odd's voice begins somewhat lower and calmer, perhaps trying to emulate the sound of his previous voice actor, but gradually gets higher and screechier until it crystallizes into his iconic tone.
    • Several background characters without many lines early in the series, such as Herb and Mr. Ishiyama (who sound like William in their first appearances) and Mr. Delmas (who is far more nasal in "Teddygozilla"), have voices that sound nothing like those established later on.
    • William's voice gets lower and less shouty during Season 4. This may have been to reflect Clone William's difference in personality, but it's kept for William after he returns.
  • Andy Berman's voice for Dib on Invader Zim tends to go back and forth. Sometimes he has a higher, faster-paced voice as he did on the debut episode; other times, his voice is lower and rougher, and he talks more slowly. The latter voice makes him sound more like a teenager.
  • Adventure Time:
    • Because Finn's voice actor is an adolescent, his voice is already beginning to become noticeably deeper and crackier. As such, they justified this in-universe by having Finn turn 13 in the middle of season two.
    • Jake is also notable. In early episodes, he sounded a lot more like Bender (only not as much of a drunken jerk). In later episodes, Jake still sounds like Bender, only a bit more wackier and more nuanced.
    • Ice King's voice has gotten a bit less raspy and a bit more high-pitched over the years, possibly to reflect him being less of a jerk and more of a pitiful person.
    • After Too Young, and in some parts of You Made Me and beyond, Lemongrab starts to sound a tiny bit effeminate, and sometimes has a very slight British accent for some reason. He sounds a little more eloquent in his later episodes.
    • Cinnamon Bun goes through this in his very first episode.
  • In SilverHawks, main villain Mon*Star originally had a very deep voice, but as the episodes wore on, it got higher and higher, until voice actor Earl Hammond was using the same screechy voice for Mon*Star as he was for Vultureman on sister show Thunder Cats. It was particularly jarring during his Transformation Sequence, since it still used the original voice and was never re-recorded.
  • Pretty much all of the voices for Regular Show have become more upbeat since the characters' first appearances in early short films made by the show's creator, J.G. Quintel.
    • Sam Marin (who voices Pops, Benson, and Muscle Man) is noticeably calmer as Pops in the pre-Regular Show short The Naive Man from Lolliland, and as Benson in 2 in the AM PM. The latter also has Quintel using a much quieter tone for Mordecai (although it's still Quintel's natural speaking voice).
    • Quintel, Marin, and William Salyers (Rigby) all kept their noticeably quieter deliveries on the Regular Show pilot, which also had Mark Hamill using a more clipped and gruff delivery for Skips. By the time the show made it to series, everyone's delivery suddenly became a lot more energetic, and Skips' voice became a bit more natural.
  • In the early pilot of what would later become The Problem Solverz, Alfe started out with a normal voice that was only slightly low. In Neon Knome he became a very low Guttural Growler which was lightened up in the The Problem Solverz to reflect his more impetuous personality. Roba's voice was also lower in the first pilot, and since then it's gotten higher with a robotic filter added on. Horace has a different voice actor for the series as well.
  • Doug:
    • The title character's voice (in the Nickelodeon series, played by Billy West) was much more high pitched and nasal in the pilot, "Doug Can't Dance". Around season four, Doug's voice noticably gets lower and closer to Fry's voice. Then Doug crossed over to ABC and West was replaced by Thomas McHugh after wanting nothing to do with the new version of Doug – McHugh's Doug voice is even lower and less nasal than West's was by the end of the Nickelodeon series.
    • Patti is a little softer and Skeeter is a little more nasal in the first season.
    • Connie and Patti both sound lower in the Disney episodes.
  • Hey Arnold! has all the kids voiced by real kids that matched the age of the kids on the show. Some got replaced when their voice changed (most noticably Arnold, who had five voice actors) but a lot of them also remained, even a huge number of the boys:
    • Gerald's voice changed quite early on, but since they couldn't find a new actor to replace the original, they used it as a plot point and thus he didn't have to be replaced.
    • Helga's voice became much more mature sounding.
    • Phoebe's voice actually became higher as the series progressed. Likely because her voice actress was getting older and had to put more force into her voice to sound like a 9-year-old.
    • Other characters like Harold and Stinky just went through their voice change without any explanation to the viewers.
  • Jimmy's voice for The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius TV series is quite a bit lower and deeper than it was in the movie, probably meant to signify that he had gotten older since the events of the movie. Sheen's voice also changed after the movie.
  • In the Internet cartoon of Making Fiends, Charlotte sounded like an actual little girl, and Vendetta had a high, shrill voice with a thicker accent. In the TV cartoon, they have the same voice actors. Charlotte's voice is still high and cheery, but she sounds more like a kindergarten teacher than an 8- to 10-year-old girl, and Vendetta's voice is lower, more guttural and overall less pleasant to the ear (though it never was pleasant). Marvin's voice is actually higher, and more nasal, unlike in the web cartoon where he had a nearly Simpleton Voice. Malachi's voice went from archaic and mature, to whiny and comical.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic have many instances of their characters pitches change throughout the show:
    • Rarity has seen her vocal quirks (pitch shifting and Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping) becoming more and more prominent as the series has gone on. Pinkie Pie on the other hand has exhibited vastly increased range. Previously limited to her usual excited squeak, she increasingly slips into a much lower, more mature voice when voicing more dramatic scenes. Sweetie Belle has also changed noticeably, losing her slur and becoming much less childish, sounding more and more like the actress who portrays her.
    • Applejack started off with a higher pitched voice similar to Rainbow Dash. Ashleigh Ball, who voices both characters, intentionally lowered Applejack's voice later in the series to differentiate the two and make it easier when Talking to Herself.
    • Fluttershy, mimicking her personality, started off extremely quiet and awkwardly pronouncing and tended to murmur and whisper everything. In later episodes (starting about halfway through the first season), she has a slightly more confident and perkier tone, likely due to Character Development.
    • Sweetie Belle's voice in the Polish dub of Season 2 is a bit more mature when compared with her performance in Season 1. This is due to voice actress hitting puberty.
    • The same thing happened with Sweetie's English VA as well. Compare her voice in Season 4 to her voice in Season 1. Her days as "Squeaky Belle" are all but over. A lot of fans think the deeper voice is unusual since Sweetie looks exactly the same, though it's a debatable if the CMC need new voice actresses.
    • Apple Bloom's voice became lower and developed a Southern Accent starting in Season 2. After the CMC have acquired their cutie marks Apple Bloom’s first line in the subsequent song is really low and rough, prompting jokes about instant puberty. Oddly enough the rest of the song is delivered as normal.
    • Princess Luna's voice has also changed between seasons, even after you take into account the hamminess from "Luna Eclipsed".
    • Diamond Tiara's voice became lower in "Ponyville Confidential", though it went back to the original pitch later.
    • Sunset Shimmer’s singing voice lowers with every song, from “Grumpy Twilight Sparkle” in ‘Welcome To The Show’, a much fuller deeper sound in ‘My Past is Not Today’ and ending in what could almost past for a male singing voice in ‘Acadeca’. This is clearly an attempt to distinguish it from Twilight’s singing voice, as the actress provides both.
      • The evolution continues. In "Embrace the Magic", Sunset's apparently gone country.
    • Since the beginning of season six, the voices of some characters are noticeably higher-pitched. In particular, Twilight Sparkle sounds younger than she ever has before, despite growing up both figuratively and literally since the show started.
    • Scootaloo's voice has also noticeably matured in Seasons 5 and 6.
    • Starlight Glimmer's voice underwent a noticeable change after the end of Sesson 5's Heel–Face Turn, becoming younger and more energetic sounding to note her Character Development. The difference was so pronounced that some people were surprised to learn that it was Kelly Sheridan doing Starlight's voice both Pre and Post-Heel Face Turn.
  • The Smurfs: Paul Winchell's Gargamel sounded more like Dick Dastardly early on but started to show some wear as the series went on. Even his Dick Dastardly on Yogi's Treasure Hunt (1985-88) started sounding like late Gargamel.
  • Regina King, the voice of Huey and Riley from The Boondocks, had managed to give both characters more distinctive voices over the three seasons.
  • A more unique case for Thomas the Tank Engine. Michael Angelis originally narrated the show in a faster, more excited tone. As seasons progressed his storytelling style became slower and more mellow sounding. His voices for some of the engines also changed. This is even more noticable due to stories from earlier seasons he has renarrated for audiobooks and other projects later on.
    • For the later CGI episodes, Rupert Degas' voice for Flynn became rather higher and younger sounding within the course of only four appearances.
    • Ben Small's voice for Thomas himself has gradually become more nasal and helium pitched in the UK dub. Meanwhile Keith Wickham emphasized a cockney accent more for James, and less for Percy (likely to differentiate them more).
  • All the kids on Martha Speaks, save Carolina, have definitely changed over the years. Some of them stayed on until they were re-cast due to their voices changing.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball has two examples of vocal evolution brought on by puberty. Logan Grove (Gumball) and Kwesi Boakye (Darwin) were both around 13 when they began voicing their respective characters. Both of them have gotten noticeably deeper in Season 2, especially Logan, whose delivery also got calmer. Interestingly, their voices cracked even in the first episodes, so change was pretty much inevitable. They were eventually recast in Season 3, and the season's lead episode even made the voice changes a plot point.
    • In the first season, the voices of several recurring characters (such as Bobert, Alan, Clayton, and Leslie) constantly changed between episodes. This can be attributed to the actors trying to find a voice that worked. By the second season, their voices remained consistent.
  • Hamilton Camp's performance as Gizmoduck sounds very different in DuckTales compared to his later guest appearances in Darkwing Duck. It's a lot less booming, and a lot sillier sounding, sounding similar to when Fenton's superhero voice broke character when he got excited on the former show.
  • Superjail!:
    • Superjail started with Jared sounding less shrill and with a slight lisp. Alice still had a deep voice, but spoke in a more subdued tone. Their voices would gradually evolve over the course of the first season to their current styles.
    • The Twins had slightly higher voices in the pilot, with the normally higher-pitched one sounding more on the nasal side. The higher-pitched Twin tends to have more vocal variation throughout the series, sometimes sounding only slightly softer than the other to having a much squeakier tone.
    • Gary's perverted cellmate initially had a somewhat nasal voice, but it evolved to become higher and more childish to emphasize his creepy nature.
    • Jean started out with a bit of a Southern accent and a raspier voice, while Paul's vocal delivery was less flamboyant in his early appearances.
  • In early episodes of Garfield and Friends, Wade only managed to talk-sing during musical numbers. Later episodes have him actually singing.
  • The Dreamstone:
    • In the early points, Leonard Whiting originally voiced Urpgor in a much more tranquil, gravelly murmur, much expectant from a usual Igor-type. Throughout the first season, he gradually becomes louder, hammier and more flamboyant sounding.
    • Stuart Lock's voice for Rufus also became squeaker pitched and less soft spoken. In contrast Amberley became slightly deeper sounding as Nancy Hendry reached adulthood.
    • John Franklin Robbins's voice for the Dream Maker was also more gruff and relaxed. By the second season he has a more dignified and hammy pronunciation.
  • The Ren & Stimpy Show:
    • On Ren & Stimpy "Adult Party Cartoon", John Kricfalusi couldn't figure out how to make Ren's voice sound like it did on The Ren & Stimpy Show. As a result, he just did it without pitch-shifting, thus creating a lower, more gruff voice than before.
    • Incidentally, Billy West's first recording of Ren's voice (for a "Goodbye" bumper) was pitched up, and it sounded very odd. By his first full episode as Ren, it was determined that he could reach the desired pitch naturally. From there, the voice gradually evolved away from Kricfalusi's interpretation, with the accent becoming less pronounced over time.
    • West's voice for Stimpy also started out lower and more deadpan, like an exact Larry Fine impression, eventually becoming higher and more excitable sounding.
  • Steven Universe:
    • By season 1A (the exact same time the show rise in quality) Steven's voice had notably deepened, getting closer to Zach Callison's natural voice. Season 3 seems to have reverted it as Steven's voice is higher pitched sounding in episodes like "Steven Floats" than it originally was. His voice evolved again after the Time Skip; Callison stopped pitching his voice up and just started using his natural voice, reflecting Steven’s own In-Universe aging.
    • Early in the show, Pearl's voice was notably higher in pitch. It deepens as the series goes on, especially as she goes through Character Development. Comparing her voice in "Steven the Sword Figher" to "A Single Pale Rose" will show a clear difference.
    • All the voice actors in the Steven Universe Pilot are the same as in the final series. Pearl and especially Steven use different voices though. Pearl has a deeper tone and when she says "Woah, what are you crazy?" to Amethyst her voice is a completely different tone than normally. Steven is extremely different, having both a deeper and a more nasal tone. Even in the intro compared to the pilot itself this happened. Steven's voice is very raspy when he says "And Steven!"
    • In Blue Diamond’s first few appearances, Lisa Hannigan is obviously trying to hide her Irish accent and uses an American one. In later episodes she drops this and more or less just uses her natural speaking voice.
  • George Jetson on The Jetsons sounded very different in the 1985 revival from the 1960s run, despite being voiced by the same actor George O'Hanlon. This was due to O'Hanlon having suffered a stroke.
    • During production of Jetsons: The Movie , he and Mel Blanc (Mr. Spacely) both died during production, with Jeff Bergman doing the remaining dialogue, sounding almost exactly like them. Besides shorts and commercials, the first prominent time he voiced them afterwards was in The Jetsons And WWE Robo Wrestle Mania , where he voiced George with a higher register and Mr. Spacely with a less gruff voice.
  • Mickey Mouse: It's speculated by many that one of the reasons that Walt Disney stopped voicing Mickey Mouse was because he was having more and more trouble doing the falsetto voice. Disney was a chain-smoker for most of his life; this coupled with age will have an affect on any voice. This is especially apparent during the last times he provided the voice for Mickey, which was the animated intros to The Mickey Mouse Club. Mickey's voice sounds much deeper and at times, raspy.
    • Similar example with Mickey's 3rd actor, Wayne Allwine. For a while, his Mickey voice sounded high pitched, and had a squeak in to it, similar to earlier actors' portrayals. However, before he died in 2009, his Mickey voice somehow lost its squeak, and sounded slightly lower. When former Hallmark illustrator Bret Iwan took over, Mickey did get his high pitched-voice back, but lost the squeak almost entirely.
  • In the newer episodes of Max and Ruby, some of the characters got recasted with new voice actors when the Series got Uncanceled:
    • The most notable example would be Ruby sounding more older than her previous voice.
    • In the first three episodes Ruby sounded more high pitched and more young. In the later episodes, she was given a less high pitch voice and sounding more of a caring person with a playful tone. Every since the show returned in 2009, Ruby now sounds more mature with a more Deadpan feel to it. She was also given a deeper chuckling type laugh compared to her previous cute giggles in the older episodes.
    • Due to Max being voiced by an actual child, a new voice actor was hired. As a result, Max sounds a little older compared to his voice in older episodes. Most noticeable during the episodes where Max can be heard reading the title for an episode. Max also made more noises such as grunting while mostly silent in the earlier episodes.
    • Martha used to have a cute high pitch voice in early episodes, she now sounds older and not as hyperactive.
    • Roger is a strange case, he used to sound like an actual teenager but now sounds younger than his age.
    • Louise retained the same voice actress since the series began. As a result, while her voice sounds the same it also sounds a little more natural compared to how she sounded in the older episodes.
  • In the direct to video Tom and Jerry movies the duo are often menaced by three Siamese cats named Tin, Pan, and Alley. When they first appeared in Tom and Jerry Meet Sherlock Holmes, Pan (the one with the goggles and droopy ears) originally spoke in a heavy English accent sounding very similar to one of his voice actor Jess Harnell's more famous role, Wakko Warner from Animaniacs. From his second appearance onwards in Robin Hood and His Merry Mouse he starts talking like Raymond Babbitt from Rain Man.
  • During his brief appearance as Alfred in Young Justice, Jeff Bennett sounds like an older English version of Owen Bennett from Gargoyles. When he reprised the role for Batman: Year One, his Alfred sounded similar to Brooklyn from Gargoyles, only with an English accent.
  • In The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy:
    • Billy had less of a Simpleton Voice in the earlier episodes (particularly when the show was still bundled with Evil Con Carne). He started sounding dumber as time went on, which is appropriate because he legitimately was getting dumber.
    • Irwin initially sounded very congested and had a bit of a lisp. The lisp went away pretty quickly, and his congestion started fading away significantly. The end result was a very unique sound that fans of the show could easily recognize.
    • Eris originally talked like a Valley Girl, but immediately after her first appearance, she switched to a British accent. This did not go unmentioned In-Universe.
  • The Real Ghostbusters: In a few of the very early episodes — "Knock, Knock" in particular — Maurice LaMarche sounded a bit more like Harold Ramis when voicing Egon, but after a while he settled in to the "Egon voice" heard throughout the series. The slight Ramis impression later returned for Extreme Ghostbusters to denote an older Egon.
    • In the very early episodes of Real, such as Mrs Roger's Neighbourhood, Egon's voice is noticably much lower than it would be in a few episodes time, such as When Halloween Was Forever.
  • Samurai Jack: Jack's voice initially sounded like a watered down, slightly accented version of the voice Phil Lamarr would use for John Stewart in Justice League. As Season 1 progressed, his voice became softer and his accent more pronounced, and Lamarr became more flexible with the character for episodes such as "Jack vs. Mad Jack" or "Aku's Fairy Tales" (which show Jack acting wildly out of character due to his temper/Aku's twisted storytelling respectively).
    • Additionally, Mako Iwamatsu originally voiced Aku with a somewhat monotone, chilling, overall sinister tone, rarely raising his voice at all. As the series progressed, Aku became more comedic and displayed a broader range of emotion, frequently losing his temper, with his normal speaking voice rarely going below a shout.
  • The Flintstones: One of the most famous examples: Mel Blanc had a car accident and fell into a coma, and so for a while Barney was voiced by The Other Darrin (namely Daws Butler), who imitated the voice Mel had given him. But when Mel recovered and voiced Barney again, he gave him a new voice, one that was deeper and perhaps more dopey. Nobody told him the voice was different, and it stuck; this new voice is almost certainly the one you're picturing now. Said voice was, incidentally, much closer to that of Barney's inspiration, Ed Norton from The Honeymooners, which Blanc had refused to imitate at first.
  • Ready Jet Go!:
    • In season 2, Sean's voice gets deeper and raspier, likely due to puberty. Which results in everything that comes out of his mouth becoming Narm.
    • Also in season 2, Sydney and Mitchell both got new voice actors. Sydney's new voice is younger than her previous one, while Mitchell's sounds more whinier.
  • In Dragon Tales, Max's voice sounds slightly deeper in season 3 due to his voice actor hitting puberty between seasons 2 and 3.
  • Mike, Lu & Og: Lu's voice was little more breathier in the pilot compared to the series proper.
  • In Phantom Investigators, Andrew Decker used his natural voice for Casey in the first half of the series. By "Haunted Dreams", his voice started to get higher pitched and a bit squeakier.
    • In the first episode, Navarro's voice sounded almost identical to the voice Richard Cansino used for Kenshin but with a slight Latino accent. His voice became a bit lower and his accent became more prominent as the show went on.
  • Yogi Bear: In the original shorts, Don Messick's voice for Boo Boo sounded like he was congested or had a cold. Starting with Hey There, It's Yogi Bear!, this aspect vanished, allowing more expression in the voice.

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report