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Clearly this isn't your run-of-the-mill zombie game.
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Death Road to Canada is a self described "road trip simulator"; a Roguelike with RPG Elements, and an The Oregon Trail hybrid mixed together with zombies, dogs, jerks, and otakus. It was developed by Rocketcat Games, who received funding on Kickstarter on September 27th, 2013, and initially released the game on PC through Steam on July 22nd, 2016. It was then ported to iOS devices on March 22nd, 2017, and then to Playstation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch on May 8th, 2018.

Long story short, the zombie apocalypse has broken out in the United States. Don't bother asking any who, what, where, or why questions, because it suddenly happened. Since nobody wants to be a walking corpse with a taste for human flesh, it's up to you and/or someone else to leave the lovely, yet infected state of Florida and fight your way up to the home of maple syrup, mounted police, socialized health care, and poutine. The idea of a road trip sounds better than anything else right now...

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The main goal is to get a group of survivors to travel across the East Coast in order to enter Canada (which has not struggled with the undead, strangely enough). During the journey, the player and up to 3 NPC allies must fight against zombies and loot different areas in order to survive the trip. Along the way, the group will encounter unique characters and events, depending on how the Random Number God feels.

Despite the subject matter, Death Road to Canada has a lighthearted tone; gore is featured in a "cutesy" style and the Steam store page itself describes it as the "most family friendly zombie apocalypse game on the market!". It doesn't take long to see that the game doesn't take itself seriously, you'll meet a lot of people, face moral dilemmas, like who should take blame for a fart, or should you share a fun sized candy bar or eat it alone. And lastly, have the opportunity to tell other people to COOL IT.

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This video game provides examples of:

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    Tropes #-D 
  • 1-Up: The unlockable Phoenix trait gives a full (explosive) revive.
  • 11th-Hour Superpower: Downplayed. Upon reaching the final stretch, characters with high enough morale will gain a point in dexterity (running speed) for the rest of the run.
  • 3/4 View: The main camera perspective of the game.
  • A-Team Firing: Characters with poor shooting will have a real hard time hitting anything from a distance with guns. With automatic weapons this gets even worse as they have pretty nasty recoils and can make the character aim anywhere but at the zombie horde's direction if you try to fire wildly.
  • Abandoned Area: Well, it's a zombie survival game after all. Each place can be looted to help your gang survive the trip.
    • Abandoned Hospital: Both the Hospital and Clinics apply. They tend to have a few medical supplies and some scalpels and canes.
    • Abandoned Warehouse: The factory. Full of industrial tools that can be used as weapons.
    • Ghost City: The usual template for maps. Some maps have a few houses to explore in addition to the main event described in the location's description.
    • Haunted House: The anniversary update gives you two types of haunted houses as rare locations: Dark and Haunted. Dark has no ghosts, but is bigger than city maps and always has a nifty weapon or item hidden in it. The Haunted one is a harder version that in addition of a (usually) powerful item like in the Dark Mansion, also has ghosts that offer various stat increases, but at the cost of morale and/or health, the Haunted Mansion has respawning zombies too, however.
  • Ability Required to Proceed: You can't reach the Canadian border without a car. If it breaks down or you run out of gas, your characters walk around in search of a new ride with a worse batch of random events than usual. Fortunately you no longer need a car after the driving days to Canada hit zero.
  • Action Survivor: You can create characters that start off as this or make them grow to be one. You can also meet people along the way that are this too (beware of liars, though).
  • After Action Patchup: May happen in-between driving events. The more skilled a character is in Medical the less resources they use and more people they can heal per healing event. Characters with maxed Medical can even improvise without med kits available.
  • After the End: The game takes place in a world where Canada is the last remaining nation on Earth and your job is to get there with or without the characters you start with.
  • A.K.A.-47: The guns have very basic names, such as ”Pistol” and ”Shotgun”. The basic revolver, however, is called the ”Dolt .45”, most likely based on the Colt .45 Peacemaker, judging from its name. There's an assault rifle actually named ”AK-47”, but it bears no resemblance whatsoever to the real weapon. A powerful handgun is also called the ”Ded-9”, named after the Intratec TEC-9.
  • The Alleged Car: Heavier vehicles have crappy mileage and poor speed, making them this.
  • Ambidextrous Sprite: The eyepatch tends to flip-flop whenever your character turns. Which is strange, because there are sprites for both eyes individually.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Unvisited rooms/houses during ABL events will have a small colored sparkle flashing often so you don't waste time entering places you already went in.
    • You can more or less see zombies if you inch yourself close to doors, this is very useful to prevent yourself from being ambushed by a large number of zombies lumbering outside.
    • Normally quitting during a mission will cause the whole save to be deleted. However if the game somehow suddenly shuts down this won't happen.
    • The "Kinda Pushy" road event has a random character forcefully enter your party. This could potentially ruin runs where the player is intentionally trying to go with a single character, however in this case the game will still give you the option to refuse recruiting them. Similarly, if you have a full party, you can reject them instead of being forced to remove an existing party member.
      • Ditto with the Clown who you normally can't stop from joining the party; he won't join if you've been doing a solo run up until that point.
    • No random events that automatically causes damage will ever be of "lethal" damage type (ones that can actually kill characters), even Walking events, so you don't have to worry about someone just suddenly dying.
    • Rescued characters will always leave all of their equipment with you if you don't recruit them. Handy if they get a hold of something you might've wanted. However, the same cannot be said for any food, gas or med kits their AI may loot by accident...
    • If someone is resting, you don't have to worry about leaving them behind, even if you acquire a new car that they couldn't logically have been resting in. Also, resting survivors can still train and make deals at trading posts.
    • Before the final two sieges of the game (some of the hardest ones in the game) you'll always find a party member in the last Trader Camp that has either good Fitness, Strength or Shooting. This can be a helping hand if you need someone to fill a vacant slot and fight the zombies.
    • After the last night, there is no use for food, so if the party has excess, they will eat extra or even double as a last opportunity to gain morale before it is checked against the 11th-Hour Superpower event.
    • The final siege, City of Crushed Hopes, will never be at night, so you don't have to worry about wasting a precious equipment slot with a dinky flashlight.
  • Anti-Hoarding: Downplayed. Bandit events and NPCs will discourage the player from hoarding food (and sometimes even ammo) as you can lose anything ranging from 1/4, 1/3 to everything depending on your party's size and the difficulty you're playing at. However you can prevent losses if you're prepared to face the consequences of said text events; either with a character that can handle it or enduring the health and/or morale damage.
  • Anti-Rage Quitting: If the player quits during a mission, the whole save file will be deleted.
  • Annoying Arrows: Mostly averted with Bow and Arrows, they can pierce a number of zombies if you take a little bit of time to charge it.
  • Anyone Can Die: Comes with the roguelike package.
  • The Apunkalypse: Some characters will express their disappointment over how this trope failed to happen. That doesn't stop the player from being able to make custom characters that sport mohawks and leather.
  • Are We There Yet?: Characters will sometimes ask this during driving segments. Sometimes another character can answer back (angrily) with a typical "NO, STOP ASKING".
  • Arrange Mode: There are game modes that make rare or familiar (player-created) characters show up more often, lower or raise the number of driving days to Canada, make the game Endless, start the game with rare characters of your choosing, and so on.
  • Artificial Stupidity: Your AI-controlled buddies can show shades of this from time to time.
    • It's not uncommon to see characters get stuck behind furniture during a mission. A book shelf that's right in front of a door can cause a buddy to run into it and block him/herself from leaving, although they will try to smash through it with their weapons if necessary.
    • If an NPC becomes tired from using a melee weapon for too long and has a firearm, he/she will resort to using it. This wouldn't be a problem if the AI knew how to conserve ammo. Your buddy will shoot at any zombie that is in the way until his/her stamina recovers. Luckily, there are commands in the pause menu that allow you to tweak this.
    • Averted with explosives. Previously, he/she might have ended up using it in desperation, while the other members of the group might not even notice that a molotov/grenade was thrown except you. Thankfully, since then, the AI will no longer use any throwable weapons.
    • Party members under AI control who only have one item slot can't decide whether to hold onto a melee weapon or a gun. They'll constantly switch between the two, dropping whatever they had previously. Such characters holding guns will constantly fire unless they pick up a melee weapon for some reason or another.
    • An update now allows the player to change how NPCs in the group fight zombies and what tactics can be used against them. The problems still remain, but at least they can now be altered on the fly depending on the mission.
    • The AI has particularly unusual preferences when it comes to melee weapons. They often grab lighter melee weapons even if they have enough strength to reliably wield more powerful heavy weapons such as swords.
    • The AI can't use special moves such as the dog's bark, El Satan's zombie-grabbing, or DSYP's fart attack.
    • Don't try to cross narrow paths unless you're ready to see your AI taking a completely different path often going all around the obstacle even if it means going through a thick horde of zombies (which more often than not can get them munched on or dead).
  • Autosave: The game features this. After every text event the game autosaves.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Fire. Great for taking out a large group of zombies, but since your buddies are often fighting them up close, don't be shocked when one of them gets caught in the blaze.
    • The weapons that the anime salesperson sells to you qualify. Despite delivering decent damage, Otaku katanas break quickly, and shurikens don't return to you, forcing you to go pick them up.
    • Explosives. Clear a nice-sized chunk of a horde... And probably blow yourself up in the process. They can be lifesavers, but often that valuable slot is better taken with a gun or strong melee weapon.
    • Automatic weapons like the Assault Rifle, Uzi and the Minigun. More Dakka that can clean through a horde like nothing else, but burn through the entire stockpile of ammo in moments.
    • The Double Barrel Shotgun is pretty damn powerful since it fires two shells instead of one. But in a game where ammo is best used sparsely, and can be difficult to acquire depending on how finicky the RNG is feeling, this becomes a problem on the long run.
    • The Flamethrower and Chainsaw. Amazing horde-clearers... But they use super-valuable gas to work. The flamethrower has a good chance of self-damage, and the chainsaw has a high chance of stalling unless the user has high Strength. In most cases, they simply aren't worth the trouble. Averted once you hit Canada. With no car, you don't need to worry about gas, and the chainsaw can make the final siege and bridge run a LOT easier.
    • Heavier melee weapons can devastate multiple zombies in few hits, but it takes a lot of strength and fitness to use them effectively. Lacking these two traits means that you'll be tired out from swinging a lot.
    • Bow and Arrows. It's silent and can kill several lined up zombies. However it also has several problems: you must aim it manually, the bow is taxing on your Fitness (it doesn't use Shooting like most ranged weapons) and without the proper perk for it there's no way to replenish ammo for it.
    • The Jason Expy uses a Sturdy Machete and a Chainsaw as his signature weapons, and starts out with high Strength and Fitness. The big downside is that he'll randomly kill off a party member, and if you run out of party members to sacrifice, he leaves on his own accord. Hope you aren't too attached to your gang of survivors!
  • "Awesome McCool" Name: You can give your custom characters one. Or not.
    • If you are lucky enough to find the rare city building Department of Motor Vehicles, you can use the driver's license machine change a character's name to Cool [Name]. This gives them +3 morale and says they feel "way past cool" with their new name.
  • Ax-Crazy: You can stumble upon traders who only sell axes while wearing a creepy mask. You can make custom characters who are this, giving them a white porcelain mask and appropriate Fighter perk that grants them a red hatchet to start.Mason most certainly is this, as he'll happily kill off your other party members to restore his own morale, or for no reason at all.
  • Badass Boast: Most characters that you meet will do this in order to join your group. Unless one of your members has the Paranoid trait, or is high in the stat that the new person claims to be good at, there's no way to tell if the boasts are true or not.
  • Baleful Polymorph: The "telegraphic vortex" random event will alter your party's characters in a small variety of ways, provided you choose to interact with it. Any character that attempts to fight it, specifically, will be turned into a dog. This can also be done from experimental machines located in labs.
  • Bare-Fisted Monk:
    • Characters with the Martial Artist perk becomes this. They have real good unarmed attacks (Kung Fu) and can kick plenty of undead ass. If you find the rare character Bryce Lu he will teach anyone Kung Fu, regardless of perk, if said character already knows Kung Fu it will then become Kill Fu. The problem is that Martial Artists will absolutely not use firearms and gas powered weapons (chainsaw, weed whacker, leaf blower or flamethrower).
    • Big Bruiser characters will get a "Boxing" unarmed attack. Not as good as Kung Fu, but still hurts considerably more than an untrained punch.
  • Batter Up!: Not only do you have a wooden bat that can break, but there's also an invulnerable aluminum version and even a cricket bat that's remarkably sturdy.
  • Beating A Dead Player: If a party member is killed by zombies during an event such as a scavenging mission or a siege, the zombies will chew on their corpse for a while unless distracted. This means fewer zombies are attacking the remaining survivors.
  • Being Evil Sucks: It's incredibly risky to run a team with low loyalty and focus on robbing other people. The latter can end in many injuries and the party will be more than eager to screw each other over and abandon them in certain situations.
  • Being Good Sucks: The whole shtick of "Civilized" trait. They are decent folk among bandits and other morally questionable people during their trip to Canada, but their Morale can never truly go above neutral (max of 3 instead of 6).
    • This is especially true for low Loyalty characters, doing good actions (especially not robbing people) will actually reduce their Morale.
  • Bears Are Bad News: A particularly nasty event when camping without a car involves a bear attacking the party. Unless you think you can fight it, you'll have to choose what supplies you want to save.
  • Berserk Button: The "Cool it" and "Say it, don't spray it!" options from Irritating characters will always piss off people and have severe consequences for the offending party. Unless you've used it 3 times before, in this case it will be the complete opposite. People will love it and will give some big rewards to your party.
  • Beware the Living: Bandits and even your own buddies can enforce this trope, with harsh looting demands and all.
  • Black Blood: Played straight with zombies. Humans, on the other hand, bleed red blood.
  • Body Horror: The Anime Girl gets bigger eyes the longer she is in your party until she explodes violently. The last version of her character model before the explosion just looks... Wrong. The transformation can be stopped if she meets someone with a pure love for anime.
  • Bottomless Fuel Tanks: Subverted. Gasoline is needed to drive vehicles or power certain weapons such as a chainsaw. Using all of the gas forces the group to abandon the car and walk until they stumble upon another car.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Played straight. Although guns display bullet ejecting there's no actual reload animation or time.
  • Boring Yet Practical:
    • There are certain weapons that never break upon use. A few of these, such as the Tire Iron, Wrench, Hatchet, small Hammers (claw and ballpoint), and Rebar don't deal as much damage as other weapons, but they're a godsend for a long-term means of defense.
    • The unassuming Meat Cleaver is one of the few light weapons that are guaranteed to hit more than one zombie per strike, it's also fairly common and has a very small chance to breaknote . The fact it's so light means even characters with piss poor Strength and Fitness are able to use it effectively as well.
    • A cane turns out to be more damaging and stable than a wooden bat. Cane Fu is in full effect here.
    • The basic firearms of each class, Pistol, Cowboy Rifle, and Shotgun, are the basic bread-and-butter weapons that can be found commonly and be reliably used in a pinch even with a low shooting stat.
    • The Tactical Spear that can be bought from a semi-common vendor in Trader Camps. It's far from being the flashiest weapon out there, but the fact it's usually affordable costing 9 Food, consumes less stamina per attack and can hit more than one zombie makes it a solid choice even for characters with poor Strength and Fitness.
    • The Practical trait is this by definition: great boosts to stats, but a personality as dry as a bone, with no quirks or abnormal (well, no more than normal anyway) behaviors.
    • Martial Artist characters can't use firearms, and start with an unarmed attack that is better than most of the melee weapons you'll ever find.
  • Borrowin' Samedi: The rare character Samedi- she wears a top hat, suit and a white mask, summons skeletons to fight for her, and can revive herself with a skeletal body (twice).
  • Breakable Weapons: Some melee weapons can break from too much use. Annoyingly, so can firearms, if you run out of ammo and have to resort to Pistol-Whipping.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Familiar characters will occasionally say things upon being recruited or killed that suggests they know this isn't their first run, or necessarily their last. This includes leans such as saying they're glad to be back on the road, and outright breaks like hoping for better luck next time in their dying throws.
  • Break Out the Museum Piece: Almost literally. Museums are rare locations that have neat things like Katanas (including an unbreakable one), Axes (Hatchets and Medieval ones), food displays (lots and lots)... and a freakin' Minigun. Everything in pristine condition and ready to be used to do some serious zombie killing.
  • Burn the Undead: Molotovs and even blow torches can be used to do this. There are even deadlier weapons such as the Flamethrower and the Firelunk Sword that can reduce crowds of zombies to a crisp.
  • Butt-Monkey: Due to the quirk Anime Fan hasnote  players will often throw them at events that cause morale drops, so this usually involves a lot of bad stuff happening to them during the trip to Canada.
  • Bystander Syndrome: Averted hard if you decide to rob Medical Attention doctor in Trader Camps, people from the camp will come to help her and will rough up your party.
  • Canada, Eh?: Your destination, which milks the trope for all its worth if/when you get there.
  • Car Fu: Can occur whenever a mission starts and ends if zombies don't move out of the way. Some random events that occur while driving have this trope as an option. Works best with big, heavy cars like SUVs, but trying it in a Hybrid is a quick ticket to a long walk.
  • Catchphrase: Characters with both low wits and attitude can say "COOL IT" during random encounters.
  • Cats Are Mean: Once the zombie apocalypse broke out, it seems like every cat became feral and turned into this; dogs come in friendly and feral varieties, but cats are only ever bad news. Even after the Halloween update allowed you to recruit them the moment they want to leave your team they just decide to fatally maul someone for good measure.
  • Chainsaw Good: While they need fuel to be used, chainsaws can help the player get out of a horde of zombies, which makes this a straight trope. And fuel is a non-issue once you hit Canada. There is a more fuel-friendly (and weaker) version of the Chainsaw, the Weed Whacker, the game itself describes it as "slightly wimpy son to the chainsaw".
  • Changing Gameplay Priorities: Due to the nature of this game your priorities in status boosting will change wildly depending what perk and traits you start with, or your gameplay style in general. Having enough food will let you get riskier locations with better weapons, which in trade (usually) has little edible things.
  • Character Customization: Death Road to Canada allows up to 80 custom made characters. Each one can have their own unique trait and perk, and even if you don't take them with you up front, they have a small chance of showing up in any given playthrough. Familiar Characters mode has all the appearing characters be nothing but these, save the random rescue missions.
  • Celebrity Survivor: One random quip about a survivor states that he/she might be one.
  • Combatant Cooldown System: Melee weapons' cooldown time are defined by your Strength and Fitness, having only one isn't enough for long term combat as you'll either swing the weapon slowly or not recover the used up stamina quickly enough to fight large number of zombies.
  • The Computer Shall Taunt You: One NPC in particular can tell the player to "git gud" complete with a smug face emoticon.
  • Combat Medic: The Surgeon perk adds points to Medical and Shooting, great to grow a gun-toting healer.
  • Console Cameo: The GameBronus Entertainment™. A thinly-veiled parody of the Game Boy.
  • Cool Car:
    • Muscle cars can be found. They are one of the fastest cars in the game, and a random blurb about a character can state that he/she wants to use one to get to Canada.
    • The Hybrid car is extremely gas-efficient, which makes it this as well.
    • The Car Nut perk increases the chances of that character beginning the game with one.
    • The UFO car found in a rare location never uses up any gas. Better make the most out of it!
  • Crapsaccharine World: The zombie apocalypse has begun, humans are forced to trade food as currency, bandits run amok, feral cats and alligators have spread out across the east coast, but it's all presented through cute retro-sprites!
  • Crazy Cat Lady: The Cat Lady rare character. She has a hefty recruitment price at trader posts, but she does come with a reliable cat escort that doesn't take up party member space. Fittingly, her wits are low, but surprisingly, her attitude stat is high.
  • Crazy Survivalist: Downplayed with the Hermit rarely found in Always Be Looting events. He's justifiably pissed that you attracted zombies to his hut, but won't hurt you and will even reward you if you help him survive the siege. He can also be swayed to join your party if someone has the Charming trait.
  • Crippling Overspecialization:
    • Most (though not all) characters created in the custom characters menu tend to favor one or two, sometimes three stats which are at maximum or otherwise above average. Every other stat will moreso be either good, decent, or in most cases, bad or abysmal. Explanation 
    • Certain rare characters may also be god-like in one or two stats, but cannot change their fighting strategy. The biggest example would be The Last Bodybuilder, who can lift anything with sheer strength, but must rely solely on thrown objects to fight; he cannot use weapons the normal way.
  • Critical Existence Failure: Every zombie in the game explodes into a pile of guts and gibs upon death. This can also happen to you or any of your buddies if killed and eaten by the undead. As well as the car, which will explode if it happens to run out of Chassis points during a mission.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Some of the random events cause this. One in particular involves a bee entering the group's car. The wrong choice can cause a character with one hit point left to die from having the bee enter his/her mouth!
  • Crutch Character:
    • A BERSERK! Big Bruiser. The gist of it is that the BERSERK! supplies a mountain of boosts note  at the cost of being garbage at personality checks and having 1 HP, meaning they're unreasonably flimsy. Big Bruiser gives a boost to Strength on top of that supplied by BERSERK!, Boxing (Better unarmed attack than normal, but worse than Kung Fu) and, the important part, 1 extra HP at the cost of a barely noticeable amount of movement speed. The HP supplied by Big Bruiser allows them to make it through fighting bandits and minor screw ups in Normal difficulties, but the problem arises with the fact that bandits are capable of dealing two points of damage in Hard modes, meaning that a BBB is drastically more at risk of death, and thereby unreliable in those modes. However... 
    • Martial Artists are able to massacre armies of zombies with just their bare mitts; they can deal a lot of damage without needing a weapon, and they start with higher strength and stamina making it even easier to do so, but they can't use guns and they do as much damage with melee weapons as anyone else. They can carry the team when supplies are low but once everyone is fully stocked with high-end weapons and plenty of ammo, they can start to look like liabilities.
    • Certain rare characters have traits that are highly beneficial in the early game, but lose their significance when other survivors bulk up. One example would be El Satan, who can pick up and toss zombies without losing much energy, but can't use guns or chainsaws.
  • The Cynic: Characters that have the Paranoid trait enforce this trope. They wear on everyone else's nerves, but sometimes they may turn out to be right and save the group some headache.
  • Cut-and-Paste Environments: Even though each run is procedurally generated, the houses and city blocks always have a basic layout, as do many of the miscellaneous building types; expect to see the same apartment, convenience store, and Yall-Mart layout pretty frequently. Some rare locations re-use the templates of their basic counterparts but add their traditional flair (ie the Haunted Mansion is just the Dark Mansion with ghosts that can be interacted with as well as respawning zombies).
  • Death Cry Echo: In worded form at least. Sometimes a character goes "shriek" or something like that if they become zombie chow.
  • Determinator: If you survive the sieges caused by extreme low morale (aptly named Despair Event) "Fatal Argument" or "Haze of Despair" your party will also receive a massive Morale boost.
  • Demonic Possession: One of your characters could end up being possessed by Hekatrius, who simply wants a slice of pizza. If you don't sacrifice a party member, said character gets devil horns, a pitchfork, and a morale penalty.
  • Despair Event Horizon: Your group can cross it if their morale goes down. Once this happens, group members can snap and leave you high and dry, demand (sometimes violently) that other members leave, or worse, steal some of your loot on the way out. An entire group that has crossed it will thoughtlessly wander into large zombo hordes, at which point the players are presented with an instant Game Over button they can press if they've crossed the horizon themselves.
  • Devoured by the Horde: The most common way to die in the game. If any character's stamina decreases, he/she will have more trouble breaking out of a group of zombies, leading to this. Zombies will continue to eat at the corpse until only a skeleton remains.
  • Diabolus ex Machina: If you do badly in several events/missions in a row, it can certainly feel like the RNG is bringing out this trope out in full force.
  • Dialog During Gameplay: While you are travelling with your car, characters will often say things, bicker between themselves, agree on something among other things. Rare characters sometimes have unique lines of dialogue while fighting zombies.
  • Difficult, but Awesome:
    • Fire damage and explosive weapons. In the hands of a rookie they're as dangerous to your own party as they are to the zombies, in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing these are some of the most effective ways to annihilate ranks and ranks of the zombie hordes.
    • BERSERK! trait is this. New players will struggle to keep them alive as any sort of reckless risk can get them killed since they have miserable 1 HP, but the massive combat stat boost they get makes them one of the best characters to solve nearly any text event regarding Strength, Shooting and Fitness if you train it only a bit or combine with perks like Athlete or Fighter. Besides they can go one point over the usual cap on these stats as well making them excellent candidates for high end melee weapons like the Claymore or the MegaKnight Blade.
  • Die, Chair! Die!: Breaking furniture can leave behind a piece of wood that can be used as a weapon. Especially useful when one NPC accidentally breaks a melee weapon or runs out of ammo. Of course, throwing furniture is more effective.
  • Digital Avatar: You can make one as custom character. Due to the random nature of personalities that aren't predefined by traits your avatar can be either a loyal companion or a complete jerk.
  • Disc-One Nuke: Due to the randomized nature of the game, it's possible to find more powerful weapons in the earlier stages of the game. Certain rare characters found on your travels can also constitute as this.
  • Disaster Dominoes:
    • A small bad event can cause one character's morale dip into zero (orange bitter face). Characters with low morale can cause huge problems ranging from dropping even further the morale of the party, which can cause even more trouble like forcing you to choose between kicking out a party member, facing an extremely difficult siege, to a party member stealing everything from you (car, food, meds and weapons).
    • A small fire you used to torch a zombie can cause another one to set on fire which can be useful to thin out some of the horde, but if the zombies are close to your party they can set a member on fire as well and then another party member... You get the idea.
  • Do Not Drop Your Weapon: Thankfully bleeding inducing bites will not make your character drop weapons, only death will. Sometimes not even that.
  • Double Tap: Zombies that are down will get back up after some time unless you do this.
  • Draw Aggro: Dogs can bark which will cause zombies to go for them, sometimes forgetting about other teammates. But since your party will always be close by this can backfire real bad.
  • Drunk on Milk: In bars you can find people who passed out from drinking too much soda. Diabetic coma?
  • Dumb Muscle: BERSERK! characters embodies this having the lowest personality status possible in favor or massive combat boosts. A prime example is that this is the only perk that can make a character kill themselves by punching them on their face because of a lost sneeze.
  • Dump Stat:
    • Chassis toughness for cars. This only affects how tough the car is against the zombies when scavenging; cars get hurt equally whenever their chassis takes a hit through text-events, essentially rendering this stat worthless. Tragically, a lot of cars take the "tough chassis but bad gas mileage and slow speed" approach.
    • It may be wise to have only one character that focuses on Mechanical and Medical talents, as only one person is usually needed to heal people and repair things. Raising these two stats on your fighters would be a waste of resources.
    • Certain characters who cannot use certain weapons or fighting methods may not want to bother raising the stat outside their expertise, such as shooting with El Satan, who can't use guns.
    • Downplayed with Composure. While there are situations where high Composure would be helpful, there are an equally numerous amounts where low Composure would also be beneficial. Aside from certain combinations (such as bypassing a blockade with high Wit but low Composure, or fending off an attack with high Strength and low Composure), having low Composure makes it easier to determine if a character also has low Loyalty, as robbing traders and other Bandit actions requires both low Composure and Loyalty.
  • Dynamic Entry: A mission usually begins with the group's car driving through a street before stopping abruptly. Up to Eleven if you reach the Canada Border with a functioning car, you drive it at top speed and launch it against a thick horde making the car explode in the process.
    • Zombies do this constantly during high-difficulty sieges inside buildings, dropping down from the ceiling or erupting from the ground periodically. They're still active during this, and can take a bite out of a party member on the way down if you don't keep moving.
    • The Mecha Mountie does this in a rather spectacular fashion in the final area of the game.
    Tropes E-H 
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: After all this game isn't called "Vacation Trip to Canada", reaching it won't be easy. You WILL fight through thick and thin to get to your destination.
  • Easy Level Trick: Running into side rooms during sieges may sometimes (key word being sometimes) make the ordeal of surviving them a little more manageable since the main bulk of the horde won't gun immediately to your party and you can bottleneck them with a little more ease and control. This may work wonders in some sieges and even the dreaded final siege, City of Crushed Hopes, as long as you don't have to walk too close to the horde and draw their attention.
  • Early Game Hell: Until you get a hold of a good weapon, or gain status boosts, or find teammates that have both you can bet zombies will be either headaches or nightmarish threats.
  • Elaborate Equals Effective: Simpler weapons like Kitchen Knives and Wooden Bats are as plain and bland as you can imagine, but weapons like the Cold Steel Greatsword or the MegaKnight Blade looks very cool. Similarly basic firearms like Pistols and Shotguns look bland compared to their "upgrades", the Magnum or the Autoshotgun.
  • Eldritch Location: The Lost Woods variety. When G*** says he hates Mondays, he MEANS it. Don't make him upset.
  • Emergency Weapon: Pieces of Wood and Femurs are extremely common since you'll break plenty of furniture and meet lots of skeletons (dead ones, not walking ones). They are also equally flimsy and have a very high chance of breaking, but it's still better than having your characters just punching zombos in the face (without the benefit of Kung Fu or Boxing).
  • Every Car Is a Pinto: Zigzagged. Text events that destroy the car (usually not exploding either) sometimes won't hurt your party, but getting a car roughed up by zombies too much, or having one in real bad shape and driving to escape the horde, will make them explode and deal huge damage to everyone in it. Additionally, if you reach the Canada Border with a functioning car your party will throw the car at full speed on the first horde and make it explode.
  • Escort Mission:
    • Comes in two flavors: the "get this person out of the map alive" and "protect this person until the siege is over". Rare locations can have you saving more than one character in order to get the (usually much better) reward. Thankfully the AI works as usual and will actually act as an additional party member helping you fight the zombos, provided they get a hold of a weapon.
    • The K*E*P*A game mode makes a whole run into one long Escort Mission, in which you must keep Kepa (the leader of the dev team) alive to earn an achievement. His personality stats are all bottomed out, he starts with the worthless cardboard tube as a weapon, and has a max vitality of 1 meaning that any fatal hit will kill him.
  • The Everyman: Any character with the Practical trait fits this trope to a T; superb stats, rock-boring personality with no quirks whatsoever. This trait was also previously called Everyman.
  • Everything's Deader with Zombies: And they become dead-er in the more difficult modes where they become more numerous.
  • Evil Feels Good: Characters with really low Loyalty will not feel bad about stealing traders, helpless or innocent people among other things that would normally cause a Morale drop with characters with higher Loyalty.
  • Excuse Plot: Zombie apocalypse happened and it's better to go to Canada now. Get to it.
    • Even better, the opening text for a new run implies that you're going to Canada because Florida got boring.
  • Failed a Spot Check: If the party has very low morale, they might be too busy arguing to notice a zombie horde until they're right in the thick of it. This siege gives the player the option of giving up instead of attempting the siege.
  • Fake Difficulty:
    • Mainly when there are too many options for the game to care to display. You may find a case where you can't leave a talk with a trader without doing anything note , or when you find a character that you want to recruit but already have a full party, and the one character you wanted to kick out is the one the game won't let you because it doesn't want to display five options at once. It's also not fair that if a character is under attack you can't take control of them to manually break them out of whatever situation they've gotten stuck in.
    • And of course, there's the whole nature with the RNG. The same location may provide plenty of weapons, or scarcely any supplies at all.
  • Famous Last Words: A dying character will say a random line from a long list. A few choice quotes:
    "Wait, that one didn't count!"
    "Oh well! Better luck next time."
    "Well I'll be a monkey's uncle. I'm dead!"
  • Faux Horrific: Some rather mundane things can cause a big drop in morale, including vending machines that won't take your money, terrible video games, and losing a sneeze.
    • One event, 'TRUE DESPAIR' has you decide who, if anyone, will open a government ration box with dog poop on the handle. If not done by someone with a high attitude stat or the "Friend to Dog" perk, or a dog, or by using a stick, it can cause a permanent drop in morale!
      WARNING: THIS IS REALLY GROSS
      THERE IS DOG POO ON THE CRATE
      (flashing) THIS COULD BE A BIG DEAL
  • Fission Mailed: If the only surviving member of your party is a dog, the game will start off saying that your journey is at an end. However, the dog will get a flash of inspiration and teach itself to drive the car, thus continuing the game.
  • Fortune Teller: The Wiz can appear in trading posts. Ask him for his services, and you can get your fortune told, in which case everyone's morale will take a hit but a random party member's maximum health will increase, get a tarot reading for a party member which reveals their personality stats, or hire the man himself. He always assumes everyone else will die a horrible death.
  • Friendly Fireproof: Thankfully played straight — largely. You can't hit other party members with your guns or melee weapons, but you can hurt them with explosives or fire if you (or they) are careless.
    • Averted hard in the "Abandoned Gun Range" text event. Choosing just simply "Train Group Haphazardly" can have your own group accidentally shoot their own party members possibly killing someone.
  • Game Gourmet: You'll find cans, packs and boxes of food everywhere and characters can comment how they like or how gross they are. Several events around food exist as well, including lethally delicious hot wings and gross healthy food.
  • Gender Bender: A possible result of messing with the Mysterious Device or Tetrographic Vortex.
  • Gender-Blender Name: The names of some rare characters are still randomized, yet they're always of one gender. This can result in Sumo Wrestlers named Susan or Roller Derby Girls named George.
  • Glass Cannon: The BERSERK! trait turns a character into a One-Hit-Point Wonder, in exchange for a big increase in all fighting stats.
  • Glowing Eyelights of Undeath: Some of the zombies rock this style.
  • Golden Ending: Parodied when using the stick to remove the dog poo in the "TRUE DESPAIR" event. The game proudly announces that you've unlocked the true ending to the game, even though you only get the food without harm and the music changes temporarily.
  • Golf Clubbing: You can even find them lying around in offices! Too bad they don't deal a whole lot of damage and can easily break.
  • Gonk: Most of the preset human faces available for custom characters aren't exactly... cute. This even extends to some of the options for women.
    • Exaggerated for characters with the Anime Fan trait if they hit maximum morale, or the Anime Girl who automatically starts as this. Their faces start off looking like a standard, if pretty, Magical Girl, but over time will morph and deform before they explode.
  • Good Feels Good: It's far safer and potentially more profitable to not be a total jackass to other survivors via high loyalty, as there are many events where high loyalty pays off, such as watching out for bandits/zombies at night, getting food at a grocery store, and getting morale boosts for doing altruistic things. This is especially important for Civilized characters, who have high loyalty but can't have their morale higher than a neutral state.
  • Goodies in the Toilets: "Toilet loot" can be found in bathrooms. Yes, this even includes gas. There's even a toilet genie that can grant you a wish.
  • Gory Deadly Overkill Title of Fatal Death: Most of the possible names for arcade games fall under this trope: DEATH SPLATTERS, TOUCH OF DEATH, DEATHSPLOSIONAL, and U*L*T*R*A*D*E*A*T*H. Overlaps with Ultra Super Death Gore Fest Chainsawer 3000 in that playing the games also increases the Shooting skill- "the critics were right!"
  • Government Conspiracy: Characters around campfires occasionally state that Canada is one. Also, in the "Death Road Radio" event, giving the mic to a Paranoid character will result in them ranting about how the government engineered the zombie apocalypse "as a smokescreen to make jorts illegal".
  • Graphics-Induced Super-Deformed: Due to the nature of the game's style. You can take it to ridiculous levels with characters having the usual head size and really tiny bodies. The experimental machines also have the capability of changing head sizes even further.
  • Grease Monkey: Any character with the Mechanic, Gungineer, or Car Nut perks is this by default. They can even have their own complementary wrench or crowbar!
  • The Grim Reaper: You can find him in graveyards. Shaking hands with Death will also give you his Sinister Scythe and a boost to your character's fighting stats, but reduce their maximum HP to 1 permanently.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: Ex-Wrestler perk and Grappler trait allows characters to pick up downed zombies and throw them around. Best used against other groups of zombies. Combine both to be able to grab zombies without even needing to knock them down! This also gives them the El Satan body sprite.
  • Gun Nut: Gun Collector perk in particular makes a character start with decent Shooting skills and a bunch of basic guns and ammo.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • It is possible determine which personality your character has by observing their dialogue in-between driving events. Good luck figuring which is which on your own, though. And there still is no way to figure out loyalty this way.
    • Personality combos are not fixed to the selection traits when making a custom character and can be generated at random and option to use them will show up even if you don't have the personality status of the character that has it revealed.
      • Paranoid requires high Wits and low Attitude. Oblivious requires low Wits and high Attitude.
      • Calm-shooter requires high Composure and high Shooting. Angry-strong requires low Composure and high Strength.
      • Charming requires high Attitude and high Wits. Grating (Irritating) requires low Attitude and low Wits.
      • Sociopath (Bandit) requires low Loyalty and low Composure.
    • There are a few items that are almost worthless as weapons but have some utility outside combat. The game makes little to no effort to tell you that.
      • The "True Despair" event can be safely disarmed if you have either someone with the Friend of Dog perk or a Tree Branch, a weapon that's about as useless as you'd think compared to other things you find around.
      • The "Horrible Weather" walking event is morale taxing, but if you have Umbrellas (another REALLY flimsy weapon) equal to the number of characters you won't take any morale penalty at all. No one in their right mind would hoard Umbrellas unless in extreme desperation for weapons.
      • Recruitable Dogs sometimes found in Trader Camps or Junkyards can be bribed to join your party if you have a Femur handy.
    • Individual text events rely heavily on survivor stats. Some ideal outcomes aren't immediately obvious.
  • Gut Feeling: Characters with the Paranoid trait use it to determine who to trust, can identify traits when recruiting characters (as well as tell when they're lying about their skills), predict and counter bandit attacks, and avoid traps and other dangers. On the other hand, they can turn down perfectly fine meals or camp sites, starving themselves or exhausting and stressing the party out, so it can be a bit of a gamble sometimes whether or not they're right.
    • Characters with high stats on something (Strength, Fitness, Shooting, Medical or Mechanical) can actually measure if the recruit's skill is true or if they are trying to pull a fast one on your party.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Characters with Angry-strong trait are this by definition. One particular bandit event has the option for this character just simply punch the daylights out of them.
  • Have a Nice Death: YOU HAVE DIED on the DEATH ROAD TO CANADA(TM)note 
  • Heroes Love Dogs: The "Friend of Dogs" perk makes it easier to tame and recruit wild dogs. This doesn't guarantee that wild dogs will return the favor in the long run though...
  • Heroic Canines, Villainous Felines: It seems like every dog you find in the game is either tame enough to adopt or too feral to become a pet. Dogs don't attack humans unless they've past the Despair Event Horizon. Cats, on the other hand, only appear during random events to attack a group member. An update allows you to recruit cats, but their despair events can have pretty nasty consequences.
  • Heroic Dog:
    • This is inevitable since the player can adopt a randomly encountered dog. Dogs can be used to find supplies, fight zombies, keep watch over camping events, and can even be trained to DRIVE THE CAR! This can be subverted as a dog's loyalty is not always guaranteed to be high...
    • Played straight with the Puppy character, who can be recruited at trade posts. It starts off slightly weaker than the standard dog, but eventually grows and always has maxed out loyalty stats.
  • Heroic Second Wind: Shield of Hope grants the ability to endure bites from zombies that would kill them as long as they have high enough morale. It doesn't work on some instant-death events, however.
  • Hockey Mask and Chainsaw: Played with for Mason, who's equipped with both a Machete and a Chainsaw.
  • Holiday Mode:
    • Santa can be recruited as a party member in an event if it's Christmas! Just don't be a jerk to him...
    • Starting the game on Canada Day (July 1st) starts you off with 255 hockey sticks and a beaver as an additional party member.
    • Uncle Sam will join your party if you start a game on July 4th.
    • Playing the game on (American) Thanksgiving starts you off with a live turkey. You can just eat it if you don't want to recruit it, of course.
    • All of the characters will wear masks if you play on Halloween.
    • Cupid will join the party on February 14th.
  • Howl of Sorrow: Dogs can do this if morale is low, or if they die.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Downplayed. The Gourmand trait has the character eat one more food unit (3 instead of 2) in favor of restoring their Morale more per meal (and meals can bring their morale to 6, rather than 3 like other characters). However running out of food will nosedive their Morale even faster than usual.
    Tropes I-L 
  • I Know Mortal Kombat: The GameBronus event allows a party member to play a video game to build skills that apply to the main game. The downside is that all the games are notorious for being Nintendo Hard, causing a big drop in morale for the person playing them.
    • Playing an arcade game gives the character a level of Shooting.
  • Improvised Weapon: In addition to all of the scrap that your characters can wield (wood, rebar, etc), the game encourages the player to throw furniture so zombies can move around it. If a character has high strength, he/she can throw sofas. The Last Bodybuilder can even throw the car.
  • Infernal Retaliation: Reckless usage of fire damage (Blowtorches, Molotovs, Flamethrowers...) will result in a zombie giving a more than warm hug on your characters besides the possible bite.
  • Infinity +1 Sword: The chainsaw is an awful early-game weapon due to needing gas, which is supposed to be used for your car... But after you begin crossing the border for the final stretch of the game, you no longer need the car, turning the chainsaw into a godsend.
    • The Sturdy Machete counts as the standard melee weapon, being unbreakable and having great stats, while requiring no special stats to use well.
    • Likewise, the Strong Katana is equally as powerful as the Otaku Katana, but it never breaks. It can only be found in a Museum, or being used by an Anime Fan (who risks turning into the ticking time bomb that is the Anime Girl).
    • The Golden Knife and the Golden Spear may not be able to damage multiple zombies, but they still hit hard, and they don't drain a character's stamina as fast as other melee weapons. They're ideal on characters with low strength & fitness.
    • For high-strength characters, large swords such as the Claymore are the best weapons. They can consistently one-shot zombies, but are also so heavy that without sufficient strength and fitness most characters can only swing it very slowly, and will get tired quickly in the process. There are lighter options such as the Cavalry Sabre or the Knight Sword. These and the weapons mentioned above can often be found in the Dark/Haunted Mansion.
  • In-Universe Game Clock: Zombies are more aggressive at different times of day. Sieges require the group to hold off hordes until a certain amount of time passes.
  • I Regret Nothing: One of the possible last words, along with "I regret everything".
  • It Only Works Once: The Hero Type character can prevent somebody's death in a text event, but once done, that ability is depleted. Ditto with the Phoenix's self-revive.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: The loyalty stat is often difficult to uncover, and not important right up until the moment that it is (for example, when you need to trust someone to keep watch for the night, or when the character suddenly leaves due to running out of morale). It also doesn't correlate neatly with the other personality stats. Someone with bottomed-out attitude and wits can nevertheless turn out to have a high loyalty stat, and the opposite can also be true.
  • Joke Character:
    • There are a number of rare characters that don't have any redeeming qualities whatsoever. Such examples include The Clown (who if you have room in your party can't reject its request to join), Garfielf, and the Governor Emperor. The last one in particular simply steals your food when it's time to nap.
  • Joke Item:
    • Otaku Katanas, purchasable in bulk for almost nothing from the anime salesperson, and for good reason; their damage is decent, but they have a very high break chance, largely negating any value they have.
    • The shuriken from the same merchant, as well. 10 food for a shuriken that does decent damage when thrown... But you only get one and if it fails to come back to you it has to be retrieved. A basic pistol does more damage and requires less micromanagement. Really, anything the anime salesman sells is an example.
    • There are various other weapons that are also very weak, such as the purse and knitting needle.
  • Jump Scare: A very downplayed example. Quitting the game causes a zombie head to fly onto the screen and play a quiet 8-bit zombie roar.
  • Just Keep Driving: When entering and leaving a mission, characters will always drive into any zombies that happen to be in the way.
  • Kaiju: One rare event has your characters dealing with a giant prehistoric monster stomping through a city... If you choose to "save the city", you find that she's just a recruitable human in a costume, with high strength, fitness and one more point of health than the average character. She doesn't have any pockets though, meaning that she can't hold more than one weapon at a time.
  • Karma Houdini:
    • Characters can steal some of your loot if they decide to leave the group or screw over the party during certain events. He/she will never appear in the game again, which makes one wonder if that character even got their comeuppance at all. All the more reason to make constant loyalty checks and ditch the ones with low loyalty.
    • Sadly, you can never just kill off and loot any bandits that harass you throughout your journey.
  • Katanas Are Just Better: Subverted for most of them in the game, as they shatter easily after being used against zombies. You can pick up a more sturdy one in a museum, however.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: There are opportunities to do this throughout the game under certain conditions, often involving the "COOL IT" mechanic, violence, or suicide.
    • The Irritating character can tell pretty much every trader to "COOL IT" by saying offensive things to them. This includes the Anime Salesman.
    • The recruitable survivor at the Dinkdoor can be given a taste of their own medicine if another Irritating character is in the party.
    • It's possible to take manual control of disliked survivors and deliberately sending them into a zombie horde. It turns into this example if they have low loyalty.
    • The one and only "good" deed a bandit character can do is threaten to burn a bridge guarded by bandits. Should the RNG be successful in this choice, they'll burn it anyway.
  • Late Character Syndrome: Characters can show up from day 1 to the last day before reaching Canada, including ones you made. The problem is that characters usually take time to become really good and unless you're desperate for a party member for the final sieges you'll probably ignore them.
  • Lawyer-Friendly Cameo: Quite a few of the rare characters are parodies or pastiches of popular fictional characters. Some will amusingly have their in-game name chosen randomly from a pool that all skirt around the famous character's real one. Some of these had their costume colors changed for the console release.
  • Le Parkour: Characters with good fitness can perform it during a random event.
  • Lethal Joke Character:
    • Irritating character that can tell people to "Cool it". Usually this ends in something really bad happening. On the plus side, telling people to "Cool it" over and over can result in a "Cool it!!!" (with flashing exclamation marks) option, and is guaranteed to have a favorable effect, from having bandits apologize to getting a free assault rifle to even recruiting characters that cannot be obtained by any other means.
      • Another "benefit" of Irritating characters is, surprisingly, during the Despair Events like the "Giant Rant" one. Making the character say "Say it, don't spray it!" will piss off the other one, but it will also prevent the nastiest outcome from happening (the other character simply leaving the party).
    • Horse, at least when controlled by the AI. He's the fastest character in the game... But has one item slot, cannot use melee weapons, and if given a firearm, will fire wildly at the nearest zombie with no restraint at all. In the player's hands he's one of the best characters to solo with due to his high speed, but in the AI's hands he's more a distraction than anything else.
    • The Last Bodybuilder can only attack by picking up and throwing objects. But he's so swole that he can lift and throw even cars.
    Tropes M-P 
  • Machete Mayhem: Machetes can mainly be found in hardware stores. The Sturdy Machete is considered one of the best melee weapons in the game, being unbreakable, but rusty ones are everywhere.
  • Mad Libs Dialogue: With several pieces of chatter during the road trip. Some variants can cause Morale drops or raises.
  • Made of Plasticine: If you don't keep your characters healthy, they can die in some astonishingly stupid ways in some of the random events, such as simply pulling out a tooth or getting bit by ants. Zombies will often explode into Ludicrous Gibs from one or two hits, and characters with the BERSERK!! trait will ALWAYS die instantly from any source of damage unless you found a way to raise their health (in exchange for huge fighting stat boosts.)
  • Magikarp Power:
    • "Irritating" characters' ability to say "Cool It" during events often doesn't yield any benefits (and may even diminish morale), but after saying "Cool It" enough times, it will yield a good result for the party when said (indicated with three flashing exclamation marks when available).
    • Characters with Hidden Potential don't start out with high combat stats, but their Strength can exceed the usual maximum if trained thoroughly enough. This also applies to Nimbus Ordeal, who uses a BFS but starts out with the lowest Strength and Fitness.
  • Manly Tears: The Last Bodybuilder has a single tear in his eye after the inevitable result of challenging him to a flexing contest, in which the challenging character is completely obliterated upon witnessing TLB's first flex. The game doesn't even check the challenger's strength or vitality; flexing-off with TLB is a guaranteed death sentence.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: The BERSERK! and Frantic Whiner will reduce a character's maximum health from the natural 3 points to 1 and 2, respectively. Shaking hands with the Grim Reaper will also decrease their maximum health to 1 as well (while giving massive combat boosts).
  • Minmaxer's Delight:
    • The Paranoid trait gives a character the ability to detect if someone is lying about his/her advertised skill, as well as revealing a whole slew of hidden stats on new recruits. It can also save the whole group from bandit encounters and other bad events, making it one of the best traits in the whole game.
    • The Civilized trait grants a character the maximum personality stats, which can also be used against bandit encounters, or be used safely for other events that require things like composition and loyalty. The only downside is the harsh cap to morale, where it's impossible to go above neutral. Even this tends to be quickly remedied upon resting thanks to their high attitude stat.
    • The T*S*T*C Class has maximized strength and only mediocre fitness. Fantastic for manual control such as using furniture as a weapon.
  • Monster Clown: A possible party member, although the game questions just why you would do that if you do. You don't get a choice to leave him behind if you have room, unless you've been doing a solo-character run. Make him mad, and he'll leave... and bring FRIENDS.
    • If you get the Clown to the final siege, all clowns in that stage and the next stage will be zombie clowns. This gets you a hidden achievement on Steam.
  • Mooks but No Bosses: There are no special types of zombies, let alone boss ones. Not that zombies need them anyway.
  • Murder Simulators: Playing arcade games, "Like all games ever made" in the game's own words, will increase the shooting skill.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Parodied with the Ominous Labs.
    The group drives past an office complex. The sign says OMNI-BIO-CORP LABS, which sounds way too evil to be a real company.
  • Nerves of Steel: Shown through the Calm Under Fire trait, as well as characters with high shooting and composure stats.
  • Nice Day, Deadly Night: Downplayed. Days can still have a truckload of zombies. City and town maps are particularly nasty with this as complete night will cause an ominous music to kick in and zombies will respawn endlessly on the edges of map.
  • Nintendo Hard: Your chances of making it to Canada are not very favorable, unless you know the game's mechanics inside and out.
  • Non-Standard Game Over:
    • If your party consists of nothing but non-sentient animals (such as goats), the game will come to an end. The only exception is if you have a dog in the party, who miraculously learns to drive.
    • You may also get the option to end the game entirely before a very tough Siege, giving you this.
    • Quitting a session outside of driving scenes wipes the save in that file and adds one "loss" to the player's stats. Deleting a save will also record a loss.
    • The Jason Expy will leave on his own if he runs out of party members to kill off randomly.
  • Mook–Face Turn: You can actually get a character named Buff Bandit to join you, but good luck figuring it out by yourselfnote .
  • My Car Hates Me: Your car's engine stat isn't just for show, the worse it is the harder will be to actually start it and this can be a real problem if you need to get out quickly because of some angry zombies gunning for your party...
  • Multiple Persuasion Modes: Some text events can have special options for characters with special personality combos (Charming, Paranoid, Oblivious...).
  • New Game+: Sort of. You can start new games after upgrading perks with Zombo Points to start with better chances of surviving the death road.
  • Nobody Poops: Played surprisingly straight considering the weird focus on toilet this game has.
  • No Bulk Discounts: Nope! However characters with the Charming trait will get extra items, especially if you buy large quantities.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: One of the rare characters you can encounter is Alvis, who is capable of using Karate while unarmed, and croons tunefully every time he attacks a zombie. If you can bring his morale down to its lowest, there's a chance that he'll leave the party and come back with a different appearance, reflecting Elvis' own reinvention of his image. Do it again, and...
  • No Sense of Direction: If your group decides to take a detour, there's a chance that they could get lost and waste precious gasoline. The chance is fairly high, so this is always a high-risk option as opposed to other choices.
  • Not the Intended Use: Walking events are normally there to punish the player for losing the car, but daring players can use them to stock up a large amount of gas at cost of Morale and every other resource. It takes preparation (and luck) to pull this off and due to the random nature of the game this still can backfire horribly.
  • One-Hit Polykill: Rifles and shotguns can easily mow down hordes of zombies if your character's Shooting skill is maxed out. This is one of the most effective ways to survive the final siege.
  • One Stat to Rule Them All:
    • Gas mileage for cars. Gas is somewhat difficult to find, and you're in for three usually miserable events if you lose your car, often due to running out of said gas. Smaller cars such as the Hybrid or the Hotrod are incredibly valuable for this very reason.
    • For personality stats, having high Loyalty is pretty much guaranteed to be important in the long run. You'll run into many text events that require someone in the party that's trustworthy. Anyone with the lowest Loyalty will betray the team by either sleeping on night watches, turning on the party to bandit checkpoints, not gathering supplies in an abandoned grocery store, or not taking responsibility for a fart. Having a decent enough Loyalty stat also prevents the option to rob a trader from appearing (this requires a character's Loyalty and Composure to be super low), thus preventing the list of actions from being cluttered. This applies doubly-so for pets such as dogs, as their combat stats cannot be properly raised, which makes them ideal for night watches. A dog with low loyalty isn't worth keeping.
  • Only in Florida: Downplayed; the zombie apocalypse has ravaged the entire east coast. You just start your journey from Florida.
  • Optional Stealth: Running past the zombies during a mission is viable and even encouraged by the game, especially if the melee weapons you currently have can break. There is a silenced weapons salesperson who sells suppressed weapons that encourage this kind of play. They cannot be found in the wild.
  • Overly Long Gag: There's a chance that a DMV may appear in a city map. Exploring inside shows a very long line of skeletons, leading to a driver's license machine (this allows you to change the name of a survivor, though the options are very limited).
  • Padded Sumo Gameplay: A strange variation: higher difficulties throws more zombies at you, so you will either take more time to handle the horde to progress or just ignore them instead which will make this trope work in reverse.
  • Panda-ing to the Audience: A possible recruit that can be found when scavenging in cities. You'll need the Charming or Friend to Dogs traits to recruit it.
  • Path of Most Resistance: Usually rooms with the most goodies are filled with zombies. Especially true for Dark/Haunted Mansions and Rest Stops.
  • Pistol-Whipping: Once a character runs out of ammo, he/she will resort to using any firearm as a melee weapon. This is generally a terrible idea, as they're only marginally better than the lowest-tier weapons and some guns have a chance of breaking in the process.
  • Player Nudge: Some dialogue in-between Always Be Looting events can give the player hints and tips. Like how throwing furniture on zombos is effective, or that shutting doors can buy you some time to avoid having to deal with a small horde inside houses. Some survivors tend to give bad advice, however; these people tend to have low Wits.
  • Point Build System: A core mechanic of the game. You raise your characters by increasing their Strength, Fitness, Shooting, Mechanical and Medical abilities and starting traits and perks can change how powerful they are.
  • Polar Bears and Penguins: Once you get to Canada, there are penguins and polar bears in the background. This is lampshaded in the dialog.
  • Pokémon Speak: Rck Grimes can only shout the word "CARL!"
  • Post-Apocalyptic Dog: The player can encounter stray dogs that they can adopt.
  • Post-Apocalyptic Traffic Jam: The "Traffic Jam" text event involves the road being blocked by a sea of rusted-out cars. Your options to get the group through are: abandon the car, take a detour (might work), drive the car offroad (probably won't work), or bench-press a car (makes the bench-presser stronger... but doesn't work).
  • Post-Processing Video Effects: Film grain and scratch can be turned on or off in the options menu.
  • Power at a Price: There are plenty of very attractive perks, traits and events that will give you massive boosts... At an (usually) equally hefty price.
    • BERSERK! trait is a shining example. You start with massive combat boosts but your character can take only ONE hit before dying (not all text events are lethal, thankfully) and their personality stats are all low.
    • Civilized has your character starting with maxed personality statuses and 3 points in Medical and Mechanical. The catch? They will never be able to raise their morale over than 3 (with the usual maximum being 6), if you get a real bad morale event this is all it takes to make them liable to cause the dreaded "Despair Events" that can end your run.
    • T*S*T*C perk has the character starting with maxed Strength at 6 (and can train up to another six times), however your Fitness is locked at pitiful 2 points and can't be trained further, so your character will be strong, but will tire out very fast as result when swinging heavier weapons.
    • The Cursed Treasure text event allows you to pick from supplies to stashes of certain status boosts and good weapons, the flashing option is always the Mighty Claymore. However... The stashes of status boosts or weapons will hurt your party and the Mighty Claymore will permanently lock the weapon to the selected character and reduce their inventory to a single slot.
    • The Grim Reaper found in the rare map Cemetery, will grant the character who shakes hand with him maxed Strength, Shooting and Fitness... At cost of your maximum health being set to 1, like BERSERK! characters.
  • Press X to Die:
    • Sometimes, when a siege is imminent, the player may be given a choice to give up on the journey to Canada. Selecting this choice will end the game immediately.
      Driving Off the Death Road
      The team finally gives up. They retreat to an unknown fate.
      The journey to Canada is at an end.
    • On occasion, when confronted by bandits, you may have the option to have one of your "Irritating" characters say "COOL IT" as their Last Words. This will always result in their death, unless a Hero Type character can save them.
    • If you try to make a feral dog follow you without using a bone or Friend of Dog, it will deal 1 lethal damage. If you try this with a character at 1 health, the button quite literally reads "Get Killed By Dog".
  • Properly Paranoid: Whenever it comes down to bandits, the Paranoid character is a godsend as they (almost) always come up with a plan to deal with them, avoiding painful injuries and/or catastrophic resource loss.
  • The Power of Love: The Anime Girl is a pretty powerful recruit despite endangering your party by mutating then exploding after three days. But, given that she's a Magical Girl, her mutation can be halted indefinitely if she talks with someone with a "true love for anime", aka the Anime Salesman.
  • Punny Name: Unomey the gnome who can appear in Zombo Town (pronounced "You-know-me".)
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Custom characters can be made either male or female, but there is no distinction between the two in stats or events.
  • Purely Aesthetic Glasses: There's a nice amount of them in the character customization.
  • Purposely Overpowered: OPP Mode stands for "Overpowered Party Mode", and lets you recruit rare characters at will right at the start. Even the out-of-the-box Rare Characters Mode makes the game easier on average, which the game acknowledges in the description, and in the ending where it hopes you found an OP party member. And, of course, regardless of mode, the "big guy" the RCMP brings in at the very end of a successful run is this.
    Tropes Q-T 
  • Ramp Jump: One random event has this as an option. Its success varies on the speed of your vehicle; fast cars can make the jump (and look really cool doing it), average cars barely make the jump but sustain some damage in the process, while slow cars fall into the pit and explode.
  • Random Event: One of the primary mechanics of the game.
  • Reality Ensues: While many, many event outcomes avert this, there are some that play it for laughs. For example, if the road is blocked by a sea of cars, the party will face the risk of having to continue on foot. If the strongest character in the party decides to bench press one of the wrecked cars, they may well succeed in this and feel good about it, but the game will point out that this accomplishes little for clearing the wreckage and force the party to leave their car all the same.
  • Resting Recovery: Trader camps sometimes have bonfires which can be used to rest for a day during using food, it will also remove the "Tired" status and heal wounds if you have enough med kits.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: The Dolt 45 and Snubnose are more powerful than the average pistol, at the expense of firing slower and holding less ammo. They're better as early-game weapons where saving ammo is more crucial. In the endgame, it's better to switch to pistols with higher reserves assuming one's shooting stats improves.
  • Road Trip Plot: With zombies!
  • Room Full of Zombies: In areas with lots of zombies, this is quite common.
  • Run-and-Gun: Required if you want your gang to survive sieges. Though taking time to stand still to line up a shot deals more damage.
  • Running Gag:
    • The game seems to have a thing for bodybuilding having people obsessed with it and even a bandit gang that abides by the "Bodybuilder's Code" (yes, even their dog is super buffed).
    • It also has a tendency to call random people nerds.
    • Anime is also often mentioned here, although in a much less flattering light.
  • Samus Is a Girl: There are quite a few rare characters who are always female, despite being in a full costume and could thus qualify to be both genders otherwise, such as the Knight or the Kaiju.
  • Save Scumming: Despite the Anti-Rage Quitting measures for quitting in the middle of a mission, there's no stopping a player from force-quitting the game (via a Home Menu quit or stopping the application forcefully on a computer) and restarting from where they left off. The save is only deleted if the player selects to quit back to the main menu ingame. There are a few situations where Save Scumming flat-out won't work though, such as determining the ultimate prize in the Dark Mansion, determining the result of the experimental machines, or making decisions based off of stats rather than pure luck. There's flat out no way to save scum for trader posts, as returning to the game immediately sends the player back to the road, with a glitched out party display to boot (it gets fixed after the next level).
  • Sdrawkcab Name: When someone goes through the Tetrographic Vortex, their names gets reversed, capitalization and all. The character may also experience genderswapping, body changes, and potentially being turned into a dog.
  • Self-Harm: Mostly played for laughs. Some text events can have characters do stupid stuff like smashing their face on a wall to prevent a sneeze from being "lost", or failing to try to make a teeth extraction on their own (via brute force, or with medical knowledge, or by teetering the bad teeth on the car door and slamming it).
  • Serious Business: Since this is a Road Trip Plot game, farting. Expect huge morale drops, especially for the one you choose to accuse, unless you have someone who can solve the mystery, in which case only the accused takes the hit. (Unless they have a great attitude, in which case they blame ghosts.)
  • Severely Specialized Store: One store you can encounter during an Always Be Looting event is a store that sells umbrellas. Just umbrellas. They're irritatingly common in Malls too. There's also the rare Toilet Emporium.
  • Shooting Gallery: One random event involves your group finding one. It can be used to train one member carefully, or train your entire group haphazardly (which can get someone accidentally killed).
  • Shoplift and Die: Stealing from certain merchants can be really bad for your character's (and party) health if they don't succeed (and sometimes it happens anyway). Those who aren't absolute traitors will also suffer a morale boost.
  • Shopping Cart Antics: Shopping carts are common props in the game that can be thrown at zombies. One character that can be met by a campfire states that they are the ultimate weapon.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: There are various shotguns, starting with the basic pump shotgun, which is already very practical. Variants include double-barreled shotguns with twice the destruction and auto shotguns which is an absolute lifesaver provided you have plenty of shells. Shotguns tend to be effective even on people with low shooting stats.
  • Shout-Out: Since it's an indie zombie game, there's bound to be a bunch of them.
    • Billy from Vlambeer's Ridiculous Fishing appears as a rare character. The screen even shakes whenever he shoots!
    • The rare recruits have almost too many shout outs to count. Just to name a few, you can recruit Octodad, Jason Vorhees, and the main character of the Flash game Don't Shit Your Pants, complete with a lethal fart attack!
    • On death, a party member's Last Words may be "BARF!"
    • During car rides, some characters ask "where are the exploding zombies and the tongue ones?"
    • In one piece of dialogue where a survivor suggests trying to power up a game console, another survivor may chime in "No items, no bullcrap."
    • In one event, you can shoot some cans left on a fence for shooting practice and a farmer starts yelling about your destruction of his antique can collection which is a joke in the "Marge on the Lam" episode of The Simpsons. An irritating character with a full COOL-IT meter can summon "Bort Sampson".
    • If Santa gets too unhappy and you have someone else in the party, you can receive an event titled "THAT ONE TIM ALLEN MOVIE BASICALLY". This results in one 'dead' party member.
    • If you rescue a pig, your characters will take notice of a nearby spiderweb, and note that this situation is exactly the same as in Charlotte's Web.
    • The Pesticide Van is the spitting image of the Dale's Dead Bug van.
    • The Type 1 Muscle Car bears a striking resemblance to the Pursuit Special from Mad Max.
    • The rare Dog Van is just like that one from Dumb and Dumber.
  • Sliding Scale of Undead Regeneration: Type II: zombies do not heal, but they don't rot away either.
  • Smiting Evil Feels Good: Zigzagged in case of bandits. Fighting them head on will cause damage to the entire party with no Morale boost. However, outwitting them with someone, like a Paranoid character, will usually give you a Morale boost and prevent the harsh loss of resources.
  • Smug Snake:
    • The rare character, Governor Emperor. He shows up as any normal recruit would, although in this case, you stumble into his home and he shouts at you. Consider allowing him to tag along, and he'll charge you quite a bit of food to do so. Say "no" after this, and he'll start begging you to change your mind, offering to give food in return. If you accept this offer, it's only two units of food. If he's in your party, he'll rob you of pretty much everything by the next day. You can't recruit him if you have a full party, but as a result, there's no way to avoid a morale penalty as he shouts insults at you. Sadly there's no option to kill him immediately (although there's nothing stopping you from taking manual control of him in the next battle and getting him killed deliberately).
    • The anime salesman claims to "do his part in keeping civilization alive". This apparently involves selling crappy items to unsuspecting survivors. Don't bother talking to this man unless you have the Anime Girl or want to power up your "Cool It" stat.
    • Irritating characters are described as this. "They think they're cool, but they're totally not!" This is reflected in their personality stats, as both their wit and attitude are at the lowest values.
  • Solo-Character Run: It's entirely possible to win the game by playing with only one character from start to finish if you know what you are doing, you'll most likely not risk running out of food, but surviving sieges will take a lot of preparation and know-how since you'll be even more shorthanded than usual. You do get an achievement for succeeding. Solo runs also protects you against characters that normally force themselves into the party.
  • Speech-Impaired Animal: While most animals are explicitly labeled "not sapient", dogs are excluded from this label, though they still look like normal dogs and can't talk. They can draw up a banner as a Distress Call, and the banner will say "bark!" instead of the word "help!" used by human rescuees. The game usually ends if only animals are left in the party, but dogs will miraculously learn how to drive the car if one is in the party when this happens.
  • Spread Shot: The Shotguns (sans the Slug one) all feature this type of pattern.
  • Tactical Door Use: Encouraged by the game itself. It not only blocks zombies but also attract nearby ones to it which can either work in your favor or not.
  • Taken for Granite: Characters with high strength can challenge a strength trainer NPC to a pose-off. This results in an rather interesting result:
    "IMPOSSIBLE! THIS IS IMPOSSIBLE!" shrieks the Strength Trainer, in a strangely high-pitched voice.
    "ARE YOU 'THE SWOLE THAT WAS PROMISED'?" and then he turns into stone and, moments later, shatters into a million fragments.
    • Averted with the immortality wish from the genie. At first is sounds like the wisher is the victim of a Jackass Genie, but all that happens is the character gains a boost to their max health and their sprite gets a tint of grey.
  • Take That!:
    • The game has quite a jab-streak when it comes to Anime. The Anime Salesman sells a bunch of useless crap, the Anime Magical Girl explodes in a number of days (unless cured through an incredibly rare event), the Otaku Katana breaks easily, the Strong Katana that doesn't break is rare, and reading Anime magazines at the Anime store only benefits characters with low Wit (it harms anyone else).
    • Characters with low Wits tend to blame Barack Obama for everything (this game was developed and released when Obama was still the President).
  • Throwing the Distraction: If someone bites it during an "Always Be Looting" scavenging mission you can throw their corpse to attract a large number of zombies to feast on it until they are only bones.
  • Toilet Humour: There are several text events that have this, erm, flavor. Farts, dog poop among other things are included.
  • Token Heroic Orc: Characters with the Bandit trait qualify. Their experience in banditry means they can rob and steal from people they cross paths with, letting them procure supplies quickly (if riskily). Of course, they're more than eager to screw you over too.
  • Too Dumb to Fool: Characters with the Oblivious trait can avoid consequences in certain events just by sheer audacity. Examples include miscommunication resulting in intimidation, not having to participate in a drag race, bypassing bodybuilder bandits, or not noticing a bee.
  • Totem Pole Trench: The rare character Woof is one of these in the form of three dogs, one of them a pug.
  • Trial-and-Error Gameplay: Unless you've ventured into a guide or watched thoroughly videos of the game you won't know what most text event does or what stats you must have to get the positive outcomes on them. Expect to get your party killed a lot while learning.
    Tropes U-Z 
  • Undesirable Prize:
    • The Pukeyballs in the Dark/Haunted Mansion. These are consumable items that summon creatures to fight for you, but they disappear after a period of time. Meanwhile the other potential ultimate prizes in the Mansion are all powerful melee weapons that never break on use. The Turret can also be this for the same reasons.
    • The DMV in City Locations. All it does is allow a character to change their name, and the choices are limited. Meanwhile, other rare finds in City Locations include certain rare characters, or miniature versions of rare locations such as the Dark Mansion (without darkness), a device commonly found in the Ominous Labs, or a Comic Book Store that provides a power-up to a character.
    • The Flamethrower in the Burning Inferno. Flamethrowers use up a lot of gas. The other prize is the Firelunk Greatsword, which is a powerful sword that can light zombies that haven't been outright killed by the blunt impact on fire.
    • Sometimes if you lose your car, you'll automatically obtain one without having to go through a zombie-infested level to find it. However, among the cars provided this way is the SUV, which is a terrible, slow, low-mileage car. There's no way to save scum for a different result.
  • Undignified Death: It's possible to die by swatting a bee or tripping over a rock.
    • Want more? It's quite possible to die by pulling a teeth via car door slam. It's about as silly (and undignified) as it sounds.
  • Undying Loyalty: Since personality statuses are very difficult to change, characters that have high Loyalty will (most likely) remain loyal. Civilized and Hero Type characters start out with high Loyalty by default.
  • Uplifted Animal: A dog can be turned into a dogman if selected to be zapped by the Strange Machine found in places like the Ominous Labs, resulting in this trope note . This has the opposite effect on humans, which turns them into a dogataur, a creature with the head of a human and the body of a dog.
  • Useless Useful Spell: The Fireproof trait. On paper it sounds awesome being unable to be harmed by fire in combat and text events and even more on ABL events like Burning Houses. But chances are even if one of your characters are immune to fire the rest of your party won't be and text events where Fireproof is useful are few and far between.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
    • One tip that the game gives you in the beginning states that sacrificing a character that you don't like is usually a benefit, since it can distract the zombies. A purchasable upgrade even compensates you with a Zombo Point for getting characters killed!
    • Having a Bandit character lives and breathes this, as you can rob peaceful traders and other travelers, and screw over various NPCs and groups just because you can. Of course, you can always do the same to said character.
    • Upon dying, characters have a chance to ask to be buried with something, such as their food cans or the car keys, or to have a sweet epitaph on their tombstone. Regardless of the nature of the request, you cannot bury them, and instead must leave their bodies to be inevitably chewed to the bone. Of course, sometimes they're already surrounded by zombies and couldn't possibly be buried, but other times you just casually leave an ally's body alone in an empty room after getting hurt by a single zombie. Or, if you've already tossed the poor sod's body into the middle of an inbound cluster as a distraction.
    • You can also simply leave characters behind when they're too far from the team leader at the exit, or by driving the car when they haven't boarded.
    • You can freely kill peaceful people, traders and salespeople in camps with fire or explosives.
    • The best way to deal with the Governor-Emperor if you recruit him. Otherwise, he steals your food when you next camp.Note 
    • You can use fire to kill NPCs such as the traders or the Prime Minister.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment:
    • On the other hand, don't expect to get away with things like this in random events, as being a consistent Jerkass will quickly nosedive your group's morale. Some cases will even have a violated character leave the group or be killed!Note 
    • Robbing traders in Trader Camps can backfire real bad too. Either you get some nice supplies or some heavy hits to Morale and Health.
    • Killing the Prime Minister with fire nets you an achievement... And forfeits your current game, counting it as a loss.
  • Video Game Tutorial: The game starts with one to more or less show the quirks of conversations and how combat and map navigating work.
  • Voice Grunting: Featured in every character with lines. Including animals.
  • The War Sequence: Sieges near the end of the game (or even at the start depending on the difficulty) easily becomes this.
  • Warm-Up Boss: If one sees the sieges as "boss battles". The first siege will usually be rather tame and have not a lot of zombies, mostly to teach the players how they work.
  • We Cannot Go On Without You: Averted. If the player-controlled survivor is killed on a supply run, the game switches control over to one of the AI survivors escorting them; if everyone on a supply run dies but at least one survivor was set to 'Rest,' control is switched to them as they flee the scene. The only way to get a Game Over is through a Total Party Kill.
  • We Care: Somewhat implied by Yall-Mart's logo, a red heart.
  • What You Are in the Dark: A few events, like helping a helpless person stuck under a pile of cardboard boxes or sharing a fun sized candy bar will reveal your party's Loyalty.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: At the end of a successful run, each survivor gets a blurb describing their new life in Canada.
  • With Friends Like These...: Just because your characters are traveling together (and even dependent on each other for survival) does not mean they're obligated to get along. Depending on their quirks, they may routinely decrease each other's morale with pointless bickering, cause backlashes during events with their incompetence, or even sell out the party to bandits.
  • A Winner Is You: You get to see characters that made to Canada walking with a Mountie, they speak a few lines of dialogue and you get to see a random epilogue, but that's it.
  • Yet Another Stupid Death: Screwing around with fire, explosives or getting a little too greedy while a massive horde is coming for you are very, very common ways to end your run.
    • Forgetting to check if a character is afflicted by the Tired ailment before sending them to a text event that requires Strength, Fitness and/or Shooting and getting them killed because of that is also very easy to do, and will make you feel very stupid.
  • You Lose at Zero Trust: Downplayed. The game doesn't outright end if your party's morale gets critically low, but any party member who hits zero morale can bring some real nasty events down on the entire group. Some of the things that can happen is having them walk out on you (possibly taking a good chunk of your supplies with them causing catastrophic loss of resources), suffer loss of hard earned status boosts, or, in case of pets, severely wound, possibly killing, a party member.
    • If your whole party's morale hits rock bottom, the difficult "Fatal Argument" siege can trigger; characters travelling alone may face the equally difficult "Haze of Despair" siege. Both sieges give the player the option to give up and end the run before even trying.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: The setting of the game. Nobody knows how it started, and no one really cares.
  • Zombie Gait: Since all of the zombies follow the rules established in the Living Dead Series, this is expected. Some characters lament that they aren't fast, but given their sheer numbers, it's probably better off that they're slow. The developers have explicitly stated that there will be no zombie variety for the sake of focusing more on text events and hordes.

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