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Monster Hunter: World is the main entry in the fifth generation of Capcom's popular Monster Hunter franchise, released on January 26, 2018 on the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, and on August 9, 2018 on PC. It is the first major title to be truly released on a home console rather than a handheld since Monster Hunter 3 on the Wiinote , resulting in a huge jump in graphical power and overhauled game mechanics.

The player takes control of a hunter sent to the New World, a largely unexplored continent far from the series' usual setting, with the Guild's Fifth Fleet to join a research expedition. The main subject of that research? The Elder Crossing: a migration of Elder Dragons to the New World which historically occurred every few centuries, but now takes place every decade. As the player explores the New World alongside their Handler—a chipper young woman tasked with taking care of their logistics—and their Palico combat buddy, the secrets behind the continent's unique ecosystems and the Elder Crossing slowly come to light.

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The game is currently Capcom's best selling game of all time, with total shipments over over 12 million units.

In December 2018, an Expansion Pack titled Iceborne was announced for release on September 6, 2019 for consoles and later for PC. The expansion features a new story scenario, the highest quest rank, moveset updates, and new and returning monsters.

This game provides examples of the following:

  • Absurdly High Level Cap: Once the various caps are unlocked, Hunter Rank can go up to 999. Ranks past 15 are unlocked by beating the final boss and most players will have completed all achievements well before reaching the cap.
  • Absurdly Sharp Blade: The "Mind's Eye" ability, which allows you to always cut without bouncing off the target's hide, returns. The Charge Blade now has a built-in powered mode for its Sword that allows you to gain this ability as an inherent weapon feature.
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  • Actionized Sequel: While the games have always had a lot of action in them, World makes a number of changes that cut down on prep time and get the player into the action quicker. In earlier games, you would have to wander the map (or go through the trouble of activating certain armor abilities) to find your target, while World's scoutfly tracking mechanic speeds up this process significantly. Gathering materials is also much quicker and an auto-crafting feature has been introduced. Gunner gameplay in particular has been given an action-oriented revamp, and the supply box includes a variety of ammo which saves time on ammo crafting. Cutscenes and story setpieces are much more dynamic and action-packed than they were in 4/4U.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Has its own page.
  • Anti-Magic: A new part of Dragon Elemental weapons is the elderseal mechanic, which will lower the effectiveness of Elder Dragon attacks and special abilities. Previous, more specific anti-Elder exploits, such as poisoning Kushala Daora to disable its wind barrier, have been removed as a result.
    • Another example on the monsters' side is DragonBlight, a status ailment the player can get from certain monsters' attacks, which completely nullifies the elemental or status-effect portion of your weapon's damage until it wears off.
  • Apocalypse How: Continental; towards the end of Low Rank, it's revealed that the Zorah Magdaros that was supposed to have died in the Rotten Vale has instead redirected its attention toward the Everstream, a network of underground energy that connects the entirety of the New World; if it dies there, the bioenergy it releases will surge into the Everstream and overload the network, making the entire New World go kablooey and take everything and everyone on the continent with it. The last few Quests in Low Rank are thus spent trying to avert total annihilation.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: It's an increase from previous games, but it's still a limit — there can be three large monsters in a map at any given time. Some event quests will have four or more targets, but only three will be present at any given time with new targets spawning upon others being defeated.
  • Arc Number: Five. The player arrives with the Fifth Fleet, the Creation Myth "The Tale of the Five" is introduced, there are five maps, and version 1 features five Elder Dragons (not counting the giants), all on the first entry of the fifth generation.
  • The Artifact:
    • The game features a Gathering Hub for multiplayer missions as in previous games. In World version 1, the only reason to bother heading up to the Hub was to take on Arena Quests—all other quest types are now multiplayer by default and can be accessed from any quest board. Returning to the Hub after a quest wasn't even an option; you could only start an expedition or return to the Astera tradeyard. It was almost like players were being actively discouraged from bothering with the Hub. Capcom has taken conscious actions to address this: the version 2 update adds the option to return to the Hub following a quest; seasonal festivals, which redecorate the hub, were introduced; and the version 3 update introduces Siege Quests, which are a group effort among 16 players in the same Hub.
    • As in previous games, in High Rank missions you will occasionally be dropped off somewhere besides camp. This would create the additional difficulty of having to trek to the camp on foot (or use a Farcaster) to grab supplies, and there is also the chance that you will spawn in a secret material-gathering area that cannot be reached by any other means. However, this game introduces the ability to fast-travel to camps when you're not engaging a monster, and secret spawn areas no longer exist, making the random location spawn almost pointless. The other key risk of this High Rank quirk is still present—there's a chance you may spawn right in front of your target...
  • Attack Its Weak Point:
    • Every monster has parts of its body that are more vulnerable than others and often to different types of damage. Breaking parts can weaken related attacks, such as breaking the wings to reduce their use of flying attacks. The skill Weakness Exploit encourages this.
    • Zorah Magdaros has four magmacores and two stone "scabs" which can be destroyed for loot and to weaken him. In particular, taking out all three magmacores during the final stage of his fight prevents him from using his charge attack.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Fire elemental weapons, seeing as the vast majority of monsters are either neutral or resistant to it.
      • On the inverse, Fire Resistant armor is very strong due to the abundance of fire monsters while water resistance only really benefits one monster in the right circumstances, the Jyuratodus. By proxy ice resistance has little to no real use either. All of two monsters are capable of inflicting iceblight as of the 3.0 patch; the Legiana and the Kushala Daora, and the latter can only inflict it under the right circumstances.
    • Weapons with high raw damage and negative affinity, depending on the amount; -10%, for example, isn't too big of a deal, but bigger penalties, such as those from Diablos and Deviljho weapons, come at the cost of doing less damage rather consistently. It's possible to balance this out with Weakness Exploit, which requires hitting soft spots consistently, or Affinity Augment, the former of which can be easier said than done.
    • The Bludgeoner skill, which increases damage if you're using a weapon with green Sharpness or lower. Blue- and white-Sharpness weapons deal more damage and can exploit weak points and avoid bouncing more easily than green Sharpness, and the only fully-upgraded weapons that can take advantage of it are the Zorah Magdaros weapons, which leaves several weapon classes unable to take advantage. It is most useful in Low Rank, where blue Sharpness is unobtainable, but otherwise Bludgeoner is not recommended to build for in the endgame.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: Seeing a Teostra and Lunastra together was said to be a very rare occurrence, but the fact that the latter makes her debut by saving the former from a Nergigante implies this is the case. They even use a special cooperative attack, something even the Raths don't have, themselves a strong and loving pair.
  • Bag of Spilling: Downplayed and lampshaded in the opening scenes. It's heavily implied everyone in the Commission fleet had to leave most of their gear at home, since there's only so much space on the ships. Depending on character creation, the PC might start with a basic set of armor, but loses whatever weapon they had during the Action Prologue. Of course it could have been much worse—one NPC hunter seen during the initial tour laments she had to ditch all her gear just to make it ashore.
  • Battleship Raid: The second half of the Zorah Magdaros fight involves manning a series of cannons placed along a defensive barrier to try and drive him back. It's also possible to climb back onto him when he attacks to reach a magmacore on his head and the big one on his back.
  • Benevolent Architecture: Or landscaping, in this case; the various maps are nicely designed to accommodate hunting, with a wide range of environmental hazards, ramps, ledges, vines for climbing, grapple points, and more.
  • Big Bad: Xeno'jiiva, an extraterrestrial Elder Dragon, is the cause of the Elder Crossing and the reason for the recent changes in Elder Dragon behavior.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • The Field Team leader saves both the PC and the Handler from a hungry Great Jagras and the Anjanath that later appears near the beginning of the game.
    • During the initial battle against Zorah Magadaros, the Huntsman jumps in to save everyone when Nergigante suddenly shows up and begins wreaking havoc.
    • Following the final battle, the Admiral leaps in to save you from falling to your death in the collapse of Xeno'jiiva's lair.
    • From a gameplay perspective, anyone who comes in a map if the leader shoots an SOS flare.
  • Big Eater:
    • The Handler's character schtick in World is that she loves food.
    • Also the Fiver Bro, who passes his quests on to you so he can spend more time eating.
    • Every PC Hunter, honestly. The Canteen cutscene has your character wolf down an entire platter of food in a single sitting, with the upgraded platters getting almost comical in the amount of food consumed.
  • Bloodless Carnage: It's certainly almost bloodless. Blood spray in the previous games provided some feedback on whether you were making good hits, but World introduces damage numbers.
  • Bonus Boss:
    • Kirin is the only Elder Dragon in the base game that is not part of the main plot. The quests that unlock it are all optional and not apparently related to an Elder Dragon-scale threat.
    • Elder Dragons added post-launch, such as Kulve Taroth and Lunastra, also count as they are independent from the plot.
    • Tempered Deviljho is unique in that he is the only tempered monster that can only be fought during a special event. He has the special reward of dropping extra streamstones, including ones normally only dropped by tempered Elder Dragons.
    • Arch-Tempered Elder Dragons are similar to Tempered Deviljho in that they can only be fought during an event. In addition to having extra health and doing more damage, their movesets and patrols are adjusted. Defeating them rewards access to a unique variant of their armor set.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Your Palico starts with the Vigorwasp Spray. Despite being the very first Palico Gadget you have, it's easily just as useful as any of the other Gadgets you get down the line; the free healing is a godsend in the middle of large monster hunts, it saves you Potions and Mega Potions, your Palico uses the Gadget with decent frequency, and at higher levels its potency rises and your Palico can set a stationary Vigorwasp that you can trigger yourself or even deliver a Vigorwasp to you on command.
    • Nergigante weapons are also this, and it appears to be by design. They have great raw attack, high elderseal, and superb sharpness without much in the way of weaknesses as far as weapons go aside from their lack of customization. They fit very easily into any endgame playstyle that doesn't require heavy customization or specific weapon attributes, such as slots or elements, to work properly.
    • Deviljho weapons have the same benefits as Nergigante weapons and the added bonus that they are a separate weapon tree. This allows construction of the weapon with only Deviljho parts where Nergigante weapons require a large amount of ore to build the base weapon.
    • Barroth weaponry. Not only do they offer great raw damage (among the highest in their class), they have a considerable defence bonus, two slots for decorations, and are very easy to make - Barroth is a rather straightforward monster to fight, with plenty of Investigations for Wyvern Gems, and the only problem part being the single Nergigante Horn for the final upgrade. The only downside to the weapons are the slight malus to Affinity, which is easy to patch over with an appropriate skill (and if not, is easy enough to live with).
    • Great Jagras Weapons of all things. While not too amazing without Non-Elemental Boost, the Great Jagras is by far the easiest monster to fight, making them quite easy to make. The Jagras Hacker, for example was one of the more common Great Swords prior to Deviljho's launch.
    • And as usual, there is nothing wrong with sticking with the regular ore and bone upgrade paths. In fact, Grand Barong (the final bone Sword & Shield) is a top-tier choice.
    • The Earplugs skill. All it does is stop you flinching when a monster roars. Thanks for the free attack windows.
    • Elemental resistances and resistance skills. Increasing elemental resistance both reduces damage from that element and increases the chance of resisting the associated blight. Resistance skills can also cover specific debuffs not governed by elements, such as Stun.
      • Level 3 Effluvia Resistance is a niche Skill only useful against Vaal Hazaak. It render the player completely immune to the monster's signature debuff and trivializes the ticking damage, which are the most difficult part of the encounter to manage.
    • Health Boost increases your maximum health beyond what is possible with eating or Max Potions, unlike earlier games, and is easy to fit into a set compared to the survivability it grants.
  • Boss Arena Idiocy: In areas with hanging boulders, monsters have a tendency to idle in a spot where said hazard can be dropped on them. The most notable instance of this is the first phase of Xeno'jiiva, where four boulders can be dropped onto him.
  • Boss-Only Level: The optional arena maps, the Great Ravine and the Everstream for Zorah Magadros, and Confluence of Fates, where you fight Xeno'jiiva. Story fights against the Elder Dragons also feature this, as no other monsters will spawn on the map.
    • Vaal Hazaak has a number of small monsters in its story mission, but they serve a purpose during the fight itself. It can drain the miasma from them to power himself up and at low health will revive them to fight the Hunter.
    • Kulve Taroth is the only monster that spawns in the Caverns of El Dorado map. Gajalaka are also present, but their main interest is in stealing loot rather than fighting Hunters.
  • Bragging Rights Reward:
    • The Rocksteady Mantle - a specialized tool that negates all knockback and halves damage taken from attacks, including roars - a huge advantage as it allows you to pile on damage on the monster. It is probably the last tool unlocked in the game by doing a quest that involves Beating a Tempered Vaal Hazak AND Tempered Odogaron and is unlocked only after beating several tempered Elder Dragons via investigations. Subverted however as while it is the latest unlock the player will most likely still have monsters to hunt and gear to produce meaning they can use it due to the effect it provides.
    • The Rainbow Pigment which allows hunters to have their armor shift in all the colors of the rainbow is only rewarded via quest that unlocks after completing every Assigned and Optional quest, having captured every monster capable of being caught at least once, and having maxed out the research for at least 15 monsters.
    • The Lunastra equipment has high Affinity, long natural white Sharpness, strong Blast properties, many slots, and comes with built-in Set Bonus skills like Guts, Hasten Recovery, and Razor Sharp/Spare Shot. Fully upgrading them requires a ticket from completing either the aforementioned quest or reaching HR 100 and completing a three-Tempered Elder Dragon Boss Rush.
  • Brats with Slingshots: World introduces a new mechanic called the "Slinger", a wrist-mounted slingshot. The Slinger can be used to fire either makeshift projectiles gathered from the environment or various inventory items such as the Knife items at monsters and other objects with precision accuracy. Just like items, the Sword and Shield weapon class is able to fire their Slinger without sheathing their weapon.
  • Brutal Bonus Level:
    • "The White Winds of the New World," the traditional Boss Rush that requires completing almost all base-game quests before it. This pits you against all four apex monsters (Odogaron and Legiana, Rathalos and Diablos), two at a time. Unlike past examples, though, you can take other hunters with you.
    • "The Sapphire Star's Guidance" requires reaching HR 100 and has you fight Tempered versions of Nergigante, Kushala Daora, and Teostra all at once. Then there's the event quest "The Thronetaker," which swaps Kushala Daora with Lunastra.
    • The event quest "A Visitor from Eorzea (Extreme)" pits you against a Tempered Behemoth, taking the hardest boss in the game and cranking it Up to Eleven: even more absurd health and damage, a shorter time limit, larger meteors that inflict Defense Down, shorter Charybdis castings, and comets are only summoned by dealing damage to Behemoth. The result is a nightmare reserved for only the top echelon of hunters. Even the best solo speedrunners in the world win with just seconds on the clock, while Time Attack communities gave up against a monster that was nigh-impossible even without TA restrictions. The reward is purely cosmetic; anything else would be unfair.
  • The Bus Came Back: After nine years, World sees the return of Lunastra as a huntable Monster with its third free update.
  • Call-Back:
    • A few older monsters are often referenced by NPCs.
    • The first time you cook a Well-done Steak, the Handler will say it looks "So Tasty!", in a tone similar the clip that played in previous games when you successfully cook one.
    • The sea captain can bring back sellable stones that are named after previous cities from previous games.
    • The Commander will say "You're the one to get it done!", the Catch-Phrase of the Caravaneer, when giving postgame assignments.
  • Cap:
    • The Item Pouch limits the number of any consumable item that can be brought on a quest, with the exact number varying based on the item. This can be worked around to an extent by gathering material in the fields and crafting more items.
    • Gathered crafting materials such as herbs and bugs are limited to 10 per stack in the Pouch, which limits a player's ability to farm them during a quest.
    • Players can only carry two of each type of Large bomb at any given time. Additionally, only two Large bombs can be planted per Hunter; any additional bombs must be set down after setting off the first set.
    • Hunter Rank is initially based solely on story progress. Once Xeno'jiiva is defeated, Hunter Ranks are unlocked up to 49 where an additional unlock is required. Interestingly, any experience earned prior to Xeno'jiiva is saved up and added to the player's Hunter Rank after the unlock.
  • Central Theme: Gameplay example and Story Example:
    • Open-Ended Exploration. Not only was World the first game to be announced in a Western Event rather than a Japanese one, the setting involves traveling in a new world. And much like Tri before it, it mostly featured new monsters in lieu of a returning monsters. It also has worldwide connectivity.
    • The game's actual story tends to deal a lot with life, death, and rebirth. One of the main maps, the Coral Highlands, has a plethora of beautiful lifeform, but wouldn't exist without The Rotten Vale, which is underneath and also where the majority of life falls to die. That's before getting into the monsters; Zorah Magdaros travels to the new world so it can die peacefully. The Problem? Its death would essentially cause a nasty explosion that would wipe out a huge chunk of life because of the massive bio-energy it contains. Once it's redirected back to the ocean, its death can instead start a new ecosystem. The Elder Dragon Xeno'jiiva is also one such example of being birth through the death of other Elder Dragons.
  • Character Customization: World features a robust character creation system, allowing you to control every bit of your hunter's appearance except for their build.
  • Cherry Tapping: The Capture Net does 2 damage if shot at anything other than an endemic creature. This has a surprisingly wide range of applications; Kelbi Horns can almost always be extracted from Kelbi if you shoot the net at a Kelbi enough times, and the net can be used to kill insects like Vespoids without breaking them.
  • Chrome Champion: Tempered Monsters have a distinctive metallic sheen, and they're way tougher than their normal counterparts. Arch-Tempered Monsters takes this even further.
  • Color-Coded Item Tiers: Dependent on the rarity of the items: 1 = white, 2 = grey, 3 = yellow, 4 = green, 5 = teal, 6 = blue, 7 = purple, 8 = orange.
  • Colossus Climb:
    • Mounting comes back from the fourth generation, although whether you get bucked is now dependent on your stamina instead of a unique mounting gauge. If you can hang on until the monster exhausts itself, you can trigger a Finishing Move to end the mount and stun the monster.
    • The first half of the Zorah Magdaros fight plays out like this, with Hunters running and climbing along his volcano back to attack various weak points. Once the second half of the fight starts it's still possible to leap back onto his body to any weak points you previously missed, though his constant movements make this more difficult.
  • Combat and Support: This is how hunter teams are composed in World; one Hunter, who handles the field work and the monster hunting, is paired with one Handler, who manages all the Quests and paperwork to send them on monster hunts.
  • The Computer Is a Lying Bastard: Once again, the on-screen attack stats for weapons are bloated with arbitrary weapon-specific multipliers that don't actually factor into anything, much like in older games prior to Generations (which uses "true attack" values without the multipliers).
  • Continuity Snarl: According to series lore, elder dragons are predisposed to hating humans because of their subjugation under the pre-Hunter civilization. However, in World, elder dragons are among the many large monsters who only attack if provoked. The New World is stated to be where elder dragons travel to to die, so it's possible that these specimens are simply older and more docile.
  • Convection Schmonvection: Zigzagged.
    • When you're perched atop Zorah Magdaros, who's basically a living volcano with streams of lava pouring through its crevices, you don't suffer any ill effects. However, standing near an active magma core will cause damage over time, which is why the Handler recommends a Cool Drink.
    • Inside the hotter zones of the Elder Recess where the lava pools are present, you'll suffer damage over time unless you use a Cool Drink. However, this only applies when actually in rooms with the lava, indicating the heat doesn't radiate much.
    • While a Cool Drink will protect players from heat damage, standing on actual lava will cause constant fire damage until you get out of it. Still downplayed in that your feet don't melt off.
  • Cool Pet: World gives you a Capture Net which can be used to acquire small items such as insects easily. It also lets you capture Indigenous Species, which you can then place in your quarters. This includes fish, birds, and other small animals.
  • Cool vs. Awesome: Turf Wars. Two giant monsters in the same area clash together and inflict hundreds of points of damage on each other. Also, the Lunastra introduction quest features a tag team of her and a wounded Teostra fighting a Nergigante; the Nergigante beats a hasty retreat and the Teostra leaves to lick his wounds, leaving you to deal with his Violently Protective Girlfriend.
  • Corpse Land: The Rotten Vale, being home to the hideous Fanged Wyvern Odogaron and the Elder Dragon Vaal Hazak. It also functions as an "elephant's graveyard" for Elder Dragons in general.
  • Cosplay: A paid DLC cosmetic allows you to dress up the Handler in the Guildmarm's outfit. A Chun-Li outfit was also added.
  • Counter Attack: World adds a new move to Long Sword's arsenal called the Foresight Slash that's very reminiscent of Generations Ultimate Valor Style's evasion action. By pressing R2+O at any time, even during a combo, you will dodge backwards, then execute a horizontal slash. However, if an enemy strikes you during your invulnerability frames, you will leave behind a blue aura "ghost", and, following the horizontal slash, you can perform a Spirit Slash that can be immediately chained into your Spirit Roundhouse finisher, even if you have no Spirit Gauge.
  • Creation Myth: The "Tale of the Five" is introduced in this game. It describes reality before creation: a white, unending void inhabited only by humans and five dragons. When asked why nothing had a beginning or an end, instead of answering, the dragons vomited an ocean and swam away to combine their bodies to form the New World. One man managed to find the island with the guidance of the Sapphire Star and brought back scales from the Five, which the humans used to create the Old World themselves, and time began to flow...but the New World would remain in the collective memory as a sacred site and an uninhabited, untouched paradise. It is very heavily implied that the crystal meteor you find in the Elder's Recess is the Sapphire Star itself..
  • Critical Hit Class: Not only possible but actually quite viable. By stacking skills like Weakness Exploit, Critical Eye and Attack Boost and combining it with a weapon with natural affinity, it's possible to build a character who can hit with a critical strike with nearly every attack as long as it hits a monster weakspot. Even 100% affinity (you crit with every attack, which worth reminding effectively amounts to a 25% damage boost) is reachable. Keep in mind though that the focus on attack skills at the expense of any defence and elemental resistance skills might risk your character becoming something of a Glass Cannon - if you get stunned, it's probably all over.
  • Crossover:
    • On the PS4 version, some DLC missions will reward you with gear based on Horizon Zero Dawn that gives your Palico the appearance of a cat-like Watcher and your hunter the full appearance of Aloy, as well as her Bow. Similar DLC exists for Street Fighter, Mega Man and Devil May Cry.
    • The collaboration with Final Fantasy XIV introduced Behemoth as a huntable monster to complement Rathalos' appearance in FFXIV.
    • A quest chain based on The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt brings Geralt to the New World.
    • A new crossover is added in that introduces Assassin's Creed to the game.
  • Crutch Character: The Zorah Magdaros repulsion mission that closes Low Rank nets you a package of Zorah Magdaros parts, which can be used to create High Rank Blast Element weapons and Zorah α/β armor that couples the weapon with Blast Attack, both of which are reasonably stronger than any of the other High Rank equipment you can create from the High Rank versions of previously-encountered lesser monsters. That said, Zorah armour is not the end-all-and-be-all and you'll want to get a replacement suit soon enough.
  • Cycle of Hurting: It's possible for a monster to trap a Hunter in a chain of attacks that keep them knocked down long enough for the next to hit.
    • Tempered Kirin is particularly bad for this. It's a fast-moving monster with a lot of wide-reaching area thunder attacks that often appear without warning, can knock Hunters flying, and can inflict paralysis as well.
    • A group of Gajalaka can achieve this thanks to having the ability to inflict Sleep and Paralysis with their daggers. Combined with their high damage explosives which can stun, it's possible for them to stunlock both Hunters and monsters.
    • With high enough damage, a Hunter can keep monsters trapped in a cycle of being downed and vulnerable. Working Sleep and Paralysis abilites or traps into the cycle can extend it even further.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: How many of you veteran players sheathed your weapon instead of blocking or using attack inputs involving the shoulder button when coming from the 3DS's 4 Ultimate or Generations, or the Switch's Generations Ultimate? Not even reversing the shoulder button mappings in either game makes them perfectly align one way or the other for things like sheathing your weapon (which you have to do with Y in the 4th-generation games) or dashing while sheathed (same button for weapon inputs in 4th-gen, different shoulder button in World that also sheathes while drawn). And this isn't even getting into all the mechanical changes...
  • Death from Above: Nergigante and Bazelgeuse both make lovely uses of them.
  • Developers' Foresight: Kushala Daora will never go to the volcanic areas of Elder's Recess on its own, but if you lure it near lava using the Challenger Mantle, its tornadoes can catch fire. They don't gain a fire element, though. Similarly, a tornado spawned on top of a patch of Lunastra's blue fire will become a blue fire tornado.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: The Great Sword has long been a poster boy for this trope among the weapon choices, but new to World is using the True Charge Slash on a sleeping monster. It requires a lot of spacing practice to perform right and there's quite a bit that can go wrong, but it's possible to do damage in the four-digit figures with one hit. Here is a video example of the move being performed on a sleeping Bazelgeuse.
  • Discard and Draw: α armor sets have more skills built in but fewer Decoration slots, while β armor sets have more Decoration slots but fewer built-in skills. Whichever one is the best depends on the build being used.
  • Disc-One Nuke: Since stronger monsters roam the map at all times, even earlier in the game, you can obtain especially powerful gear early in the game if you manage to hunt them:
    • The Wyvern Blade "Fall" Long Sword and Rathslinger I Bow are Fire element with high raw and 15% affinity and can be obtained as early as entering the Wildspire Waste and hunting Rathian.
    • The Rathalos armor has over thrice the defense of anything available in the early-game and can be obtained before leaving the Ancient Forest. (Now, have fun with that Rathalos in the meantime, but if you pull it off...)
    • The Diablos armor also has way high defense compared to anything else and grants Bludgoner as a Set Bonus — normally Awesome, but Impractical but useful since only green Sharpness is available — and can be obtained as soon as you reach the Wildspire Waste.
  • Driving Question: "What is the purpose of the Elder Crossing?" Answering this question is why the Expedition was dispatched and serves as the core plot of the game. Even after driving off Zorah Magdaros, the reason for its increasing regularity continues to drive the plot.
  • Drop-In-Drop-Out Multiplayer: By using an SOS Flare in the middle of a Quest, you can enable other players to hop into the Quest you're playing to assist you even if you've already started, which could not be done in previous games.
  • Dynamic Difficulty: Unlike previous games, which cleanly split up offline (single-player, easier Quests) and online (Quests designed to be played by four players) Quests, World employs this in all Quests due to Drop-In-Drop-Out Multiplayer; taking on a Quest solo will use single-player difficulty, while adding more players causes the Quest difficulty to shift to multiplayer difficulty in real-time.
  • Easy Level Trick:
    • Egg Quests were infamous in previous games because while carrying the egg your movement is much slower and you can't attack or block. In World you can just wear the Ghillie Mantle, which makes you effectively invisible to monsters. You can walk past a Rathian's face holding a Wyvern Egg and the most she'll do is hover around you in confusion.
    • Beyond the Blasting Scales requires you kill two tempered Bazelgeuses, each of which is a difficult fight. However, one Bazelgeuse can be lured to the other at which point they will begin fighting one another. Done properly, it's possible to have one kill the other and then kill the nearly dead survivor.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Two of them invoke the appearance of one:
    • Vaal Hazak has the imagery of a Dracolich and can revive smaller monsters. It can also weaponize some deadly gases against the hunter. Unlike other Elder Dragons, it looks less a classical description of one and more of an undead demon.
    • The final monster, Xeno'jiiva, is an Elder Dragon that came from outer space. Not only does it have the very imagery of one, with Extra Eyes, glowing body parts, and unnatural flame colors, it's also responsible for the crossing of various other elder dragons crossing into the new world, to take the bioenergy.
    • Guest Fighter Behemoth is not one back in its homeland, merely being The Dreaded instead. In Monster Hunter however, a Low Fantasy setting, it would qualify in-universe, being a magical High Fantasy threat that has invaded said setting, the former being rich on magic, while magic does not traditionally exist in Monster Hunter.
  • Elemental Tiers: This time around fire actually gets the short end of the stick, with only one difficult monster being weak to it, Vaal Hazak, and almost all others being either neutral or resistant to it, or simply are easy enough that having their weakness doesn't help in the long run, and slightly more odd is there are 4 monsters who give you fire elemental weapons note  despite fire resistance being common. Dragon itself also has shades of this, although the fact that the Rath monsters are weak to it and that it has elderseal helps avoid the same rut that fire is in, but even the elder dragons aren't really weak to Dragon.
  • Elephant Graveyard: The Rotten Vale is ultimately revealed to be where Elder Dragons go to die and the destination of the Elder Crossing.
  • Escort Mission: "The Best Kind of Quest" involves protecting The Handler and a group of scholars as they try to push a cart to a piece of slag that's of significant interest to them. It's a downplayed example; while you do have to "escort" them in the traditional sense, you never come across any monsters who are inherently hostile to you... unless you want to piss off that Rathian you walk past. Once you get to the slag, the Quest turns into a straightforward hunt afterwards.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": As per standard for the series, all characters are only known by their job. This leads to some amusing names such as Meowscular Chef and Fiver Bro.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: Averted. In previous games, any large monster, including herbivores, would attack you on sight. Thanks to World's refined monster behavior, most large monsters you come across will not antagonize you, and are perfectly willing to pass you by unless you provoke them in some way—which, to be fair, can simply mean approaching them in some cases. Some monsters, such as Tzitzi-Ya-Ku, are more likely to attack other large monsters than Hunters.
  • Expansion Pack: Iceborne, which is on the scale of previous G-rank Updated Rereleases. The expansion adds the highest quest rank, a new cold-weather area, new and returning monsters, and additional hunter moves.
  • Experience Booster: Some Event quests that focus on hunting two or more Tempered monsters give bonus XP to help with gaining levels.
  • Eyepatch of Power: The Dragonking Eyepatch is a high-level headpiece that gives the Hunter up to two levels of the powerful Weakness Exploit skill, a lot more protection than you would expect of a little strap of cloth, and according to the description, a more badass appearance.
    "Put this baby on to double your manliness instantly. Ideal for the grittier guys and gals."
  • Fearful Symmetry: The Turf War between Diablos and Black Diablos plays out with them squaring off and locking horns, struggling back and forth until one is overpowered and thrown to the ground. The victor is randomly decided.
  • Food Porn: True to form from this series, all food is rendered in crisp, mouth-watering high-definition graphics.
  • Four Is Death: The fourth area is the Rotten Vale, a land of death and decay.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: While there are some pretty notable counter-examples noted below, the game is also pretty good about this.
    • In previous MH titles, you had to pay a certain amount of money before taking on a mission as a "contract fee"; basically insurance in case you failed the client. In World, there are no contract fees... because you're not actually taking standard guild contracts like you do in Old World games. Astera and the Airship are the only human-wyverian civilization for hundreds of miles; everything you do is done directly for the Research Commission. There's no need for contract fees because all of your work in World is done directly for the Guild and its state-level supporters back across the sea.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: A case where the aversion makes it being played straight all the more noticeable. During the main story you can beat up on a monster the game tells you to outside of the assigned quest and it will count. For example, having to fight a Paolumu and defeating it in free mode or the optional quest of another player will count as having fulfilled the requirements. It won't count, however, if you do it before the game tells you to. To give an example, if you go out of your way to defeat a Diablos or Rathalos during expedition before being told by the First Wyverians that you need to defeat both to get answers from them, it won't count you as having beaten it for that quest.
    • Another one that can be either dumbly hilarious or endlessly frustrating for people who like going out of your way to capture all monsters, or at least the first time you see each monster. There are a series of sidequests given to you to capture a given monster instead of killing it. If you capture a monster, it will be at base being examined by the person who gives you those quests, and those quests open up once you've beaten the monster for the first time in the story. This will lead to him, up to 4 times, asking you to capture a monster that is captured and sleeping right behind him. The kicker? The NPC's title is Smart Biologist.
  • Gang Up on the Human: Despite the "Turf War" mechanic (See Mêlée à Trois), monsters have a tendency to prefer the human. Usually, a Turf War will only kick in once a fight - and once that is said and done, even if the monster hasn't fled the area, it will sometimes join up against the invader.
    • If you can successfully make one monster hostile to you and have another monster that is only hostile to the first monster and hide, it'll become a Curb-Stomp Battle in favor of the one that is not mad at you, because the other monster will spend half its time attacking the other monster and the other half trying to sniff you out while their enemy will continually attack them.
    • This is also heavily downplayed compared to previous games, as small monsters will back away from larger monsters and hunters if they start clashing in their area. Monsters will fight each other even if they do focus on the human more than the other monster. Gajalakas will direct their ire towards large monsters first, ignoring the hunter unless there is no large monster in the area at which point they become instantly hostile to the hunter, although their attacks will still affect the hunter if they're in the way of them.
    • Played straight if fighting either a Rathalos or Rathian; dealing damage to either will always draw the other one (if they're present on the map during the quest) to the immediate location of the fight after which the two Raths will tag team the hunter unless one of them is driven off with a dung pod.
    • Teostra and Lunastra are an even more dangerous pair, especially when they sync up their supernova attacks for a one-two-three blast of damage. Witnessing their teaming up on you is actually worth research points. Thankfully they're not as likely as the Rath pair to join up with one another if you attack one in a different area.
  • Genre Shift: The "Trouble in the Ancient Forest Quest" that came about from the Witcher add-on plays out like a vertical slice of The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt. NPCs are conversed with via dialogue trees, there are optional side quests to complete, and the whole adventure boasts multiple endings. It's even accompanied by music and sound effects from The Witcher 3.
  • Geo Effects: Most of the maps in World have at least one or two environmental hazards that you can use to your advantage. For example, the Rathalos nest in the Ancient Forest is positioned near a dam, which you or a monster may break to create a huge damage/stun opportunity. The Wildspire Waste features a similar quicksand trap above a Diablos den.
  • Harder Than Hard: Arch-Tempered monsters, beefed up versions of the already dangerous tempered Elder Dragons. Even with endgame gear tailored specifically to fight them, it is entirely possible to go from full health to carted back to camp in a single attack. And if you were fighting them with friends, well...
  • Hitbox Dissonance: It wouldn't be Monster Hunter without this, after all.
    • Anjanath's attacks have deceptively huge hitboxes. It isn't uncommon for players to get hit even if they're behind something. That is, if the Anjanath doesn't just come leaping through it.
    • Nergigante's dive is similarly deceptive, since the shrapnel and rubble created by the dive seems to count as the attack as well, hitting you with full strength even if you're nowhere near it.
    • Teostra's explosive blast can cause this as well. It's been known to hit players who're nowhere near the blast. Part of the reason behind this is due to the fact that the effect hits so quickly that players who think they dodged it still get hit.
    • In the player's favour with Insect glaive, sometimes attacks that look like they missed will be counted as hits while performing some aerial attacks.
    • Finally there are also those little edges of attacks that seem to hit you even if you just barely made contact that still count for full damage from the attack, such as a monster's heel as it comes down or the edge of the monster's tail during a charge.
  • Hollywood Acid: Downplayed. In the bottom level of the Rotten Vale there are pools of acid, which are light blue and glow. Standing in them causes damage over time but not any worse than standing in lava.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight:
    • The third beta featured a mission against Nergigante, and gave you 15 minutes to kill an Elder Dragon with fairly low-tier weapons and armor. It was possible, but probably not without a full party. Anyone who managed to complete this staggering task was rewarded with Nergigante materials in the full game.
    • The second encounter with Zorah Magdaros is doomed to fail. Without the Dragonator, the Hunters cannot put out enough damage to slow him down, with or without the sudden appearance of Nergigante.
  • Hub City: Astera, the New World's main research outpost.
  • I Choose to Stay: Following Xeno'jiiva's death, all of the hunters in Astera decided to stay for a challenge and/or to study the new monsters more. A wise choice, as once Xeno'jiiva is dead, all sorts of other monster activity starts springing up, attributed to its death.
  • I Don't Like the Sound of That Place: Who would willingly go to the "Rotten Vale"?
  • Immune to Flinching: World gives the Great Sword a new move: a shoulder tackle. What's special about this shoulder tackle is that it deals impact damage at point blank range and has super armor, allowing the player to tank through monster attacks given proper timing, then transition into a charge. You can even interrupt charges with tackles to immediately transition into the next tier charge attack without needing to perform the previous attack in the chain.
  • Instant Expert: World's hunter is stated to already be one of the best hunters in the Old World. However, the player is likely not a veteran to the series.
  • Interface Spoiler:
    • You first fight Zorah Magdaros fairly early on, and it drops High Rank materials. Obviously you're going to fight it again later on.
    • While looking for quests to join, it's fairly possible to be spoiled by the fact that subspecies make a return after being absent from Generations.
  • Jungle Japes: The Ancient Forest is an enormous old-growth rainforest centered around a single, colossal tree.
  • Kaizo Trap: Fighting some monsters in their lairs can be significantly more dangerous than their low health would imply.
    • Diablos can burrow or walk into the falling sand walls of its lair and charge out at an unexpected angle with little warning.
    • Nergigante's lair is narrow which makes dodging his lethal divebomb attack even more difficult. It will also slam through walls of the lair to instantly cover its body in hardened spikes, allowing faster divebombs.
    • Kushala Daora can instantly fill most of its lair with tornadoes or wind walls, greatly reducing visibility and available room for fighting.
    • Teostra and Lunastra's lair in the Elder's Recess has a hardened magma floor. When disturbed during a fight, cracks will begin spewing lava before exploding, which deals high damage and can send you flying. In the Wildspire Wastes they instead use the Diablos lair, whose small size makes escaping a nova much more difficult.
    • When successfully jumping Behemoth's Ecliptic Meteor, your character will move in the air to land roughly where Behemoth's head is. The game does not stop to check whether or not you'll wind up getting hit by one of it's Charybdis tornados afterwards though, and the damage from it may very well be enough to cause a cart (and potentially even fail the quest).
  • Kamehame Hadoken: As part of the Street Fighter V Arcade Edition collaboration, you can purchase a Hadoken Gesture for $3.99. In addition to looking exactly like its Street Fighter counterpart, the gesture deals minor damage if it makes contact with an enemy.
  • Later Installment Weirdness: Judging by how much World deviates from traditional MonHun fare, one may think that it's a spinoff. No, Capcom has stated that it is the fifth mainline game. To elaborate:
    • Sub-areas of maps are now seamless, instead of being separate instanced areas.
    • Instead of using paintballs to track enemies, you now train scoutflies by finding traces like footprints or feathers, then the scoutflies will automatically track monsters on the map for you.
    • You now use the same armor between Blademaster and Gunner weapons. Instead, what differentiates the two types in terms of defense is boosted defense for Blademasters and boosted elemental resistances for Gunners.
    • Armor Skills work completely different than in previous games. Earlier in the series, gear features Skill Points for particular Skills, and a Skill will only activate if your combined gear built up enough points. In World, having a Skill on your equipment outright gives you the Skill's effect. In addition, having more of the same Skill equipped at once can boost the effectiveness of that Skill, and certain Armor sets can have Set Bonuses that grant an additional Skill on top of the ones granted by your Armor if you wear enough pieces of the same Set.
    • Charms and Decorations have switched functions: instead of finding Charms out on the field with randomized Skill Point distribution based on Charm type and Rarity, Charms are now crafted from materials through the Smithy and are upgraded the same way as weapons, with upgrades increasing the number of Skill Points that the Charm grants. Decorations are found as randomized rewards and can be melded into other Decorations, just like Charms used to.
    • The base camp has been substantially upgraded; among other things, you can change weapons, restock supplies, and eat at a canteen, where previously you would be stuck once you began a mission.
    • There's actual voiced dialogue now, though you are free to use the traditional "Monster Hunter Language" (as the game calls it) if you want.
    • By default, color-coded damage numbers are now shown for attacks.
    • The highest quest rank introduced in Iceborne is named Master Rank instead of G Rank.
  • Lava is Boiling Kool-Aid: Downplayed. Areas where lava can be walked on treat it as solid floor rather than a liquid. While Lavasioth is able to freely swim through it as usual, the lava that spatters off of its body is viscous and doesn't spread much before it cools and hardens.
  • Lethal Lava Land: The Elder's Recess is a place full of lava flows and enormous crystals created by the resulting pressure and heat.
  • The Lifestream: The New World has the Everstream. It's basically a bunch of lava tunnels that provide the energy for life all over the New World. Zorah Magdaros wants to go there and die. Unfortunately, this would have catastrophic consequences given the immense energy its death would release, so it's up to the Commission to drive it away.
  • Life Drain: The Health Regen augment is essentially Life-Steal built in to your weapons.
  • Limit Break: World imbues the Generations spirit into its Bowguns, as both the Light and Heavy Bowguns are now armed with "Special Shots" that are independent of your normal ammo, are tied to the weapon itself, and can only be used when you have Special Shot gauge left to spare. Special Shots pack an enormous punch and come in several different varieties, like the Light Bowgun's "Wyvernblast", which plants a landmine that can be detonated with attacks or shots, or the Heavy Bowgun's "Wyvernheart" (More Dakka) and "Wyvernsnipe" (Pierce Ammo + Stuff Blowing Up) Shots.
  • Make My Monster Grow: The Final Fantasy XIV collaboration additionally includes a unique Kulu-Ya-Ku fight that involves battling a Kulu-Ya-Ku who grows much larger after being mutated by the Crystal. Not only is it twice as large, it wields the Crystal as a weapon in place of a rock.
  • Mascot: Nergigante is the most advertised monster of the game, with Anjanath also being prominently featured. Velkhana is the flagship of Iceborne.
  • Mêlée à Trois:
    • Unlike previous games, where pissing off multiple monsters in a given area would cause them to gang up on you, World changes how monsters interact so that if another monster enters the immediate vicinity of another, they will sometimes try to fight each other, even if you're in the middle of fighting one of them. The "Turf War" mechanic not only gives you a major opportunity to either recover or wail on your target while it's distracted, monster-on-monster combat has been buffed in World so that monsters attacking each other inflict several hundred damage at a time. It's very possible for your wounded quarry to be killed in a fight with another monster, it is important to note that due to how "Turf Wars" work those fights in particular will never result in a dead monster (the animation of a monster getting up from a Turf War automatically prevents either from dying in one - they'll leave the Turf War with precisely one hit point instead to account for it) but simply throwing a stone at it after it's over will finish the job if they're that close.
    • If both any version of a Rathalos and Rathian are on a map together, attacking one will bring the other to the fight. They'll then go for a two-on-one until one of them is either damaged enough or a dung pod is used.
    • Teostra and Lunastra stick to the same areas and will work together to fight the Hunter. One special Event quest takes this further by having the duo get into a Turf War with Nergigante.
  • The Migration: The story of World is centered around the Elder Crossing, a phenomenon that occurs every 10 years whereupon Elder Dragons migrate to the New World. Countless Hunters, scholars, and so forth have been sent from the Commission to the New World in order to investigate and find the truth about the Elder Crossing.
  • Money Multiplier: Investigations can randomly receive a bonus that increases the zenny award for completion. Lucky Vouchers also double the zenny award of any mission with a cash reward.
  • More Dakka: Heavy Bowguns' "Wyvernheart" Special Ammo, which allows the Heavy Bowgun to rapidly pump out shells into a desired target. Unlike Siege Mode, this is completely separate from your existing ammunition types and has effectively unlimited ammo, but must recharge between uses.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The Huntsman is a walking, talking example of one to previous Monster Hunter protagonists. He wears a unique version of Rathian armour in the old pattern with a full-cover helmet that conceals his face (and that he never takes off), and he refuses to use new-fangled technology like the slinger or the scoutflies.
    • Furthermore, the Huntsman has a particular focus, after Nergigante, on Teostra, with a lot of implication that he's fought one or more before. Unsurprisingly, his blademaster armor is specifically a model from Monster Hunter Dos, and there's some further implication he's even none other than the star of the intro to MH2G. Teostra is one of the central monsters of Dos/2G.
  • Nobody Poops: Both averted and played straight.
    • Played straight in that the player character, despite a diet of rich protein in vast quantities, never stops to relieve themselves.
    • Averted with the monsters. Like most titles in the series, they produce Dung, which players will be eager to collect to collect to produce Dung Pods.
  • No-Sell:
    • As in the rest of the series, Elder Dragons are completely immune to traps. There are also some specific immunities, such as Kirin being immune to Flash Pods.
    • Monsters will gradually become more resistant to repeatedly used status effects, and in version 3, Tempered monsters will become completely immune after being hit with enough Flash Pods.
  • Non-Indicative Name:
    • Diablos is considered an Apex Predator despite being a Herbivore. This might actually be a title for the strongest monsters in the locale rather than an actual predator.
    • One example that's actually invoked and explained by the head biologist; he explains that "Elder Dragon" is less of a term for dragons and more of a term for unusual monsters that don't fall into the regular evolutionary tree.
  • Not Quite Dead: "Blazing Sun" ends with the Teostra defeated and then carved by the Hunter per usual. Despite this, it's apparently only wounded and reappears in "Pandora's Arena" where it's recovering from the injuries.
  • Outside-Context Problem: Leshen is this to the Commission - unlike the various bestial but still understandable monsters that dominate the Monster Hunter universe, Leshen is a very angry humanoid nature spirit from a Dark Fantasy universe. Notably, you aren't the one to hunt it - the Commission instead hires Geralt to kill it, as he's fought it before.
    • Behemoth is a Downplayed example - its magical abilities are certainly unlike anything ever seen in the New World, but it still has enough similarities to existing monsters that the commission is willing to send hunters after it, unlike with Leshen.
  • Orphaned Etymology: It's clearly only used for a pickle pun, but the Handler refers to her meeting with the Deviljho as "that wasn't kosher". Kosher is a Jewish word related to dietary laws, and the pickles are only called kosher because they're frequently sold in delis.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: The Ghillie Mantle is introduced in the Ancient Forest where it makes sense to disguise yourself as part of the green vegetation. It makes less sense that it just as easily fools monsters in the nearby desert, corpse pit, and active volcano.
  • Pint-Sized Powerhouse:
    • The Gajalakas. Their miniature size belies their surprisingly high attack power; one hit from them can deal as much damage as the average hit from a large monster, and they typically show up in packs of three or four.
    • Mini crown monsters. Despite being vastly smaller than typical for their species, they still hit as hard as a normal-sized monster.
    • Compared to the other Apex Predators, the Odogaron is much smaller. It doesn't prevent it from being such.
  • Power Creep: Each major title update added bigger and nastier monsters, and as such added weapons and armor to fight them that continued to surpass the base roster. First was Deviljho, with weapons that have some of the highest raw damage in the game plus white Sharpness with any level of Handicraft. Then came Kulve Taroth, with weapons that outclass the majority of the craftable roster if one is lucky enough to find them. Then Lunastra, whose weapons have high Affinity, many high-level slots, natural white Sharpness, and come with Set Bonus skills built-in, with the near-invinciblity Temporal Mantle added on the side. Then Behemoth, whose Drachen armor set is considered one of the strongest in the entire series with an emphasis on critical hits in a meta built on it plus tons of slots. Finally, Arch-Tempered Kulve Taroth, whose Kjarr weapons have skills like Critical Status and Critical Element built in on top of their already astounding stats.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Tempered Monsters have a purple outline around their icon while looking at quest information. Was eventually subverted with the addition of Arch Tempered Monsters, which have a Thick Red Outline instead.
  • Rare Random Drop:
    • Plates and gems are the rarest monster part and required for high end armor and weapons. Their drop rate can be increased slightly by breaking as many parts of the monster as possible, but they are never guaranteed. They can also be gotten by the Melder, if one has various Wyvernian Tickets, but these require taking on Limited Bounties overtime.
    • Warrior's Streamstones and Hero's Streamstones are special items that allow you to further augment a fully-upgraded weapon like in 4 Ultimate. However, they only drop incredibly rarely from high-level Tempered Monster quests. Hero's Streamstones in particular have a drop rate of 3% from Tempered Elder Dragon investigations. And there are seven types of them, effectively making it a 0.43% chance of getting the one you want from a TED quest.
    • Attack Jewels are among the most coveted Decorations, but many hunters have gone hundreds of hours without obtaining more than the one given for free.
  • Recurring Boss: Zorah Magdaros is encountered three times in the story: In the prologue where you can only flee; at the end of the first act when you can fight back but ultimately lose; and at the end of Low Rank when he is finally driven off.
  • Recurring Element: Several:
    • One of the first monsters you fight is a weaker monster that serves as the King Mook of a weaker monster. Though unlike previous games, these monsters are Fanged Wyverns reminiscent of lizards rather than Theropod Bird Wyverns.
    • A weak and comical "true" Bird Wyvern that acts as the hunter's first real challenge.
    • A Flying Wyvern that does not take after any reptilian monsters and is a source of an item needed for boosting drink buffs.
    • A Massive Elder Dragon that cannot be fought on land, and hunters must use cannons and ballistae.
    • An Invasive Elder Dragon level monster that shows up in High Rank, with a Background Music Override telling you to get the hell out of there lest you or a few fellow hunters get carted.
    • Tempered Monsters continue the concept of beefier, stronger monsters that serve as a post-game challenge. Arch Tempered takes it even further and are the closest equivalents to Apex Monsters from 4U/Deviants from Generations.
    • A newer monster that challenges Rathalos. Only this time, Rathalos comes out on top.
  • Retcon: Lunastra was said to be the more docile between her and Teostra during the second generation games lore. She's actually more aggressive here.
  • Revisiting the Roots: Despite all the departures from the formula, there are elements of this. For example, World brings us back to relative realism after the comparatively fantastical Generations games. World also marks a return to the PlayStation line again after several Nintendo-exclusive entries.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter:
    • Poogies return (But not Moofahs) and many endemic life can be captured and treated as adorable pets. The former can even be petted/carried! Beyond looking for small, hidden treasure around Astera, this has no gameplay benefits.
    • Paolumu is the closest thing for large monsters, compared to the more terrfying ones, but even that's before it becomes provoked.
  • Ribcage Ridge: There's one in the Rotten Vale, easily identifiable as a Dalamadur's remains.
  • Rocket-Powered Weapon: The winning design of the first fan weapon design content, the Wyvern Ignition, is a rocket powered greatsword.
  • Running Gag: The Handler asking the Player Character why they came to the New World at various points in the game. She never gets an answer.
    The Handler: DO YOU EVEN HAVE A REASON?!
  • Set Bonus: Many armor sets have special skills that activate if you're wearing a certain number of pieces from the same set.
  • Shifting Sand Land: The Wildspire Waste, a rocky desert known for its eponymous giant anthills. Also contains wetlands in the south.
  • Shoryuken: You can purchase a Dragon Punch Gesture in World for $3.99 USD. It has invulnerability frames when performed, which has niche applications, but is otherwise nothing game-changing.
  • Shown Their Work: World features two interconnected ecosystems: the Coral Highlands and the Rotten Vale beneath it. Animals from the Highlands die and drop into the Vale, where scavengers will eat their corpses. The detritus created by these rotting carcasses is eventually blown upward back into the Highlands, providing it with necessary nutrients. Other than the fact that this is all taking place on land, this cycle is a fairly accurate depiction of the marine snow and upwelling processes seen in the ocean.
  • Skippable Boss: Nergigante during both Zorah Magdaros fights. It will stay in a set fight arena and can be safely ignored as it will eventually retreat once enough time has passed. This is not the case for Arch-Tempered Zorah Magdaros; ignoring it will only delay the final stage.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: Hoarfrost Reach, the central map of Iceborne, is a massive frozen forest.
  • Smart People Wear Glasses: The Strategist Spectacles. Text flavor aside, it gives players a small, but notable increase in the critical eye skill. It also gives a small boost to elemental resistances.
  • Solid Gold Poop: There's nothing golden about it, but monster dung is a valuable resource for players to harvest thanks to its uncanny ability to drive any and all monsters away when crafted into Dung Pods. Very useful to have when a tough monster like Bazelgeuse shows up to interrupt your hunt.
  • Speaking Simlish: In the majority of installments, all voiced human dialogue is in a made-up "Monster Hunter Language". World introduces actual voice acting in various languages, but this can also be turned off and replaced with the standard gibberish.
  • Spin Attack:
    • The Dual Blades feature a new aerial spin attack that makes you look like Levi from Attack on Titan.
    • The Hammer has two spinning attacks, one for dealing multiple blows while moving and the other for a smaller number of strong blows in one spot.
  • Stealth Pun: Rathalos is the apex predator of the Ancient Forest. His animal motif is the Lion. Basically, he's the King of the Jungle.
  • Super Mode:
    • Tempered monsters. Just like 4U and Generations frenzied and hyper monsters respectively, these are stronger than usual monsters that the player doesn't fight till after post-game. Unlike frenzied or hypers, however, Elder Dragons can now be tempered. Arch-Tempered monsters added in ver 4.00 fill the roles of apex monsters and deviants, being even stronger versions of said monsters.
    • World extends the Charge Blade's Element Up capabilities by enabling you to charge your Sword with Phial power. By entering Element Up, then initiating a Charge in Sword Mode and holding the Light Attack button during the Charge until you see your Shield burst with energy, then release the Light Attack button, your Sword will become charged. While charged, this grants, among other things, Mind's Eye as a weapon ability, which additionally allows you to strike with your Sword even if you're in Overcharge state, and the ability to apply a Phial burst upon landing any attack in Sword Mode that deals Phial-based additional damage.
    • World grants Switch Axe the ability to enter Amped Mode, which rewards aggressiveness in Sword Mode with even stronger Sword Mode attacks and the ability to apply a Phial burst when landing any attack in Sword Mode that deals Phial-based additional damage. In addition, being in Amped Mode transforms the Element Discharge into the powerful Zero Sum Discharge, which involves mounting a target, then stabbing the Switch Axe into the target while unleashing a full power Element Discharge.
  • Suspicious Videogame Generosity: Meta example; when Lunastra was added, so was a very powerful mantle that was basically an automatic Adept mode from Generations built into it. Not only would it be very useful against Lunastra in future hunts, it essentially became a recommended tool against the Arch-Tempered Monsters.
  • Take Your Time:
    • The main story will wait if you choose to instead go run other missions instead. Taking your time is actually a very good idea as it's the key to building up your armor and weapons to deal with the story missions.
    • Averted with the optional Zorah Magdaros mission and Xeno'jiiva mission that appear after completing Low Rank and High Rank respectively. The missions are only available for the length of two missions, at which point they despawn. Thankfully, they will randomly respawn.
  • Temporary Online Content: The free DLC events are now a limited, one-time thing like in Tri as opposed to an extra quest that's saved permanently on your system.
  • That's No Moon!: The Hunter's ship ends up aground on a volcanic rock. But as you navigate it, it starts to move. You're on the back of the Zorah Magdaros.
  • Timed Mission:
    • All missions have a time limit, usually set at 50 minutes. Investigations often reduce that window, sometimes to as little as 15 minutes, in exchange for more rewards.
    • During Expeditions monsters will only remain on the map for a limited time, after which they will leave even if they are on the verge of death.
    • During the Deviljho assignment, the Handler accidentally gets stuck atop a raging Deviljho, requiring you to topple the beast before she falls off and ends up as Deviljho chow.
  • Too Awesome to Use: Defied with the Lucky Vouchers, since they're given out on a real-time basis but you plain lose out on new ones if you already have five. It encourages players to just use them.
  • Under the Sea: Subverted with the Coral Highlands. It looks just like a gorgeous coral reef, but there's no ocean. In fact, the entire thing is precariously perched atop cliffs.
  • Vendor Trash: Trade-in items such as the various metal eggs, Argosy stones, and Bandit Mantle scales only exist to be sold for zenny.
  • Violently Protective Girlfriend:
    • While it always the case in older games, the Rathian will know when a hunter is attacking a Rathalos and come to his aid, with a surprise attack often. The improved AI expands upon this with both monsters having increased tandem to kill a hunter.
    • This is how Lunastra gets introduced: it fends off a Nergigante who saw easy prey in a wounded Teostra, and then fights the Hunter to buy time for the Teostra to escape.
  • Virtual Pet: Poogie returns, and if you pet him after a few quests in a row he'll enter a state of loving you to bits. After that you can carry him around to find Poogie costumes and other items. You can also capture various small wildlife in the different maps and let them loose as pets in your room; with each upgrade you can set more with the highest room upgrade allowing you to display a small zoo's worth of creatures, which you can then interact with by "resting" in your room.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss:
    • Anjanath serves as the wall barring you from leaving the Ancient Forest for other locales. Its extreme aggression is a big change from the Great Jagras and Tobi-Kadachi you were fighting before that. It's also the first monster that will go out of its way to chase you down, demonstrating just how much the new open maps change the way the game is played.
    • Diablos makes the monsters encountered before it look like wet noodles. It has astounding speed and ferocity compared to anything encountered before it (even Anjanath) is rather foul-tempered, and is the first monster you encounter that can regularly hit for half your health in damage. The constant burrowing also prevents you from hitting it and lets it get surprise attacks on you, which complements its high attack power.
    • Nergigante is the first Elder Dragon players will kill and a forewarning of what's to come with its brethren. It's lightning fast and flight capable, its abilities are constantly changing due to his thorns growing and breaking, and its divebomb ability is not only a one-hit kill but it also has a massive AoE radius. Once low on health things get worse, as it will purposefully injure itself to generate thorns and divebomb more frequently while also retreating to a small lair where dodging is even harder.
    • With its implementation in the Spring Update, Deviljho takes this throne up once again, roaming about six star quests, seven star quests, and high-rank expeditions. A new player fresh into high-rank won't be even remotely close to being equipped to deal with it safely until very close to the end of the story.
    • Tempered Kirin, the very first Tempered Elder Dragon that players face at Hunter Rank 49, and the hardest hunt in the game so far (even more than Tempered Deviljho). Anyone who hasn't been building monster specific gear with the right resistances, or hasn't learned to play carefully, focusing on pure DPS, will quickly learn to do so during this hunt. Additionally, the hunt becomes much harder in groups due to its already powerful lightning attacks becoming almost guaranteed one-hit kills, meaning that players who've been using group hunts to get by are now made to learn to play the game solo.
    • Arch Tempered Vaal Hazak. While Tempered Deviljhonote  and Arch Tempered Kirin were already established walls that only had slight changes elsewhere besides damage and durability, Arch Tempered Vaal Hazak has a tweaked AI that is not only more aggressive, it will effectively take advantage of its miasma armor by landing in the middle regions of the Rotten Vale where the damage over time from the area's effluvia.
  • We Are as Mayflies: In The Witcher crossover, the Wyverian Botanist tells Geralt that he began studying plants because he was tired of watching Human companions come and go around him.
  • Why Isn't It Attacking?: For the first time in the series, large monsters don't necessarily attack on sight. A few do, and some will attack if you begin to approach, but in many cases you can safely stroll at a monster's shoulder.
  • The Worf Effect: If certain large monsters meet, they may have a Turf War, where they will engage in a brief but fierce fight. Most are one-sided with the more powerful predator beating the lesser one into submission very easily (for example, Anjanath beats Great Jagras and Tobi-Kadachi, but is beaten by Rathalos). In rarer cases, both monsters will take damage, though one will come out as victorious in the end, as is the case with Barroth fighting Jyuratodus and Nergigante fighting Teostra or Kushala Daora.
    • Deviljho specializes in this in particular. It has Turf Wars with many of the larger monsters that it handily wins and the small monsters don't even get a fighting chance before Jho grabs them with its jaws and starts smashing them about as an improvised weapon. The only monster that gets away is Bazelgeuse and even it only escapes because Jho tries to tear its throat out and gets a mouthful of explosive scales for its trouble.
    • The one that stands out is how Deviljho deals with Diablos: it catches and stops Diablos mid-charge and then suplexes it for a ton of damage. Scary for many players given Diablos has a reputation as a rather tough Wake-Up Call Boss and is a favourite for a lot of theoretical "who would win?" monster matchups.
    • Lunastra is introduced when Nergigante tries to jump a wounded Teostra. Lunastra arrives and the two proceed to tag-team Nergigante until he retreats with tail between his legs.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: Over 40 years the Guild has only managed to send five fleets to the New World to form and aid the Research Commission on account of the seas and the skies being turbulent on the best of days. This leaves the Research Commission cut off and makes returning home a borderline impossible task most of the time. And while the Research Commission makes their absolute best efforts to send couples expecting children home, it's far more common for children that are born in the New World, such as the Field Commander, to grow up there. Once the Zorah Magdaros crisis is solved, the seas calm enough that the Captain decides to start braving them on the Argosy to provide a line of imports from the Old World. Once Xeno'jiiva is slain, the seas and skies clear completely allowing the Research Commission and Guild to regularly send ships, supplies, and provide transport back home to the Old World should one desire; however most of the Commission's hunters have grown to love the new continent so much that they don't want to go back.
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