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  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • Bazelgeuse's method of attacking can sometimes look less like a B-52 Bomber and more like a bird dropping... something else.
    • Additionally, plenty of people unfamiliar with Barroth from previous games think he's flinging something other than mud.
    • When are Nergigante's thorns signalling that he's going to do his infamous divebomb? When they're Long, Black, and Hard.
    • What does the Handler tell you about weakening Kulve Taroth's golden mantle? Beat/shoot her chest. Then you proceed to strip her of her mantle.
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  • Americans Hate Tingle: The Handler is very popular in Japan for her cute quirks, but Westerners have a less forgiving attitude toward her propensity for running headlong into danger. She doesn't tend to be quite The Scrappy, as she does know when to fold 'em and actually is smart once she realizes things have gotten dangerous, but she tends to lose a lot a sympathy when the PC hunter is the only reason she's still alive after rushing headfirst into a dangerous area.
  • Annoying Video Game Helper: Palicoes are still at this, even after all these years. While the main ''Monster Hunter'' YMMV page complains about their attempts to knock a hunter out of stun, the issue in World is exactly the opposite. While equipped with most gadgets, they will often quite competently slap the sense into a stunned hunter... but if they're equipped with the Coral Orchestra gadget then you are so out of luck. The Orchestra does grant the useful Negate Stun buff if your Palico remembers to use it, but if it drops off (or was never applied) and you're stunned as a result then your Palico will often run right up to you or dig their way there... and then proceed to try and apply Negate Stun, which takes longer than it would to slap a stunned hunter. However, this appears to have been at least partly corrected as of Iceborne, where your Palico is MUCH more likely to smack you out of stun than previously.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
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    • The final battle with Zorah Magdaros has become infamous for being 15 minutes of attacking rocks and loading cannons. Granted, you're not trying to kill the poor thing, but it is still considered a resounding disappointment. The Arch-Tempered version is at least more involved. note 
    • The mystery final boss, Xeno'jiiva, also is this for a lot of hunters, but that's more because anyone who gets to it had to be forged in the fires of Nergigante and Teostra first. Compared to the other late-game monsters, Mystery Monster is enormous, but if anything this makes it easier to get around and to hit (especially for Insect Glaive users, who can use the boss to stay airborne forever) and it's rather bad about using its bulk to try and punish you outside of a few very heavily telegraphed attacks, usually preferring to try and use Frickin' Laser Beams instead (which are not too difficult to dodge). Having no elemental weakness but conversely no elemental resistance also doesn't help, along with having very large and easy-to-hit weak spots. It does have a ton of HP, but once you quickly learn what few attacks you need to be careful about, that just serves to drag the fight out more than anything. There might be some story justification for this, given that it might be an infant, but even so. The Arch-Tempered version significantly ups the difficulty, not just with its massive HP and a shorter time limit but with having multiple new attacks and additions to its older ones.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
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    • The monster hunter team admitted they made World easier so that newer players would not be intimidated. The response after hearing It's Easy, So It Sucks! was that they're making Iceborne quite a bit harder to address difficulty issues. It helps that many of the newer players are now accustomed to the more challenging aspects so now they can go all out.
    • The relatively mild complaints about the lack of monster diversity (too many fire element, barely any water or ice element, and dominated by birds and dinosaurs) have also been addressed by making the expansion focus on the barely-used ice element, adding more mammalian monsters (including the previously absent Fanged Beast category), and making the newly introduced subspecies of other monsters use less-common abilities.
    • Many Master Rank armors have unique designs, including homages to prior games in the series, rather than just being recolors or minor variations of lower ranked armor like High Rank armor was to Low Rank. This includes making previously unique sets, like the Huntsman's Rathian Armor now being the Master Rank design.
    • The October 2019 update features many new Layered Armor Setsnote  based on armors from Low Rank and High Rank, with the promise of more sets on the horizon.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • The Handler, as mentioned in Americans Hate Tingle, does have a few fans in Western countries, but she isn't nearly as liked as she is in Japan. Said entry above explains everything.
    • Anjanath is either loved for being a badass fire-breathing semi-realistic Tyrannosaurus rex and a cool choice for an early-game big boss, or hated for its frustrating boss battle and underwhelming power and uninspired design compared to previous T. rex monsters such as Deviljho. A common criticism of the monster is that it shares many characteristics with Glavenus without the unique aspects that made Glavenus so memorable, which became even more glaring when that monster returned in Iceborne.
    • Is Lunastra a perfect challenge that forces players to stop going Glass Cannon, or an exercise in frustration even with defensive skills equipped? No one can really agree.
    • Kushala Daora. A reasonable challenge that just requires you to swap to a ranged weapon, and thus, a fair challenge, or complete bullshit because of it?
    • Bazelgeuse is either cooler than Deviljho, equally as cool, or a lot more annoying as an invading monster.
    • Kulve Taroth, Behemoth, and Ancient Leshen. Monster Hunter has always had a multiplayer aspect to it even while allowing solo players access to all substantial content if they wish to earn it on their own, but a solo siege of Kulve Taroth can take upwards of hours, while Behemoth and Ancient Leshen are both actively balanced around being fought by a group. Some take issue that these three monsters all hold some of the most powerful and useful gear in the game and the time commitment or difficulty of the solo fights makes them outright unfair, while others contend that their uniqueness and the transitioning of the franchise justifies their existence.
    • Arch Tempered Elder Dragons event quests are all over the spectrum depending on the quest. They're either seen as fun and rewarding challenge to endgame players or a bad case of artificial difficulty whose changes do nothing but make the fight more frustrating and serve as filler.
    • From a lore sperspective, Nergigante. Some (particularly fans of previous titles) take issue with its theme, particularly when its opponents in turf wars don't make full use of their unique abilities, simply bum-rushing a creature who specializes in physical brawling. note  Others will argue that Nergigante still takes significant damage in all of its turf wars, and offscreen the regular variant had been failing to successfully hunt in spite of being an invasive species that the native Elder Dragons are unfamiliar with. At the same time, these setbacks undermine Nergigante's reputation as The Dreaded to critics, and the in-game claims that it served as a "reactionary force" against Elder Dragons disrupting the environment flies in the face of Nergigante interfering with efforts to repel the dying Zorah Magdaros, who would have destroyed the entire New World if not driven away, although Iceborne shows this claim in action when Ruiner Nergigante kills the Not Quite Dead Final Boss. It also raises the question why it never responded to the serious ecological near-disasters in previous titles.
  • Breather Boss:
    • Of the Low Rank monsters required for Assignments, Radobaan is fairly easy due to it being a weaker Uragaan with no major gimmicks and easily breakable armor, and it never goes into the hazardous lower areas of the Rotten Vale. It's also the last monster you face before you start getting quests to fight the apex monsters of each region that cap off Low Rank.
    • Both of the Zorah Magdaros fights qualify; the first time, you just fought your first Anjanath (who is your introduction to truly dangerous big critters and a major wall for new players) and the second time, you're hot off of fighting Rathalos and Diablos, the two biggest threats in low rank. Zorah, meanwhile, involves shooting him with some cannons, running around breaking rocks on his back, and having a few token exhibition fights with Nergi. The first one is completely scripted, and even the second is hard to lose so long as you have a pulse. Hell, you can even IGNORE IT COMPLETELY in favor of going around and breaking more Magma Cores and the like, in which it will simply just stand there for a few minutes before flying away, which is a godsend for solo players and a huge convenience for groups.
    • Upon entering High Rank, the first monster the player has to hunt is a lowly Pukei-Pukei. While the huge jump in stats it gets can be startling, it behaves just like it did in Low Rank and anyone with enough experience fighting it can beat it with a Low Rank loadout. The next High Rank monster you're required to hunt for an Assignment (after you finish tracking Pink Rathian)? Anjanath.
  • Broken Base:
    • Is there enough endgame content in the base game? Is the amount of monsters on launch acceptable? Some say it's okay since not only is World using a new engine requiring everything to be done from scratch, while others point out that Capcom is a big company and should have the funds to hire more people to help add in new models. The Iceborne expansion seems to address this problem.
    • The Earplugs ability. No one will tell you the skill is worthless, but there is contention over whether it's worth the cost to have higher level versions of the skill. Some argue that it's wiser to practice rolling through roars so you can concentrate on damage-increasing abilities, while others feel that perfectly dodging roars is too difficult and that being able to simply ignore them is worth it.
    • Whether or not G-Rank should have been added to the game from the start instead of coming with the expansion is this. Some argue that it's series tradition that G-Rank doesn't come in the first game of a new generation. Other say that sticking to tradition has robbed World of a more meaningful endgame.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • For those who disliked fighting Dalamadur in 4 and 4U, the Rotten Vale can be an oddly pleasant sight, since it's mostly made up of the monster's corpse.
    • Is there a certain monster you don't like? Thanks to the turf war mechanic, some monsters suffer The Worf Effect, one such example is Rathalos beating the shit out of Anjanath.
    • Those who really hate Deviljho finally got this when The Greatest Jagras showed up - not only could this overgrown Warm-Up Boss beat the stuffing out of Jho, the World Eater actively tries to run away from the fanged wyvern. And in Iceborne, Yian Garuga knocks the Brute Wyvern to the ground with a tail slap.
      • On the flip side, those that hate Yian Garuga for constantly tormenting Yian Kut-Ku and being an annoying monster to hunt (mainly in previous generations) celebrated when the Bird Wyvern gets defeated easily by Rajang.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: Has its own page
  • Contested Sequel: The game has been praised far and wide for dramatically streamlining the more clunky elements of the series and having the most beautiful visuals of any Monster Hunter game to date, to the point where it's hard to go back to old/"traditional" MonHun games. On the other hand, however, it does have its critics, who feel that the game doesn't offer enough in terms of monster variety (while more monsters were added over time, this has led to accusations that World was released as an incomplete game), has a lackluster endgame, makes event quests a hassle by making them and their rewards time-limited, and makes things a little too simplified. As such, Iceborne addresses many of the aforementioned complaints, including higher difficulty and a large number of returning monsters. Furthermore, World is exclusively for home consoles and PCs; while this does mean that the game is designed around much more powerful hardware thus allowing it to do things that the Switch, much less the 3DS, cannot, for many longtime fans, a big part of the appeal is meeting up with friends in person to play; even playing on a laptop just doesn't match the play-on-the-go factor of the PSP, 3DS, iOS devices, or the Switch. This last one is a much bigger point of contention in Japan, where the series took off because of its prominence on the PSP.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Gajalakas. While they're not too durable, they do a lot of damage for their size AND they can cause some nasty ailments to the player. Thankfully, large monsters are not immune to them either and they're smart enough to know large monsters are a bigger threat to them than hunters when both are present. Of course if you're between a downed monster and Gajalaka you're likely to get hit in the crossfire.
    • The basic Jagras summoned by the Ancient Leshen become this in the second The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt crossover event mission. Not only do they have ridiculously more health than usual, but the Ancient Leshen can also mark a player, causing the Jagras to relentlessly attack them, forcing the unlucky player to divide their attention between both the Leshen and the pack before they get swarmed. To make matters worse, unlike normal Jagras who will flee after a few of them are killed, these ones will not let up until you've slain all of them.
    • Banbaro in Iceborne. It's one of the weaker monsters in Master Rank, so it wouldn't be a big deal, right? Think again. This dino-moose is huge, aggressive when encountering other monsters (otherwise it's docile until damaged), and hits like a truck, with charge attacks that deal huge damage and knockback. But the kicker is that it will show up in every map at some point and doesn't just keep to itself; it's all to happy to crash your hunts a la Deviljho or Bazelgeuse and either waste your valuable hunting time or cart you outright. Hope you remembered to pack Dung Pods.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Fans were immediately taken with Yian Kut-Ku's new cousin, Kulu-Ya-Ku, due to its adorable, yet funny dodo-like design and goofy mannerisms involving the rocks it's fond of digging up.
    • The Great Jagras, despite being a Warm-Up Boss along the lines of Great Jaggi or Velocidrome, quickly gained infamy for its habit of swallowing entire monsters whole and looking appropriately bloated as a result, leading to a flurry of vore-related memes about it.
    • Tobi-Kadachi immediately garnered fans upon its reveal due to its unique snake-ferret design, its flying squirrel-esque flight, and for being a new Fanged Wyvern. All in spite of appearing for about six seconds in its reveal trailer.
    • Great Girros quickly became loved after release due to its ability to paralyze other large monsters, which made it a Helpful Mook for many, as well as its awesome-looking Plague Doctor armor set.
    • Likewise, Tzitzi-Ya-Ku is a favorite among hunters tackling Legiana or Paolumu due to their habit of turning up out of nowhere seemingly just to flash the flying monster out of the sky.
    • Dodogama also has its own share of fans due to its comical appearance, especially compared to its much fiercer neighbors in the Elder's Recess. It also helps that it's not aggressive, happy to eat rocks instead of picking a fight with players.
    • Odogaron thanks to being a source of one of the most popular armor sets visually on both males and females. It doesn't hurt that said armor is quite good before going in to fight the stronger threats.
    • Among the endemic lives, the Wiggler is very popular in the Pixiv community thanks to the Wiggler Head Alpha headgear: a goofy, wiggling headgear that makes several items to affect nearby allies via the Wide-Range skill. It's also adorable.
    • Paratoads, another endemic creature, is popular for its ability to paralyze (most) large monsters. A well-timed kick on a yellow boi is sometimes all it takes to turn a bad hunt around.
    • Pukei-Pukei picked up a lot of fans after the Witcher III crossover event both for the efforts taken in keeping it alive in the mission, and the intelligence it shows in trying to thank Geralt afterwards, more than any non-Lynian monster in the entire series. To the point that many players have stopped slaying them or hunting them altogether.
    • The Serious Handler became this in Iceborne - including for those who don't like the Handler - after a short segment early in the story, when she temporarily takes over Handling duties while your Handler goes off searching with the Tracker. She even has her own animations for things like the Steamworks and cooking at the campsite.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • While not actually evil, Nergigante is very destructive. Didn't stop it from being rather memorable.
    • Again not evil, but the vanilla Final Boss, Xeno'jiiva, is more overtly harmful to the environment than Nergigante, and boasts a very visually stunning design and boss fight. It's also a cool concept in general, being a godlike and otherworldly take on the classic, mythological fire-breathing dragon.
  • Evil Is Sexy: A lot of the the skimpier armor sets, surprisingly, come from the more violent monsters, such as the Odogaron, Deviljho, and Zinogre.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the announcement of Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate finally being localized, the classic "Nintendo vs Sony" wars came back, with certain people saying they would drop World for GU. Others refuse to touch GU due to what they perceive to be a massive downgrade due to missing a lot of World's refinements and visuals.
  • Fridge Logic: The claim that Nergigante instinctively preserves the ecosystem by killing monsters that threaten the natural balance has gotten sidelong glances from some players. Why wasn't it doing anything to stop the earlier threats of the series, like Fatalis or Gogmazios? Simple. It's a New World monster. It was introduced in World and, while the Commission had seen it before, there was no specific indication that it was anywhere in the Old World.
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Slicing shots made nearly any other ammo type irrelevant on release. They are fast with a huge hitbox, incredibly accurate, deal a ton of consistent and focused damage, ignore critical distance and deal max damage at any range, sever tails ridiculously quickly, and can stunlock very easily. Their only downside is that careless gunners can trip other players incredibly easily due to Slicing shots' large hitboxes, and that's negated in singleplayer. As such, virtually every Heavy Bowgunner used Slicing shots. This was such a breaker, in fact, that Slicing got nerfed heavily in an early balance patch (which dropped it down to the mere depths of "really good in the right guns").
    • Spread Ammo, with a bowgun that can use them effectively note , a properly assigned set of skillsnote , and three Close Range Up mods, can result in a damage output comparable to hitting a monster with a charged Greatsword per shot, without any risk of bouncing off from the monster. If you happen to have Taroth Blitz "Spread" LBG (Rarity 8), you can even plant 3 Wyvernblasts to rack up the damage output even further. Even the most hard-shelled monster can be pelted like a Jagras.
    • The Deviljho HBG Dark Devourer is one of the best HBGs in the game, rivaled only by the Taroth Assault "Glutton." Take its enormous base damage, stir in its exceptionally good reload/clip size for cluster and sticky ammo, sprinkle 3 pieces of Xeno'jiva armor to give a chance of not consuming ammo; and you have the recipe for what basically amounts to an extremely high damage ranged hammer in group play and a weapon capable of melting even the highest ranked monsters in literal seconds in solo play. Blindfolded runs are easy to pull off with this beast of a gun.
    • The Nergigante and Vaal Hazak armors are extremely powerful for melee hunters. Their high defense stats allow the player to tank powerful attacks and their built-in healing abilities let the player recover that damage through aggressive play.
      • Both armor sets were dethroned by the Drachen set, especially in tandem with the Gae Bolg insect glaive that it comes with; not only does the armor itself have some very desirable natural skills that increase damage, it gives two good set bonuses, the first of which increases airborne element damage (useful for the insect glaive that it comes with) while the second negates sharpness loss for every critical hit, significantly boosted thanks to the high natural affinity of the weapon. The only downside besides its low fire resistance in a game where many of the strongest monsters employ fire damage is that it requires farming Behemoth, no easy task.
    • Prior to the 3.0 patch, there was "flash-locking". Players discovered that flashing certain flying monsters when they were trying to fly out to another area could get them caught in a loop where they'd try to continually fly out after they recovered from the flash. Players could abuse this to keep them from getting away, forcing to crash to the ground and take massive amounts of damage before they'd try to fly off and get caught in a flash again. This was patched out in the 3.0 patch by making it so that Tempered Monsters could now only be flashed 3 to 4 times before they'd become immune. The same goes with every Master Rank monster in Iceborne.
    • While many skills from previous games were adjusted such that multiple points of it would be required to have the same effect as in the previous games, one skill that wasn't was Fortify, a skill that provides a sizable boost to attack and defense based on how many times you've carted. While further impractical for multiplayer or during investigations that allow for fewer carts, there are literally no penalties using it during expeditions, it can be crafted after defeating the very first boss monster, and later on there are level 1 Fortify Jewels, allowing them to be easily thrown into nearly any set.
    • For speedrunners, the Bow as a class would frequently clock in kill times that were *minutes* faster than any of the other weapon classes, whose differences could be measured in seconds. This is due to the Bow's high damage uptime from being a ranged weapon, combined with the fact that it's max level charges would do similar damage as the strongest spread heavy bowguns, and the fact that the bow has incredible mobility that exceeds even light bowguns, means the weapon class far outstripped all but the most powerful of heavy bowguns. For certain match-ups the bow stands alone. Here are the Time Attack times for Extreme Behemoth, touted as the most difficult monster in the game. An expertly played Heavy Bowgun can reach 15 minutes. A solo Bow has recorded a 11 minutes, 37 seconds kill on Extreme Behemoth.
    • Master's Touch, native to Teostra Armor and the above-mentioned Drachen Armor, is more or less the meta-defining skill for Blademasters. It negates sharpness loss when you land a critical hit, which sounds balanced at first...except between augments and skills like Weakness Exploitnote  providing large affinity boosts, it is ridiculously easy to achieve 100% affinity with just about any weapon, allowing you to sit on infinite white sharpness and not even think about sharpening while tearing monsters apart.
    • The Cactaurs that now appear in the Wildspire Waste since Behemoth's arrival. Much like the Paratoads and their cousins elsewhere, you can kick them, which causes them to unleash a 1000 Needles attack that can rack up a lot of damage. Add in proper trap placement, and you can use them to kill some monsters outright.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The Hub Lass in the Gathering Hub was far better received in western countries than the Handler despite having a far smaller impact in the story, due to being seen as more professional and much more attractive.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • The Paratoad. Note that the Paratoad isn't inherently hostile, but if interacted with, it sprays a paralyzing gas that has the same effect as a Shock Trap... except it effects anything in its vicinity. That includes both monsters and Hunters, and anything in between, even Elder Dragons. This can cause problems in the middle of a hunt, since you can be in the middle of an intense fight one second, then the next second you're face planted on the ground while the monster is following suit; or managing to time it right and getting the monster paralyzed only for a small misstep causing you to also wind up paralyzed right next to it wasting any openings that could've been had. The same thing is true for their sleeptoad and nitrotoad cousins, though neither are as ubiquitous, sleep effect are nullifiable with consumable items, and the nitrotoad explosion has a longer delay and doesn't stick around as a cloud like the other two.
    • Anytime you step into water you are almost guaranteed to be hit by the Gajau sooner or later, which might as well be named 'water Bullfango'. Unlike the Bullfango however they have an annoying habit of circling you before charging - and do so from quite a distance - which means if you're busy fighting something else they'll most likely hit you from off camera.
    • Any hostile small monster, such as Jagras, Girros and Barnos. These monsters stop posing a challenge after the first few missions and only serve to annoy you as you hunt large monsters and prevent you from fast-traveling. Special mention goes to flyers like the effluvium corrupted Raphinos in the Rotten Vale and the Barnos in the Elder's Recess. Whereas ground-based monsters like Jagras are likely to get hit by (and die from) your weapon swings sooner or later, these flying monsters like to swoop in, knock you over and quickly fly out of reach.
    • Vespoids aren't as actively annoying as the small monsters, being less likely to attack and easier to kill. They make up for this with the fact that they can paralyze with one attack and their willingness to do so while you're fighting a monster.
    • The Gajalaka in the Kulve Taroth raid quest; they're already obnoxious as it, but unlike the ones found in the main game, these little bastards will interrupt you at the worst possible time.
  • Goddamned Boss: Paolumu, Lavasioth, Kushala Daora, and Vaal Hazak. Iceborne adds Shrieking Legiana. See this page for more details
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Bazelgeuse's enormous body, wide wingspan, and habit of flying low to the ground means it tends to get stuck in terrain a lot, especially while online.
    • The quest to hunt a tempered Deviljho had a way to reliably get him stuck in the terrain, even after being knocked down, until you beat him, trivializing the quest. Capcom took care of this by moving the quest from the Ancient Forest to the Elder's Recess.
    • The Switch Axe's Zero Sum Discharge allows you to latch onto a monster's body part while attacking. If done on Xeno'jiiva's tail when its tail is severed, you'll latch onto thin air.
    • There was a glitch that allowed you to chain a Super Amped Element Discharge into an Amped Element Discharge, but that was fixed in the 4.0 update.
    • Palico weapons with negative Affinity normally have a chance to deal reduced damage, but instead they're glitched so that they always crit.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Many joked that Kulve Taroth was basically a Queen Great Jagras when she debuted back early in the game's cycle. Nearly a year later, we got the Greatest Jagras, which itself is massive and powerful.
    • In Soul Calibur VI, Geralt's story mode has him back home. Shortly after the former's release, Geralt finds himself in another universe, making many joke that Geralt wasn't done being forced into traveling through portals.
    • Odogaron is often seen as an expy to Tigrex due to its aggressiveness. Not only does Tigrex return in Iceborne but it resides in Rotten Vale and manhandles Odogaron.
    • These videos from an animator known as NCHProductions are quite prophetic in hindsight.
      • This fan animation predicted a Zinogre/Rathalos turf war two years ahead of Zinogre's debut in Iceborne.
      • This fan animation of the Arch Tempered Zorah raid featured a Rajang coming out of nowhere, holding up a banner complaining that it is not in World. Jump forward to early September 2019...
      • This fan animation of a crossover between Splatoon and Monster Hunter featured Brachydios being the green team's fourth member, and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate allows the Inklings to fight a Rathalos. Now look at the Namielle Armor in Iceborne...
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • Deviljho's turf wars against many of the other monsters are savage to say the least, but perhaps the one that terrified everyone the most was when Diablos gets suplexed brutally. Deviljho picking up Odogaron like a chewtoy had a few of these as well.
    • Most people were expecting to get a Final Fantasy XIV themed armor and weapon set when the collaboration was announced. Then Behemoth was revealed as the next huntable monster.
    • By the time that The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt crossover was announced, most people were expecting that something similar to the Final Fantasy one mentioned above. Then came the reveal that Geralt is coming to Monster Hunter and will be completely playable.
    • The general reaction to Iceborne was already extremely positive when it was revealed that classic monsters like Tigrex, Nargacuga and Glavernus would be coming back in next-gen glory. Then the third trailer teases at the return of Brachydios, and the fandom went wild.
    • While Rajang preying upon Kirin was somewhat established by the lore in the Frontier games, this was mostly seen as an Informed Attribute in the main series since regular monsters could not intrude in Elder Dragon quests. Rajang's introductory cutscene in Iceborne made their respective positions in the food chain clear by having it absolutely destroy a Kirin in a fight, snapping off and eating its horn in the process.
  • Hype Backlash: Deviljho's announcement was treated with great reverence by veterans who told many a horror story about it to newer hunters. Once it was released many newer hunters wrote Jho off as easy, didn't get why the older hunters feared it so much, and became just a bit too cocky for their own good as they forgot they were in endgame gear and far out-scaled a standard Jho. The older hunters got the last laugh however once tempered Deviljho arrived.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!: A common complaint before the release of Iceborne (which gave Master Rank) was that the game was made "too easy". Many veterans were caught between appreciating the quality-of-life improvements and feeling that World went a little too far and "dumbed it down".
  • It's Short, So It Sucks!: The (initial) lack of G Rank once again for Western players note  combined with a monster roster significantly smaller than 4 Ultimate and Generations led to a lot of complaints that there wasn't enough to do in the endgame. While Capcom did add new monsters over time free of charge, this has led to accusations of artificially extending the life of the game and punishing early adopters. Confounding this is the fact that new monsters release at a glacial pace.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: When it was announced that Behemoth would become a huntable monster in collaboration with Final Fantasy XIV, many MH fans seemed less interested in hunting the Behemoth and more hopeful that its unique (to this game) but familiar skeleton might provide the means for fan-favorite Zinogre to make it to World. Zinogre would eventually be introduced in Iceborne using its own skeleton.
  • Meme Acknowledgement: In the Iceborne expansion, there is a parallel quest involving Dodogama in which the Chief Ecologist states that research in the Elder's Recess has stopped due to a rambunctious Dodogama. However, most of the hunters are refusing to hunt it because it's cute to them. This references the "Best Boi" nickname meme the community gave Dodogama for it's silly and endearing appearance.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • The Paratoad garnered this status among fans for being able to instantly paralyze Elder Dragons with its gas despite its small size.
    • Due to how much stronger Lunastra is, she's usually depicted as a protective and loving mother towards Teostra rather than as a mate.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • The Great Jagras joins the Great Jaggi and Yian Kut-Ku in the pantheon of Warm Up Bosses that everyone loves to bully.
    • Despite his initial status as That One Boss among newer players and The Dreaded in story, base Nergigante is seen as a literal punching bag by most of the fandom due to its unique spike mechanic making it easily to consistently chain trips until it dies.
    • Another That One Boss for new players, Anjanath, is mocked by a sector of the fanbase for being a "generic" Tyrannosaurus rex in a franchise that had previously introduced much stronger and scarier Brute Wyverns reminiscent of the dinosaur, as well as being a mid-tier predator with sneezing attacks that gets curb-stomped in turf wars with Rathalos.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "WHERE'S MY DRAGONATOR?!" Explanation 
    • "GAINS" Explanation 
    • "Featuring Dante from the Devil May Cry series" Explanation 
    • "DEEPEEASS" Explanation 
    • "THIGHS" Explanation 
    • Jokes about Kulve Taroth actually being a superior female Great Jagras came about due to it using the game skeleton and animations of the latter.
    • The legendary second Attack decoration. Explanation 
    • "Oops! All Wyverns!" as a criticism to the game's lack of monster variety.
    • Kushala skeleton Explanation 
    • Brachy Drumsticks Explanation 
    • Cats are more important than weapons. Explanation 
    • ZoDaZoDaZo, aka The JoJo Build Explanation 
  • Memetic Troll:
    • Did the USAF just order a bombing run on your High Rank hunt? Nope, just Bazelgeuse.
    • Wingdrakes in High Rank have a habit of constantly dropping hunters off in a random part of the map instead of camp at start of a quest, oftentimes in front of that Tempered monster that is the target.
  • Most Annoying Sound: For those having trouble with Behemoth during the collaboration storyline, the Final Fantasy XIV Theme that overrides the normal music in Asteria until the quest is done quickly becomes this.
  • Narm:
    • Can be invoked by the player through the use of mixing armours. It's better than in previous games, but Xeno'jiiva armour looks absolutely ridiculous. If you're a female it gives you a bridal veil. The ridiculousness can be turned Up to Eleven with the Wiggler Head, Kulu-Ya-Ku Head or even a Faux Felyne Head.
    • The Palico armour designs go into WTH, Costuming Department? easily, the higher up you go the more over the top and ridiculous they get. They start off with clothes, then go onto things that look like halloween masks and bridal veils.
    • Evade extender. Much like the past games it plays the same animation at roughly the same speed but increases your distance. In this game, it's even more notable because your character seems to suddenly perform a dodge-roll in slow motion yet they are practically sliding on the ground.
    • When a Tzitzi-Ya-Ku gets knocked over, it makes a very prominent chicken squawk as it goes down.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Bazelgeuse's roar, while unnatural sounding, can come off as more comical than terrifying for some...without context. Once you know that it means a nasty airplane wyvern has came to ruin your day, you know things went south.
    • Some weapon descriptions read like something straight out of Warhammer 40,000 lore. The Nergigante, Vaal Hazak and Deviljho weapons are especially guilty of this. But that's what makes them so fun to read and what sets them apart from the other, dryer weapon descriptions.
    • Kulve Taroth usually announces an attack beforehand by making an incredibly squeaky noise. This would normally be funny coming from what is a gigantic elder dragon except that it means that it's usually about to roll along the ground and hit you for massive damage with wonky hitboxes. Once you've heard it enough, you'll learn to loathe it.
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • The Rotten Vale, especially for Dark Souls veterans, as it may remind them of the equally nauseating Blighttown. And that's before going into Great Girros, Odogaron and especially Vaal Hazak.
    • Even before that, there's the introduction to the Great Jagras. Watch as he immediately eats an Aptonoth alive and whole and you have to fight him knowing that you're wailing on a recently-eaten monster inside of him. And it doesn't stop there. A strategy to make the fight against him easier is to pummel his stomach enough to where he throws up the bits and pieces of the monster. Yummy.
  • One-Scene Wonder: The giant, Crystal-wielding Kulu-Ya-Ku in the Behemoth questline only appears in one, non-repeatable quest, but its uniqueness, surprising difficulty, and the Chobobo Race theme used as its fight music have made many clamor for a repeatable version of the assigned quest.
  • Padding: In this game, you have to actually track the monsters. While this isn't seen as bad, with the Elder Dragons, you have to track them across multiple quests just to unlock them.
  • Porting Disaster: The PC version of the game has quite a few issues:
    • The PC port of World suffers from all kinds of issues ranging from inability to use a controller, to performance and connectivity issues, constant crashes as well as issues resulting from its implementation of Denuvo. It is so bad that two weeks after its release on August 9 2018 the game's Steam review score, with over 25,000 evaluations, has fallen under 40%, with most of the negative reviews being the result of the game's technical issues. One month later, in September 9 2018, with over 35,000 reviews, the game's review score remains low but rose to 48% after a couple of patches helped to alleviate connectivity issues, and one patch remedying the lightning effects issues.
    • At release, particle effects effectively slows the frame rate to a crawl, with lightning effects in particular having the most noticeable bad impact, even if the player doesn't see those effects on screen, baffling everyone realizing where the issue is coming from. A patch released in September addressed the lightning issues.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Gajalakas due to their annoyance factor. Gastodon in the Elders Recess as well. Not helping in the case of the former as they love to smack you to highly aggravating levels in the Kulve Tarroth repel quest.
    • Lavasioth for being the one real large monster that almost no-one likes to fight due to its perpetually-hardened lava armor, having a powerful attack that can One Hit KO many hunters, and having its abilities from older games removed. Unsurprisingly, it was the least hunted monster in the first year of the game's life.
    • Banbaro in Iceborne is considered to be a pointless annoyance by many players. Despite being based on a moose and clearly designed for the Hoarfrost Reach, it randomly shows up in every biome during seemingly random quests, sticking out like a sore thumb in places like the Coral Highlands and Rotten Vale. Additionally, despite being described as a Gentle Giant, if it encounters another monster or takes any sort of damage, it's highly aggressive and will attack both hunters and monsters (but mostly the former) with extremely brutal attacks that are hard to escape. To top things off, Banbaro is far less rewarding than similar invader monsters Deviljho and Bazelgeuse, as its carves are used to create relatively weak Crutch Character armor and weapons rather than ones of Infinity -1 Sword caliber, and many players just find that its concept (a moose-dinosaur hybrid) simply lacks the cool factor of those two. Its saving grace is that its female armor set is popular and considered to be very cute.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Monsters roaring during battle. Hunters can be in the middle of attacking or using an item, only for the monster to roar, interrupting whatever they were doing. This pause can be incredibly annoying or frustrating as it disrupts the flow of combat and halts crucial item use. If two or more monsters are nearby they may even chain their roars together resulting in an even longer pause.
  • Self-Fanservice: Humanoid fanart on Kulve Taroth usually depicts her as a rather curvy young lady. Others take the "elder" part into account and make her into a very curvy MILF-aged lady. The fact that a lot of her fight is essentially undressing her makes sure they keep coming, too.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • Many of the weapons in the base game were derided for looking almost exactly the same only with a different tint and/or parts of the specific monster tacked on. Many players excused or at least forgave the issue as a factor of spending so much time on such a large and detailed world. But it flared up again in Iceborne when it not only continued, but many weapons from returning monsters that already had much more unique models from previous games got replaced with the much more "generic"-looking weapons in this style. Standout weapons include nearly half the Brachydios weapons, and the Glavenus Great Sword, made even more apparent by the fact that the Palico Glavenus weapon is indeed a miniaturized version of the original weapon.
    • Turf wars can fall into this. The movements of the monsters tend to look smooth and natural from your close, low angle, but watching from a distance as two monsters attack each other reveals that their movements are actually somewhat stilted and unnaturally quick considering their size. And sometimes they don't even appear to be touching.
  • Squick: Accidental Innuendo aside, Bazelgeuse's explosive scales essentially amount to it dropping explosive skin tags on you.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: The Coral Highlands in World. First of all, the place is absolutely stunning and very colorful, and full of interesting-looking, almost alien-looking endemic life. Even the boss monsters that call this place home are rather pretty.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Upon early reveal, some of the changes in World rubbed a few veterans the wrong way, including the use of an on-screen command guide, damage numbers, a heartbeat monitor that acts similarly to an Enemy Scan function telling you how much life the monster has left, and proper voice acting. However, it was later confirmed that most, if not all of these options can be turned off or otherwise changed, which softened the blow.
  • That One Attack: Lunastra's Nova Attack. The attack does massive damage over time that even high fire resistance and defense only negligibly reduce, and it hits with two heatwaves that stagger the player - once when the attack first lands, and again right when a player that doesn't have stagger negating skills would finally be able to move again. It's basically a One-Hit KO pretending it isn't one, and even if you manage to panic dive to avoid the first heatwave you don't stay on the ground indefinitely anymore like previous games, meaning you have to dive again to avoid the second heat wave. And during the time between getting up and diving again, you'll be taking that fire damage meaning even a perfectly timed dodge that's within the area of effect will chip off about half of a maxed-out health bar.
    • Behemoth's Meteor. It is instant death for anyone on screen, off screen, or even in camp. It is supposed to be mitigated by Behemoth dropping comets onto the ground to hide behind, but most annoyingly these can be destroyed by players or Behemoth. Many hunts have failed because the game allows the monster to destroy the only cover available from his instant OHKO move. He will only perform the move 3 times in a fight, but this is enough to end hunts easily. Add in the other attacks that Behemoth spams constantly, and you have a fight that many deem to be too unfair to even attempt. One attack, the Tornado, has a very annoying habit of being used right on the aforementioned cover, meaning you have nowhere to go to avoid being carted. In one memorable instance, the hunter was carted by one of many of Behemoth's OP attacks, then was hit by Meteor as they got back up from the cart in camp, leading to a fail without any chance to mitigate it. The devs certainly wanted you to earn that Drachen set.
  • That One Boss: Anjanath, (Black) Diablos, Nergigante, Bazelgeuse, Tempered Kirin, Tempered Deviljho, Lunastra, and Behemoth. Iceborne adds Tigrex and Velkhana. To see why, visit this page.
  • That One Level: Ancient Forest, Rotten Vale, and the Azure Rathalos arena quest. To see why, visit this page.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • World deviating from traditional MonHun fare even moreso than Generations, especially with its focus on open-world gameplay, caused quite a stir from series traditionalists. Coupled with a total lack of information about localization of XX for over a year, fans felt like Capcom was trying to market a totally different game as Monster Hunter to western countries in an attempt to appeal to what some Westerners consider a good game. To be fair, it worked and World became the best selling title in the series within a month of launch.
    • On a smaller note, some Hunting Horn mains were particularly upset that World did not bring back Double Notes from Generations, which were seen as a game-changer for Hunting Horn that encouraged aggressive play. World still has the Encore mechanic, but now requires using the Play action twice in succession, which eats up some extra time.
    • Many fans are not happy with the weapon designs, since most of them look like an ordinary weapon with a monster part slapped onto it instead of looking like the weapon was made out of monster parts from scratch. While Iceborne does feature more weapons with unique designs, there are still many weapons that have the "basic weapon with monster part slapped on" design. Even some weapons made out of old monsters suffer this, even though they already had unique weapon designs in the earlier games.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Arch Tempered Zorah Magdaros does not have an Arch Tempered Nergigante as a preview, which is rather jarring as Arch Tempered Teostra gave a preview of how an Arch Tempered Kushala Daora would function. This ended up being justified by the fact that AT Nergigante ended up being by far the most difficult hunt reserved for the end of vanilla World, as well as the fact that it was meant to be a surprise.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Captured monsters are stored in a pen near the Ecologist's area of the Tradeyard, where for a quest or two, you can watch as the vicious monster that was spending so much time trying to kill you sleeps peacefully. One example in particular is Anjanath. It looks like a mix of a T. rex and a marabou stork, but when it's asleep, it kicks its legs a little and raises its head like a dreaming dog.
    • Even some of the Elder Dragons can get in on this. When Nergigante isn't fighting you, what is it doing? Rolling around and preening himself like an oversized housecat.
  • Uncanny Valley: World's character creation system is well-received, with the models being generally high-quality and detailed. However, if the player doesn't account for expression and angle changes in day and night lighting and shading, the differences between the profile model and the in-game model can be staggering.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Nobody was expecting subspecies to show up in World. This applies In-Universe too; when the player confirms the first sighting, the entire Research Commission is baffled by its presence in the New World.
    • Unlike Deviljho, who was announced as being added even before the game was released, Kulve Taroth was revealed just a few days before its event. Though for some, this may have been averted since it was hinted at in a prior leak.
    • Lunastra was a surprise largely due to her last appearance in a title being eight years ago.
    • Behemoth caught a lot of people off guard since there was no idea of it appearing until the announcement of the Final Fantasy XIV collaboration at E3 2018 and because it wasn't in the popular leak that included the other monsters added post-release. The fact that crossovers didn't include an actual monster from another franchise was something that was discussed as well.
    • Arch-Tempered Zorah Magdaros was the least expected of the Arch-Tempered Elder Dragons because there was never a "regular" Tempered Zorah Magdaros.
    • When the collaboration with The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt was announced, many expected a monster from The Witcher to appear, and anticipated it to be a beast like a Fiend or a Griffin. None, however, expected Leshen, a supernatural humanoid, to be the representative. Leshen was not included in the popular leak, either.
      • Not many people were expecting Geralt himself to be playable, either, since normally, players do not change characters in the course of one playthrough.
    • The reveal that Glavenus would be making the jump to the New World caught many players (and Rathian) by surprise. While by no means an unpopular monster and its teaser was well-recieced, "lava-shooting T-Rex with a red-hot knife for a tail" is a design one would expect to see in a Frontier game, not so much the more grounded & realistic setting of World.
      • To say nothing of it getting a subspecies.
      • This is compounded by the fact that, while Glavenus is a flagship monster, few people expected it to be announced first, expecting more popular monsters such as Zinogre, Barioth or one of the Fatalis trio.
    • A recent trailer for Iceborne slipped in the appearance of a Yian Garuga, a monster that was nowhere near anybody's list of expected/speculated/wanted monsters.
    • Due to the lack of his skeleton in the base game or Iceborne, very few were expecting Rajang to make it in as Iceborne's first post-launch monster.
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