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A Champion in Earth-Bet is a Worm quest written by sun tzu. Its POV protagonist, the Avatar, is a visitor from The Avatar's World, a Mutants & Masterminds-style original superhero setting, The Leader of the top-tier Global Champions Super Team... and, incidentally, the god of Heroism. The story follows the events that happen when an exceptionally powerful and idealistic character gets thus sent to a Crapsack World like Earth-Bet.

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A side-story, titled The Brave Little Spider, displays the events of the story from Taylor's perspective.


A Champion in Earth-Bet provides examples of:

  • All There in the Manual: Some characters' backstories and power details, parahuman organizations and other bits of information haven't made their way into the actual story, but are instead sprinkled throughout the thread. The author has created a repository for all his notes thus far.
  • All Your Powers Combined: Surdoué of the Guild has a mental version of this. He essentially has the intellectual strengths, skills, and knowledge of everyone in his range, as long as they remain there.
  • And Then What?: What ultimately tips Taylor over to quitting Coil's employ.
    Avatar: Well, if I may suggest, start by taking some perspective. Let's suppose you decide to let things be as they are, in order to stay with the Undersiders. What will happen afterwards? Will that be the last moral compromise you need to make?
    Skitter: ...It'll never end. Our patron… he's a monster. A real monster. He'll keep breaking every rule to get ahead. There will be more atrocities. Whatever I do about the Undersiders, he needs to go down.
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  • Apocalypse Wow: Courtesy of a tinkertech antimatter weapon, the Avatar's fight with the Simurgh starts with an explosion that causes the (parallel, uninhabited) Earth below them to lose its spherical shape, unleashing a firestorm that advances across its entire surface. The fight ends with an explosion that vaporizes the planet, and melts the side of the Moon facing it from hundreds of thousands of miles away.
  • Artificial Human: Throne, the parahuman king of Uzbekistan.
  • Batman Gambit: As Mexico is about to become part of the Protectorate, the cartel cape Lord Cognito stages a robbery on a police armory. This goads his main rival, Deadmask, to one-up him by staging a bigger assault on a military armory with more casualties, which immediately makes Deadmask and his cartel the top priority of the new Mexico City Protectorate while leaving Cognito aside for the moment.
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  • Big First Choice: The first chapter of the quest has the readers choose which of the 10 Global Champions will be the one Madman sends to Earth-Bet, and where exactly in the timeline they will be sent to. They choose the Avatar, and put him in right as Leviathan starts attacking Brockton Bay.
  • Breaking Speech: In trying to gain Tattletale's help for the Guild, the Avatar exposes a few uncomfortable truths about her motivations to help Taylor; in that while she genuinely is Taylor's friend and brought her into the Undersiders to save her life, she also manipulated her into becoming a villain rather than a hero, something that was one of her core tenets from the get-go, and doing so nearly broke her.
  • City of Adventure: Averted for Brockton Bay. While most of the focus of Worm was centered around the city (at least in the early part), the Avatar has been more focused on the worldwide situation. Even Taylor doesn't stay in the city, as after she joins the Wards, she gets transferred to Boston so she doesn't have conflicting loyalties about fighting the Undersiders.
  • Conflicting Loyalties: Taylor goes through a lot of this in the beginning of the story, trying to decide whether to stay with the Undersiders, even though they have no compunction in working for Coil despite the atrocities he did to Dinah Alcott, or betray the only friends she ever knew to do the right thing. Luckily the Avatar helps her work through them, and even advocates that she be relocated to another city as a way to help avoid these issues.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Use of these tactics is the only way the Avatar can outmaneuver the Simurgh.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Madame Lustucru made a lot of preparations to cause as much damage to her territory as possible if her territory was stormed (poison and explosive mines across the area, hidden capes, objects falling from the sky, child hostages, child hostages falling from the sky...).
  • Curb-Stomp Battle:
    • When the Avatar intervenes in a battle between New Wave and the Merchants, with Protectorate reinforcements inbound, the battle was only ever going to end one way.
    • Even with a cape roster edging into the hundreds, the Omega Cartel doesn't stand a chance against a Protectorate assault force that includes both the Avatar and Eidolon.
  • Death by Adaptation: Coil gets killed by Jack Slash after becoming the Butcher, which not only means that he died before he did in canon, but that Jack is now the Butcher.
  • Death Is Not Permanent: As Long as There is One Man alive with a spark of heroism in his blood, the Avatar cannot be permanently killed; he'll be Back from the Dead in a while.
    • It requires for the "one man alive with a spark of heroism" to be within range, though, which is why the Simurgh starts her fight with the Avatar by moving them both to an uninhabited dimension.
  • Deconstruction: The Avatar deconstructs the relationship between Lisa and Taylor in early Worm. While Tattletale might have helped provide a support structure for a nearly-suicidal girl with no friends, and may have saved Taylor from herself, Taylor wanted to be a hero first and foremost (and indeed, wanted to be one for years). Tearing down that dream did great damage to her psyche, and while Tattletale might deny it, her motives for helping Taylor were not entirely altruistic. The two of them still consider each other friends, but the way it was in canon was not a healthy relationship.
  • Defeating the Undefeatable: What does the Avatar do on his first day in Earth-Bet? Kill Leviathan.
    • And then goes two for two with the Simurgh.
  • Didn't See That Coming: Sure, Coil, tell the Avatar how your power works and that you're holding an entire timeline hostage! It's not like he has a way to make you drop your timeline bargaining chip! Oh wait...
  • Didn't Think This Through:
    • Leviathan never considered that by punching a Nigh Invulnerable target deep into the ocean floor, the pit he digs with all the punching would leave him no way to dodge the retaliation attack coming right for him.
    • The Avatar calls Trickster out on his obvious plan to trick the Avatar into coming into contact with Echidna, which would make clones of him. The Avatar points out that this "Genius Plan" would mean that there are now evil clones of a person capable of killing an Endbringer flying around.
    • When the Avatar used a magnetic pulse to destroy all the nanomachines the Simurgh sent at him, he forgot about the ferrous asteroid fragments she also threw at him.
  • Dirty Business: Wing Warrior doesn't like betraying the Guild's trust and secretly replicating Tattletale's power in his Tinkertech in a backroom deal with Prochnost, but he's willing to do so if that's what it takes to get the tools to keep the world safe.
  • Dirty Cop: A subversion. During an operation in Mexico to eliminate the Omega Cartel, the Avatar and his cosmic senses notices the second-in-command Del Duque taking something from a third-party cape in exchange for letting him go free. The quest decided to ask Del Duque in private what that was about, and Del Duque clarified that the cape in question is a known smuggler with moral standards, who frequently herds refugees in the right direction towards caring authorities and who Del Duque judges as worth more as a part-time informant.
  • Do Not Go Gentle:
    • With the E88 leaving Brockton Bay in droves, Hookwolf would rather go down fighting, even against someone like the Avatar, than give up peacefully.
    • Madame Lustucru does a lot of inhumane things For the Evulz, and if she goes down she's going to do as much damage as she can in the process.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: How the Avatar and the Guild take care of the territory of the Nigerian villain Blood Count - the Avatar flies in, shapeshifted to look like Blood Count, and with the help of the Stranger Ninja Roja, lures all of the villains in his territory into one location for the Guild to ambush all of them at once.
  • Establishing Character Moment: In the middle of a Global Champion meeting where the members are all discussing important events and updates, Madman pops in and says he's just here for the coffee.
  • Everyone Has Standards: The Madman may do a lot of dangerous things for the laughs, but even he puts his foot down when the Simurgh plans to make an alternate Earth her one-on-one battleground with the Avatar, heedless of the 7 billion inhabitants. He instead moves the battlefield to an Earth where an ecosystem never evolved.
  • Experienced Protagonist: With experience in superheroing stretching back to the 1920s, leadership of the Global Champions, and his dealings with the likes of Garzor, Nollius and Professor Cryo in his own world, to say nothing of his credentials as a god, the Avatar has a lot of experience under his belt by the time he is placed from Earth-Gimel into Earth-Bet.
  • The Exile: With his power of supersonic flight, and sub-powers of inter-planar and inter-dimensional travel, the Avatar has done this a few times.
    • He left Wyld Hunter on the moon, knowing his area of influence would keep him alive.
    • Ash Beast, Skylance and Fuji-Sama are all shunted to another Earth where they can't harm anyone. The former willingly goes and the Avatar regularly checks up on him, the latter two's stay is just temporary until their trials.
  • Expy:
  • Fantastic Recruitment Drive: Two so far after the Avatar decided to join the Guild and go international - one where the Guild looked for international heroes to join it alongside the Avatar, and another where the Avatar scouted potential European heroes to revitalise the European Brigade.
  • Flying Brick/Flying Firepower: The Avatar's base powerset is a mix of these two, as he has the Flight, the Super Toughness, the Frickin' Laser Beams, but replaces the Super Strength with Mind over Matter.
  • The Fundamentalist: The Purifier is essentially a Taliban with the parahuman equivalent of a Death Note. Good thing it's vision-based.
  • Gambit Pileup: This is the case when the Guild go to oust the Japanese warlord Skylance and take her into custody. Skylance's initial plan was to selflessly surrender herself to the Guild, turn herself into a martyr and encourage her supporters to campaign for her release. The arrival of her rival Fuji-Sama, though, forced her to stand and fight lest he denounce her as a coward and usurp her position as leader of the Japanese ultra-right movement. The Guild, however, were the ones who directed the two villains' attention at each other in the first place, putting their plans in conflict with each other and allowing the Guild to capture both of them, cripple their political agendas, and push for international cooperation instead.
  • Heel–Face Door-Slam: Defied. Taylor turning to heroism after her stint with the Undersiders faces some challenges and hostility due to her past actions, but the Avatar's support helps her get through them... for now, at least.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Several villains across the world do this following Leviathan's death... including Skitter.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: In a brutal moment of bad luck, the Simurgh ends up shooting herself with her own Anti Matter Tinker cannon. Which is all the opening the Avatar needs.
  • Hope Bringer: The Avatar and his speeches do this very well. It's the subject of his very first public address in Earth-Bet.
  • Hope Spot: The Kolwezi warlord Madame Lustucru actually Invoked one to spread more despair amongst her subjects and show how much of a bastard Hope Crusher she is. A cadre of parahumans staged a rebellion and actually managed to oust Lustucru, only for her and her allies to later walk right into the victory party and reveal that the rebel leaders were working for her the whole time.
  • Humans Are Special: The Avatar states this outright while he's reeling at the news that three out of four parahumans turn to villainy.
    "Humans, simply put, are better than that. You've observed them for enough millennia to know."
  • Ideal Hero: The Avatar, by his very nature as the god of heroism, pretty much has to be this.
    • Tattletale is able to get relatively close to the Avatar's origin because of this, picking out that he was created rather than was born - he's too perfect at the job, and doesn't truly relate to others except through heroism.
  • I Know You Know I Know: The Avatar's thoughts go through a lot of this during his battle with the Simurgh. Especially after he reads her mind.
  • Inelegant Blubbering: Taylor breaks down in tears when the Avatar gives her a hug after hearing all the turmoil she'd been going through, from her joining the Undersiders to finding out about Coil's plans for Dinah.
  • Instant Expert: The specific power of the Mexican cartel leader Lord Cognito; any information source he touches, from books to electronic devices, he can instantly read and understand.
  • Know When To Fold Them: Credit to Coil where it's due, as soon as he learned that the Avatar was on his case for kidnapping Dinah, he immediately let her go and put her at a hospital to recover. Of course, he immediately switched to negotiating with the Avatar to stay out of his business in exchange for his help.
  • Lesser of Two Evils: This is often the case where less reviled parahuman warlords garner support by opposing more openly villainous warlords.
    • The Triple Alliance, three allied Congo warlords, claimed to be the lesser evil against the more sadistic and vicious Madame Lustucru, but kept her in power because she was a useful boogeyman against potential rebels.
  • Magic A Is Magic A:
    • The Avatar has made a clear distinction between planes and dimensions, and what can cross one can't necessarily cross the other (such as the Simurgh's Tinker remote that allow her to control her Tinker devices across dimensions, but not planes). In particular, the Avatar has discovered that the source of parahuman powers are inter-planar, and can allocate his secondary power pool to blocking that inter-planar movement and thus nullifying powers.
    • Powers from the Avatar's universe work (and are acquired) differently from those of Parahuman abilities, ranging the Fantasy Kitchen Sink from Mutants to actual magic. It's why he initially shows such shock at the prevalence of child heroes and villains as well as precognitive powers - such things are very rare in his world, but are fairly common on Bet.
  • Making a Splash: Aside from Leviathan, three parahuman hydrokinetics have shown up in the story: Tsunami, an ex-villain and Kyushu survivor who joins the Brockton Bay Protectorate, Captain Hydro, a Polish cape and new member of the Guild, and Madame Lustucru, a Congo warlord that can bypass the Manton limit.
  • Manipulative Bastard:
    • Rhetor, the leader of Gesellschaft, is particularly adept at it thanks to his Thinker power of knowing exactly what will convince a person.
    • Skylance also qualifies, given that she fed the Kyushu refugees a false story about how the rest of the world had abandoned them to keep them endeared to her, when in reality she was the one keeping the world out of the camps.
  • The Mole: The Toybox associate Prochnost, who assists the Guild with his robustness Tinker specialization, is a mole for the Queen of Black and White.
  • Multinational Team: There had been a tragic dearth of these in Earth-Bet (most likely due to the Simurgh), but the Avatar and his support of international assistance is seeking to change that.
    • The Guild was already this, with members from Korea, France, Argentina and the Congo, and the addition of the Avatar encourages them to go for more recruiting, adding heroes from Poland, Brazil, India, Indonesia and the Ivory Coast.
    • The European Brigade was a inter-European parahuman peacekeeping force proposal that was rendered stillborn by the Simurgh, but the Avatar slaying her gets the idea on more stable footing.
    • On the villainous side, the Mexican Lord Cognito has a Villain Team-Up with Russian, Burmese, Iraqi, Ivory Coast and Uzbekistan warlords.
  • Must Make Amends: After the Avatar slew Leviathan and spoke to the world about heroism and hope, a lot of villains worldwide, from Tsunami in Brockton Bay, to Niszczyciel in Poland, to Blink in Indonesia, turned themselves in to custody, if not pulled outright Heel Face Turns.
  • My Country, Right or Wrong: Given the Crapsack World of Earth-Bet, it's no surprise that a lot of governments and the people and capes in charge of them have adopted this ultranationalist mindset due to the rise of parahumans, from the Yangban, to Lord Walston of Britain's King's Men, to Fuji-Sama and the Yamato Party of Japan.
  • New Skill as Reward: A variation involving parahumans and resources. After the Avatar joins the Guild and they begin taking out the worst of the worst global threats, they slowly gain political capital and favours owed to them by the countries they assist. After operations in Cuba and Japan, they end up recruiting some high-tier capes from those countries.
  • No-Sell:
    • The Avatar has no human bodily functions and is Immune to Mind Control, so any attack targeting those specific functions against him (like Heartbreaker's powers) are useless.
    • Celo, an Argentinan Guild member, has this as her main power; she has complete immunity to all parahuman power effects as well as being a mid-range Flying Brick.
    • Benefit of being the Butcher? The powers of every Cape that the Butcher has ever been. Downside to being the Butcher? Near-instant madness as the voices of every person who was the Butcher starts screaming at you. Jack, thanks to Bonesaw's brain mods, shrugs it off by barely being able to hear it.
  • O.C. Stand-in: This fic's version of the bit cape Chubster is quite different from canon. In canon, he was a jovial Protectorate member with Super Toughness and immovability who died during Leviathan's attack on Brockton Bay. Here, he's an ex-independent hero and loner, current Guild member and Flying Brick that can hit proportional to his mass (hence his weight gain) with political views that tend towards anarchism.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: After the Avatar neutralizes Coil, Echidna comes barreling in. The next scene is him telling Director Piggot how he handled both threats.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • The Simurgh has a brief Eye Take when she realizes that a twist of fate has caused her own Tinker superweapons to lock onto her.
    • Poseedor of the Four Ghosts of Santiago has this reaction when he finds the Avatar knocking on his doorstep.
    • Fuji-Sama has this reaction when the Avatar tells him he's not going to be put into an ordinary jail he could easily break out of, but instead an alternate Earth where he can't hurt anyone until his trial.
    • Shape-Stealer has his grin wiped from his face when he realises that he is not in a mundane prison he can escape from, nor the Birdcage full of parahumans that he can kill and gain their powers, but in a Lockbox suspended in orbit around the earth.
  • One Steve Limit: A few aversions:
    • There are two characters named Titan, both of whom don't appear in the story: the Avatar's Sizeshifting comrade from Earth-Gimel and fellow Global Champion, and a villainous cybernetic Tinker that was taken down by the Protectorate and the Silver Crusader.
    • When hearing about a Nigerian warlord named "The General", the Indonesian Guild hero Iron Snake thinks back to a villain in his home country with the same moniker. And his reaction to another General in Vietnam is "...Seriously?"
  • Outside-Context Problem:
    • The Avatar is a big one for most of Earth-Bet.
    • On the flip side, the Avatar is a little puzzled about Tinkers and precogs - the former because the whole idea of blueprints appearing in one's head from nowhere is frankly bizarre, and the latter because he's encountered precious few of them throughout his whole decades-long hero career.
    • The Avatar points out that this is one of the problems with Earth Bet, as while in his world, there have been superpowers for a long time (mutants have been around since the dawn of the twentieth century, and magical powers go back much further), Bet's history with powered individuals only goes back about thirty years, and are exacerbated by the nature of said powers. While his world was, for a lack of better term, eased into the concept (with examples of such individuals going back centuries or even thousands of years), Bet was suddenly and violently thrown into a world they had no knowledge of experience with.
  • Overnight Conquest: For a city the size of Lagos, Nigeria, ousting and arresting its seven largest villain warlords would be a long, painful endeavor lasting ages, but the Avatar, along with the Guild, the Kenyan Pentagon and lots of backup, manages to do so in a couple of days.
  • Physical God: The Avatar himself is the sapient earthly incarnation of the god Adeltom, the abstract concept of heroism, and arguably more powerful than any of Earth-Bet's parahumans.
  • Power Nullifier: Through Super Senses, the Avatar knows that parahuman powers are inter-planar in nature. By putting up a planar barrier, he can temporarily halt power effects, like Gray Boy loops.
  • Pragmatic Hero: The Avatar can heal people, but it exhausts him. He could heal a few people an hour, but it's a better use of his powers to patrol for villains and combat threats in other ways.
  • Pride: What drives the alliance between Lord Cognito and his co-conspirators.
    Bariq: All well and good, but pride is competitive. Proud people, generally, hate other proud people. How will we keep from killing each other?
    Lord Cognito: It is precisely our pride that will maintain our alliance. Once we have given our words and committed to a course of action… why, it then becomes beneath us to stray from that path. Of course, basic politeness and common courtesy will no doubt help too.
  • Railroading: Invoked as part of the narrative: at the end of the chapter Avatar World Tour, instead of delivering the quest's usual choices for the readers to decide the Avatar's next course of action, the narrative presents a series of preselected actions that the Avatar takes, which references the Simurgh's manipulations to get him in just the right place for her to abduct him.
  • Recruiting the Criminal:
    • Niszczyciel, a Polish parahuman with a Touch of Death forcefield, is one of the ex-villains who wants to make amends following Leviathan's death, doing so by joining the European Brigade.
    • After their arrest, the Nigerian warlords Harvest and the Doctor are put to work in civilian capacities by the Guild and governments as their Tinker-engineered crops and healing powers respectively are too vital to Nigeria's future.
  • Reed Richards Is Useless: Played straight with Tinkertech, which can't be reproduced. To help combat this, the Avatar produces tons of carbosteel and omni-metal (supertough Fantasy Metals from his world) for the scientists to reverse engineer.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!:
    • The Empire 88 decide to leave Brockton Bay en masse after the balance of power in the city swings firmly towards the Protectorate, and after an operation that cuts their illegal operations and supply lines out from under them.
    • Midway through the Guild's battle with Skylance's forces, the warlord uses one of her portals to evacuate the battle after she gets injured. Luckily, one of the Guildsmen has the powers needed to track her down.
    • During the Guild's Lagos operation to clear out their warlords, one of them, the Doctor, decides to skip town to Port Harcourt. It doesn't help him.
  • Scry vs. Scry: With Thinker and precognitive support on both sides, the Guild's operation to clear out Lagos's villain population is just as much tactical chess as it is urban combat.
  • Shadow Archetype: The author has stated that he's taken cues from canon Skitter and the Undersiders when World Building some of Earth-Bet's supervillains from other countries.
  • Shout-Out:
    • A French independent Tinker specializing in Humongous Mecha has modeled his appearance on an old Japanese anime, and has named himself Goldorak. It's part of why he's independent; there's no way he could get away with this if he was government-sponsored.
    • The Japanese hero Wing Warrior takes some inspiration from the anime Wing-Man.
    • "Familiar Farces" is a TV series using latex puppets of celebrities to deliver news on a comical tone - a blatant reference to ''Les Guignols de l'info", a French political parody.
  • Shut Up, Hannibal!: The Avatar does this to quite a few villains, such as Coil and Kaiser.
  • Shut Up, Kirk!:
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: This gets played with. The setting of the story is pretty far on the cynical side of the spectrum, but it gets greatly impacted by the Avatar, who hails from much closer to the idealistic end. If you want to get technical, the Avatar is literally the Idealistic end of the spectrum, seeing as how he's the god and Anthropomorphic Personification of heroism as a concept.
  • Spanner in the Works: The Avatar's arrival was completely unpredicted by any precog or clairvoyant on Earth-Bet, derailing a number of plans including those of the Simurgh's.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: The only cape casualty of Leviathan's attack is a cape named Multishot. Every other canon casualty, including Dauntless, Gallant, Aegis and Kaiser, isn't.
  • Speeches and Monologues: The Avatar gives a lot of these over the story, and he's a master at delivering them.
  • Stop Worshipping Me: The Avatar says as much to an evangelist preaching him as the return of God, saying that he wishes to be emulated, not worshipped. That being said, he actually is the avatar of a god, so the one preaching him isn't that far off.
  • Sudden Principled Stand:
    • Present in the backstory of the Indian Garama cape Multi-Hit, where he Triggered after refusing military orders that were borderline illegal and unethical.
    • One cape enforcer named Deathblow that the Avatar encounters during the Lagos operation refuses to attack him, as he thinks that attacking the man that killed Leviathan and the Simurgh and ousted Madame Lustucru is just plain not right.
  • Swiss-Army Superpower: The Avatar's cosmic energy manipulation is essentially this, since it can become almost any superpower that he wants. However, it takes time to change powers, and there's only so much cosmic energy to go around at any one time.
  • Tailor-Made Prison: After gaining more Tinker support, the Guild starts developing Lockboxes as alternative prisons for parahuman criminals with troublesome powers but do not warrant the Birdcage. They are placed in various inescapable locations such as in orbit or buried beneath the earth, with only a few parahumans able to place them and transfer prisoners into them.
  • Talking the Monster to Death: When the Avatar encounters the Travelers, he manages to convince them to turn themselves in without fighting him, by promising them that he'll be fair in exchange for their backstory, and telling them that they have no fear of being a pawn in the Simurgh's plan since his unpredicted arrival has effectively derailed it.
  • Talk to the Fist:
    • Wing Warrior, a Japanese hero, does this to the villain Fuji-Sama, before the villain can spin the rhetoric to his favor. Though the Avatar has to nullify his Brute powers first.
    • Right as he is confronted, the Nigerian villain Choker is about to propose playing a game, but the Avatar just blasts him before he gets any further.
  • Team Spirit: Cooperation, especially of the international sort, is something the Avatar is trying to establish all across Earth-Bet. Early on, he explains to Armsmaster why he tries to set up teams and encourage other heroes - despite the Avatar not needing sleep at all, even if he had a full week every day he'd never get done everything that needs getting done. Having more people in the fight helps.
    • After a cape battle which took out all the Merchants, Shadow Stalker called out the Avatar for following Armsmaster's orders during the battle instead of finishing everything himself, saying that because Avatar is stronger, he doesn't have to heed Armsmaster's will. The Avatar calmly rebuts her argument by saying that strength comes in many forms, including the abilities to form good plans and ally with good people.
    • The Guild went on an international recruiting drive to bolster their roster and become more of an international peacekeeping force.
    • The Avatar advocated for reviving the stillborn European Brigade international organization, something that had been proposed before but never really got off the ground. This already has seen a few benefits:
      • A Tinker specializing in Humongous Mecha but had transportation logistical issues gets proposed assistance from a Tinker specializing in pocket dimensions.
      • A Tinker capable of improving the robustness of Tinkertech has assisted a force-field-based Tinker in Kenya, freeing her up to assist in other projects.
    • The Pentagon are Kenya's five best capes with significant power synergy with each other, and the reason it's an island of relative stability on the African continent.
    • On the villainous side, the Four Ghosts of Santiago, the African Triple Alliance and even Cognito's coalition are all proof that teaming up has its benefits.
    • On a personal basis, the parahuman Johnny Kong has a Thinker power that revolves around teamwork synergy.
  • Tempting Fate: Wyld Hunter, a Brazilian Reality Warping villain, has this to say after he successfully tanks less than 0.1% of the Avatar's power.
  • There Are No Therapists: Subverted once Taylor joins the Boston Wards and is made to attend therapy sessions with Doctor Yamada.
  • This Is Something He's Got to Do Himself:
    • Present in spirit when Hookwolf, watching the Empire leave Brockton Bay, chooses to go down swinging against the Avatar. The Avatar, however, views his own presence as superfluous and lets the Protectorate have the honors of getting closure while he remains on support, resulting in Miss Militia triple-tapping him with a bazooka.
    • This is a factor of the Avatar not actively assisting in some Guild operations, such as the raid on the Indonesian Lords of Flesh. After all, he does plan to return to Earth-Gimel eventually, and wants to make sure Earth-Bet and all its Super Teams are as well-equipped and well-formed as possible and able to operate on their own before he leaves.
  • Took a Level in Badass: The European Brigade, intended to be an international task force to handle parahuman threats throughout Europe, was effectively a joke due to the Simurgh, with its member countries only contributing a few token heroes each. Once the Avatar killed the Simurgh and brought new life to the project, more A-lister capes were added to the Brigade's ranks, including Ice Queen, Goldorak and Niszczyciel, incredibly boosting their effectiveness.
  • Traumatic Superpower Awakening: One of the key differences in powers between the Avatar's world and Bet is that Parahumans acquire their abilities through this trope exclusively. In the Avatar's world, there's multiple sources, but the most common is the Puberty Superpower method.
  • Unfortunate Names:
    • There is mention of a Vietnamese warlord named Phosphor, as in white phosphorus. Word of God mentions that he has some degree of self-loathing.
    • The Guild discusses the appropriateness when they hear of a Polish Thinker named Napoleon, considering the country's polarized opinion over his historical namesake.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: What does the villain and ex-Slaughterhouse Nine member Shape-Stealer do when the Avatar frees him from a Grey Boy loop? Try and blast him with a fireball. Not that it works.
  • Unwitting Pawn:
    • The Japanese A-lister villain Fuji-Sama was used as such by the guild to take out their main target, the Villain with Good Publicity Skylance. By clandestinely feeding him information and getting him to crash their confrontation, they pitted his and Skylance's ultranationalist agendas against each other and kept her from spinning the narrative in her favor.
    • Wing Warrior may think he's in a backroom deal with Prochnost and the PRT to secretly copy useful parahuman powers into modules for them, but he's actually making them for Cauldron and the Queen of Black and White instead.
  • Vampiric Draining: The essence of Blood Count, an A-Class villain in Lagos, Nigeria. He slowly kills people around him by exhaustion, effectively draining their Life Energy, and the more he does so, the more Combo Platter Powers he develops, from Super Speed to liquid shapeshifting to disintegration touch. He's said to be in Eidolon's class if he drains enough people, and Endbringers aside he's the first cape to at least keep pace with the Avatar in a one-on-one fight.
  • Victor Gains Loser's Powers: Two occurrences in this quest:
    • Throne, Artificial Human and parahuman king of Uzbekistan, can summon and banish swords that store and replicate the powers of parahumans they kill.
    • Shape-Stealer, ex-Slaughterhouse Nine member, is a Shapeshifter who takes the forms of people he kills, as well as a copy of their powers if they have any.
  • Villain Ball: Coil holds this big-time when he tells the Avatar how his power works in order to play up his usefulness to the greater good, and says that if the Avatar doesn't accept his deal to stay out of his business, he'll drop the current timeline for one where he'd already killed a lot of people. He never expected the Avatar to have a way to make him drop the wrong timeline.
  • Villain Team-Up: A Multinational Team example. After the Avatar returns from killing the Simurgh, six parahuman warlords: Lord Cognito from Mexico, Swarm from the Ivory Coast, Storm Rider from Myanmar, Bariq from Iraq, Koroleva from Russia, and Throne from Uzbekistan, form a coalition dedicated to bringing him down.
  • Villain with Good Publicity:
  • Wham Episode:
    • The chapter Avatar World Tour concludes with the Avatar returning to Brockton Bay after clearing four global A-Class threats (Moord Nag, the Purifier, Wyld Hunter and Heartbreaker), only for the Simurgh to appear and abduct him.
    • Perspectives: Earth-Bet shows that not only has the Butcher's powers passed to Coil and then to Jack Slash, Behemoth is charging up for his next battle along with two new Endbringers.
  • What Would X Do?: The Avatar has just engaged in battle with the Simurgh, and she's outthinking him at every turn. Realizing what he's doing isn't working, the Avatar thinks about what his genius allies in the Global Champions would do, and the combination of Tracer Pulse's deduction, Causality's analysis, Techno-Paladin's logic, and Bleu-Blanc-Rouge's tactics help him come up with a successful plan.
  • Winds of Destiny, Change: While most of what the Avatar does is just as easily predicted by precognitives as anything else, his fate-manipulation power is not, and can trick even the Simurgh. Shame his use of it is restricted.
  • World Building: One of this quest's main strengths. With the Avatar's heroics going international, this quest takes a look at how the rest of Earth-Bet fared from the advent of parahumans, from the villains all over the world and the heroes that try to stop them. Especially when the Guild goes on an international recruiting drive.
  • Wretched Hive: In the age of parahumans and Endbringers, quite a few cities and even countries have almost been completely taken over by villains and criminal organizations. Santiago, Cuba was taken over by the Four Ghosts, many cities in Nigeria are almost entirely the lands of villain warlords and Kolwezi in the Congo is the domain of the sadistic Madame Lustucru, while the Ivory Coast was taken over by the villain Swarm and Brasilia, Brazil is the only place in the country that is not cartel-controlled. The Avatar, upon joining the Guild, has put clearing some of these cities out higher on his agenda.
  • Wrong Context Magic: The rules of how powers work are very different between those of Earth-Bet (Worm) and Earth-Gimel ("The Avatar's World"). Metahumans in the Avatar's world, for example, don't get their full strength until they hit adulthood, and on average tend to be much stronger than those found among Parahumans. On the flipside, Parahumans get their full power as soon as they Trigger, the power variety is much greater than those of most Metahumans, even young people can get powers, and abilities can include precogs, which is practically unheard of in the Metahuman population.
  • Xanatos Gambit: The Simurgh set up a few more of her domino time bombs to drive the world into more chaos in the event that she loses the one-on-one with the Avatar. Fortunately the Avatar not only won, he read her mind in the process, enabling him to defuse said time bombs.
  • You Are Better Than You Think You Are: The Avatar thinks very highly of Taylor, and doesn't miss an opportunity to let her know it.
    • It also extends to her father as well, and he doesn't let him forget it either.
      Your daughter is a good person. She did not get it from a bad father.
    • He also says a similar line to Tattletale, claiming that despite her manipulating Taylor into becoming her friend and abandoning her heroic dreams for her own ends, she truly cares for Taylor as her friend and is a lot more altruistic than she gives herself credit for.
  • You Shall Not Pass!: Quoted directly by Myrddin when he stops Madame Lustucru's last trick: a kinetic projectile falling from the sky.


    Tropes in The Avatar's World 
  • All There in the Manual: Aside from an introductory first chapter and the Avatar's inner monologue, very few details of Earth-Gimel make it into the fic proper. The majority of information is located throughout the story thread and from this incomplete wiki.
  • Amnesiac Hero: Phantom, Thermakron and Mimic of the Global Champions have very little knowledge of their origins. The former only approached Earth out of curiosity and has no knowledge beyond appearing in space, and the latter cannot remember anything before waking up in Nollius's dungeons in Avalon.
  • Arch-Enemy: A good number of the Global Champions have one.
  • Been There, Shaped History: In Earth-Gimel, the Avatar has been around since the 1920s, and he's participated in a lot of events since then, including taking out the Ku Klux Klan. In Earth-Bet, the neo-Nazi Kaiser is flabbergasted when the Avatar tells him he's heard his same insulting rhetoric from Hitler, and he wasn't impressed then either.
    • In Earth-Gimel, he gave Martin Luther King Jr. a protective amulet that kept him from being assassinated, though it had the side effect of keeping him as a controversial rabble rouser hated by the right instead of the national hero with a holiday in his honor.
  • Benevolent Conspiracy: The Arcane Alliance, a secret coalition founded by the Avatar to find a way to stop/slow down the return of the gods to Earth after the unbanishment of magic, since his transformation from Adeltom to the Avatar vastly (and to his knowledge irreversibly) crippled his power, and he would thus be unable to maintain the Balance of Power between the good and evil gods. The reason for secrecy is that all it would take is a few idiots working to summon them to bring the gods back that much faster, so the less people that know, the better.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Banished to Limbo along with the other gods many centuries ago, yet able to witness the first mutants being persecuted by humanity, Adeltom, the god of Heroism, could not stand by any longer. So, he restricted himself to a physical avatar that was able to bypass the banishment spell, but only had a crippled fraction of his full divine power. That fraction of divine power was still more than enough for him to enact great change as the Avatar, Earth-Gimel's first and greatest superhero.
  • Bullying a Dragon: When Golden Dawn managed to perfect a Power Parasite magic ritual, they decided to test it out by targeting Global Might. It didn't go well for them. At all.
  • City of Adventure: Megalopolis, a city built largely of omni-metal by the Mega-Corp Omnicorp, that boasts one of the highest metahuman-to-human population ratio on Earth.
  • Corporate-Sponsored Superhero: The Omni-Force, the world's largest Super Team, is sponsored by the Mega-Corp Omnicorp. Though they've been accused of being a giant PR stunt, they've garnered a lot of good will.
  • Deus Exit Machina: The Avatar would have been an outright game changer for the Allies in World War II, so Hitler hired an alien mercenary named Tagton to dispose of him. Tagton successfully trapped the Avatar in the sun to burn as fast as he could regenerate, keeping him out of commission for the majority of the war; the Avatar only managed to escape in time for D-Day.
  • Diabolical Mastermind: Professor Cryo, the Conqueror of Cold, one of Earth-Gimel's greatest villain masterminds. He is named for his signature thermodynamic field that can sap nearly any person or being of their energy the moment they enter it.
  • Didn't See That Coming: When the Avatar crippled his power from a full divine god to a Physical God avatar in order to escape the banishment from Limbo and assist humanity's growth personally, he never thought that during World War II, the Nazis would somehow find a way to undo the banishment. Which means that sometime in the future, the other gods will return from Limbo with their full divine might, and Adeltom, stuck in his crippled Avatar state, unable to maintain the Balance of Power. It's why he formed the Arcane Alliance in the first place.
  • Enigmatic Empowering Entity: The Living Nebula, a space-faring entity that seeks to empower humanity to save them from a threat that is pursuing it. It does so by secretly editing the DNA of humans all over the world, creating the first mutants in the 1920s.
  • Expy: Oh, plenty.
  • Fantasy Metals:
    • Omni-metal was reverse-engineered by Omnicorp from the wreckage of an alien invader's spaceship and is nearly indestructible. It is used both in military and civilian construction (Megalopolis is almost 90% made out of alloys of it), and Bleu-Blanc-Rouge wields a Monomolecular Blade made out of omni-metal.
    • Venture Industries developed carbosteel, which is just as durable as omni-metal yet lighter than plastic (though prohibitively expensive to produce), and is used extensively in the aerospace industry and even in the construction of the Tower of Babel Space Elevator.
  • Fantasy Kitchen Sink: You've got gods, Mutants, aliens, super-tech, dragons, magic, etc, etc.
  • Hero Killer:
    • Angelbane of Global Might's raison d'être, created by Nollius for one purpose - to kill superheroes.
    • The Man of Might, who single-handedly turned Jerusalem into a crater and halved Earth-Gimel's hero population. Even the Avatar fell to his power.
  • Legion of Doom: Global Might, the villainous counterpart to the Global Champions. Comprised of:
  • Mega-Corp:
  • Multinational Team: The Global Champions boast members from all over the world, with representatives from France, India, Morocco, the United States and Japan.
  • Nebulous Evil Organization: Shadow, an organization created during the Cold War to try and gain control over metahumans.
  • Outlaw Town: What once used to be the city of Pittsburgh is now the Cryosphere, a domain taken fully over by Professor Cryo and a haven for supervillainy. The heroes of Earth-Gimel have tried several times to reconquer it to no avail.
  • Outside-Context Problem: The Avatar mentions that Tagton, an alien mercenary that Hitler hired to get rid of him, was an example of this trope at the time, since he was the first alien to actually reach the Earth and the first defeat he actually suffered.
  • Putting on the Reich: Blitzkrieg is a German Super Soldier, speedster and actual member of the Waffen SS. After the war and as the years went on, he became a deadly mercenary and member of Global Might, though he's since become bored of the Nazi ideology and only displays their symbols out of nostalgia.
  • Really 700 Years Old: As a god, the Avatar's been around since as long as there have been humans, but he only became a hero in the 1920s.
  • Secret Identity: Most democratic nations require metahuman heroes to register, but they can ask that their identity be kept hidden. About half take it, and those that don't remain relatively safe for the same reason that regular cops don't have secret identities - if anything happened to them, the other heroes would fall on their attackers like a legion.
  • Super Team: The Global Champions, Earth's greatest hero team, who has saved the world many times over from a multitude of threats. Each one is noble, competent and a force to be reckoned with in a fight, which is why Madman decided to send one of them to Earth-Bet to fix things up. Its latest membership includes:
  • The Archmage: Earth-Gimel contains several prolific magic-users.
    • Nollius, the elf Evil Sorceror ruler of Avalon.
    • Causality, a physicist whose analysis and understanding of magical phenomena made her worthy of joining the Global Champions.
    • White Witch and Valerius, both of Global Might.
  • The Call Has Bad Reception: The Living Nebula spent decades creating mutants to try and prepare humanity from a far-off existential threat, but eventually it decided to address them directly and created the Energy Being Phantom as a herald. Unfortunately, Phantom could not hear its telepathic communication and is just as unaware of his purpose as everyone else, though he makes up for it by being a hero.
  • The Family That Slays Together: The villainous Turbo-Clan, headed by the eponymous Turbo-Man. He made it by impregnating multiple women in a short time frame using his speed, and then abducting the babies to form his crime family.
  • The Magic Comes Back: After all magic in the world was banished to Limbo sometime around the turn of the first millennium, during the last year of World War II, Nazi mystics, deciding the Godzilla Threshold had been crossed, enacted a grand ritual that successfully unbanished magic. This wasn't enough to win them the war, but it slowly caused more magical beings to return from Limbo over the coming years, including Nollius and Avalon, Uberwyrm... and eventually, the gods themselves.
  • The Omnipotent: Madman, the Mad Scientist responsible for the events of the story, has such Sufficiently Advanced technology that he is practically this. Good thing he's more of a Great Gazoo.
  • The Syndicate: Several.
    • The Combat Network, created by the Super Soldier-making Mad Scientist Doctor Combat.
    • Golden Dawn, a crime syndicate centered around magic.
  • Throwaway Country: Madagascar seems to be this in both Earth-Bet and Earth-Gimel. In the former world, the country was dropped into anarchy by a teenage Control Freak duplicator, and in the latter, it was obliterated by the Galactic Conqueror Garzor as a show of force.
  • Tragic Villain: Doc Prometheus. He was a Japanese robotics engineer who fell in with the Yakuza and was Blackmailed into making combat robots for them - until his police detective son was killed by the gangs for digging too deep. Doc Prometheus snapped and waged a one-man Roaring Rampage of Revenge on the Yakuza with a robotic army, uncaring of collateral damage, until he was warring against the entirety of Japan. He was finally beaten and arrested by Titan of the Global Champions, and is now under rehabilitation in Venture City.
  • Transhuman:
    • Technically, all naturally-born Mutants count, since they were secretly genetically modified in utero by the Living Nebula.
    • The Global Might leader Mordor is this taken Up to Eleven: the crime syndicates of Megalopolis decided to hit a Mook with every Super Empowering treatment they could get their hands on - with the result being a Super Strong, regenerative villain. And then he was equipped with technology and weapons.
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