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"Do you remember the first time you saw a dinosaur? You don’t really believe it. It’s like a miracle."
Senator Sherwood: Do these animals deserve the same protections given to other species? Or should they be just left to die?
Dr. Ian Malcolm: These creatures were here before us. If we're not careful, they're gonna be here after.
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Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is the 2018 sequel to Jurassic World, and the fifth film in the Jurassic Park franchise. Juan Antonio Bayona takes over the director's chair from Colin Trevorrow, who remains on as executive producer alongside Steven Spielberg. Trevorrow is credited as co-writer with Derek Connolly. It was released in the USA on June 22, 2018.

Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard and B.D. Wong reprise their roles as Owen Grady, Claire Dearing, and Dr. Henry Wu. They are joined not only by newcomers played by James Cromwell, Toby Jones, Geraldine Chaplin, and Justice Smith, but also notably by Jeff Goldblum, who reprises his role of Dr. Ian Malcolm from Jurassic Park and The Lost World.

Three years have passed since the fall of Jurassic World. Isla Nublar has once again been abandoned, the park left in ruins and the dinosaurs to their devices. Now, the island that was once home to the original Jurassic Park and its successor is ready to go up in a massive eruption of lava due to a volcano that awakened on the island. Because of this, one of John Hammond's old partners offers to help rescue the dinosaurs. Claire Dearing recruits Owen Grady to join in on the rescue mission due to the fact that his old companion, the Velociraptor Blue, is still alive on the island. Now, it's a race against time and the vicious creatures still on the island to rescue as many as possible to release into a sanctuary, before Isla Nublar finally goes up in a catastrophic inferno...

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Or at least, that's the story they are told...

In February 2018, a third Jurassic World film was announced with a tentative release in June 2021. An augmented reality game, Jurassic World Alive has been released on 24 May 2018.

Ironically, it's the first Universal picture to be filmed in CinemaScope since another dinosaur film, Dinosaurus!, released nearly 50 years prior.

Previews: Trailer 1, Trailer 2.

Please move any character tropes to the proper character page.


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Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom contains examples of:

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    A – E 
  • Absentee Actor: Omar Sy (Barry, the other raptor tamer), Lauren Lapkus (Vivian, the control room operator) and Jake Johnson (Lowery, the other control room operator) all played supporting characters who had significant screentime in Jurassic World and survived the events of the film. They did not return for Fallen Kingdom. Nor did Nick Robinson (Zach) or Ty Simpkins (Gray).
  • Abusive Parents: Mills is, for all intents and purposes, Maisie's adoptive father should anything happen to Lockwood, which does happen, unfortunately, and while he does show a few Pet the Dog moments toward Maisie, he ultimately treats her more as his property rather than an individual simply because she is a clone, not to mention it is implied he primarily wants to keep her to have Wu perform rather atrocious experiments on her to improve the genetic code of any future bioweapons they may cook up. By the time Maisie has found much better parental figures in the form of Owen and Claire and refuses to come with Mills, the man loses his patience and reveals her true nature rather sadistically.
  • Accidental Hero: The Indoraptor shows up just in time the kill the armed guards with Mills after he reveals the true nature of Maisie to her, Owen and Claire.
  • Action Film, Quiet Drama Scene:
    • Maisie watching the video of Owen interacting with young Blue, cut between the now-adult Blue getting treated while a visibly anxious Owen watches.
    • When they are imprisoned, Owen and Claire briefly reminisce on the magic of seeing a dinosaur for the first time.
    • The expedition team and the mercenaries silently watching a lone Brachiosaurus watching the ships leave as smoke and lava overtake it, and with it, the remains of both Jurassic Park and Jurassic World.
  • Actionized Sequel: Sure, the previous film had plenty of action, but this one takes the cake. The first act alone has the protagonists avoiding the carnivorous dinosaurs while trying to outrun a volcanic eruption. Later in the film, Owen turns into a One-Man Army and, with the help of a distraction caused by a young Stygimoloch, beats up stun-prod-armed mercenaries with nothing but his bare fists. Finally, there is the final battle against the Indoraptor, which ends with the thing being brutally impaled in an Agujaceratops skull.
  • Actor Allusion:
    • While being held in captivity beneath Lockwood Manor as Mills tells Owen and Claire of his Evil Plan, Owen seizes Mills and threatens to break his right arm. Mills' actor Rafe Spall already had his right arm broken after encountering an alien in Prometheus.
    • Despite this presumably being their first face-to-face meeting, Sir Lockwood warmly greets Claire by saying how nice it is to see her again; James Cromwell previously played police chief dad, Capt. George Stacy to Bryce Dallas Howard's Gwen Stacy in Spider-Man 3.
    • Like Chris Pratt's Emmet Brickowski, Pratt's Owen has a moment in which he awakens to full consciousness but unable to move, and then with an extreme effort he is able to roll and twist just enough to save himself.
  • Adrenaline Makeover: Somewhat inverted as Claire has ditched the suit and heels for something more practical to go adventuring with. Justified, since in the first movie she was caught unaware by the disaster while at work, while here she's actually prepared to go hiking through the jungle. And she still looks gorgeous.
  • Advertised Extra:
    • Jeff Goldblum returns as Dr. Ian Malcolm for a grand total of two scenes, which he described as a "sprig of parsley" that could easily be removed entirely, since he doesn't even interact with any of the remaining cast at any point. This didn't stop the first of these scenes from appearing in every trailer and Goldblum from appearing in-person at several promotional events and interviews for the film.
    • Geraldine Chaplin received a fair amount of press coverage after she was announced as part of the cast, but her character has only three or four brief scenes before being unceremoniously dropped from the story half-way through the film.
    • To a lesser extent, the Dilophosaurus as well. It was heavily discussed and strongly suggested at appearing in the film (even the opening scene) but all we see of it is one of many inanimate dinosaur sculptures at Lockwood's manor. This is par for the course for the series since 1997. There is a sound very similar to their characteristic hooting cry in the first scene, but it's so quiet that it's easily missed.
  • All Animals Are Domesticated: Explored in the film. Namely, Blue is so important because Dr. Wu believes that she demonstrates the traits required to begin the process of domestication. She's still a very dangerous wild animal, but demonstrated empathy and curiosity towards Owen that none of the other Raptors did. He draws the comparison between a wolf and a Bulldog, nearly identical in genetics but possessing key differences in behavior towards humans.
  • All There in the Manual: As with the Masrani Global website from Jurassic World, the Dinosaur Protection Group promotional website goes a long way to fleshing out the series' lore and filling in plot holes from past movies—like where the Spinosaurus from Jurassic Park III came from and what happened to the dinosaurs on Site B.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: The car sized Carnotaurus unfortunately stopped to try and get at Owen right as the bus sized Tyrannosaurus came at it.
  • Animal Stampede:
    • Owen, Claire, and Franklin have to flee from a stampede of dinosaurs (and Pteranodons) at one point.
    • Near the end of the film, a second stampede happens as the remaining dinosaurs flee from Lockwood Manor. Mills takes cover under a vehicle to avoid being trampled... only to be shredded to pieces by Rexy, a Carnotaurus and the Compsognathus as soon as he makes himself visible.
  • Animal Wrongs Group: The trailers make Owen and Claire out to be this, but this is averted in the film itself. The DPG does not free animals in a way that would endanger innocents, and Claire herself is unable to set the dinosaurs loose on the mainland at the end, because she knows the cost will be too great.
  • Artistic License – Biology:
    • Played with. At first, it seems that Dr Wu seeks Blue's DNA to make controllable Indoraptors, which makes little sense, as Blue was trained and raised by Owen since infancy and such gained her bond. Her behavior is due to social conditioning, but logically, her DNA would be like any other raptor DNA. The only way it would make any sense is if one considers that it was her specific genetic makeup that made Blue more docile and empathic than the other raptors, but even then replicating that using Blue's DNA would require unbelievably good luck. Later on it turns out that Wu needs Blue precisely because her behavior was socially conditioned. He says that in order to make the following generations of Indoraptors more controllable, they need a mother they can learn such behavior from.
    • Multiple human characters are sedated with animal tranquilizers, with Wu specifically naming the particular narcotic used as carfentanil at one point. Carfentanil is extremely potent and has a lethal human dose in the micrograms, meaning any human injected with a dinosaur-sized dosage of it should have experienced fatal respiratory failure. This is specially ridiculous after Zia complains that the sedative dose is too high for a dinosaur. Although Zia was able to pull the dart out of Owen's chest before it injected the full payload, this does not appear to be the case for Wu, and both men recover fairly quickly and suffer no lingering side effects.
    • Subverted in the T. rex to Velociraptor blood transfusion scene, as explained by this article (in short, you could probably do a successful transfusion the first time, if you tried a second time it'd likely be fatal).
  • Artistic License – Cars: Like the previous film, one of the vehicles from the original park is seen, this time Ford Explorer 04 that fell into the T-rex paddock. It looks like it was just recently flipped over, with the livery still visible. After 25 years in a Central American jungle, it would have rusted into nothing, as with the Jeep in the previous movie. Also it fell down a brick wall, which is missing, and a into a tree, which is also missing. note 
  • Artistic License – Paleontology:
    • Jack Horner (the technical adviser and onset paleontologist for the previous Jurassic Park films) recommended that they not use Stygimoloch for the film, since there is an increasing amount of strong evidence to suggest Stygimoloch was just a juvenile stage of Pachycephalosaurusnote . However, his request was turned down. Ultimately, in the movie itself, the specimen is actually never identified by species, so any viewer could very well just assume it is a young pachy.
    • The Sinoceratops in this film has exposed holes in the fenestrae of its frill.
    • The Baryonyx in the film has a broader head, both its arms and neck are also shorter, its teeth are more like a needlefish, and it is horribly shrink-wrapped (which could alternatively be it starving).
    • This film's Stegosaurus seemingly lack the beak they had in real life...and indeed, the previous Jurassic Park films. Unless if the beak is actually still there and just blended into the skin, like with the film's Gallimimus.
    • Despite being based mostly on a theropod, the Indoraptor is shown walking and running on all fours. With the pronated-hands issue aside, another problem would be the structure of a theropod's shoulder blades, which would end up injuring its own neck muscles in such a posture (a reason why many paleontologists rejected the idea of Spinosaurus being quadrupedal when it was found to have very short hind limbs).
    • Ankylosaurus looked nothing in life like how it is depicted in the film; the "walking tank" appearance with a shell of bony armor and spikes running down the sides was dispelled at least 2 decades ago.
    • For some unknown reason, the Mosasaurus, which was only somewhat over-sized in the previous film, is now practically Kaiju-proportioned.
  • Artistic License – Physics:
    • The volcanic eruption is a (well-depicted) explosive flank blast, making the Outrun the Fireball cloud very much a fireball-esque pyroclastic flow. Forgiving the fact that the "cloud" in real life would be moving at 50 mph (no human could ever run faster than 24), it is also a mix of dense rocky volcanic matter (read as: very hot glass particles) with a temperature approaching 1,300 degrees Celsius. Human beings do not survive being enveloped by this, and Owen would have been at best ended up like a victim of Pompeii if he isn't flat-out incinerated while the gyrosphere would have melted into slag. The down-the-cliff escape to the water also probably will not work as pyroclastic flows descend mountains all the way to sea level and then skim across the water surface depositing heavier hot material as they go. It's not going to be over by the time you need to resurface even if you did get deep enough to survive.
    • The classic Soft Water trope occurs as well. That's a long ways down and while the gyrosphere will probably survive it, the vertical deceleration of the humans inside is another story. Owen has no practical chance of surviving this, both for fall distance and also, being a human on foot, not being able to jump far enough to get clear of the cliff.
    • Given the weight of a full-grown T. rex (around 9 tons or 8,160kg), carrying one in a helicopter in a safety net may not be a very good idea.
  • Ascended Extra: The Pachycephalosaurus had never been more than a background species in the previous movies in the franchise. In this one, a young specimen, or one of a related species (more info up in Artistic License – Paleontology) is quite prominent and even crucial to the plot.
  • Aside Glance: The Indoraptor smirks at the camera right before revealing himself to and killing Wheatley. He seems just as aware as the audience of how stupid Wheatley is.
  • Asshole Victim: Almost everyone who gets killed by the dinosaurs (Wheatley, Eversol, Mills, etc.) deserves it one way or another.
  • The Atoner: Benjamin Lockwood feels that he has a responsibility to save the dinosaurs as a way of making up for exploiting them and using the cloning technology to clone his late daughter against Hammond's wishes.
  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: The Indoraptor can still be distracted by the laser-acoustic system that it was trained with, even when on a murderous rampage.
  • Auction of Evil: The Super Bowl trailer shows a scene where the Indoraptor is being auctioned amongst various bidders. And it's not just the Indoraptor but the whole array of species "rescued" from Isla Nublar's volcanic demise. Most of the bidders are top-level arms dealers interested in genetically engineered Living Weapons, with some stupidly rich folks thrown in that are just looking for some new toy to show off.
  • Bad Boss:
    • Wheatley doesn't care about one of his men who gets killed by Blue.
    • Mills only cares about saving his own skin (and the Indominus bone) when the dinosaurs start breaking out and it’s abundantly clear that his own bottomless greed comes before anyone else.
  • Behemoth Battle: A Carnotaurus fights a Sinoceratops.
  • Big Bad Esemble: Eli Mills and the Indoraptor. But Mills is the one with more screen time and a bigger impact on the plot.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Just like in the previous film, Blue saves the protagonists' asses on several occasions, even going claw to claw with the Indoraptor during the climax.
  • Big Red Button: Maisie presses one to free the dinosaurs trapped in Lockwood Manor.
  • Bits of Me Keep Passing Out: Inverted; after Owen is tranquilized, he starts to come back to consciousness one body part at a time, flopping and crawling along the jungle floor until he's finally able to stand up and run.
  • Bittersweet Ending:
    • There's several positives about the ending (Owen and Claire seemingly reconciled, Maisie is saved, Blue and Rexy both surviving, the Indominus sample destroyed,the Indoraptor dead, Mills and Wheatley as well as a good deal of the mercenaries kicked the bucket during the whole ordeal.) but for the most part it's at best ominous. Isla Nublar and the majority of animals on the island are gone, the surviving dinosaurs now roam California including several very dangerous predators, the Mosasaurus is not only loose but hunting near populated shores, a large number of animals are in the hands of criminals with either death or suffering awaiting them, not to mention Wu is still out there and most likely won't be very happy after what our heroes did with his plans. The balance is shifting. That the music playing over the ending is the dark main leitmotif instead of the usual sweeping majesty says something.
    • In regards to the dinosaurs that are owned by the criminal auctioneers, there's one ambiguous line that can be speculated as a ray of hope that the dinosaurs will regain their freedom somehow: "Life finds a way..."
  • Black Comedy:
    • The Indoraptor is one hell of a Troll and seems to enjoy this greatly. At one point he even smirks at the camera as he's about to kill Wheatley.
    • The film in general has a spectacularly dark sense of humor, from a semi-paralyzed Owen lurching away from an approaching lava flow to the Stygimoloch tossing attendees of the Auction of Evil like ragdolls.
  • Black Dude Dies First: One of the mercenaries in the submersible at the start of the film is black. His Tempting Fate comment about all the dinos surely being dead pretty much seals his doom.
  • Bloodless Carnage: Some kills should have realistically been a lot messier, especially Wheatley's death by the Indoraptor, as it involved a completely severed limb and Wheatley crawling on the ground for a minute. The Indo noticeably has some blood in his teeth immediately after, but is still far milder than it should be.
  • Book-Ends:
    • A Brachiosaurus is the first dinosaur Owen's team sees on the island and also the last as they leave. In a meta-sense it's also the first dinosaur visitors to Isla Nublar saw in the first movie, and the last dinosaur visitors to Isla Nublar saw as the island was reduced to a burning wasteland.
    • The film opens and closes with Ian Malcolm testifying before a senate subcommittee about his stance on the dinosaurs' continued survival on Earth.
    • The main theme plays at the title and once again at the ending. Both times, the theme signifies dark times to come.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Wheatley attempts to take a tooth from the Indoraptor when he thinks it's incapacitated. It isn't and he pays for his stupidity with his life.
  • The Bus Came Back:
    • Dr. Ian Malcolm returns in a cameo after being absent from Jurassic Park III and Jurassic World, twenty one years after the events of Site B and the San Diego incident.
    • Brachiosaurus and Compsognathus both return after their absence since the third film (although the former can be heard in the background in Jurassic World).
  • Bus Crash: According to online supplementary material, Isla Sorna (Site B), unseen since Jurassic Park III, suffered an ecological collapse shortly after the events of that film due to InGen's illegal creation of additional species (including III's signature dino Spinosaurus), and the remaining dinosaurs had been shipped to Nublar before the events of World - thus explaining why Nublar is now the last refuge of the dinosaurs as of Fallen Kingdom. However, this fact goes totally unmentioned in the film proper, leaving casual viewers to wonder why the dinosaurs on that island aren't acknowledged in the "re-extinction" discussions.
  • Call-Back:
    • Rexy emerging from the jungle during a dark tropical storm and chasing a man in a raincoat.
    • The protagonists come across a Brachiosaurus upon arriving on Isla Nublar, much like in the first movie.
    • The wreck of Explorer 04, the one the T. rex pushed off with Tim Murphy inside it into a tree in the first movie, can be seen in the latest trailer in the scene where Owen reunites with Blue.
    • Yet again we're treated to a shot of someone in vehicle's mirror with 'Objects in the mirror are closer than they appear' writing on it, this time of Owen while searching for Blue, in the mirror of wreck of Explorer 04.
    • Similarly, the shot of faces in the mirror that was prominent in the first and second film.
    • Just like in the first movie, a carnivorous dinosaur lunges at the protagonists only to be sidelined by the sudden arrival of Rexy, who then proceeds to kill the smaller carnivore before roaring in triumph.
    • The Indoraptor's shadow casts on the wall of Maisie’s bedroom and it taps its talon on the floor, in the same manner as the Big One in the original Jurassic Park.
    • Lockwood’s plan to save the dinosaurs involves moving them to an isolated island sanctuary where they would be left to live in peace, ala Hammond’s plan for Site B in The Lost World. Mills has a different idea.
    • Once again, a character reboots the system and turns the power back on at the worst possible time. In the original film, it's the electric fence Tim was climbing. In this film, it's the museum exhibit in Lockwood Mansion where Owen, Claire, and Maisie are hiding in. With the lights back on, the Indoraptor sees them and attacks, injuring Claire.
    • Once again, a character becomes a play toy for two dinosaurs before finally being eaten. In this case, it's Eli Mills, making it a Karmic Death of sorts.
    • Once again, a character overestimates his control over a dangerous predator he knows next to nothing about and ends up losing an arm and being reduced to a panicked blubbering mess as he is mauled to death and devoured as a result.
    • Fans of the first film might be reminded of the tail end of Dr. Alan Grant's Chekhov's Lecture:
      Dr. Grant: The point is, you're still alive when it starts to eat you. So, try and show a little respect, ok?
    • Once again, a girl tries to hide from a charging predator by squeezing into a small hole and pulling down a jammed door.
    • Claire's first appearance in this film mirrors her Feet-First Introduction in Jurassic World.
    • This film ends with Blue running to the edge of a cliff overlooking the city to roar, similar to how the previous movie ended with Rexy roaring over her view of the park.
    • We are yet again treated to a scene where a once majestic sauropod slowly and painfully dies before everyone's eyes.
    • Unsurprisngly, considering his origin, the Indoraptor goes through a lot of the motions of the Indominus Rex during the film: He momentarily vanishes from sight as Owen tries to grab a weapon, tries to attack Owen and Clare through a space he can't get through (the garage in Jurassic World, the fallen scenery in the exhibits here), and Blue attacks him by getting up on his back.
    • A role-reversed Call-Back: The Indoraptor meets his end in the same way as Robert Muldoon due to being so focused on his prey that he fails to notice a side attack from "the other raptor that" he "never even knew was there".
    • We have Blue defending her father figure by knocking a monster twice her size through a window and ultimately causing it to impale itself to death due to gravity, just like Kelly does for Ian in The Lost World.
    • Someone again crawls underneath a vehicle for safety when the dinosaur(s) rampages out the gate (and fluid pours out from the vehicle). The person doesn't survive this time.
  • Cassandra Truth: Lockwood does not believe Maisie when she tells him about Mill's real plans for the dinosaurs. Then subverted later when it turns out Lockwood did believe her, but presumably did not want her to get any more involved in a potentially dangerous situation. Of course, given his arrogance and naivety, Lockwood may simply have asked Mills out of curiosity who his guest was, and only realised what was really going on when Mills told him.
  • Casting Gag: In the Japanese dub, Zia is voiced by Yui Ishikawa, who already had some experience voicing characters fighting against enemies bigger than herself, except this time, she is fighting against dinosaurs, rather than Titans or machines, or someone with former military backgrounds.
  • Central Theme:
    • No matter how hard you try, you can't save everyone.
    • When a radical new technology (like nuclear weapons, or in this case, genetic engineering and cloning, and de-extinction as a whole) is created, it can never be contained. Sooner or later, it will proliferate across the globe.
  • Changing The Uncomfortable Subject: Owen makes fun of Claire and cuts her off when she brings him to the bar, but it's clear that he does not want to talk about Blue.
  • Cheerful Child: Maisie lacks any emotional baggage, loves her doting grandfather, trusts his shifty-looking assistant and is all-around a fun bundle of sunshine. She becomes a terrified, traumatized wreck in light of the dark secrets under the mansion, discovering her own screwed-up past, finding her grandfather dead, of course, and being hunted by a mutant dinosaur and her greedy sociopath of an adoptive father who wants her for his own nefarious schemes.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • The very first promotional image gives us Maisie standing in front of an Agujaceratops fossil. That fossil is what's used to finally kill the Indoraptor in the climax.
    • Claire witnesses during the Auction of Evil that the Indoraptor can be controlled using a gun with a laser beam pointing at his target before triggering a signal to order him to attack. She recovers that gun in the climax and uses it in a Batman Gambit against the Indoraptor by pointing the laser beam at Owen to trick it into leaping at him so that it would break the fragile glass roof and fall to its death. It doesn't work out when the Indoraptor manages to climb back up, but the roof structure was weakened enough by his weight that when Blue leaps onto him, the roof they're on collapses and the Indo falls into the Agujaceratops fossil to his death.
  • Chekhov's Volcano: The fact that Isla Nublar is actively volcanic was noted in the first novel, and it seems some thirty years later, this detail finally becomes plot-relevant in dramatic fashion.
  • Climactic Volcano Backdrop: Isla Nublar suffering from a volcanic eruption is a major plot point, as Owen and Claire go back to the island to try and save the dinosaurs.
  • Clones Are People, Too: Claire and Owen both wholeheartedly believe this and not just about the dinosaurs but also about Maisie, in fact after getting over the initial shock of finding out that the little girl they are trying to keep safe is a clone (running from the Indoraptor certainly helped get them back to their senses) they pretty much stop caring about that detail and don't treat her any differently from how they treated her before the reveal, this is in contrast to the Big Bad who sees clones including Maisie as property to do with as he pleases.
  • Cloning Blues: Maisie is distressed by the revelation that she is a clone of her mother, and this influences her decision to free the dinosaurs afterwards.
  • Comedic Sociopathy: While still an Ax-Crazy bio-weapon, the Indoraptor is evidently sentient/stable enough to have a dark sense of humor. He lightly pokes Maisie's hair to frighten her and playfully toys with Wheatley before going in for the kill.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Indominus rex's skeleton is discovered at the bottom of the Mosasaurus enclosure, confirming her death at the end of Jurassic World.
    • Hoskins outlines his plans for a miniaturized version of the Indominus rex to Claire and Owen shortly before his death. These plans are realized through the creation of the Indoraptor.
    • The Velociraptor model in Lockwood's museum has the same "tiger" colouring as the Velociraptors from The Lost World: Jurassic Park.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Unlike the last movie where the Tyrannosaurus is summoned to fight the Big Bad, in this film it's only by complete chance that she's the one that kills the main antagonist at the end.
  • Convection Schmonvection: To an absurd degree. When Owen's paralysis wears off, he is only a few inches from lava at most and yet he does not suffer any ill effects. Not to mention he was lying on ground that, apparently, was hot enough to cause discomfort to a large dinosaur's feet (if the calm Sinoceratops suddenly stomping the ground before running off is any indication). Not only that, briefly he has his hand stuck through lava, yet does not lose his hand or even receives any injury as a result of this. Even more so with Baryonyx that sneaks up on Claire and Franklin, which takes lava in the face and only flinches.
  • Darker and Edgier: The film is darker in tone than Jurassic World, and the third act is very much a horror film that feels like a vampire/werewolf/Alien movie at times. It also ends with an ecological disaster, the likes of which the heroes and Costa Rican Air Guard way back in the first book tried to prevent—dinosaurs getting onto the mainland. Notably this was the second film in the franchise to have received the 14A rating in Canada instead of the PG rating, however upon the DVD and Blu-ray release it was bumped down to a PG.
  • Dark Reprise:
    • The only movie so far to not end with a triumphant rendition of the main theme. Instead, we are treated to a somber, almost tragic version of it, as we see dinosaurs being transported to be used as weapons of war or invading human territory. Signifying that yes, this is the franchise's Darkest Hour.
    • The music that plays when the Brachiosaurus dies is a somber reprise of the main theme of Jurassic Park.
  • David vs. Goliath: Blue battles the Indoraptor, who was designed to be stronger in every way. Then again, he was a faulty prototype, which gave our girl one big advantage against him.
  • Defiant Captive: Zia, big time. She willingly lets herself be taken prisoner by Wheatley and his men because she's the only one who can nurse Blue back to health after one merc gives her a particularly awful wound. As she remains imprisoned by people who have no qualms with killing her at the whim of an order, she nonetheless snarks at them a lot and makes it clear she doesn't enjoy working for them in their faces. Later on, Wu handcuffs her to Blue's cage and demands her to help him extract Blue's blood to start his work on the next Indoraptor batch. Zia nonchalantly tells him that she gave Blue a T.rex blood transfussion to save her life, effectively making her useless for Wu and Mills' Evil Plan, shortly before an undercover Franklin takes Wu out and frees Zia.
  • Demoted to Extra:
    • Rexy, despite having a bit more screen time than in Jurassic World. In that movie she was key to the climax; in this one, she only makes token appearances throughout the movie. She does kill the human Big Bad, but only by sheer coincidence.
    • The Mosasaurus, while not having many scenes to begin with in Jurassic World, only appears at the beginning and end of the movie for a few seconds each, and does not take part in the main plot at all.
  • Dirty Coward: Mills may be a sociopath who has no qualms with killing people that may be an obstacle to his schemes, but, he is ultimately a fearful weakling who will run away whenever he's confronted with something that he perceives as a direct threat to his life. Case in point, he first runs away from Owen when the guy unleashes Styggy to crash his auction and gets rid of his mercenaries. And when he later shows up with two more mercs, this time determined to staight-up murder Owen and Claire and reclaim Maisie, the Indoraptor has been unleashed by this point and kills the two mercs accompanying Mills, causing the scared asshole to turn around and flee the scene.
  • Disney Villain Death: The Indoraptor gets pounced on by Blue and falls through a glass roof, landing right on top of the horns of a fossil Agujaceratops.
  • Don't Celebrate Just Yet: Three times:
    • A mercenary is chased by the T. rex and jumps onto a helicopter's rescue ladder. Everyone cheers. Suddenly, the Mosasaurus erupts from beneath the surface of the lagoon as the helicopter flies over it, eating the guy.
    • Claire and Franklin are trying to escape the Baryoynx in a room full of lava. They clamber up a folded emergency ladder, and Franklin cheers and celebrates... only for the ladder to suddenly slide down due to his weight, dropping him back down into the room.
    • Gunnar Eversoll manages to reach the elevator and type in the code to close the doors before the Indoraptor can get to him and the two other clients inside. They all share a nervous laugh... only for the Indoraptor to smash the controls for the elevator with its tail, causing the doors to open and the Indoraptor to slaughter the three of them.
  • Double-Meaning Title:
    • Jurassic World no longer refers to the park itself, but rather our world now literally becoming a "Jurassic World" as dinosaurs and humans are forced into coexistence alongside each other.
    • There are four ways to see what Fallen Kingdom means.
      • The 'Fall' of Isla Nublar, the island which all surviving dinosaurs are living on and thus their 'Kingdom', which is about to be destroyed by the volcanic eruption and threaten to cause another dinosaur extinction.
      • The 'Fall' of InGen, with the original founders, John Hammond and Benjamin Lockwood both died. However, they left behind their own legacies in the form of Maisie and the dinosaurs to rule this new 'Kingdom', the planet Earth.
      • The 'Fall' of the Hybrids where Blue defeats the Indoraptor while Rexy kills Mills and smashes the last piece of the Indominus rex, destroying any chance of these abominations terrorizing man and dinosaur alike.
      • The second half of the plot taking place at the Lockwood estate resembles the fall of a fairytale kingdom, with the manor architecturally resembling a castle complete with an actual dungeon, with Benjamin Lockwood being the sickly King, Mills being the King's corrupt right hand who takes power for himself, Maisie being the Princess, the Indoraptor being the dragon after the Princess while Owen and Claire are the heroes from a far off land who along side their loyal companion Blue slay the dragon and save the Princess.
  • Eaten Alive: It wouldn't be able to call itself a Jurassic Park film if at least one person didn't fall prey to this trope and indeed, several do, especially after the Indoraptor gets loose.
  • End of an Age: The volcanic destruction of Isla Nublar signifies the end of what was once home to Jurassic Park. Also, the release of the dinosaurs into the modern world signals the effective end of the Anthropocene—humans will have to learn to co-exist with dinosaurs now instead of dominating them.
  • Elaborate Underground Base: The basement of the Lockwood Estate contains a secret research facility dedicated to the illicit development of biological weapons, staffed by amoral geneticists such as Dr. Wu.
  • Escaped Animal Rampage: A rare heroic version—Stiggy the Stygimoloch goes to town with the Auction of Evil after Owen lures her out of the holding cells. And technically, this trope is the entire ending—dinosaurs running loose on the American mainland. The Stinger gives us Pteranodon (already established in previous films to be territorial and aggressive) arriving in Las Vegas, as police sirens blare.
  • Emerging from the Shadows: Maisie hides from the arguing Mills and Wu in a long, dark tunnel with bars at the end, and slowly, a long arm with deadly claws creeps out from it behind her....
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • Downplayed as the reason is more from pragmatism than morality, but Wu objects to the sale of the Indoraptor as it is an unstable, uncontrollable prototype. Rather than wanting to create scarier or deadlier dinosaurs, he wants new Indoraptors down the line to feel empathy and mutual respect with their handlers... so they can be more efficient, controllable and marketable bioweapons. It makes sense when you consider a savage, uncontrollable animal that is likely to turn on you as soon as it can is much less desirable than a stable yet just-as-deadly animal that can work with a handler it trusts. Wu also correctly points out that selling the Indoraptor too early would break the monopoly on genetics that InGen has long since held.
    • When the people on the boat notice the Brachiosaurus dying in the volcanic ash, even the mercenaries who were sent to capture the dinosaurs and tried to kill Owen were taken aback and remained totally silent.

    F – K 
  • Fade to Black: Right after the Indoraptor accidentally opens the elevator that Gunnar and several auctioners are taking refuge in. he turns around, gets an Oh, Crap! look on his face, and the screen does exactly this before treating viewers to an instance of Sound-Only Death.
  • Fairy Tale: In a roundabout way, the second half of the movie is very much like a modernized fairy tale and makes the "Fallen Kingdom" title more poignant. There is a castle (Lockwood Manor) ruled by an aging lord with a nobility title (Sir Lockwood) that has a princess that is an objective of both the heroes and villains (Maisie). And in the end, a dragon (the Indoraptor) is released from a dungeon-like setting and tries to go after said princess. Owen (The Knight in Shining Armor), Blue (his Faithful Steed/Animal Companion), and Claire (his Fair Maiden) must slay the dragon to protect the Princess.
    • During one easy-to-miss piece of dialogue between Iris and Maisie (The Princess), Maisie pronounces the word bath like an American would. Iris immediately demands that she pronounce it b-ah-th, in an English accent. What does Iris call the accent? The Queen's English.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Wheatley is presented as a kind of honorable Great White Hunter but drops his niceness as soon as Owen reunites with Blue. And while Mills looks kind of slimy from the start, he remains polite from start to finish, even when casually telling Owen and Claire that they officially died at Isla Nublar when it erupted.
  • Five-Second Foreshadowing:
    • The Indoraptor notices that the glass ceiling on the roof is weak and can be broken through. With some help from Blue plus a bit of quick thinking and trickery the Indoraptor falls through the ceiling to its death.
    • After the dinosaurs are freed and Mills comes out from nearly being crushed by a car after taking cover under it because of the stampede, something catches the attention of the trio of Compys above the wrecked car, and they promptly run off. Not long after, Rexy snatches up Mills out of nowhere.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • The Mosasaurus is first seen escaping of its confinement into the real world. In the ending, all of the surviving dinosaurs are released into the real world as well, starting the new age of dinosaurs where they are not confined to an island anymore.
    • Zia mentions the possibility of cloning a caveman early in the movie. While not a caveman, Lockwood had successfully performed human cloning years ago.
    • A meeting about the ethics of cloning is one of the headlines scrolling along the bottom of the BBC News segment. It's later revealed that Maisie is actually a clone of Lockwood's late daughter, rather that his granddaughter.
    • Iris's "I raised them both!" later on is a less subtle example.
    • A few hints that the tranquilzers won't work the way they're intended. For instance, when Blue is captured and shot with several tranqs, she takes a while to go down and manages to fatally wound a man before having to be shot with live ammo. Later the Indoraptor gets shot with only two tranqs and not only is he not affected in the least but he takes it as an opportunity to to lure his prey within biting distance.
    • The title itself, with it's shift from Jurassic Park to Jurassic World. At the end, the Dinosaurs are no longer restricted to a mere park.
  • Gaia's Vengeance: Discussed by Congressman Sherwood, who questions whether the eruption of Mount Sibo is a divine act of retribution for humanity playing God.
  • Genetic Engineering Is the New Nuke: The underlying premise to Ian Malcolm's congressional deposition amounts to this. He even directly compares it to nuclear proliferation at one point, in case, uh, the point was, uh, too subtle.
  • Geographic Flexibility: The Mosasaur pen is in a completely different location from where it was seen in Jurassic World in order to better explain its escape into the ocean, which it couldn't have done in the preceding movie.
  • Great White Hunter: Name-dropped by Owen to describe Wheatley, although the guy lacks any heroic qualities and thus qualifies as an Egomaniac Hunter at best.
  • Gothic Horror: Surprisingly evokes this trope in a modern setting. The third act is set in the opulent Edwardian-style Lockwood Estate during a dark and stormy night, with operatic music and the protagonists evading the Indoraptor which is a product of Frankenstein-esque mad science. The Indoraptor itself howls at the full moon like a werewolf, and it slinks about in the darkness like a vampire.
  • Gory Discretion Shot:
    • A few here and there, the most notable being the mercenary that shoots Blue appears to have his face getting bitten off by the raptor.
    • Wheatley's death is mostly shown from a distance with the either the Indoraptor, the cage bars or an onlooking Eversol (due to perspective) blocking most of it from view. Apart from a Freeze-Frame Bonus, him being disarmed plays more to Bloodless Carnage, since we should see arterial blood spraying everywhere even with that side of his body facing away from the camera.
    • The film fades to black when Eversol and the people in the elevator are torn to pieces by the Indoraptor.
    • Averted with Eli who gets the most graphic death in the series since The Lost World: Jurassic Park.
  • Groin Attack: While the Stygimoloch certainly delivers some painful looking headbutts to idiotic millionaires, amoral arms dealers and mercenaries, one unfortunate sap gets the hit right in the family jewels with the horn on the Styg's snout milliseconds before the rest of the skull smashes into his gut.
  • Guns Are Useless: The tranq guns/darts are only somewhat effective in neutralizing Blue and don't do squat against the Indoraptor, although he acts otherwise. The assault rifle Owen uses against it is similarly ineffective.
  • Gut Punch: The death of the Brachiosaurus, which assumes a similar pose to the one we first see in Jurassic Park as it mournfully calls to the leaving boat while lava overtakes it, and with it, the last remains of Jurassic Park.
  • Half the Man He Used to Be: Mills get the worst of deaths in the movie as Rexy chomps on his upper portion of his body and the Carnotaurus joins in to grab the lower part. The two have a tug of war on him until he snaps off in half. However, the Carnotaurus escapes before she could finish and those remains are paraded by the Compsognathus.
  • Halfway Plot Switch: From rescuing the dinosaurs from an active volcano to disrupting an Auction of Evil.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Mostly in a general sense, Blue is still a dangerous animal but loyal to Owen. She ends up taking a particular dislike of the Indoraptor and comes to the rescue several times. This is the first film where the Velociraptor species has no moment as the villain.
  • Hollywood Healing: Blue is at the brink of death due to a gunshot wound, but barely makes it thanks to Zia treating her with the few resources they can find at the ship and much improvisation. A mere few hours later, Blue is healthy enough to overpower a group of mercenaries, outrun an explosion and go toe-to-toe with a super hybrid without ever displaying any signs of pain or fatigue.
  • Hope Spot:
    • At the beginning of the movie, a mercenary narrowly avoids being killed by Rexy and then his comrades in the helicopter, who tried to cut the ladder he was holding on to. Fortunately, the part of the ladder Rexy is chewing tore off, and the mercenary is safe... until the Mosasaurus jumps out and devours him.
    • After the Indoraptor escapes, Eversol manages to hide inside an elevator where three buyers are hiding, closing the door a second before the hybrid can enter. The Indoraptor then accidentally smashes the elevator control with its tail, opening the elevator, and killing everyone inside.
  • Idiot Ball:
    • Mill's and Eversol's decision to auction off the Indoraptor (over Wu's objections), instead of just saying "not for sale" and leaving it at that, and Wheatley going into its cage to take a tooth from the damn thing certainly qualify.
    • Blue is critical to Mills and Wu's plans for the Indoraptor project. They have a paleovet to treat her after she's shot, but who is vehemently opposed to their work (to the point of holding a gun on an entire group of armed mercenaries. So of course, it makes total and complete sense to leave her completely alone with their critical specimen, give her no staff or equipment with which to attempt to save Blue's life aside from a few terrycloth towels to try and stop the bleeding, and force her to rely on the protagonists who shouldn't even be on the boat in the first place to get blood from Rexy so she can give Blue a transfusion to get the bullet out.
  • If I Do Not Return: Owen tells Claire "If I don't make it back... remember, you're the one who made me come here." She answers with a Death Glare as he walks off after saying this, although he does immediately follow it up with a "Just Joking" Justification.
  • Instant Sedation: The Indoraptor falls asleep about two seconds after being hit with two tranquilizer darts by Wheatley. Seeing as Wheatley is an Egomaniac Hunter who is a fake expert to boot, he assumes this trope is in place and climbs inside the cage to get a tooth for his collection. By the way, the dinosaur isn't tranqed at all. Compare his efforts to Roland Tembo's successful tranquilizing of an adult male ''Tyrannosaurus rex''.
  • It Can Think: Being part Indominus rex, the Indoraptor is at least as intelligent and cunning as his genetic mother, with a cruel sense of humor to boot. The beast seems to know what tranquilizer darts are and actively fakes being tranqed when Wheatley puts two in his neck. He then continues Playing Possum until the dumbass is in the perfect position for the last and most terrifying surprise of his life.
  • It Was a Dark and Stormy Night: Both the film's opening scene and climax invoke this trope, with the latter to play up the Gothic Horror aspect of the story.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: How the Indoraptor is taken out.
  • I Want Them Alive: Mills and Wu need Blue alive and in good condition because they need her to be a "mother" to the next generations of Indoraptors. The only way they'll be controllable is if they learn that behavior from her.
  • Karma Houdini:
    • Downplayed. In the grand scheme of things, some of the auctioneers escape with the dinosaurs and/or the dinosaur DNA they bought. However, they didn't leave before getting either spooked or rammed by a loose Pachy.
    • Despite being responsible for both the creation of both the Indoraptor and Indominus Rex, who killed numerous people, Henry Wu still lives and still has the resources and funds to continue his genetic experimentations. Seriously, will the guy never learn?
  • Karmic Death: Given this entry in the franchise has some of the most awful human villains, it's only fitting they all get well-deserved deaths for everything they did.
    • Wheatley shows how much of an asshole he is by approaching a sedated Stegosaurus and painfully yanking out one of her teeth to add it to his personal collection. Later on, at the auction, when he sees the Indoraptor in his cage, he shoots him with a few darts and, believing everything is fine, foolishly opens the monstrosity's cage and gets inside to try and yank out one of the Indo's teeth. This proves to be his last mistake.
    • Most of the mercenaries on Mills' and Wu's army get this as well. After capturing and mistreating the dinos, they are all viciously murdered by a highly-intelligent, psychopatic dino they are utterly powerless to stop. The ones who were present with Wheatley when he painfully subdued Blue are taken down by an utterly pissed-off Blue after she's freed by Zia from her cage. And the remaining mercs are all trampled to death by the dinosaurs when Maisie sets them free.
    • And Mills himself, the biggest scumbag of them all, is ultimately undone by some of the very same dinosaurs he tried to exploit for his own selfish gain, namely one very hungry T.rex.
  • Kick the Dog: It looks like Wheatley is about to have a pet the dog moment when he approaches a sedated Stegosaurus and pets her comfortingly, almost as though Stegos are his favorite dinosaur. No. Turns out he keeps a tooth necklace and he cruelly yanks out one of her teeth with a chuckle.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: All of the Indoraptor's kills count but the biggest one is Wheatley.
  • King of Beasts: After escaping her confines, Rexy enters a zoo and sees a male lion standing on a rock before roaring at him. In return, the lion roars back at her.

    L – P 
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Mills gets eaten by the very dinosaurs he captured and mistreated for money. Specifically, none other than Rexy!
  • Laser Sight: The Indoraptor is normally uncontrollable, but if it sees anyone being targeted by a laser scope, it will stop whatever it is doing and shift its attention to them. This ends up being the creature's undoing, as it leads the Indoraptor straight into a trap.
  • Last of His Kind: Blue is explicitly stated to be the last surviving Velociraptor. Rexy is also presumably the last Tyrannosaurus rex. This also applies to the dinosaur population on Isla Nublar in regards to Los Cinco Muertes since it’s the last ecosystem populated by dinosaurs on earth, and it’s driven even further when only a scarce few of eleven species are saved from the volcanic eruption.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: The Indoraptor flashes a Slasher Smile at the camera right before it horribly ends the life of Ken Wheatley.
  • Lethal Lava Land: The first act of the plot revolves around Isla Nublar's volcano exploding and endangering all the dinosaurs.
  • Like a Daughter to Me: Unspoken, but the way Owen looks back on the homemade-style video clips of him playing with young Blue and her sisters screams this.
  • Lightning Reveal:
    • How Rexy is revealed behind the mercenary at the beginning of the movie.
    • In a heroic case Blue is seen perched on the roof via flashes of lightning, moments before she finishes off the Indoraptor.
  • Living Weapon: The Indoraptor, a monster designed entirely for human combat and based directly off the Indominus rex genome. It is taken further, as the Indoraptor was designed to follow laser targeting and attack based on a sonic signal, both capable with a specially designed gun.
  • The Mafiya: One of the buyers at the Auction of Evil. He becomes the first person to bid on the Indoraptor, and wins it eventually. Given the brutality of Russian mobsters, one shudders to imagine what would happen if he got his hands on it.
  • Meaningful Name: The ship transporting the dinosaurs is called the Arcadia, in reference to Lockwood's wish to give the dinosaurs a sanctuary home. Thing is, that's not where the dinosaurs are being transported...
  • Miles Gloriosus: Wheatley presents himself as a Great White Hunter and a badass, but it doesn't take long before it's apparent he's a complete phony who has zero expertise on animals or hunting and is in it just for the money and the glory. This gets him killed when he thinks the Indoraptor is tranquilized immediately and he doesn't bother to double-check.
  • Mix-and-Match Critters: The Indoraptor, who was birthed from a sample of the Indominus rex. It's not specified what was modified about its genetic makeup, so one has to guess based on his physical characteristics. (Strangely, he is partially quadrupedal and displays rather feline movements.)
    • His overall body plan is dromaeosaurid, with a large size similar to that of Utahraptor.
    • His head resembles that of Tyrannosaurus rex, but slimmer.
    • Dermal armor from abelisaurids like Carnotaurus, Majungasaurus, and Rugops.
    • Presumably he still has cuttlefish, tree frog and snake DNA, as the traits granted by those genes (color camouflage, thermal camouflage and thermal vision, respectively) would be useful for a combat-oriented dinosaur.
    • Opposable thumbs and uncanny intelligence from an unknown source.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Downplayed with Claire, though her outfits this time around are a lot more fitted to her curvaceous figure.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The orange counter-shaded coloration of the Stygimoloch matches the incarnation from Warpath: Jurassic Park. During their brief battle, the Carnotaurus and Sinoceratops use several moves straight out of the game. The Concavenator resembles Warpath's incarnation of the Spinosaurus, especially with the snout.
    • Once again, a man named Owen is dragged to a Jurassic Park site to thwart corporate forces attempting to capture the dinosaurs for purposes that will endanger the mainland.
    • Wu explains that he needs Blue for two purposes—one, to use her genome to create the next generation of Indoraptor that is less unstable and can feel empathy for its trainer and handler (presumably he got this idea from the close bond between Owen and Blue that caused her to turn on the Indominus at the climax of Jurassic World). The second purpose is so that she can be a 'mother' to this next generation of Indoraptor. This ties back to the second book where it is said the raptors are unstable and violent because they lack parent figures to nurture them properly. Wu evidently does not want to repeat the mistakes done with the first generation of Velociraptors as well as the Indominus.
    • Large masses of dinosaurs get onto the mainland, exactly what the heroes and the military try to prevent in the very first book.
    • The Lost World featured a T. rex rampaging through the streets of San Diego. At the end of the film, Rexy bursts onto the scene in a zoo that appears to be, or at least strongly resembles, the San Diego Zoo.
    • An unconscious Owen is woken up when a Sinoceratops licks his face, just like Sarah is licked by a Stegosaurus in the second book.
    • Wu wants to makes dinosaurs 'friendlier' ala Version 4.4, albeit with a very different context.
    • The human Big Bad hides under a car and is forced out of it before being chomped by a T. rex (and a Carnotaurus and Compsognathus too, for that measure).
    • The Big Bad has a conversation with Wu where he discusses the applications of extinct animals with no rights in the modern world, ranging from agriculture to big game hunting, just like another conversation in the Lost World novel where his Composite Character counterpart discusses a similar topic.
    • There's even one to the Telltale game—once again, Rexy crushes a small object that contains genetic samples that the Big Bad wants. Troodons are also in Lockwood's dioramas.
    • Like in the game and the novel, Hammond has screwed over yet another business partner—albeit for moral reasons this time around.
    • Ian Malcolm giving a Character Filibuster about the evils of private science and unchecked genetic engineering is very in-line with the book version of Ian, and a Crichton staple overall.
      • Many of Malcolm's lines are directly from the first book, mostly towards the end when Malcolm is dying of T. rex-inflicted wounds and high on morphine. In particular, his statement that "great change is like death; you can't see what's on the other side until you get there" ("are at the gates" in the film) and that people think of great, sweeping, paradigm-redfining change as a rare event completely outside our control, when in fact it's inherent in all complex systems, are almost word-for-word quotes.
    • The beach our heroes wake up on after escaping pyroclastic flow is identical to the one the protagonist in Jurassic Park: Trespasser wakes up on after the plane crash.
    • Genetic tampering to create a hybrid dinosaur bioweapon is the plot of the Chaos Effect toyline—and the Indoraptor's stripes and dark coloring recall its own mutant apex raptor, the Alpha.
    • A black hacker teen shows up, just like Arby from the book version of The Lost World, and saves the day twice with his knowledge of electronics. He also recalls Ian's daughter in the film version, and carries out the same role as the film version of Lex: screaming, neurotic, and great with computers.
    • The HVAC failing to pump poison gas out is a big plot point in the Jurassic Park ride.
    • A mad dash to escape an erupting volcano on a vehicle while dodging angry herbivores recalls the first Jurassic Park arcade game.
    • Eureka, California was one of the primary filming locations for The Lost World, about a rescue mission against the corrupt remnants of InGen. It is heavily implied Lockwood's estate, where the climax takes place, is in Eureka, as it's not far from Orick, California, where the heroes attempt to run off to.
    • The slimy Corrupt Corporate Executive seeking to usurp a Hammond figure recalls Ed Regis' and the film version of Gennaro's cowardice, Ludlow tarnishing the name of a Hammond figure to profit off of importing dinosaurs to the mainland to attempt to continue InGen and Masrani's doings, and the novel version of Lewis Dodgson, who outright wanted to weaponize the dinosaurs and use the gene research for nefarious purposes.
    • Mills dies in a manner similar to Dodgson in The Lost World novel, hiding under a car before being eaten by a T. rex when he emerges. Granted, Dodgson gets pushed out by one of the main characters, but still.
      • The rest of Mills' death references the deaths of Ludlow and Eddie from the film version—swung around like the former as he screams for his life, then shared between two theropods like the latter.
    • Wheatley carries on a long line of Great White Hunters hired to help wrangle or deter dinosaurs—Muldoon from the Jurassic Park book and film, Roland from The Lost World film, and the mercenaries from Jurassic Park III. Unlike any of them, (and more like the second film's Dieter Stark) however, he's a sleazy, animal-abusing douchebag.
    • Wheatley's death mirrors that of the previous film's Vic Hoskins, starting with him arrogantly thinking he has control over a dangerous animal he knows nothing about; just like with Hoskins, said animal bites his hand off, then proceeds to make a meal out of him.
    • Blue as a baby acts very similarly to the friendly baby raptor from the novel version of Jurassic Park—always trying to get close to the humans and never showing any signs of aggression. Blue, however, isn't torn apart for smelling like a human.
    • Carrying over from Jurassic World, the high-tech displays—especially when Mills shows the tracking movements of the dinosaurs across the island—are straight out of The Lost World game adaptation.
    • Baryonyx also showed up in the game of The Lost World, as did Allosaurus and Carnotaurus.
    • Zia, an animal vet, combines the book and film versions of Sarah Harding in both spunk, willingness to use violence, and risking their lives to save an animal.
    • Indoraptor bears a passing resemblance to the "Deinonycanis", a unreleased hybrid action figure from Kenner's Jurassic park: Chaos Effect toyline back in 1998.
    • This is not the first time Jurassic Park has dealt with the cloning of humans, as the game Scan Command and Dinosaur Battle featured the antagonist Irene Corts cloning humans for a project named "Project Primo".
  • Naïve Animal Lover:
    • Most of the buyers at the auction at least have some nefarious reason for wanting to buy the dinosaurs. One of the rich pricks wants to get a Triceratops simply because his son asked him for one.
    • Averted with the DPG themselves. Although they wish to save the dinosaurs, they are not blind to the danger of wild animals and come to the island prepared.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The trailer shows a scene in which Owen approaches Blue and tries to reconnect with her after years of absence. We see him get his hand close and then suddenly she jerks back and wails, which implies she will attack him. In the final film, we see the reason she reacts that way is that she was shot with a tranquilizer dart, which was conveniently erased from the trailer.
  • New Old West: A very interesting, metaphorical example. The last shot has Blue running across the California desert and overlooking a small town as the sun rises. This represents the new frontier of genetic power and dinosaurs now living alongside humankind.
  • No-Sell: Nope, those tranquilizer darts have absolutely no effect on the Indoraptor aside from giving it the perfect opportunity to lure Wheatly to his Karmic Death while being a complete troll. Later, Owen takes several point blank shots with an assault rifle on it, but they don't even penetrate its hide.
  • "Noah's Story" Arc: The film starts off as this, with a plan to save as much dinosaurs as possible before the volcano kills them all and transport them to an isolated island sanctuary. Turns out the "rescuers" who brought our beloved heroes in are mercenaries who just seek to save a few species for an Auction of Evil... on the mainland.
  • Non-Human Sidekick: Stiggy the Stygimoloch, who breaks herself and Owen/Claire out of prison.
  • Not Now, Kiddo: Maisie thinks Mills is up to no good and tries to inform her grandfather, but he's very tired and tells her to talk to him in the morning.
  • Not So Different: Maisie and the Velociraptors, this and her status as a clone raises the possibility that she might be part raptor.
    • Both are clones created in a laboratory.
    • Both are fond of sneaking around among foliage for a Jump Scare (it's implied by her nanny that it's a regular thing she always does).
    • Both are unusually intelligent and resourceful at a young age.
    • Both are excellent escape artists (the shot where Maisie breaks out of a locked bedroom is even filmed very similarly to the raptors of the first Jurassic Park learning to open doors).
    • Both form a bond with Owen, looking up to him as a father-figure.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: At the beginning of the movie, a submersible enters the Mosasaurus' lagoon. One mercenary is confidant that whatever is inside the lagoon, should be dead by now. True enough, the team manages to collect a sample of the Indominus rex's genetic sample and send it to the surface, with the silhouette of the Mosasaurus in view by the buoy. Just as the submersible is about to leave, the Mosasaurus is right behind them, with her jaws wide open.
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: Isla Nublar is now a volcanic wasteland, dinosaurs are now running freely across the mainland, and InGen is no longer the only faction capable of manufacturing more dinosaurs. To paraphrase Dr. Malcolm, genetic power has been unleashed and nothing can be done to contain it now.
  • Obviously Evil:
    • One look should be enough to know that neither Wheatley nor Mills are batting for the side of good.
    • The Indoraptor himself, who displays a sense of malice and cruelty in his actions, and his terrifying appearance perfectly reflects it.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome:
    • Rexy was one of the dinosaurs captured and saved, but it's never shown how the Queen of the Dinosaurs was taken down.
    • Later in the movie, Blue somehow sends the Indoraptor, a creature easily five times her size in mass, flying through a window.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • Owen is very understandably terrified when Rexy starts waking up while he's in chomping distance.
    • Blue somehow notices that the gas that is spreading around her is about to blow up, and barely manages to outrun the ensuing fireball.
    • One for everyone—guess what's escaped into the world's oceans? Yes, that's right, the enormous shark-eating Mosasaurus, and she seems to have grown even bigger since she was last seen in the last film.
  • Oddly Named Sequel 2: Electric Boogaloo: Though this film is the fifth in the franchise, it specifically identifies itself as the sequel to Jurassic World.
  • Offscreen Breakup: Owen and Claire broke up between films and they bicker over if she broke up with him or if he broke up with her.
  • The Oner: When the gyrosphere falls off the cliff and into the water Claire and Franklin find themselves in a Drowning Pit. The next minute and a half is one take from the inside as they scramble to get out while water rushes inside, volcanic debris splash around them and Owen swims down to help them escape.
  • Out of the Frying Pan: In the beginning, a mercenary manages to escape getting eaten by Rexy by grabbing onto the ladder of a helicopter. It doesn't save him from the Mosasaurus.
    • Then there's Claire and Franklin narrowly escaping a dinosaur in a collapsing base filled with lava, only to end up having to outrun the pyroclastic flow on the surface.
  • Outliving One's Offspring: Lockwood outlived his daughter. He wanted her back so badly, he made another one.
    Mills: [quoting Hammond] It was an unholy thing you did.
  • Ominous Latin Chanting: During certain scenes (like when the Indoraptor climbs onto the roof) there's a creepy choir going along with the film's already dark leitmotif. It adds to the Gothic Horror feel of the second half.
  • Outrun the Fireball: Outrun the pyroclastic flow, specifically. Good thing for the heroes that this normally several hundred KPH fast killer cloud has the decency to slow down to human running speed until they're in the clear. Blue outruns a more traditional fireball when explosive gas tanks in the laboratory explode, cutting power across the mansion.
  • One-Gender Race: Confirmed to be averted by Colin Trevorrow on Twitter where he stated that the dinosaurs include both male and female due to Jurassic World engaging in controlled breeding. Explicitly averted with the Indoraptor, the first confirmed male antagonistic dinosaur in the reboot.
  • Panthera Awesome: The zoo lion's first reaction to seeing Rexy roaring at him is to roar right back at her, even if she dwarfs him in size.
  • Pedal to the Metal Shot: Claire tromps the gas on the truck she, Owen, and Franklin are stealing to get aboard the mercs' ship before the erupting volcano kills them. What makes this notable is she floors it as soon as she gets the truck started, while Owen and Franklin are running behind it to hop in. Fortunately for all involved, Rule of Cool means the truck accelerates just enough to make Owen and Franklin climbing aboard dramatic.
  • Player-Guided Missile: A non-video game, non-missile example—the Indoraptor is trained to follow a laser sight, and to attack at the command of a sound clicker. A quick demonstration of this in action is enough to get The Mafiya (and others after him) to start bidding, despite it being an unstable, sociopathic prototype that is likely to turn on its masters at the first chance it gets.
  • Point of No Return: At the end, the dinosaurs are dying of poison gas, and the only way to save them is to release them. Owen points out that releasing them will have terrible, world-changing consequences and there will be no going back. Claire ultimately cannot bring herself to free the dinosaurs. It is Maisie who frees them in the end, partly because as a clone she has an intimate connection to the dinosaurs and figures that if she has the right to live so do they.
    Maisie: I had to. They are alive like me.
  • Pint-Sized Powerhouse:
    • Blue is about half the size of the Indoraptor yet during the climax somehow manages to throw him out of a window.
    • The Indoraptor itself is a quarter the size of the Indominus rex, yet proves to be far more cunning and deadly.
  • Posthumous Character: The Indominus rex, who was killed by the Mosasaurus at the end of Jurassic World, still plays a significant role in the film. Wu and Mills use a sample of her DNA obtained from her skeleton to create the Indoraptor, and Wu plans to splice her DNA with Blue's to create a new generation of controllable Indoraptors.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: Unlike Hoskins from the previous film, who can only see the killing ability of the Velociraptors, Wu correctly realizes that it is the empathetic bond between human and raptor that is truly valuable. He considers the savage, monstrous Indoraptor to be a failure because of this, and wants to engineer the same empathy into future breeds of Indoraptor.
  • Precision F-Strike: Quite a few.
    • When Claire witnesses Mount Sibo erupting before her eyes.
      Claire: Holy shit!
    • Claire fully realizing what's going on with the expedition after barely surviving the pyroclastic flow.
      Claire: THAT BASTARD LIED TO US!
    • And when Lockwood confronts Mills.
      Lockwood: Damn you!
    • "Wheatley, you son of a bitch!"
    • Mills, to Owen and Claire after they've ruined his auction.
      Mills: You two fucking deserve each other!
  • Properly Paranoid: The other submarine pilot. Turns out he was right to be nervous about being in the lagoon.
  • Psycho Prototype: The Indoraptor himself is a prototype that is by and far still not ready for practical application in the field—it is far too violent and lacks the empathy required to work with human handlers. Doesn't stop the people at the Auction of Evil from bidding on him, though. Having witnessed the result of unfinished prototypes going on rampages, Wu objects to the Indoraptor's sale, but Mills overrules him after seeing how much money the bidders are bidding.

    Q – S 
  • Reality Ensues:
    • When Blue meets Owen again after three years of living wild, her old trainer tries to stir back memories by tossing her some food. She ignores it.
    • Wheatley doesn't bother checking if the Indoraptor is asleep when he tranquilizes it. This leads to his demise.
    • In a world where genetic technology is advanced enough to not only bring back extinct dinosaurs but to create whole new species out of whole cloth, it was only a matter of time before someone started cloning humans.
    • Among the dinosaur species they couldn't save, Brachiosaurus was one of them, almost certainly because they are far too large to be caged and shipped under a very short time frame. Surprisingly, the Apatosaurus manages to avert this - although it is pointed out in dialogue that this particular specimen is still immature and has not yet reached its full size.
      • Subverted in that Brachiosaurus is revealed to have been rescued as its name is listed on the computer screens at Lockwood Manor, and one makes a very brief appearance during the dinosaurs' escape, almost crushing Mills.
    • The injured guests (and, presumably, the families of deceased guests/employees) from the events of Jurassic World launched a class action suit against the park, forcing it to close.
      • The park would have closed anyway once the active volcano was discovered. At least the last disaster had preempted its closure so no last minute park employees got caught on the island during the eruption.
    • The Pteranodons can simply fly off the island; sure enough, we see several setting up roost in Vegas in The Stinger.
    • Likewise, the Mosasaurus, now free to roam the seas at will, starts prowling for surfers along the beach.
    • Owen tries to get Blue to come with him after all the mayhem; Blue takes a look at him, notices a nearby cage similar to the one she was confined to not much earlier, and decides Screw This, I'm Outta Here!
  • Reckless Gun Usage: Invoked; Zia snaps at one of the mercs for holding his gun in such a way that the barrel is pointing at a dinosaur's head. (The rule being that your barrel should never face anything you don't actually mean to shoot.)
  • Reclaimed By Nature: It's evident that this starting to happen to the park.
  • Relationship Revolving Door: The nature of Owen and Claire's relationship; by the end of this movie they have started a relationship thrice.
  • Remember the New Guy?:
    • In a sense regarding some species of dinosaurs. This film reveals the presence of several species of dinosaurs who were not shown or even mentioned in Jurassic World, such as Brachiosaurus, Stygimoloch, Carnotaurus, Sinoceratops, Compsognathus, and Allosaurus. As Dr. Grant noted in III, it makes you wonder what else InGen was up to.
      • Some of these species, such as Brachiosaurus and Allosaurus, did appear in tie-in material, such as the website, toys, and the Holoscape.
    • Benjamin Lockwood is mentioned as being a longtime partner of John Hammond, despite never appearing in any way before this. It's implied they had a bitter past and Hammond no longer wished to associate with him after Lockwood abused their cloning technology to create a Replacement Goldfish of his dead daughter.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Poor Maisie.
  • The Remnant: Out of the apparently dozens of species left on Isla Nublar, only eleven species are saved from extinction by volcanic eruption.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Owen's baby Velociraptors are just plain adorable on the videos that show them back when he began raising and training them. Blue in particular stands out due to her empathy and confidingness.
  • Role Reprisal: Jeff Goldblum returns as Ian Malcom 21 years after The Lost World: Jurassic Park.
  • Rule of Drama: It's a bit of a Contrived Coincidence that the volcano finally erupts just as the operation to rescue the dinosaurs is beginning, but it's certainly much more dramatic.
    • Mills complains that they are running behind schedule. If they had not had so much trouble capturing Blue, they could have left earlier.
  • Sadistic Choice: In the end of the movie, Claire is forced to choose between releasing several dangerous dinosaurs into the American wild or letting them die in agony from Hydrogen Cyanide poisoning. She tearfully chooses the latter, but Maisie disagrees and makes the choice for her.
  • Same Plot Sequel: Fallen Kingdom has been called essentially a remake of The Lost World: Jurassic Park, with a heavy-handed, almost obnoxious Green Aesop about an expedition being sent back to the dinosaur-filled islands after the original park broke down to retrieve as many specimens as possible, while a bunch of Smug Snake Corrupt Corporate Executives attempt to profit off it. The dinosaurs break free and cause a rampage on the mainland, leading to a Karmic Death for the cartoonish capitalist villains, and an ending speech by one of the previous film's characters that people will have to learn to live with dinosaurs roaming the Earth.
  • Sea Monster: The Mosasaurus returns, having escaped into the open ocean, and has begun hunting people on the shore of the mainland.
  • Seldom-Seen Species: Stygimoloch and Sinoceratops are among the confirmed genera to be featured in the film. The skull of Agujaceratops, the skeleton of Kosmoceratops, and models of Concavenator, Mononykus, and Dracorex can be found in the dinosaur exhibit at Lockwood Manor. Carcasses of Peloroplites and Teratophoneus appear on Isla Nublar, as well as skeletons at Lockwood Manor. DNA vials for Dreadnoughtus (only discovered in 2014) are also seen in one scene.
  • Sequel Goes Foreign: Inverted. After four whole films taking place in a fictional island chain near Costa Rica in Central America (with a brief action sequence in San Diego), everything from the halfway mark onwards takes place (and sets things up so any possible future dinosaur-related action may happen) in the United States.
  • Sequel Logo in Ruins: Not only does this film use a crumbling variant of the previous film's logo, it also surrounds it with fiery embers.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Jeff Goldblum may have described Malcolm's presence as "a sprig of parsley," but he delivers the film's aesop, tying the film more closely with the message of the original novel. To wit, that InGen's dinosaurs are an allegory for unlicensed, unrestricted, for-profit genetic research, done by people who don't care what they've created or what the long-term effects of it will be, just that it's marketable, and the potential disasters this abuse of powerful and dangerous technology can unleash.
  • Smug Snake: Mills, big time. When Wheatley catches Owen and Claire about to rat the whole operation out to the police, he promptly brings them both to his superior, who, rather than killing our heroes right there, instead imprisons them inside a cage, and while he does call them out on their poorer choices, he nonetheless takes his sweet time rubbing his "victory" in their faces and saying how "powerless" they are to stop him. Eventually, Owen finds a way to free himself and Claire and (literally) crash Mills' auction, all thanks to a rather frenetic Stygimoloch.
    • Wheatley himself believes he's the greatest hunter ever, but in the end, he is merely a Dumb Muscle with delusions of grandeur.
  • Stalker Without a Crush: The Indoraptor has a strange obsession with Maisie, following her and slowly taking his time whenever she is in his grasp.
  • Sinister Silhouettes: The Indoraptor is introduced with shots of his silhouette against a bright light, and his roaring shadow on the wall.
  • Shout-Out:
    • When Eversol tries to hide in an elevator with some of the auction buyers, the Indoraptor accidentally breaks the controls with his tail, opening the doors. He then rushes in Demogorgon-style.
    • The scene where the Indoraptor is stalking the protagonists in the darkened fossil exhibit has shades of Alien.
    • The underwater opening credits sequence is one to the opening credits of Jaws.
    • On the rooftop climax, the Indoraptor notices that the glass he is stepping on is weak, with a curious look that is very similar to the one the Predator has when noticing another deadly trap in that film.
    • Allosaurus appears on screen for the first time in the Jurassic Park franchise, and one of the most noticeable things about it are its distinctive, red crests over its eyes, similar to how Allosaurus was portrayed in Walking with Dinosaurs.
    • A dangerous dinosaur escaping from captivity in front of a bewildered audience of bourgeois from a English-style gothic environment in the rain recalls the Pterodactyl escaping from a scientific exhibition in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World (1912).
    • The scenes of the mother and baby Triceratops recalls Willis O'Brien's surviving test footage for Creation (1931).
    • By J.A. Bayona's own admission, the part with the Indoraptor climbing upside-down into Maisie's bedroom is one to a similar scene in Dracula (1979), where the Count climbs upside-down into a bedroom.
    • It's also stated that the Indoraptor and its shadowy stalking of Maisie are meant to evoke Nosferatu.
    • The Bits of Me Keep Passing Out gag with Owen recovering from sedation seems like a nod to The Princess Bride, as Westley slowly wakes up from being mostly dead.
    • Possibly unintentional, but most of the final act on Lockwood's estate is quite similar to Carnosaur 2; even the Indoraptor's first kill mirrors a death scene from that movie.
    • People who have read the novel, Carnosaur, will note a lot of similarities between its mansion scenes and the Lockwood sequence.
    • The scene where the Brachiosaurus is consumed by fire, lava, and ash recalls the ending of Rodan, sad music and all.
    • The open fenestrae in the Sinoceratops's frill might be a reference to Patchy the Pachyrhinosaurus from Walking With Dinosaurs 3-D. Albeit, Patchy's frill opening was the result of an injury; here's it's treated as a natural occurance.
    • Regarding the Indoraptor, let's take a moment to list all the creatures he closely resembles besides being a darker, mini-me version of Indominus rex:
      • For starters, he's not the first male raptor in the series to sport protofeathers/quills and a prominent stripe down his side. There's also:
      • The Venatosaurus from Peter Jackson's version of King Kong.
      • Deinonycanis, a hybrid action figure from Kenner's 1998 Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect toyline that was a cross between a Deinonychus and a dire wolf.
      • Viewers have noted how he looks a lot like a Xenomorph and most of his sequences bring that movie and its sequels to mind.
      • Riptor from Killer Instinct.
      • The Utahraptor from Dinosaur King
      • Given Indoraptor's slinky posture, his Slasher Smile, and how he relentlessly terrorizes Maisie, Randall could also count. And he's defeated by a blue character to boot.
      • He also looks like a jet-black version of the Baby Godzillas to a degree.
    • The scene where the characters flee from a pyroclastic flow while dodging stampeding dinosaurs is highly reminiscent of Dino Run.
    • Our heroes crouching behind a fallen tree while flamings rocks shoot through the sky and dinosaurs stampede around them looks a lot like the cover to Mark Schultz's graphic novel, Time in Overdrive.
  • Something Completely Different: While Isla Nublar is a featured setting, the film's plot and story aren't centered around the island this time around to avoid plot repetition with the previous films of the franchise. In fact, the scenes on Isla Nublar barely make up a quarter of the film's runtime.
  • Spanner in the Works: Zia ruins Wu's plan by infusing Blue with Rexy's blood thereby making her tainted and unable to be used to make perfect hybrids. This only happens because Blue was injured by another Spanner in the Works, a mercenary mook who almost fatally shoots Blue in an attempt to save himself earlier in the film.
  • Spoiler Title: Played with, as the title was changed a movie ago. It's Jurassic World. At the end, the Dinosaurs are no longer restricted to a mere park.
  • The Stinger: The first ever for the series. After the credits end, we see three Pteranodons arrive at Las Vegas, resting at the top of the Eiffel Tower replica with police sirens blaring in the background.
  • Stock Dinosaurs: Rexy, the elderly Tyrannosaurus rex, as well as Blue the Velociraptor. Triceratops, Stegosaurus, Apatosaurus, Ankylosaurus, Gallimimus, Parasaurolophus, Brachiosaurus, Compsognathus, the flying reptile Pteranodon, and the marine lizard Mosasaurus also make their return for the film. New stock dinosaurs to the on-screen franchise are Carnotaurus, Baryonyx, and Allosaurus. The skeletons of Protoceratops and Edmontosaurus and models of Dilophosaurus and the proto-mammal Dimetrodon can be seen in the dinosaur exhibit at Lockwood manor. The list of genera taken off the island shown on the computer screens includes Pachyrhinosaurus (though none appear on-screen).
  • Stupid Evil: Mills allows the Flawed Prototype Indoraptor to be sold for tens of millions of dollars. Wu tries to tell him that it's an unfinished product that will end in disaster. He also points out that all it will take is someone else using the Indoraptor to reverse engineer their genetic hybrids and they will lose their monopoly on the technology.
  • Supernatural Gold Eyes: The Indoraptor's eyes are a shade of burning orange that accentuate his Death Glare.
  • Super-Persistent Predator:
    • The predators of Jurassic World will apparently ignore the imminent danger of an approaching volcanic eruption for the chance to nab some food.
    • Justified in the case of the Indoraptor, as it is explicitly designed to be a killing machine.
    • The Baryonyx is implied to be starving enough to force its way through dripping lava to get to our heroes.
  • Swallowed Whole: Presumably the fate of the minisub that collected the Indominus bone specimen.

    T – Z 
  • Tag Line: "Life finds a way", which was one of Ian Malcolm's iconic lines in Jurassic Park. It might not be a coincidence since the character returns.
  • Take That!:
    • The scene where Rexy takes down a Carnotaurus may be a subtle one against Dinosaur, which had an inaccurately designed pair of Carnotaurus as the Big Bad Duumvirate. In the final trailer during the shot when Rexy roars after taking down the smaller carnivore, you can briefly hear some of the Disney Carnotaurus’ roar before it’s cut off by Rexy’s.
    • The news report at the start of the film includes the scrolling message "US president questions the existence of dinosaurs in the first place." Given that it's stated the film is set three years after the previous one, which is stated to have occured in 2015, it's hard not to interpret this as a thinly-veiled shot at the White House's current occupant and his stupidity. Later, the repugnant Wheatley calling Zia, "Nasty woman," as an insult seems an added reference to the same by quoting.
  • Tears of Fear: Wheatley begins crying as the Indoraptor decides to play with him after ripping his arm off.
  • Tempting Fate: One of the mercenaries in the minisub at the opening says there can't be anything still alive in the lagoon, which isn't unreasonable as it has been months since the Mosasaurus was last fed, so it must have died of hunger. Guess what happens next.
  • Too Dumb to Live:
    • Everyone bidding on the (prototype, mind you) Indoraptor has a deathwish. It's pretty clear what's going to happen the instant it gets out of a cage, and the sociopathic violence of the I. rex is not a secret after the disaster at Jurassic World.
    • Wheatley decides to take a collection of dinosaur teeth as a souvenirs by pulling them out of tranquilized and restrained dinosaurs. He later tries this on a just-sedated Indoraptor... that isn't restrained, or indeed fully tranquilised. Even if the Indoraptor was tranqed, his pulling its teeth out with a pliers would probably wake it up. Not only does this get him killed, it also lets the Indoraptor loose.
    • Despite the threat of imminent death by volcano on Isla Nublar, a Carnotaurus chooses to waste time fighting a Sinoceratops and then trying to make an easy meal of some humans, something which ultimately nets her defeat by Rexy the Tyrannosaurus.
    • And in a way, Rexy herself survives the volcano, but nonetheless takes being an awesome badass in priority over her own survival.
    • Lockwood has been completely hoodwinked by Mills, and is oblivious to the vast conspiracy and arms dealing racket happening in his own house. When Maisie tells him what's going on, he doesn't believe his granddaughter. Then, when he does finally realise what is happening, he demands that Mills call the police and hand himself in. Not surprisingly, Mills doesn't, and smothers him to death instead.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Continuing from Jurassic World, Dr. Wu is now officially a bioweapons maker and is cold and curt to his his boss and his underlings—and like in Jurassic World, he has his reasons—the former deciding to sell an untested, extremely feral prototype to unequipped billionaires instead of following his advice and developing a new batch that can actually be raised and trained by a parental figure, and said feral prototype running around and on the loose in the latter.
  • Time Skip:
    • Set approximately three years after the first Jurassic World. When the DPG return to the park, plants have overtaken the buildings and much of it is in ruins. And this is before the volcano starts going off.
    • Within the movie, the first scene is a few weeks after World. The foliage isn't as bad as the later scenes, hinting at this in movie.
  • Title Drop: Near the end. When making his case that the dinosaurs will eventually escape the park and merge with the ecosystem outside once again, Dr. Malcolm sardonically says "Welcome to Jurassic World."
  • Trailers Always Spoil: Zigzagged initially, but eventually played frustratingly straight.
    • At a glance, the first trailer seemed to spill quite a bit of the action for the film. Then, Colin Trevorrow himself comes out to say that everything seen is from the first hour of the movie, only (although Malcolm's final line wound up closing both the trailer and the full film). All good, so far.
    • The next trailer gives a few hints and peeks at what might happen afterwards, but without giving it all away. Well and good.
    • Then the final trailer spells out almost every action beat and plot point the movie has, in many cases showing how the heroes escape each dinosaur encounter. To make things worse, the trailer and TV spots even show the Mosasaurus attacking surfers and the T. rex stomping into a zoo's lion enclosure. These shots appear within the last minute of the film, making up its cliffhanger ending.
  • Trash the Set: Volcanic eruption tearing through the sites of the first and fourth movies? Yup. The park's infrastructure has already suffered from years of disuse and dinosaurs running free even before the eruption.
  • Traveling at the Speed of Plot: The Arcadia makes it from Isla Nublar to northern California apparently overnight, roughly the amount of time it would take to fly that far.
  • Tyrannosaurus rex: Rexy, who makes her third film appearance in the franchise, although it has been suggested in some material she may now be identified as "Roberta", a name used in production material going back to the first film but never in canon literature.
  • Unexplained Recovery: More like unexplained survival—it's unclear how the Mosasaurus is still alive despite being trapped in an empty lagoon for weeks with nobody to feed it. Even the submersible operators lampshade how anything in the lagoon should have died by the time the prologue takes place.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: The Indoraptor, while extremely vicious and cunning, is completely inexperienced when it comes to dealing with anything that can actually fight back. This proves to be its undoing when confronted with Blue who has experience fighting larger carnivores.
  • Up Close with the Monster: The Indoraptor bites the human Dragon's arm off, then pauses to show off its teeth as it has the terrified man pinned up against a wall. In this case he really does eat him, the Indoraptor is just intelligent and sadistic enough to play with its food.
  • Villain: Exit, Stage Left:
  • Villainous Rescue: The Indoraptor kills the guards with Mills (who had just revealed Maisie's orgings), allowing the heroes to escape.
  • Villain Has a Point: Mills is a greedy sociopath, but he's not wrong when he calls out Claire and Owen after capturing them. Claire did arrange for the creation of the Indominus rex and was complicit in the exploitation of the Jurassic World dinosaurs. Owen, for his part, trained raptors for years but was enormously negligent in never considering what they were ultimately being trained for. He also seems to straight-up blame the late Hammond for every single Ingen-related disaster that has happened ever since he "played God" when he created the first park.
  • Villainous Legacy: The Indoraptor is the legacy of both the Indominus rex and Hoskins' vision of militarized dinosaurs made for combat.
  • Vorpal Pillow: Mills murders Lockwood this way after Lockwood finds out about what he has been doing. Being a crippled, dying old man, Lockwood is helpless to defend himself as Mills smothers him.
  • We Have to Get the Bullet Out: Played straight on a velociraptor, no less. May not be Worst Aid all on its own as Blue is implied to have the bullet lodged in an artery. However Blue is declared to be in the clear just from removing the bullet despite the large amount of surgical work necessary to save an artery and a limb after something like that not being performed.
  • Wham Line: Mills: "Lockwood never had a grandchild. He just wanted his daughter back."
  • Wham Shot: Maisie pulls out a picture of her mother and sees how alike they are.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Maisie's nanny Iris is abruptly dropped from the story after Eli Mills fires her.
  • Where It All Began: The Lockwood Estate was where John Hammond and Benjamin Lockwood first extracted dinosaur blood from amber.
  • Whole Plot Reference: The first act of the plot is essentially a soft remake of The Lost World: Jurassic Park down to the character ensemble and the overarching narrative of a large expedition trying to capture and relocate as many dinosaurs as possible from their island. The island expedition makes up just a half hour of the film's runtime, and it becomes very different after leaving Isla Nublar to burn.
  • You Have Got to Be Kidding Me!: Claire's reaction to getting blood from Rexie to use in a transfusion for Blue.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: The moment Owen finds Blue, the mercenaries immediately turn on him, lock the doors to the control room where Claire and Franklin are, and leave them to die. Zia is only spared because she's the only person who knows how to treat the injured Blue.

"Life cannot be contained. Life breaks free. Life finds a way."

Alternative Title(s): Jurassic World II

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