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Fridge Brilliance

  • The Indoraptor has several themes relating to wolves:
    • Being semi-quadrupedal, there is a somewhat lupine appearance to its posture and mannerisms.
    • There is a discussion with Dr. Wu where he compares the domestication of dinosaurs with that of dogs. The Indoraptor, being feral and untamable, is the "wolf" of this scenario, which they are planning to breed out their aggression and lack of empathy to make them "dogs".
    • The Indoraptor menaces a little girl, which recalls The Big Bad Wolf of fairy tales, with bonus points for Maisie wearing a red jacket.
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    • And of course the scene where it howls at the full moon from the rooftop of Lockwood Manor.
      • More indirect but, remember how in the first Jurassic World Hoskins told a story of his keeping a wolf cub which eventually mauled his wife? Lockwood's vision comes to fruition in this movie, and again, the "wolf" cannot be tamed...
  • Ian's speech makes it clear that the title "Fallen Kingdom" doesn't just refer to Isla Nublar's destruction. With the dinosaurs loose, it's now OUR animal kingdom that will be completely upended.
  • Ian makes the claim that the responsible thing to do about the dinosaur situation is let the volcano erupt and wipe them out as mankind already crossed the line in re-creating them in the first place; the U.S. government agrees, saying they're not responsible for the situation because it was on a privately owned island despite the potential global impact of the dinosaurs escaping or being taken off the island. While this is supposedly the "responsible" thing to do, but it's... really not. Ian, despite his "life finds a way" mantra and personal experience with human greed where genetic engineering dinosaurs is concerned, never seems to entertain the thought that something like, well, Mill's scheme would have been done, nor the governments of the world concerned that someone already attempted to weaponize the Indominus rex. In short, no one with the power do anything actually takes responsibility for the dinosaurs, the unscrupulous exploiters try to use them unethically and the "Jurassic World" that Ian feared comes to pass. However, this doesn't prove Ian's views wrong, if anything it really drives home that we haven't been able to control technological progress and, like Ian says in his closing speech: unless we actively take responsibility we may be the architects of our own extinction, i.e. doing nothing and deciding to let nature take its course when we've already upset that balance. It's always Somebody Else's Problem... at first.
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  • The Indoraptor is a reverse Eve, as it is a male shaped from a rib of a female (the deceased Indominus rex).
  • The Indoraptor spends all his screen time in artificial environments: in labs, cages, a bedroom, and a rooftop. He is never seen in the jungle or outdoors like the I. rex was. He is so unnatural that thematically he has nothing to do with nature itself.
  • Mount Sibo explains many of the things in Jurassic Park.
    • How did Hammond get that particular island? Well, it was the cheapest one since you had to be a crazy person to buy an island with an active volcano and as explained by Masrani, he was a bad judge of character with several things such as Nedry, the raptors, Wu, and now, the island.
      • It was also probably due to Hammond not being rich enough to make Jurassic Park as he truly wanted, as is shown with his investors repeatedly threatening to cut his funding despite how many corners he cut. Acquiring the island he did was probably necessary since any others would either be inhabited or prohibitively expensive.
    • It also explains why Peter Ludlow was so quick to dismiss John Hammond's idea of an island theme park in The Lost World: Jurassic Park. He probably knew that Isla Nublar had an active volcano on it, so any plan of building a lasting theme park there (or on any other island in the vicinity) was a bad idea.
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    • The island's volcano(es) may well have been dormant when the original park was built and later converted into Jurassic World. In the meantime, Masrani Corp. may have been negligent and not set up any monitoring equipment, thinking that the volcanic system would stay dormant, and they were caught by surprise while undergoing the lawsuits resulting from the incident in the previous film. Fridge Horror sets in when one realizes that Isla Sorna and the rest of the Cinco Muertes archipelago would all have been formed by volcanism, given the setting near the rim of the Pacific basin. Taking the dinosaurs to safety entails finding another more stable island far away, or taking them to the mainland.
      • FWIW, the first news report about the island's predicament specifically states that the volcano's status had been revised from "dormant" to "active" when it recently became unstable.
    • Thematically, it also further highlights the recurring Chaos Theory. According to the Dinosaur Protection Group, the only reason why the volcano is now starting to erupt (violently no less) was due to "a shift in the tectonic plates" that led to "minor aftershocks throughout the rockbed, creating a relatively small fissure that caused a rise in heat beneath Mt. Sibo." This small event is what eventually leads into the massive eruption, and said-eruption date is extremely difficult to predict due to several, different factors such as the island being privately owned by Masrani Global, restricted shipping lanes and no fly zones by government law, and the loud tremors created by the dinosaurs themselves.
  • The film features an Author's Saving Throw in regards to the criticism of Rexy's roar in Jurassic World, where the roar is now even closer to that heard in the original film. The whole scenario also makes sense: given how Rexy seemed to be domesticated through years of captivity in Jurassic World, she rarely had any need to roar in her exhibit, at best, which was why she sounded so lackluster in the last film. Now in this film, she had already spent four years back in the wild, which is enough time for her to redevelop the power of her roar.
    • Interestingly, she also lets out a roar that had until now only been heard from the male T. rex in The Lost World.
  • The scene where Maisie escapes from a locked bedroom is filmed and portrayed very similarly to the scene where the raptors of the first Jurassic Park learn to open doors. This is no coincidence, as it's revealed she is in fact a clone of Lockwood's daughter created by InGen, which led to Hammond and Lockwood's falling out.
  • Fridge-Heartwarming: Owen is good at taming and bonding with the raptors, which are clones of the extinct raptors. Parallel to that, Owen later calmed and comforted Maisie, who is also a clone.
  • The Indoraptor both perfectly represents the idea of man can't control nature despite the creature being entirely man-made. The last movie had Hoskins want trained raptors to act like attack dogs, a concept that isn't impossible in itself. Wolves once regarded men as rival predators at best and prey at worst (wolves in the wild still do, in fact), and yet domestic dogs barely removed from wolves by generations of coexistence with man and selective breeding instinctively see humans as companions and friends. The problem was Hoskins took a shortcut and pushed things way too fast, sending out a pack of raptors who were just barely tame around their two main keepers, and only them, and paid for it. Now Dr. Wu is trying to make an improved version of the Indominus rex using Owen's research on raptor training. But because he rushes and thinks he has control, he ends up creating something arguably even more chaotic and rabid than an untrained raptor. Domestication takes genetic changes, promoting only the "loyal bloodlines" as Hoskins puts it, but Wu thought he could accelerate the process and overestimate his ability. Ironically, Wu's failures lead him to try Hoskins "loyal bloodlines" idea but between the chaos of the Indoraptor's escape and the short-term contamination of Blue's blood following a transfusion from Rexy, it doesn't go his way.
    • What is truly ironic is that the raptors as themselves seem to be naturally heading towards coexisting with humans. The first film showed raptors as the equivalent of wolves, seeing humans as prey. The second film shows the raptors fighting the hunters, or in other words, rival predators. By the third film, the raptors seem to regard humans as semi-equal after Grant communicates with the pack. Fourth film and the raptors seem to reluctantly regard Owen as a leader. By Fallen Kingdom, the raptors (or at least Blue) regard humans as equals. Had Wu just cloned another generation or two of raptors with Blue as the "Loyal Bloodline", he may have had dinosaurs that could have been domesticated.
  • The video clips Maisie watches of Owen engaging with the raptors has Owen saying that the raptors could be completely tamed, which was the opposite of what he insisted on in the previous movie. That's because the video was cut and edited to make Owen look like he was guaranteeing the capabilities of taming Velociraptors, and, in essence, all dinosaurs. It was a propaganda piece for Mills' customers.
  • Seeing how horribly emaciated the Baryonyx is, it suddenly makes more sense that it would literally try to go through fire just to get a meal. The dino's probably not eaten for months!
    • That, or Rexy's been hijacking any kills it did manage to make before it could gulp down more than a bite or two. Which plays well with Rexy's last appearance in the film, trading roars with a zoo lion: she was the lion of the island's ecosystem, and the Baryonyx was the cheetah whom the lion robs.
  • It makes Hammond's Well-Intentioned Extremist ways a bit more justified. It was more than just stopping his nephew from capturing the dinosaurs and building a new Jurassic Park, but also to prevent him from controlling and allowing InGen to clone human soldiers.
    • That entire conversation he had with Dr. Sattler about the use of genetic power had a lot more weight to it than realized. Hammond had that same conversation with Lockwood long ago. It was then Hammond now sees that while Lockwood sacrificed morals to have his daughter but Hammond himself almost sacrificed his grandchildren for his dream. Even his time to spend with his daughter is his way to ensure she gets to live a life unlike what happened to Lockwood's daughter.
  • It's shown that there is a theme in Fallen Kingdom regarding the battle of the elements between fire and water.
    • The volcano is the embodiment of fire and proceeds to destroy Isla Nublar. The ocean which is the embodiment of water however saved the lives of many dinosaurs and Owen, Claire, and Franklin when they escape the doomed island.
    • The Indoraptor was bred for war and fire in mythology symbolizes warfare, but what stopped him? Blue the Velociraptor, as her color is blue, representing water. Not to mention he met his end during a rainstorm.
      • This second point even appears to be foreshadowed earlier when Blue manages to Outrun the Fireball, symbolically showing her triumphing over the Indoraptor.
  • The Indoraptor seems to have a Gothic monster theme, as it skulks in darkness and is dark with red eyes like a vampire, it runs on two legs or four and is shown roaring at a full moon like a werewolf, and its being a man-made creation of mad science calls to mind Frankenstein's monster.
  • Owen and Claire are "the parents of the new world" while Maisie as a clone is a "child of the new world" so it is only fitting that the three end up together in the end.
  • Blue is more than capable of handling the Indoraptor and the mercenaries. Do recall that Blue was trained by Owen, a military man. What Owen used for training were things he had experience with when he began training in the US Navy. As pack leader, Blue needs to have more focus just in case one of her pack members were taken out of commission, which pays off when she survives the Indominus rex. It's also likely for that reason that Blue can hunt by herself despite the handicap.
  • As a creature genetically modified to be a relentless predator who follows orders, it's rather poetic that the Indoraptor dies by being impaled on the dead remains of a docile herbivore, after being pushed by another predator who went through the process of being trained to follow orders.
    • Its demise could also be considered symbolic of the "Are these dinosaurs, or genetic monsters that just look like them?" quandary being "decided" by an actual dinosaur. The skull was a fossil, not an InGen or Lockwood recreation, hence legitimately a dinosaur as they actually existed in the past. The Indoraptor was never a true wild animal, but a bodged-together Frankensteinian travesty of one, designed as a tool and weapon by humans from the ground up. Blue, even with her monitor lizard DNA, was a faithful attempt to restore what dinosaurs once were, so she's able to help the fossil skull expunge this mockery of what Nature meant dinosaurs to be.
  • Ian Malcolm is the most logical choice to speak up about the matter on letting the dinosaurs live or not, and none of the cast from previous movies would be on hand or willing to join either the DPG or InGen. Most of the surviving characters in past films won't be present as:
    • Dr. Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler are still traumatized from Jurassic Park and even though Isla Sorna rejuvenated Grant's interests in dinosaurs in general, in his eyes, these dinosaurs are still genetically modified monsters. Justified as Wu himself lampshades the fact that they're mostly created from LEGO Genetics and outright stated that many of them would look or behave differently were they purebred specimens.
    • Lex and Tim wouldn't want to associate themselves with the dinosaurs who caused their grandfather so much grief and after Masrani's death, they probably want even less to do with the park than before.
    • Sarah Harding and Kelly Malcolm, who have seen a T. rex wreck havoc on the mainland, are readily on Ian's side.
    • Robert Muldoon (if comic canon is considered) would probably advocate the complete destruction of the dinosaurs, including any and all genetic material. He has seen what these things can do, and would not take the chance of any of a dinosaur possible surviving.
    • Claire may have heard about Nick Van Owen and considers him an extremist and wants nothing to do with the man because of his role in the many deaths on Isla Sorna.
    • Roland Tembo, assuming he's still alive, would not work with Mills because he won't work for another company of death and is an honorable man who won't affiliate himself with scum like Wheatley.
    • The Kirbys are just normal civilians. They have no say in the matter and considering Amanda's parting line, would probably want nothing more to do with it.
    • Billy Brennan, after the fiasco with the Spinosaurus, the raptor eggs, and his near death-by-Pteranodon experience, would likely want to avoid getting involved.
    • Barry, having seen the death and destruction that the raptors and the Indominus caused firsthand would probably want to sit this one out. He would be even less interested in retrieving Blue, as the last time they saw each other, she was trying to kill him.
    • Lowery and Vivian are merely technicians. So, their use in the DPG would be minimal and they're probably just as traumatized by what happened in Jurassic World as everyone else.
    • Zach and Gray are civilians. They have no say in the matter. And even if they did, their parents, their mother especially, probably wouldn't approve.
  • Wu seems pretty frightened when the Indoraptor was getting sold off. Well, what did he say to Masrani back in the last film, "Monster is a relative term. To a canary, a cat is a monster. We're just used to being the cat". Wu sounds confident when saying about the Indominus rex because he never once regard it as a threat due to already having a plan with Hoskins to contain it. But as Dr. Malcolm puts it to Wu long ago, "Life finds a way". Well, the Indominus rex had more abilities than Wu planned and now, the Indominus rex really was the cat.
  • Zia's choice to use T. rex blood for Blue's transfusion makes sense insofar as, out of all the carnivores present, the T. rex is the closest phylogenic relative of the Velociraptor that afford the transfusion; Allosaurus, Carnotaurus, and Baryonyx are distant cousins at best and while Compsognathus is cladistically closer to Velociraptor, you'd need to drain an entire swarm of them to get enough blood for a man-sized raptor.
    • Furthermore as all the dinosaurs in Jurassic World were artificially grown and had holes in their DNA plugged with the same material it's not out of the question that the Velociraptor and T. rex are far more closely related then they would naturally be. It's not even out of the question that they have the exact same blood type if that were one of the traits that had to be artificially filled in.
    • T. rex and Velociraptor DNA coming together? Nope, never heard of that happening before.
  • In the archival footage of Owen working with the hatchling raptors, we see Delta attack Owen as soon as he shows signs of weakness.
    • Hoskins at several points acted dominant to Delta, and in his final moments was practically groveling in front of her. Not only did Delta dislike Hoskins in the first place, he must have looked like one sorry excuse for a leader at that point.
  • Blue's blue color and mannerisms of empathy and curiosity make sense after one reads about the Domesticated Red Fox. Blue is showing early signs of raptors becoming domesticated.
    • Actually, her blue stripes are due to her particular DNA template incorporating a strain of blue tree monitor as gap-filler. But monitor lizards are, themselves, considered some of the smartest reptiles on the planet, and have been known to become surprisingly friendly in captivity.
  • Why does the Indoraptor chase after Maisie to the point of abandoning Claire and Owen when they're at his mercy? Well, he's trained to track any target a red laser light lands on, and to attack when he hears a shrill, high-pitched sound. What is Maisie doing whenever she's near the Indoraptor? Screaming her head off while wearing a bright red jacket.
    • Additionally, this adds to the Gothic Horror nature of the movie by bringing to mind the classic fairytale of Little Red Riding Hood.
    • Also, it'd already gotten a good whiff of her scent earlier, when the girl stepped backwards across the red line on the floor and its claws nearly snagged her.
  • Being a quadrupedal carnivorous dinosaur with a long neck, the Indoraptor bears some resemblance to the Rhedosaurus from the Beast of 10000 Fathoms!
    • The way it stands is also an ugly reminder that this animal never even got to roam around in a zoo enclosure. It's been held in the cramped confines of laboratory cages and transport crates for its entire life, and unlike its bipedal genetic ancestors, it's only learned to crouch, not to walk tall.
  • Why doesn't Rexy let the Carnotaurus keep Mill's leg when she already has the rest of his body to herself? Because it's likely the first time in over two decades that the old girl has tasted human flesh, and she wants to savor every bit of it!
    • Plus, what better way for her to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the film that made her a movie star than chomping down on another deserving Asshole Victim?
    • What's downright fitting about Mill's death is that even though he wears glasses to present himself as smart or cultured but ironically, he is clearly short sighted due to him being slow, impatient and lacking of foresight. Because of these traits, he gets killed by Rexy who on the other hand has the flaw with her vision being based on movement but is more successful having the patience, strategic thinking and the initiative to strike fast and hard. A humiliating insult that the dinosaur is smarter than him.
  • Why are Owen and Claire unaffected by the revelation that Maisie is a clone and continue to care for her? Simple, Claire founded and runs a group dedicated to protecting a group of clones (the dinosaurs) while Owen has raised four clones from hatching and acted as their Parental Substitute (the Raptor Squad).
  • When Blue fights the Indoraptor in Maisie’s room, she manages to knock the hybrid out of the window and onto the balcony below, despite it being twice her size. Also, despite being tossed around a few times during the fight, she doesn't seem to receive any visible injuries. Strange, right? But remember, Blue was given Rexy's blood during the transfusion earlier in the film. So, maybe the T. rex blood ended up giving her enhanced strength and durability, as an unintended side effect of the transfusion.
    • It's also a nice role-reversal Call-Back to The Lost World: Jurassic Park, when it was a raptor which got kicked in the face and knocked off its perch by a female smaller than itself. For bonus pints, that raptor also ended up landing on something sharp.
  • How the Indoraptor meets his maker is a role-flipped Call-Back to Muldoon's demise in the original Jurassic Park. Like Muldoon, the Indoraptor is so focused on the prey (Owen and Maisie) that's right in front of him that he fails to notice our "clever girl", Blue, sneaking up on him from the side until it's too late.
    • For further Fridge Brilliance, he was raised in complete isolation away from any other dinosaurs, let alone his own kind or even other Velociraptors, so he wouldn't have even known about pack hunting strategies to begin with. Even Indominus knew there were other life forms, some somewhat related to her, on the island with her.
  • There didn't seem to be any indication of Allosaurus in the previous movie but during the Auction of Evil it's mentioned the Allosaurus was a juvenile and the others seem to be of roughly similar size, meaning they were first made shortly before the Indominus incident and likely intended to be new attractions. They escaped in the chaos alongside the other dinosaurs, but have yet to reach full size in only four years.
    • Colin Treverrow confirmed on twitter that Jurassic World had breeding animals, similar to a modern zoo. This not only allowed Fallen Kingdom to have cute babies but also made a lot more sense for the company financially. It's not hundreds of thousands or millions to replace stock. You throw two animals together have get a potential full clutch of replacements.
  • As stated on the main page, the second half of Fallen Kingdom plays out as if it actually were in a fairy-tale kingdom that's brought down from the inside. The Good King (Sir Benjamin Lockwood) is betrayed and murdered by his Evil Chancellor (Eli Mills). His "granddaughter" the princess (Maisie) is the Damsel in Distress who's threatened by both the aforementioned usurper and the vicious dragon (the Indoraptor). Owen is the Knight in Shining Armor who, with the help of his loyal animal companion (Blue) and his girlfriend (Claire), slays the dragon and saves the princess. And just for a somewhat ironic twist, it's another dragon (Rexy) who kills the usurper.
  • While the literal translation of Indoraptor is the nonsensical "Indian Robber", it could be thought of Mills intentionally giving it that name for marketing reasons and for an exotic flair. It's similar to how the Sudan Red and Congo Red dyes have nothing to do with the countries of the same name but were named simply to evoke an exotic setting.

Fridge Horror

  • Before the movie ended, just what was the Mosasaurus had been doing or what she has been has hunting before going for some surfers.
    • Most likely whales, sea birds, sharks, seals, and sea turtles unlucky enough to find themselves in her path, and only two of which weren't on her species' menu when they lived.
  • The Indoraptor can make facial expressions, something that no reptile can, as they lack facial muscles. Worse still, remember how animals may show different expressions than humans do? The fact that the Indoraptor not only smiles, but smiles out of amusement at plotting something nasty, implies that he has a human-like understanding of facial expressions co-relating to feelings, the ability to imagine a future scenario, and be sadistically amused at said future scenario just denotes that this creature is far more human than you'd expect. Maybe even a little bit TOO human...
  • Lockwood and Hammond's falling out is implied to have taken place around the time the original park was developed, as Lockwood hasn't been mentioned in any of the previous movies. Furthermore, Hammond is confirmed to have died shortly after the events of The Lost World. Since the falling out resulted from Lockwood's desire to clone his dead daughter, and Maisie can't be more than 10 years old... how long has Lockwood been trying to clone his daughter? And how many failed versions did he get in the process?
  • Maisie's nanny, Iris, seems particularly eager to stay with Maisie after Lockwood's death, before she's fired by Mills, pretty much begging him to allow her to stay. At first, one would think this is because, seconds later, it's revealed that Iris was the nanny of Lockwood's daughter, of whom Maisie is a clone of. However, it gets worse once you realize how clones are born. Although they're pretty much biological copies of the donor, they still have to be carried to term by a parent. Not even the JP dinosaurs were immune to this, with the novels explaining the first batch were carried to term by close relatives of dinosaurs, such as an ostrich or crocodiles. Then you realize that depending on the time of Lockwood's daughter's death, Iris may have been still young enough to give birth. It may have been entirely possible that Mills did more than separate Iris from her charge; he may have separated Iris from her daughter.
    • On the subject of Iris, what happened to her after she was discharged?
      • She's likely fine. The auction hadn't quite started when she was dismissed, and it's implied that the first half of it (after which the chaos broke out) lasted a while. If Iris wasn't greatly delayed, she could have been far from the estate before any dinosaurs escaped.
  • The Indominus was a sociopath, Indoraptor is a sadist. Indominus had no empathy, all other animals around her were either targets or potential tools. Indoraptor understands emotion and it's his favorite plaything. Wu wanted to create a creature that could empathize with others, it worked.
    • This would also be why the Indoraptor takes a few moments before killing Wheatley and a few others it intends to kill to reach out and touch them. It is feeling their emotions and empathizing with them. However, it seems like it is more or less enjoying their misery and feeling their emotions in such a pure, raw fashion is perfectly in line with a 'sadist' Indoraptor.
  • In many ways, the Indoraptor is the complete opposite of the Indominus rex:
    • The I. rex was a female and an albino, the Indoraptor is a male and colored black.
    • The I. rex favored strength and brute force, while the Indoraptor favored stealth and agility.
    • The I. rex was angry and confused, attacking out of frustration, while the Indoraptor is curious and playful, attacking out of amusement.
  • When Blue refuses to join Owen at the end, is she supposed to be realizing that her presence only brings Owen into danger, and departing to keep him safe? Or is she effectively telling Owen that "You betrayed me and I answer to you no more?" She does look at the cages first, then back at Owen before she runs off: does that mean that she thinks Owen will capture and cage her once more, and decides that Owen is no longer trustworthy?
    • And with the final shot of her closing in on a suburban area, who knows if her opinions on humans have changed? Could she end up playing a more antagonistic role the next film around?
    • They haven't changed or she would have attacked Zia and Franklin on sight when Owen wasn't there to stop her. That said, she's still going to get hungry, or some dumb person will try to trap, catch, or kill her sooner or later...
      • To be fair there are plenty of non-human animals running around America, after all the dinosaurs hunted and survived for centuries before the meteor, Blue wouldn't necessarily hunt Humans, indeed the more intelligent species would likely focus on the prey that DON'T fight back with weapons that can hurt them badly.
      • Considering how they were fed before the park self-destructed, the various carnivores will probably seek out the same kind of prey they'd grown up eating: goats, sheep, and cattle. And in Blue's case, nice tasty rats, which she probably snacked on while loose on the island also.
  • The fates of all the dinosaurs who were successfully sold at the auction. Many of them are in the hands of hardened criminals or possibly even terrorists who, at best, will use them as tools of terror/intimidation. Still others are destined to be cruelly experimented on and you can't rule out some being slaughtered for their meat and/or hides.
    • In addition, even if the sold dinosaurs were tracked (like with the bidding machine's transaction records), those criminals and terrorists aren't just going to hand their bids back over. Some will probably even sic their dino gains on any potential rescuers.
    • Another way to look at it is that it would be a repeat of the San Diego Incident. The Tyrannosaurus buck freshly awakened from his coma somehow slaughtered the entire crew especially those inside tight space before getting stuck in the cargo hold. This is telling us that those shipped dinosaurs will most likely pull trick off and it won't just be those criminals that will taste those animals' wrath.
    • One buyer was specifically only interested in two carnivores. Dinosaur cockfights, anyone?
  • Since Maisie Lockwood is a clone of Benjamin Lockwood's dead daughter, this implies that Lockwood's company has the abilities and desire to engage in human genetic modifications and engineering. What's to prevent them from cooking up platoons of Super Soldiers for sale to the highest bidder? Imagine a clone army of Captain Americas working for The Cartel or other unsavory organizations.
  • In three years, trapped in a lagoon with no known food supply, the Mosasaurus has nearly doubled in size. How big will it get now it has an unending food supply?
    • Probably not any bigger, as, really, it's possible that the Mosasaurus only got bigger actually to go a long time without food (bigger things tend to have slower metabolisms, at least in comparison).
  • In Jurassic World, we see a human spinal column in a lab suggesting that Dr Wu was trying to utilize human DNA in both Indoraptor and the I. rex. Now, we know that not only was he trying, for around a decade he has HAD the ability to utilize human DNA, while Maisie may not have been made for malicious purposes, InGen have not only the power to clone humans, but to engineer genetic hybrids with enhanced abilities.
  • Jurassic Park was twenty-five years ago. Hammond and Lockwood had their falling out over Lockwood wanting to clone his daughter before that movie. Maisie in this film is all of twelve or so. Meaning for thirteen years, give or take, Lockwood remained obsessed with cloning his dead daughter, never achieving acceptance or moving on from the loss.
  • How many people were interested in buying the Indoraptor, even after being told he's a flawed prototype and not for sale. Granted, it wasn't explained to them how the lack of empathy and proper bond with a trained handler makes him useless as an Attack Animal, leading to regular amounts of horror at how badly this would likely go when they tried to sic him on their enemies. However, there is a use this animal can easily be put to as-is. How many The Mafiya types might want to have their own Rancor on hand to feed people to?
  • Someone on one of the other pages Joked that the Indoraptor is a literal Indoor Raptor, which is funny until you realise that was the point. The Indoraptor isn't just designed as a super-soldier for a battlefield, it's an assassin designed for urban hunting, designed to hunt targets inside buildings.
  • We see many dinosaurs jump into the ocean to escape the volcano, given how close Nublar is to Costa Rica it's likely they're going to experience a dinosaur invasion very soon. The herbivores likely won't be too much of an issue but we saw multiple carnivores among the stampede and they're going to be hungry when to they get to shore.
    • It's 120 miles of open ocean. Save perhaps the spinosaurids, those animals are not going to make it all that way. The real hazard would be the flying reptiles, which would have been able to leave the island at will anyway.
    • Assuming the Mosasaurus isn't still hanging around nearby, in which case she'll be gorging herself for weeks on stashed dinosaur carcasses and those surfers were just a between-meal snack.
      • Doubtful, she attacked the surfers off the California coast, many miles away.
    • Only if you assume those dinosaurs didn't die upon impact, sinking like stones or falling onto each other.
      • The Triceratops in front of Claire and Franklin's pod looked like she was going straight down. Her legs were moving but she clearly could not swim.
      • We see multiple dinosaurs swimming away after they hit the water so at least some of them survived.
    • The flying dinosaurs didn't leave the island before because their nests were there; if it ain't broken, don't fix it. Now there's no going back, they'll make new nests.
  • The schedule for the expedition to rescue Blue has been timed rather closely to the volcano's estimated eruption. While it is plausible that the planners simply underestimated the time it would take to gather all the necessary dinosaurs, there could be a more sinister reason for the last minute timing. The eruption would be the perfect way to get rid of unnecessary witnesses. Sooner or later, Owen and Claire would learn that quite a lot of wealthy people have acquired dinosaurs and connect it to Mills' expedition. It would be much more convenient for them to have died on the island. Few people would question a few more deaths and the eruption would destroy any evidence of foul play. It looks very much like Mills never intended for them to leave the island.
  • Has EVERYBODY forgotten about Isla Sorna? If anything, this little event is going to remind them...
    • Specifically, Isla Sorna is part of an archipelago of five islands. They removed the dinosaurs left there to populate Jurassic World, but Compys and raptors are notoriously slippery, and it's a possible refuge for dinos escaping Nublar.
  • With a laboratory in the same mansion and bringing back the dinosaurs there and the party he'd arranged for the auction and the work he was doing with Wu, Mills must have known he couldn't keep it from Hoskins. So he was willing to kill Hoskins all along, meaning he Crossed the Moral Event Horizon years ago, not just now.
    • Several of the Dinos were sold off and shipped across the world in unknowable containers, to be bred or cloned elsewhere. And Jurassic World has been shown to be notoriously bad at long-term dinosaur containment. Just because there are only dinosaurs loose in North America now, doesn't mean they won't be the only ones sooner or later.

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