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  • 8.8: IGN's initial review in 2013 gave it only 7.5 and made a few factual errors that showed the reviewer clearly didn't bother understanding the game's systems. In particular, he referred to the solar map as galaxy map and talked about the player being tasked to kill aliens. It's an easy enough mistake to make if you've only fought Infested, but the game mostly uses humans and robots as enemies; only one of the four factions (Grineer, Corpus, Infested, Sentient) isn't comprised of them. The re-review in 2018 (coinciding with the release of the Switch version) bumped the score to an 8.6, and corrected the mistakes mentioned.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
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    • There is a lot of fanart which displays the Tenno as a bunch of pranksters, goofs or otherwise comedic outside of missions.
    • The Lotus: Savior of the Tenno and leader of the resistance against the Grineer military dictatorship, or Chess Master playing an army of amnesiacs to steal Orokin technology and eliminate threats to her plans (military or otherwise)?
      • Corpus transmissions have referred to her as "traitorous", and even the developers have hinted that she's not to be trusted.
      • Teshin, one of the few individuals who lived during the Old War, isn't a fan either, saying that she made the Tenno "Complacent like oxen."
      • And in the bigger picture sense, did she and her father Hunhow overthrow the Orokin for their own evil ends, or because they wanted to stop the cruelty of the Orokin Empire? And is Hunhow after the Tenno because they are the only ones who can fight him or because he believes that without them the Lotus will rejoin him?
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    • So it turns out that the reason why the Stalker is murdering Tenno is because the Tenno murdered the Orokin. Why they did so is a less clear-cut.
      • The Orokin, for their part, achieved immortality by harvesting children and stealing their bodies, created the Sentient (who turned against them), the Infested (who turned against them), the Grineer (who turned against them), and finally, inadvertently, the Tenno (who eventually succeeded in wiping them out). Basically, the Orokin were pricks, and Inaros's quest makes it clear that at least some Tenno turned on them to end their injustices.
      • But complicating matters is Natah, whose mission was explicitly to manipulate the Tenno into destroying the Orokin. Thus whatever the Orokin's crimes, their downfall was also the successful result of the Sentients' master plan.
      • Does the Stalker truly want to avenge the Tenno's victims or is it just an excuse to pursue his millennia old vendetta?
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    • Is Ordis actually happy the way he is, or is the Mind Rape from becoming a Cephalon forcing Karris into an endless loop of remembering who he really is and being forced to fragment himself by his programming so he remains a loyal immortal servant for a heavily experimented on child/warrior-space-ninja?
      • In Octavia's Anthem, Ordis vehemently states that he is willingly distancing himself from Karris as far as possible (which is ironic, since his lines during the finale show that he still takes joy in killing somewhat, especially when it's Hunhow's fighters), and later makes it clear that he holds genuine sentiment towards the Operator, most prominently in the letter he believes to be his last that is automatically relayed to them once Hunhow captures him. So the former is the most likely correct interpretation of Ordis's personality.
    • With the "Heart of Deimos", we meet Son of the Entrati family. Upon your arrival on Deimos, the family has exiled him for a previous breach of containment, implied to be the one that caused the whole family to become partially Infested. While Son gripes that it was an accident caused by him being distracted, the rest of the family believes the breach was an intentional act by Son in order to get attention. On the one hand, Mother displays extreme paranoia and an overbearing attitude towards her entire family, Father is a misanthrope who assumes the worst of everyone, and Daughter displays pettiness about her sibling in particular that painted all of her past history with him, so it's unlikely any of them would judge his actions fairly; the whole situation can ring like a teenager being bitterly accused of intentionally letting the family pet escape. On the other hand, Son quickly reveals a disturbing fascination with the Infestation, and bitterly notes he was always The Unfavorite of the family, making it seem plausible that he would do just that. It doesn't help that in rank 4, Kermerros tells Vilcor that he intentionally bred pets his father would despise enough to massacre, because he believed a weaponsmith needed an enemy to have a purpose on Deimos, which is a classical sign of a sociopath, if only by proxy.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: A vast majority of critics in 2013 depicted that It Will Never Catch On, downright saying that "It will fail. You will never update this game, you will never get the amount of players to support your game and you will not get a sponsor that arcs it in place." Coming from those critics who praise games that poorly understood the idealistic approach of Allegedly Free Game, it becomes an Ironic Echo; as Warframe, in 2016, reaches a 26 million milestone of losers, has a high standing review on Steam, is backed by a sponsor in China and its dedication of routinely updating the game every week instead of months like most MMO's and lived for more than three years to tell about it. And it's still officially in Beta.
    • By 2017, the player count has reached to a 35 million milestone of losers, with a large advertising opening up for its release on "The Plains of Eidolon" and continues to outpace most games by making it into Steam's top 10 most active gamesnote  and staying there consistently.
    • Tellingly, during the second Steam Awards, Warframe was awarded the Labor of Love Award, in recognition of how far it has come since its beginnings.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: The Hemocyte boss from the operation Plague Star event which is just a Palette Swap of Lephantis that skips the first phase. The wide-open area negates most of the remaining difficulty, even with the veritable swarms of enemies added in.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Vivergate may be one of the most extreme examples of this in the 2010s. Viver was the only node on Eris, a planet overrun with Infestation, that had Corpus enemies. At the release of the Syndicate system in Update 15, gaining Syndicate reputation was incredibly slow. Using Mag, Trinity and Excalibur and spamming specific abilities, one could earn large amounts of reputation and affinity on Viver. DE noticed this and responded by Nerfing those three frames so the abilities they spammed would only trigger on line-of-sight. Less than a day later, Viver was removed, but the nerfs were undone, the reputation system got an overhaul, and this event ultimately led to Excalibur's rework, removing the relatively useless Super Jump and giving him Exalted Blade in its place.
  • Best Boss Ever: Some consider the Exploiter Orb fight as this due to its gameplay design not revolving around outputting as much damage as possible in-between periods of invulnerability and giving much more leeway towards using any frame you want as it mostly functions as an engaging Puzzle Boss. The small cutscenes that play when exposing weakpoints bring to mind Metal Gear Rising in their execution and further enhance its awesome-ness.
    • Ropalolyst boss fight is also considered as this by some for very much the same reasons as Exploiter battle, with many elements that made Exploiter battle memorable made even more pronounced with Ropalolyst - such as it being an engaging Puzzle Boss with several cinematically impressive moments both in cutscenes and now in gameplay too. On top of that this fight brings more personal involvement from the players on their part as the Tenno compared to Exploiter, what with them fighting a heavy-duty Sentient war construct as well as Natah!Lotus unannounced and direct involvement in the fight as her first appearance in an unquestioningly antagonistic role.
  • Best Level Ever: Not "level" so much as "game mode", but Disruption has become well-liked due to the unique gameplay of the mode (where you have to eliminate an Action Bomb enemy before it gets to its target in order to get better rewards), the relative speed of it compared to other endless game modes. On release, the reaction was a bit lukewarm due to the lack of variety and quality of rewards, but with the release of Atlas Prime and their Axi relics becoming available via Disruption, it's generally been well-liked.
  • Breather Level: After the arduous hellscape that is the Mastery Rank 19 test, the Archwing rework (which gives all Archwings a Flash Step on a three-second cooldown which bypasses ability usage restrictions) means that the Rank 20 test can literally be completed in less than ten seconds.
  • Broken Base: Has its own page now.
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: Zig-zagged. Many weapons and Warframes can be bought in completed form for Platinum with a slot and coveted Orokin Reactor or Catalyst pre-installed whereas players would otherwise have to craft all these items over intervals of real time after farming the required materials. This is, though, mitigated by the fact costs of these items are absurdly higher than the players would normally sell off with items that are already upgraded with a Prime suffix and weapons with a Syndicate prefix. This zig-zagging continues in other instances:
    • The materials themselves can also be bought and the build times circumvented using Platinum and the cash shop also contains mod packs with guaranteed rare mods. All players have access to all items that actually affect gameplay (even the once-exception, Warframe and Weapon slots, can now be earned, albeit slowly, thanks to the new, free Battle Pass-esque Nightwave system), with only cosmetics being truly cash shop exclusive. DE certainly sells a high level of convenience, but anything of tangible benefit can be (and in some cases, must be) earned through prolonged gameplay.
    • The Prime Access that allows players to directly buy Prime gear rather than having to spend lots of time farming them doesn't help. If you can afford to pay just as much you would for another video game. That being said, these Primes are still farmable, and the player-driven economy will often sell them later for fraction of the price in Platinum; as a result, Prime Access (which also includes unique cosmetics and a heaping pile of Platinum, too) is moreso a way to support the developers and get some hefty benefits out of it.
    • Rivens can be seen as this, as most of the top-tier rivens cost upwards of tens of thousands of platinum to buy, which results in anyone willing to fork over money to gain access to something that can make any weapon into an utter power-house. While rivens aren't only available through money, the exorbitant costs means aside from selling your own rivens, the only other feasible way to get those are to either grind hours upon hours to gain kuva and reroll until you achieve optimal stats... or simply buy the stats that you want. That said, most of the platinums went to the player who selling the Rivens with DE simply taking the fraction of the sales, making it a downplayed example.
  • Catharsis Factor: Finally getting to fight and kill the Rathuum commentator Kela De Thaym, after listening to her taunt and belittle the Tenno to no end during their arena battles. Her boss fight can be a massive pain but seeing her Villainous Breakdown as she loses as well as her own audience turn against her is so satisfying. Especially since shes broadcasting her own ass kicking live to the entire Grineer Empire.
    • At the end of The Sacrifice, finally catching up to Ballas and stabbing him in the gut courtesy of both Umbra and the Operator feels so very good after seeing the horrific shit Ballas put Umbra through.
    • Finally completing a prime weapon or warframe. After doing all those missions to get the right relics, refine them, and fighting the RNG system to get the pieces you needed, there's an undeniable sense of satisfaction and accomplishment from retrieving your completed prime gear from the foundry. Doubly so if you didn't buy or trade any parts from another player and farmed it all yourself. Having earned a piece of premium content with nothing but your own toil and efforts.
    • Arguably, both Orb fights on Venus count: the Profit-Taker Orb kept Fortuna in a deathgrip and was a major threat to you during the Vox Solaris quest; meanwhile, the Exploiter Orb was responsible for Solaris United's greatest failure and plunging them (especially Eudico) into their Darkest Hour, and the feelings of genuine relief and heartfelt thanks from them, especially Zuud, make it well-worth the effort.
  • Character Tiers: Somewhat invoked - certain frames are meant to be flat-out better than others in certain ways, others are not. With frequent balance changes to abilities, weapons, and frames, the tiers themselves can fluctuate regularly. Plus some of them are situational. For instance;
    • Ember's fire-based powers make her amazing against the Infested, decent against the Grineer, but severely lacking against the Corpus.
    • Volt's electricity-based powers? Very effective against Corpus, okay-ish against Grineer, much less effective against Infested.
    • Ash... well, some of the highest max health without considering modifications, good armour and damage mitigation, good shields, high sprint/run speed, and a nice set of powerful and effective abilities. He's not much of a team player, though, lacking any forms of crowd control, AOE or utility.
      • Ash Prime takes this to an insane degree. All the power of the original, with even better survivability and speed. While not much of a team player still, he's superb for solo play.
    • Valkyr is essentially built for slaughtering the Infested and Grineer, due to her melee focus. Corpus units have several hard counters for her, most notably being the Nullifier bubbles... which makes sense, considering how much Valkyr hates the Corpus.
    • Due to the potentially infinite durations of survival and defense missions, frames with lots of utility, crowd-control, and group support are preferred over frames with direct damage abilities, since the latter tend to fall off hard past the 30 minute mark. Enemies escalate in level as time goes on, becoming bigger damage sponges and capable of downing players in a handful of shots. Thus, frames like Ember, Oberon, and Valkyr are often ignored in favour of Nyx, Loki, Vauban, Nova, Frost, and the like, all featuring builds that disable droves of enemies from causing damage or defending key objectives from attack.
    • Played straight when it comes to Prime Warframes, which are designed to be better than the regular versions. With better stats like higher armor or energy, and more innate mod polarities.
    • If there's any scenario where you need every Grineer within a ten-mile radius dead, you better believe Saryn will be one of the first picks, due to her huge range, infinite scaling and innate corrosive procs shredding armor from Grineer, which removes a metric fuck-ton of EHP in the process. She also works to a lesser degree against the Corpus or Corrupted but Nullifiers exist only to spite her and keep her from truly wrecking face.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • The meta perception of the best loadout tends to shift with each update, but the generally-accepted "best" team-up includes at least one energy-supplying Warframe like Trinity and at least one loot-enhancing Warframe like Nekros or Hydroid, and using the Carrier Sentinel exclusively, as well as playing on high-level, infinite missions like Survival and Defense, especially because acquiring Focus requires grinding with max-level weapons and Warframes. That being said, the player can only gain Mastery ranks by leveling up new weapons and Warframes, forcing players to try new equipment, and virtually every weapon, companion, and Warframe is viable late-game with enough use of mods, catalysts, and Forma, encouraging players to experiment.
    • Weapon loadouts tend to include the same basic components no matter the build. A pure damage mod, a crit damage enhancing mod, a critical change enhancing mod, a multishot mod, and some combination of elemental mods suited against the enemies in the mission. While there is some variation, the vast majority of builds tend to include these components.
    • For Eidolon groups, you'll usually have 1 "DPS" frame whose primary purpose is to one-shot Eidolon limbs (usually with a kitted out weapon like a Lanka or Rubico Prime with a top-mid tier riven), usually a Chroma or Rhino, then Volt to supply shields to further enhance the DPS's damage as well as Operator Amp's crit damage, a Trinity whose job is to hunt for the lures and to keep them topped up and a Harrow with the easiest job of using his 4th ability right before the Eidolons throw out their magnetic area-of-effect attack to keep everyone's energy from draining and to yet again enhance the DPS's damage.
    • If you want to farm for a resource— any resource— using the Smeeta Kavat is downright essential, due to one of the effects of their unique Charm mod being a temporary doubling to all affinity and loot pickups— while it's rare, it stacks not only with resource doublers, but itself if it procs more than once.
  • Common Knowledge: Grineer Manics are often referred to as "Grineer Maniacs". Justified, considering the fact that they're often jumping around too much for one to get a look at their name plate, and "Maniac" sounds more natural as a name. Most players won't realize it until one is summoned during a Defection mission, during which Lotus actually calls them a "Manic".
  • Crutch Character:
    • In a subversion of Power Creep, Excalibur (the recommended starting warframe) and Rhino (one of the first available after the tutorial) can carry a new player through vast amounts of the game before their deficiencies in survivability and damage respectively force the player to seek out equipment, mods, and strategies to proceed farther.
      • Tying into the above, players will earn Excalibur Umbra by simply advancing the main narrative, long before reaching "endgame." He's equivalent to a Prime (with the added perk of behaving like an enhanced Specter when the player uses Transference), comes with several unique Prime mods that are specifically tailored to fighting some of the game's biggest Demonic Spiders, and even comes with a pre-installed Catalyst for easy modding. Pure F 2 P players who have been having bad luck with Prime farming will see an immediate boost from him, and his unique anti-Sentient advantages will keep him relevant even at higher levels.
    • Inaros and Nidus. The two warframes without shields are also the most survivable, and both are reasonably easy to obtain in the mid-game. While neither makes a devastating team-player, both allow inexperienced players to hold their own in late-game content like Sorties, becoming less relevant in the (now-defunct) trials and the revamped Dark Sectors where team synergy trumps pure survivability.
  • Dork Age: 2019 was a mixed year for Warframe. On the one hand, four fairly well-designed frames (Hildryn, Wisp, Gauss and Grendel) were released, and three of the worst frames in the game (Wukong, Vauban and Ember) got reworked to be actually viable, not to mention a steady stream of well-designed and powerful weapons (the Fulmin, Acceltra and Kuva Chakurr being standouts in this category). On the other hand, the latter half of the year saw the release of two half-baked updates in the form of the frustrating and grindy Kuva Lich system, and the Empyrean update, which launched with at least a dozen Game Breaking Bugs, which took over two weeks to be patched into a semi-playable state due to it being released right before DE took their holiday break. The first half of the year saw the introduction of Nightwave and The Wolf of Saturn Six— for more on him, see That One Boss below. On top of all of that, a new booster item that increased the chance for Mods to drop was introduced, immediately bringing forth accusations that the game was becoming Pay To Win.
  • Draco in Leather Pants
    • Some of the fans have a strong sexual attraction to Captain Vor, guts and all. Especially his guts.
    • Alad V. Despite the fact that he's an old, almost irredeemable man who cut up the Tenno, constructed Zanuka out of their parts, tortured Valkyr, and tampered with the Infestation, he won against Nef Anyo in their rivalry in the Tubemen of Regor event, and there are still some fans who find him appealing.
    • After the Second Dream quest was released there was and still is a vocal minority who were under the impression that joining Stalker would be a good idea compared to staying with the Lotus. Operation: Shadow Debt was just more fuel for their fires.
    • The Worm Queen. Her meek and rash demeanor made her a target of appreciation for some players despite, you know, being a Faux Affably Evil Psychopathic Manchild. She's very clearly content with eating any Grineer who fails to collect Kuva to her, and plans to do the same to the Tenno just for her own pleasure.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Clem, see Memetic Mutation
  • Evil Is Cool: Some players seem to think so towards the Stalker, motivating them to use the coloring options to paint their own Warframes in his colors. Needless to say, some players see his "edgy" style as just a cheap attempt at trying to be cool making this Narm for them.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Quite a few members of the community have an unhealthy fascination for Tyl Regor or bosses voiced by [DE]Skree.note  Most infamous is Yuikami's lust for Captain Vor.
  • Fanon: It's generally assumed that Excalibur Umbra sees the Operator as a Replacement Goldfish for its dead son, Isaah.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • With JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, in part because a number of available frames (such as Limbo and Atlas) have powers that emulate popular Stands, as well as the screenshot potential of an Operator and their "Stand". This eventually resulted in Rebecca Ford, voice of the Lotus and community manager, becoming a Converted Fangirl and even commissioning art of Rhino and Atlas posing as Joseph and Caesar.
    • With BIONICLE — perhaps unsurprising, given the similar premise of cyborg/organic robot protagonists with Elemental Powers. On top of the wide degree of customization allowing players to craft Toa-inspired appearances for their Warframes, and appealing to a similar collectors' mentality, a number of players have noticed surprising similarities between Lunaro and Kolhii, in-universe sports native to Warframe and BIONICLE, respectively.
  • Game-Breaker: The game has its own page now.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Initially, it was the opposite for Warframe in Japan, despite many of the game's themes drawing samurai and ninjas of Japanese folklore. As the game and backstory continued to develop, however, Japan began warming up to the series, to the point that it is listed among the top 20 games played on Steam in the country, and even a somewhat healthy demand among players for a localization.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • The Grineer Rollers/Grinders. Unlike the rest of the Grineer, which are gigantic, hulking clones, these guys are tiny metal balls that roll around stages at high speeds, turn on a dime, and stun you with each attack. If they come in groups, especially near a Grineer heavy unit, the Roller's attack will often stagger you just long enough for the heavy unit to score some solid shots on you. One player once observed that all the Grineer would have to do to conquer a planet without sending in troops would be to drop a handful of rollers from orbit and the entire planet's inhabitants would very quickly pack up and leave. It got to the point where a member of the dev team drew joke concept art of a boss Roller in response to jokes about a boss Roller.
    • The Grineer Seekers are green-colored soldiers that constantly throw mini versions of Rollers called Latchers. If a Latcher rolls into you, it sticks to you and detonates in a few seconds, unless you roll to dislodge it. Even worse if you're on a team, as they will shock and disable you until your allies manage to destroy the annoyingly durable and hard to hit thing.
    • A new addition to the Grineer's Goddamn Bats are the Scorpions. Female Grineer melee fighters, who by themselves are not more dangerous than the standard melee Grineer. What puts them into this category is that they have a high accuracy with their harpoon special ability which knocks a Tenno to the ground and pulls them towards the Scorpion, and they fire it as soon as they see the player.
    • The Corpus Shield Osprey also count. They have no attack, but boosts the shields of nearby allies and fly around in random patterns, making it hard to hit (and thus kill) them. Furthermore, when a Shield Osprey casts their shields onto a unit, that unit's shields are immediately restored to full. They are so annoying that players might charge into formations of enemies just to take them out for the rest of the team. And in high-level games, they're durable, too, and can often shield herds of 10+ enemies. God help you if two Ospreys get a chance to shield each other.
      • Most Ospreys can easily fall under this category depending on what weapons you have and what warframe you're currently using.
    • Corpus Shockwave Moa can knock Tenno down. One by itself is still okay, but when there are multiple it gets worse. Even worse if you're running solo and they stunlock you to death.
    • The Anti-Moa can fire shots which create shockwaves at their impact location, making it similar to the Shockwave Moa, but ranged..
    • Grineer Shield Lancers, since their shield blocks all attacks from the front (except for a small slit in the shield and parts of the Lancer that are sticking out), and since they can rush at players and perform a melee attack that knocks them down.
    • All of the light Infested qualify. Despite supposedly having 'weak' attacks, Chargers will somehow stagger a Warframe with almost every hit and they're fast enough that several can blindside even the most alert of players. Leapers also stagger with their punches but will additionally knock down Warframes with their eponymous leap attack. Runners can't take swings or leap but their kamikaze explosions will stagger all Warframes in a sizable area and they can juggle a Warframe that has been knocked down.
    • The Mutalist Osprey is weak and easily downed if focused on, not posing much of a threat other than dropping off some smaller Infected. That doesn't stop them from being a pain in the ass with their one and only attack where they quickly intercept you and dash through the air, leaving a toxic cloud (which goes straight for your health!) behind them while they do so. Granted, they give off a noticeable audio cue before they do it, but it's hard to either step back or kill the damn thing when you're overwhelmed by the other Infested.
    • All Heavy Grineer can and will perform a ground pound move when a player comes closer than 7 meters to them. The shockwave will always hit players in that radius and knock them on the back for a few seconds. To make matter worse the attack will always be performed when the animation starts, even when the animation is interrupted and it will always hit, including Tenno who are in the air something not even Shockwave Moas can.
    • Grineer Regulators. Canned Orders over Loudspeaker? Classy! The irritating voice that plays is somehow capable of disrupting the player's minimap and giving enemy units a Status Buff. Thankfully they are easy to destroy.
    • Grineer Commanders barely pose a threat by themselves, dealing middling damage and sporting higher-than-average health and armor, quite a bit more than the common Lancer. What brings them into the "Goddamned" status is their teleport ability ripped straight from Loki. What it does is immediately switches you and the Commander's places with each others, which means that more often than not, you'll be teleported into a large group of Grineer soldiers. Only making matters worse is that there's a 2-second duration where you're stunned after being teleported, both practically and literally as the player character looks around in confusion as he gets a bearing of his surroundings. As well, the Commander's teleport (whether by way of a bug or design) goes through walls and doors. Many a time will you be teleported without having seen the Commander in the first place.
    • Corpus Engineers and Snipers gained an ability to throw down a small device that summons Ratels, small ant-like robots that beeline towards the player and hit them with a short-ranged shock attack. On their own, they're of minimal threat. Their attack does trivial damage and they're easy enough to destroy. The problem comes in when they're deployed during protracted battles. Their spawn pads are very short, easy to be blocked by terrain, and they can spawn another Ratel every few seconds. While their attacks do unimpressive damage to you, it's still enough to interrupt shield recharging, potentially making you much squishier as a result, and it's really hard to get rid of all of them, just like real ants. And when you think you've finally got them all, another sniper all the way across the room throws down his generator!
    • Ratels themselves qualify. In addition to interfering with shield recharging, by simply spawning in, they increase the number of enemies you need to kill on extermination missions. And it adds up quickly— if the mission originally called for 90 enemies killed, you could be going after 120 by the end.
  • Goddamned Boss: Tyl Regor 2.0 can take forever to kill if you aren't prepared. He's not all that high a level (23 for one player, up to 39 for four), so he doesn't do all that much damage per attack, but almost all of his axe attacks have the Stagger status effect, much like Stalker's scythe, and his Power Fist attacks all have the Knockdown effect for seemingly no reason. More worrying is his infinite Flash Step teleport ability, identical to a Grineer Manic's AI. Combined with his fast-recharging shield, it can be very difficult to actually deal any lasting damage. There's also very little ammo during the battle, and he can summon a small group of (thankfully low-level) Manics once his health drops to 66% or 33%.
    • The new Stalker following the Second Dream. He's arguably less dangerous, because all he'll mostly use is knockback-inflicting Sword Beams and his War BFS; the former knocks you away and is far less powerful than his One-Hit Kill Dread bow, and the latter lacks the Cycle of Hurting that made his Hate scythe so deadly. That being said, he inherits the Sentients' damage assimilation effect, as well as having a buttload of health to begin with; while he can't kill you nearly as easily, he's much harder to kill as well, especially if the fight drags on and he's allowed to assimilate all of your weapons.
      • As of The War Within this is significantly less of an issue, as players can use the Operator's beam weapon or Amp to reset any of his assimilated resistances or defeat him outright with certain Amp builds, just like any other Sentient.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • "Zoren Coptering". When using the Dual Zoren, hitting the melee attack button while jumpsliding forward would cause the Tenno to whip out the Dual Zoren axes and perform a spin attack, which rapidly propelled the Tenno forward in a spinning motion. Other fast melee weapons were capable of achieving this effect as well. Up until U17, it could be considered an Ascended Glitch, but Parkour 2.0 removed it.
    • Another movement technique that's been removed through gameplay changes is that back when there was a Sprint Meter, crouching while sprinting caused you to forward slide for one second at sprint speed, but since you weren't running, the Sprint Meter refilled. This could really help you dash around in a fire fight.
    • Radial Disarm, Loki's final ability, is a powerful ability that destroys the held weapons of nearby foes, forcing them to attack you with weaker melee strikes. It also was able to literally dis-arm common Infested.
    • In a Rescue mission, you must bring a hostage to the extraction point to get them off the ship. However, the game doesn't remove the hostage when you reach extraction, so the last thing you see in a escort mission is the hostage watching their saviors board a shuttle and fly away without them.
    • Melee attacks clip through doors, allowing you to kill enemies that are on the other side.
    • It was once possible to rescue a hostage by lingering around the brig until the Lotus declared the mission successful and leaving without opening the cell door, making it impossible for enemies to kill the fragile prisoner by any means. This was finally fixed in Update 9.
    • When the Kogake was first released, it was possible to instantly kill anyone, even bosses, by knocking them down and then standing over their downed form. This was swiftly expunged.
    • The Kestrel boomerang was able to ragdoll any enemy and throw them several meters back. Since Hek, Regor, Ruk, Kela and the old Golem are basically recolored standard enemies, they are not immune to the Kestrel's effect. The result is that players could potentially knock them over into the pits around their arena, killing them with just one throw.
    • Update 9.8 brought a much needed buff to Mag. It, however, turned Mag's first ability (which is only meant to yank enemies close so she can smack them with a melee weapon or execute them with a shotgun) into the Jedi pull on steroids - it would yank anything in front of Mag (be it one enemy or an entire room) and deal armor-piercing damage that killed almost every non-elite. Even elites could just be stunlocked by waiting until they stand up, then yanking them again. This was later toned down with the overhaul of the damage system, which changed all her powers to the niche (but more appropriate) Magnetic damage type.
    • When downed, you count as stealthed, causing any kills you make to register as stealth kills.
    • The Heavy Impact mod allows a player to create a damaging shockwave when landing after a certain height. The power and radius of the wave is based on the time spend in the air. Some players found out that sliding down a wall counts as time you fall. As a result running up a 5 meter wall and sliding down caused a shockwave that could clear entire defence maps.
    • When a knocked-down enemy gets up, you can still perform a ground finisher on them for a few seconds. If you're wielding a sword or similar weapon, this makes the Tenno appear to stab their target in the head, but if you have something like a hand-to-hand melee weapon, this results in your Warframe crouching down in front of your target and punching their feet until their body explodes.
    • Attack on Stalker. In Archwing missions, the Warframe and Archwing are actually scaled down in proportion to normal assets. This means that when Stalker goes after a Warframe, he's at normal size while the Warframe has been scaled down.
    • Raptor was one of the more annoying Corpus bosses due to being able to fly away, but it was previously possible for a Loki to stand inside a prefab building and use Switch Teleport to switch places with Raptor. The Raptor would then be trapped and unable to fly out, and players could then open the doors and shoot Raptor with impunity. This was patched out around October 2013.
    • At one point, the Tigris and Sancti Tigris had a chance to cause enemy corpses to duplicate body parts if their innate Slash damage split the corpses in two. Nekros could even loot the extras using Desecrate.
    • During missions two and three of the Pacifism Defect event, Sargas Ruk sends Manics to attack the Grineer defectors that the players are tasked with rescuing. As it turns out, somehow the Manics were never coded to target the defectors, only players, demoting them from serious hazard to relatively-minor nuisance.
    • At one point, Gas damage gained an interesting interaction with stealth attacks. Somehow, the stealth damage multiplier started stacking excessively with its status effect, causing it to do obscene amounts of damage. Needless to say, this got patched out.
    • On release, if you stacked enough buffs that increased speed on Gauss (such as the Sprint Boost aura, Volt's Speed, Octavia's Vivace buff, and Nova's Exit Velocity augment), you could go fast enough using his 1 that the game's field of view would invert, resulting in stuff like this (note that this is done with 8 players via the Captura function, but still!).
  • It Was His Sled: The game was subject to a number of shocking reveals over the course of its lifetime, but due to its nature as an MMO, many of these have become common knowledge, and it's rare to see a new player who wasn't spoiled on the twist beforehand. To whit:
    • The Tomato in the Mirror of the Tenno's true identity is extremely hard to avoid nowadays, as not only is it locked behind a late-game mission, but the new powers granted by it, and the new systems unlocked afterwards, means it's possible for a veteran to spoil the twist with a literal push of a button.
    • Lotus's true identity as a former Sentient is such common knowledge nowadays that it's not even really kept a secret. This is beginning to extend to the "Part 2" of that reveal, which sees Lotus returning to her Sentient form as Natah and betraying the Tenno. Not only is this the subject of many references, art, and memes in the fandom, but it's become part of some of the game's promotional material; the most prominent example being the event-only Lotus spirit in Super Smash Bros., which evolves into her post-betrayal Natah form.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Baro Ki'Teer may be incredibly pompous, elitist, and condescending, but as a kid, he did get to listen to Grineer troopers gun down his mother in cold blood, all the while praying to the local protector deity to keep her safe. Not that he'll be any nicer towards you after you find this out. Unless you approach him as Inaros.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: A majority of people (mostly veterans), some reviewers and even DE don't consider Operators to be spoilers, as evidenced by IGN's 2018 review of Warframe, as well as most posts of the subject on the Warframe subreddit not bothering to put up spoiler tags for them. It helps that just mentioning the existence of Operators out-of-context doesn't spoil much other than the fact that you will be able to "use" them later along the line. Anyone with access to their Operator can also easily spoil them as you can swap to them in public areas where newbies will most likely see them.
  • Les Yay: Between the Lotus and Mirage.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Averted. The threat of the Grineer's Fomorian Ships is well-established. When they come around, players have to work together to defeat them, or risk losing one of the few remaining relays around the Origin System permanently. As of writing, all platforms have had three of the seven relays destroyed, and one has been rebuilt on every platform but the Nintendo Switch.
  • Memetic Badass:
  • Memetic Loser: You, apparentlynote  Even though it is just an outright verbal mistake.
  • Memetic Mutation: For general discretion, any content meant to instill the core value of the community is by means approved by the creators.
    • Greedy Milk. The community is still trying to figure out what it is. note 
    • They've apparently made enough of it for a brand name, and cereal.
    • Ascended Meme: Clem, the Grineer fan character born from the Narmy Grineer's speech, was eventually put in the game in full! You can even do a daily quest for him to get a Spectre of him, so now you can have your own Two-Grakata-wielding plucky little Tenno-wannabe Grineer defector tagging along on missions with you!
    • "Latron." "Grakata." "No, Latron." "TWOOO Grakata!"
    • SOONTM — the official release date of any planned feature you're looking forward to. Eventually, the meme was given a Primed Version.
    • For a long time, Lotus would say "I'm detecting a large security force heading your way. It's the Grineer," regardless of which faction it actually was. This was later lampshaded by Darvo.
    • Whenever new updates lead to Good Bad Bugs or Artificial Stupidity, expect the game's Perpetual Beta status to be cited as the cause. IT'S BETA
    • The sheer volume of customization present has given rise to the Fan Nickname "Fashion Frame." Since the majority can only be gotten with premium currency (which means, unless you wanna spend real money, farming for, and selling, high-end loot for the premium cash to buy them), this has led to the common stance among vets that "Fashion Frame is the true endgame."
    • "Growth. Profit. Grofit!"
    • "You can't spell Rebecca without REEEEEEEEEE", thanks to Rebecca Ford, the community manager and VA for The Lotus, saying this during an official stream.
    • In one of content creator Quiette Shy's videos, she declared an augment mod for a particular weapon to be about as useful as "tits on Vay Hek", ending the video with voice mashup of Vay Hek exclaiming, "Look, brothers! Tits! HAHAHAHA!". Vay Hek's voice actor has done a live rendition of the line.
    • The exceedingly long speech (and the opening line, "Look at them") given by Corrupted Vor upon his appearance has become a frequent copypasta. The speech is made even made more ridiculous by the fact that he will often be slain within ten seconds of appearing, only to ramble on for another full minute after his death.
    • "Ninjas farm free" or "Farmers play free" are statements that aren't new to Warframe's existing game mechanics that involves a lot of farming for specific builds that players would do on a regular basis. It doesn't help that the most primarily used items are referred to as various farm produce. For example, the Orokin Reactor/Catalysts are "potatoes", the Exilus Adapters are "tomatoes", and the Kuva are "chili peppers".
    • Dablas, since you can make Atlas dab by making him face your camera when using Petrify.
    • "We all lift together," the Solaris Catch Phrase, has been used for all sorts of ridiculous contexts, like having Vay Hek say it. On a more serious and heartwarming note, it has become the fandom's Catch Phrase, usually when helping a new player who is struggling. We all lift together, Tenno. Also the song itself became fandom anthem due to this and its general meaning about endless hard work which players ironically refer to grinding, farming and all like this.
    • Instance 69, a server instance of the new Fortuna region, which has been vigorously kept alive by players due to the obvious joke. It's been made an Ascended Meme, with DE hardcoding the game so that Fortuna 69 can never die due to being empty.
    • "Just play Warframe, it's better and it's free."explanation 
    • "Jokkett, get the Opticor."
    • SHE WILL BE OUR MOMMY BY FORCE!note 
    • Hydroid Prime's trailer. Explanation 
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The sound of picking up a rare item like Orokin Cells, Argon Crystals or Tellurium definitely counts if you're grinding towards that new gear you really want. This was briefly annoying on Railjack's release, due to the tone playing whenever you picked up any resource.
    • Although a lot more subtle than other sounds, there's no doubt that the crunchy headshot noise is music to anyone's ears, especially if you have enough punchthrough and line up a shot to headshot multiple enemies!
    • "Change of plans. Ignore your original objective. Leave nothing alive on this ship. Exterminate all life."
    • Any time Nora Night praises your actions after you complete a particular Nightwave task or successfully fended off the invader of the season.
    • The death cry of a Nox is very loud, unnerving and yet oh-so-satisfying.
    • Despite Baruuk remaining fairly under-used, everyone can agree that his sound design is absolutely phenomenal. Some say that's a big reason they play him!
  • Narm:
    • Most of the Grineer bosses taunt you with ridiculously flaccid insults and threats.
    • "Take the 'Warfra' out of 'Warframe', and what are you left with? That's right, ME!"
    • FASHION VICTIMS ARE ABOUT TO BECOME MURDER VICTIMS~!
    • The Lotus, in the Operation: Arid Fear preview, got called an "eyeless slag". The update warning included "Tenno, get revenge on the Corpus for calling the Lotus an 'eyeless slag'."
    • The new non-English update to the Grineer voiceset occasionally makes the female Grineer sound like The Muppets.
    • Nef Anyo's costume is absolutely ludicrous, and it's hard to find him too terribly threatening when you'll mostly be wondering how he can move his arms or even walk. Unsurprisingly, it's been sthe subject of much mockery by the fans, who have variously compared it to a walking McDonalds sign, an evil jukebox, or a door.
    • The MOA's seem to make... chicken noises.
    • Stance names tend to be pretty hit-or-miss. The worst example is probably Fracturing Wind.
    • Invasion missions are staged to feel like you're in the middle of a large skirmish between two parties. In reality, it's fairly obvious that the game barely spawned all the enemies in since everyone's HP is full or near it and aside from the environmental damage, it doesn't convey that feeling. Hell, if you're fast enough, you can even see enemies from both factions spawn in the SAME ROOM and have a small period of not shooting until they notice each other.
    • The Focus system. Dramatic powers that can change the tide of a battle, and can only be used after slaughtering a bunch of mooks. When activated, it replaces your cyborg ninja with a teenager that hovers around the battle in a T-pose firing Void powers from their sternum.
    • The automated message Ordis leaves you in "Octavia's Anthem" when he vanishes from your ship after trying to rescue Suda from Hunhow and gets captured himself is so sappy and over-dramatic that it is impossible to take it seriously. Though to be fair, such drama and overacting is completely in character for Ordis.
    • When you board the derelict Steel Meridian ship during the first mission in the "Chains of Harrow" quest, instead of her usual calm and collected tone the Lotus speaks in a wary hushed whisper, as if she's there next to you trying not to spook (or alarm) whatever caused the ship to go silent, and is not speaking over a secure transmission from somewhere very far away from your location. Ultimately, it just makes her look silly.
    • Some players were put-off that the "Chains of Harrow" quest could be summarized under the headline "Local Goth Cult Holds Seance For Autistic Child via Haunted Fidget Spinner; Ghostbusting Ensues."
    • Some of Ghouls' combat growls are pretty narmy - one in particular sounds suspiciously like "OM NOM NOM".
    • The name "Ballas" may be a little hard for some players to take seriously since it's also the name of one of the many rival gangs in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas.
    • And then The Sacrifice featured a game of "Komi" which no doubt remind some people of a certain memetic manga. Then it loops right back to being horrifying when you realise that the viewpoint character is also unable to communicate, on account of the Infestation that's reshaping him into Umbra...and his opponent, who is the one responsible for said reshaping and is maintaining a pleasant attitude vocally, is telepathically-taunting the PoV character that for every piece he loses, said opponent will have another member of his family killed.
    • Kuva Liches are supposed to be the player's Arch-Enemy. They're powerful, immortal foes with an undying hatred for you after they endure the painful Super Soldier induction process you started. But they're also procedurally generated, including their names. The moment that a Kuva Lich rises is supposed to be a dramatic moment, but it can easily be undercut by the game displaying a name that is pure word salad, such as Andii Grtakmb or Ree Grgrakk; a name that is (almost) one or two real words like Oniry Momm, Gitt Bakk, or Such Egg; a name that is repetitive or otherwise inherently ridiculous, such as App Rapp, Ogogg Ogg, or Bopp Bipp; or a name that is a sexual innuendo, such as Sukk Diss or Kokk Solidd. The game's community manager recorded two videos in which she reads some of the sillier names the system has generated.
  • Narm Charm: Frohd Bek's commercial for the new-and-improved Ambulas model from the Ambulas Reborn event is styled after cheesy 80's infomercials, complete with synthesized music and strange portmanteaus of corporate buzzwords. Of course, this is probably what the developers were going for, and the playerbase ran away with the word "grofit".
    • After completing Chains of Harrow, the Man in the Wall will occasionally manifest in the Orbiter as a doppelganger of the Operator...and repeatedly clip through what he's sitting on as he shifts around. This would be funny, but given how he's a Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane ghost, this also causes him to be even creepier. The effect is altered after the completion of The Sacrifice. Not only due to the direct conversation you have upon finishing the quest, wherein the Man in the Wall is pleased that you seem to think you personally killed Umbra's son, but also because prior to this he would only appear/disappear offscreen, but now he will fade out while the player is still looking right at him.
  • Nightmare Retardant: Chains of Harrow usually is scary, unless you like to play as Rhino, Limbo, Valkyr or Inaros. In that case you can casually stroll through each mission and ignore everything trying to haunt you because they cant get through Iron Skin/Rift Walk/Hysteria or hurt Inaros in any meaningful way, turning what would be a nightmare into a laugh.
  • Player Punch:
    • During the Defection missions, you can revive fallen Kavor defectors if they get downed once. However, if they get downed again or you don't revive them in time, instead of dying they immediately transform into an Infested Charger. This Charger is slightly different from the others in that is is white, the colour of armour that Kavor defectors wear, making it easily stand out. So, every time you see a white charger amidst the infested, that's the game's way of saying "This one is on you".
    • Before it got patched out, if you were in the Plains of Eidolon on free-roam, the Lotus would occasionally point to an optional objective you may do for a (usually small) reward. If you choose to ignore it, however, the Lotus would be absolutely glad to mention to you how it will negatively impact the denizens of Cetus in a passive-aggressive tone, to varying amounts of success.
  • Quicksand Box:
    • You have a tutorial mission, and a few others, but after that, there's very little indication of what you should do next, or rather, what you even can do. While it has gotten a lot better over the years, new players may find themselves a little confused if not overwhelmed as to what to do.
    • This can also happen in Cetus, due to the fact that it's a Wide Open Sandbox in a game that played much more like a minor dungeon stalker.
    • The Solar Rails update fixes this by partitioning off planets and requires specific steps to advance to others, but after the tutorial quests, the second major quest is figuring out Cetus.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Heavy melee weapons like the Galatine greatsword are good early-game weapons, but fall behind other, faster weapons due to their increased speed and comparable base damage for higher-tier play, resulting in them being abandoned by high-level players. During Update 15, however, DE buffed heavy weapon damage, including more than tripling the Galatine's base damage. Properly modded, the heavy melee weapons can now one-shot most enemies, even high-level ones, and with supercharging, the right mods, and a good stance they can one-shot the Stalker. Needless to say, heavy weapons are a viable option once again.
    • Update 17 brought upon a massive set of buffs to various shotguns, rescuing the entire class of weapons from the mastery fodder pile. Weapons like the Hek and Tigris, when properly geared, are now capable of delivering its critical one or two-shot kills to enemies as high as level 50.
    • Update 18 attempted to do the same thing for Sniper Rifles. For the longest time, they were considered inferior; the scope caused tunnel vision, they were awful at dealing with crowds, and they even had inferior damage to the faster, more intuitive, far more powerful bows. On the positive side, the scopes were redesigned to be less obstructive and have variable zoom, with scaling damage based on distance (so players have more of an incentive to keep their distance and actually, y'know, snipe). Unfortunately, the rework was marred by the inclusion of a deeply-flawed combo system. In theory, playing better would increase your combo counter, which would in turn increase your damage output; in practice, it's incredibly hard to keep the combo counter up, because it resets if you miss a shot or if you wait too long between shots, which means waiting to line up the perfect shot can counter-intuitively hurt your performance. To top it off, someone had the brilliant idea to add a "realistic" scope sway, making it actively harder for snipers to line up shots at medium-long distances. In the end, sniper rifles sank even further into the scrappy heap than before.
      • Update 22's Plains of Eidolon revisited Snipers once again, this time with vastly more success. The "realistic" scope sway was completely removed. Visual zoom levels were reduced for most snipers; while this sounds like a Nerf, it reduced the tunnel vision players experienced in the closed spaces that make up most tilesets. The combo system was made more forgiving with the introduction of a combo decay (rather than losing the whole combo from missing a shot or waiting too long), as well as more rewarding due to higher multipliers across the board. It also became easier to build combos: every sniper that didn't already have it was given innate Punch Through, and every target hit by a single shot would add to the combo, with multishots potentially doubling this. The update's titular plains tileset also provided massive open spaces optimal for actually sniping. While the update added damage fall-off to weapons over high distances (reducing damage output by up to half against targets more than 300 meters away), snipers have an extended range before this fall-off takes hold (past 600 meters).
    • Since Update 14, though some found Ordis endearing and humorous, many players found his random outbursts and incessant commentary on their every action to be annoying, to the point of begging for a way to turn him off. Update 19 added Ordis Fragments, which provide splash screens of game assets and short blurbs about the universe from Ordis' perspective. Players can investigate them further and "tune" to the proper frequency within the image to hear the tragic story of Ordan Karris, the man Ordis once was. Even some of his biggest detractors found a new respect for him after completing the Fragments story, and many even agreed Ordis was as much The Woobie as the Operators, if not more so.
    • Of all the underpowered "mastery fodder", few had earned more antipathy than the Twin Basolk. Decent base damage that was offset by a horridly slow base swing speed, bad range, and being stuck in the Dual Swords category of weapons (which are considered to have really bad stances). And its innate damage is Heat instead of Slash; elemental weapons with no physical damage (especially no Slash damage) are very unpopular with the playerbase. Crafting it will cost you one Dual Zoren and one Atomos, which are both decent weapons in their own right (certainly better than the Twin Basolk); if you don't already have them built or you're not willing to part with them, that's 12 extra hours of waiting for spares to be built. Add it all up and you have lots of players happy to anagram the name to "Twin Bolsak"note . DE tried to help with Rift Strike, a unique mod introduced with 18.10's Rathuum event, which lets the user teleport to enemies within 25 meters by using a charged attack; unfortunately, the mod has no impact on DPS, and the teleport doesn't significantly alter combat, so there's no incentive to use it over a damage mod besides the novelty factor... Until it was recently buffed during the War Within patch, rocketing its way from the Scrappy Heap all the way up to Infinity plus one status. The weapon was given the ability to reach 100% status chance with pure Gas damage, which meant that not only would every swing proc Gas status on the target, but every tick of Gas status would inflict Toxin status to nearby targets — each of which could stack and would deal shield-ignoring damage based on the weapon that proceed it. Adding this to bonuses to melee damage (such as the stealth melee multiplier) made its procs absolutely monstrous. Even after the stealth melee multiplier ceased to apply to status effects, the Twin Basolk keeps up.
    • Melee 3.0 aims to buff and fix many of the low-tier melee weapons and types, such as machetes and scythes, while equalizing the playing field so not one singular weapon reigns supreme. Insofar, it seems to have done just that, buffing many weapons such as the Fang Prime and Reaper Prime, long thought to be mastery fodder, into absolute beasts. While there's still a significant amount of weak melee weapons, there's much more variety than there was, before.
  • The Scrappy: Very few people like Nef Anyo after his redesign- partly because he looks ridiculous and sounds worse (like a Camp Gay televangelist) and mostly because his introduction event, Operation: False Profit, was one of the most irritating in the history of the game. This was a major contributor to more people choosing to support Alad V, a Smug Snake Complete Monster who was basically the Tenno's archnemesis, when they had to choose between Nef and Alad during the Tubemen of Regor event.
    • Nef has debatably Rescued from the Scrappy Heap thanks to both his role throughout Fortuna as well as the events of Deadlock Protocol - his ridiculous appearance and voice actually work very well in making him a Love to Hate Hate Sink for all the horrible things he does to Fortuna, as well as the sense of satisfaction as you consistently one-up him. Hearing him get taken down a peg or six by none other than the founder of the Corpus himself is also deeply cathartic.
    • Nora Night falls here to many. Though she has good voicework, explicitly-reminescent of the famous radio host from The Warriors, she unfortunately was the face of the game's soon-maligned battle pass-esque "Nightwave" system. While Nightwave has steadily improved, it still remains a contentious element of gameplay, and Nora herself has a limited pool of quotes that she'll spout whenever you finish a challenge, or even just hang out idle on your ship with the radio on. It gets old and repetitive fast, especially when she starts enthusiastically singing your praises for something as trivial as petting your dog.
    • Depending on your point-of-view, the Operator can come off as an unwanted annoyance. You've spent the entire game up to this point playing as a mute, badass space ninja, and now the game makes you design a teenager with a very limited set of options, complete with their own voice acting that will spout off random nonsense quotes about honor or mocking whatever faction you're fighting in missions. While there is an option to stop them from speaking randomly and to close their hood, not only do they speak frequently in story cutscenes after their appearance, but later gameplay elements heavily involve them, to the point a given player is severely-hampering themselves by avoiding using and improving them. This has slightly improved as Operators have gotten better fashion, more useful abilities, and better writing that makes them come off as more appropriately-badass and self-determined, but for some the sting never fully went away.
    • Little Duck, vendor for the Vox Solaris syndicate and an all-around unpleasant person to interact with. She serves as Fortuna's premier wetworks agent, as well as a representative of the Quills, but she's rude, abrasive, and will often insult you to your face if you deign to try to talk to her without using Transference - even if you've maxed out both Fortuna Ranks and are the single biggest hero the colony has ever seen, she'll still talk down to you. It got worse when she was made the Disruption Mission Control for anywhere other than Jupiter, as now you'll have her whining in your ear about conduits and chewing you out whenever you fail to protect one.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Corpus laser doors. They're SUPPOSED to encourage the party to stick together, but unless you're literally walking in lockstep, they tend to do the reverse. More often than not, the first person through the door will trigger the security camera without seeing it, causing the SECOND person through the door to run head-first into the laser door and take massive damage. Even worse if the second person can't take out the camera from their side of the door and the first person doesn't notice (or care) that they've left their ally behind. Worse still, a player can trigger a camera which will lock in another player in an entirely different section of the ship, with no way for them to take the offending camera out. An update eventually made it so that you can slide past them, but cameras still tend to have the irritating habit of triggering while walking through a door. The Gas City rework added a new form of laser doors that are less annoying— scanners that cover a certain part of the doorway that can be easily destroyed or slid under.
    • Secondary objectives are also annoying. Fought tooth and nail to reach an Artifact and expect to make a mad dash for extraction? Nope. There's intel that needs collecting! The worst of which is that Intel missions tend to be extremely long, especially in big tilesets, like Grineer asteroids. Another classic is having to drag a fragile hostage along on the Datamass hunt. Good times. It's rather telling that this has been mostly phased out as the developers continue to refine the different mission types.
    • Knockdown in general is widely disliked because of the enormous length of time it incapacitates the player for. In a game where you can easily die from 2-3 seconds of sustained fire, being knocked down and unable for move for four or five seconds often results in death. This is made worse because the mods that allow knockdown resistance and improved knockdown recovery are both extremely rare, and often can't fit in a player's build beyond essentials like effective health and power boosts.
    • Update 10 initially had a heavy change to the stamina system. Stamina now had a timer before it would start recovering and would take longer to do so. This was meant to make Stamina more important and encourage players to use stamina-boosting mods. However the actual result was that players would be unable to run for more than 10 seconds without stopping to let the stamina recover. After an uproar in the community it was quickly readjusted closer to the original state.note  Eventually stamina itself was completely removed during the Parkour 2.0 rework.
    • Quick Thinking's stagger mechanic. Prior to Update 11.1, a popular build for players was to combine Quick Thinking (which causes incoming lethal damage to consume energy instead) and Rage (which converts damage taken to health into energy) on their Warframe, which created a 96% effective feedback loop that could make players effectively immortal. After Update 11.1, Quick Thinking was Nerfed to attack this combination, but as a result of the changes to its damage reduction, every activation of Quick Thinking guarantees the user be staggered for almost as long as the knockdowns mentioned above, with no means to resist or increase their recovery — all the while opening the user to more damage, and costing more precious energy. What makes this really a problem is that receiving any amount of healing at all will reset this, causing ongoing heal-over-time effects (or even allies' emergency healing) in the midst of superior damage to Stun Lock the user to death and rapidly burn out all of their energy to boot.
    • Update 12 added two more traps to the Grineer tilesets. "Broken lights" zapped the player with a bolt of lightning, created a flash that can blind at a bad moment, and are nearly impossible to destroy beforehand. The lighting was strong enough to one-shot low-level Warframes. "Sensor bars" over doorways created the same Mana Burn and Interface Screw disruption effect as Ancient Disruptors - and when they were first released the off switch would only show up on one side of the doorway. Broken lights were removed fairly quickly and replaced with arc traps, which, while still dangerous, are easier to see and far less lethal. Sensor bars at least affect Grineer troops walking through the field as well and were quickly patched to have off switches on both sides of every door.
    • Having to deal with Stalker when you're still a newbie. You'll be lucky to survive more than five seconds after Stalker starts moving.
    • The new Nitain resource looks to be replacing Argon as the signature Scrappy Resource. While Argon decays if not used, it's at least easily farmable; Nitain only drops from daily alerts in limited quantities, and recipes that require it often require a large amount. The end result is effectively a time gate, as once you've cleared the current Nitain alert, you can literally do nothing but wait and try to catch the next one. Update 18.5 made it a potential bonus reward for finding all three hidden resource caches in the newly-overhauled Reactor Sabotage missions, but it has an abysmally-low drop rate of 0.67%, killing any chance of Sabotage becoming a viable source of Nitain.
    • As part of the hype for Update 19, the devs hinted they would add a way for players to explore the value of their older, un-PowerCreeped weapons. Enter "Riven" mods, which can provide a substantial boost to one piece of equipment in your inventory. Players get one from completing the War Within quest, with more coming from Sorties, albeit at a low drop chance. However, these mods come with two problems: First, the player must unlock the mod's effects before they can use it. To do so, the player has to complete some randomized challenges with ridiculous (and often downright sadistic) modifiers; for instance, the player may have to complete a high-level Survival mission without killing a single enemy, or solo a high-level Interception without taking any damage, or capture a Sanctuary target without using powers or traps while wielding a Hobbled key. If you manage to cheese your way past the task, you face the second problem: the stats are completely randomized (including some with negative modifiers, or useless stats like Zoom for Sentinel weapons) and the mod can randomly attune itself to any eligible weapon in your arsenal beyond the one it was equipped to when it was unlocked. No worries though, you can re-roll the stats - you just have to collect a heap of a rare resource and complete a new challenge, whereupon the mod will completely randomize itself again. For bonus points, some players have exploited the randomization process to sell useless Riven mods to unsuspecting players at inflated prices, whereupon it will remain attuned to the seller's inventory for the purposes of deciding a new weapon.
      • This extends In-Universe to the developers' case. Storing 15 player-generated mods may seem far-fetched at first, but considering that each Riven mod consists more data to hold, with no shortcut keys or even a base template that identifies the component stats that make up that mod. Now, multiply this sequence for over tens of thousands of players who actively obtain, remove and modify the mods hundreds of times every day. The results on the server which painstakingly works on this, with no storage limitations, will not be pretty.
    • Archwing missions have become this, ever since changes were made to allow for "6 degrees of freedom" — which have been known to aggravate players with motion sickness, and make it even harder to navigate for players without. Archwing gear is also significantly slower to level than Warframe equipment, and features a Prime-level grind in order to build any new equipment, as each weapon or Archwing part is a specific reward from specific missions. For the final nail in the coffin, many players feel it's not integrated enough into the main game to justify being part of Warframe, with Archwing transitions being the equivalent of And Now for Someone Completely Different.
      • Worse still are the underwater Archwing sections on Uranus- all the flaws of normal Archwing without any of the merits.
    • Any mission that requires Transference, aka Operator Mode. While players enjoy the utility that a free weapon brings in normal missions, and the Operator's attacks can purge the Stalker's or Sentients' damage resistances, some missions (like the Kuva Flood or Chains of Harrow finale) make the Warframe useless and force a transition to the Operator in order to progress. Problem is, unlike the Warframes, the Operator is essentially a human teen (with a few extra superpowers), a very vulnerable one. They have only 100 health, and no armor or health regeneration to speak of; they're so squishy they can take fall damage. Their maximum sprinting speed is roughly equivalent to a brisk walk, and their only parkour maneuver equivalent consumes energy from the same energy pool needed to attack or defendnote ; this pool regenerates painfully slowly compared to the energy each ability consumes. Generally, it leaves the player with long periods of running frantically away from the fight while their energy regenerates, then burning it out in short bursts. Oh, and each time you die as the Operator, your Warframe loses 10% of its max health and receives a debuff to increase this damage for the next one.. On the other hand, the most commonly accepted strategies of using Transference are:
      • 1: Because your Warframe is completely invulnerable during transference, use transference to hide, refill the shield, and striking void-element enemies. With the introduction of Mote Amp (that come with insane grinding), the Mote Amp must be levelled up using Operator's void beam.
      • 2: As transference also can grant players invisibility, it's common to use it to heal downed teammates while invisible or to complete labyrinthine corridors of late game Spy missions while using equipments not tailored to stealth.
    • Focus was long-hyped by the development team before its release in Update 18. It grants players access to 5 different trees (or "schools") of optional "talents" to enhance their play, designed to be an end-game progression system. However, acquiring the points to purchase the talents in the tree is a massive pain. The player has to receive a rare Focus Lens of their target school from a daily mission, then slot it into a piece of max-ranked equipment; from there, a low percentage of any overflow affinity going to the weapon is converted into Focus. While straightforward, shortly after its release, the base conversion rate was reduced (down to 1-2% of collected affinity per lens) and "Convergence" was added: a pickup in missions (which spawns near the next objective, regardless of distance from the player) that has a chance to spawn after any kill, which temporarily gives the player an 8x multiplier to any Focus gained — most likely to discourage common loot-cave strategies of the era wherein most of the team sat around collecting spoils while one player did all the work. Developers set an initial acquisition cap of 100,000 Focus per player per day, but with the low base acquisition rate, most casual players barely received two to three thousand Focus per day from their lensed equipment. Not only does Convergence encourage players to ignore mission objectives and teamplay while it is active in favor of collecting kills, but strategies and builds specifically tailored to it are virtually required in order to reach the Focus cap per day. Even once you unlock and invest points into a node in the tree, you still have to invest points in a "Pool" for the tree itself that determines how many nodes in that school you can keep active at once, effectively doubling costs that have already been paid. Lenses are consumed on use and non-refundable, and all point investments are final. And for the kicker, every node activated in the Focus pool increased the cooldown of the school's Focus ability, rapidly adding on several minutes at a time; most missions were shorter than the time you needed to wait to cast the ability once.
      • This was made worse after the Focus revamp in Update 22. The base lenses were moved to Cetus bounties (which can be done more than once per day) and a greater "Eidolon" lens type was added; however, the base lens drop rates haven't improved much, Eidolon lenses can only be acquired from a rare blueprint requiring multiple base lenses, Eidolon lenses don't even double the amount of Focus gained from using a basic lens, and no other changes were made to acquisition. Despite the ongoing issues with players being unable to reach the daily cap, the cap was increased to 250,000 and the costs of Focus nodes and Pool upgrades were increased to compensate. New "Waybound" nodes were added that, after taking a literal million Focus just to activate its capstone rank in one tree, could be activated from any other tree to share their benefits regardless of which Focus school is active; trouble being that these cross-tree abilities still required a Pool tithe from each tree that enabled them. The total costs for the tree were calculated to take over a year and a half of maxing out Focus every day in order to complete the tree; one Youtube partner noted that with his average Focus gains, it would take a casual player up to 9 years to fill out the entire Focus tree. And while the cooldown increases to Focus abilities were removed (if only because access to Focus abilities was restricted after unlocking The Quills syndicate), the costs of individual Operator abilities are increased with each "improvement" they receive from the revamped Focus tree — and the tree is the only way to address many of the above complaints about how weak and squishy the Operator mode is.
      • Somewhat mitigated by the introduction of Sanctuary Onslaught - said game mode only allows the usage of max-leveled warframes - that is, the ones which can have focus lens attached to them - and provides boosts to focus point acquisition, which scale as you go to more dangerous zones.
    • Earth Remastered. Causes massive frame per second drops in Earth missions for machines that should be handle the game fine on 60 fps at the vast majority of other areas.
    • The random, secondary incursions in Plains of Eidolon, that appears when you're free roam, prospecting, fishing, and scouring for materials in the Plains, brings to mind "Hey Niko, it's Roman! Let's go bowling!", only here, Lotus gives you random missions (with smaller payout than accepting the bounty directly from Konzu), if you choose to time it out and not doing it, Lotus basically passive aggressively told you that thanks to you, the enemy succeed in whatever things they done. It has since replaced by field communicator (in Plains, it must be discovered while in Orb Vallis, must be activated through a Hold the Line section) which allow you to receive bounties without having to return to Cetus though.
    • The bounties in Plains of Eidolon and Orb Vallis are generally this due to the strict time limit and different rules compared to usual mission, making it more easier to fail it if not careful. In each one of the open world plains, there is always an Escort Mission from a randomly picked pool of the missions. In addition, some of the common missions include searching a certain radius of area for small cache crates IN TIME LIMIT. While at least the caches in Plains of Eidolon emits a yellow light and chiming noise, the ones in Orb Vallis only emits bright blue light and subtle beeping noise that can be easily drowned by the other noises. Mitigated after a certain update, when the time is low, the radius shrinks and some of the Orb Vallis cache gave chance to pinpoint the rest.
      • Now, however, there is a fresh new hell in the bounties - namely, Plains' Base Capture missions. These require you to go to a specific outpost, wipe out the enemies there, then prevent new waves from capturing it for about 2 minutes. The problem is, enemy capture progress constantly increases at a slow rate even when there are no enemies around, and the only way to lower their progress is by killing enemies. This leads to the bastard situation of failing a bounty because the game simply would not spawn enough enemies, or because you killed them too quickly and efficiently, leaving gaps where the progress grew out of control. While this is somewhat less common in multiplayer, it is a nightmare for solo players, and a big incentive to always try to do bounties with a group.
    • The Nightwave. Apart from the limited ways to earn standing points (complete the assigned tasks or hunt wandering Saturn Six Fugitives that often spawn during mission, with 50 to 100 standing for each fugitive captured in a standing that requires 10,000 to level up), it has since replace Alerts and all of its associated ways to gain the rewards, and the Wolf Cred you use to trade items can and will expire when the Nightwave event ends or replaced.
    • Host Migration. Warframe, despite its MMO status, mostly exists in the capacity of a Peer-to-Peer game, with one player chosen as the host of any given mission. If the hosting player decides to leave the mission, it can result issues including but not limited to: the duration of abilities expiring prematurely, dying due to enemies still being able to attack you during migration, bleeding out, losing rewards, enemies such as the Stalker de-spawning, enemies such as the Stalker spawning again because Host Migration resets the time limit in which field bosses like him can appear, doors failing to open rendering the mission unwinnable, random zones of a map acting as if you're exposed to the vacuum of space and causing constant damage over time, and game crashes, on top of the potential latency that comes from having a host with a bad connection. The myriad of issues caused by Host Migration are so numerous that many people prefer playing the game solo, despite the difficulty spike it can cause.
    • Prior to Update 27.2, self-damage with weapons. Some explosive weapons (such as the Angsrum, Cerata and Ogris) were capable of dealing damage to its user when they are too close to the blast. Two things made it a scrappy mechanic: Firstly, it was inconsistently implemented, with newer weapons such as the Lenz and Corinth making self-damage with their explosive attacks close to impossible. Secondly, it was nearly impossible to mitigate— the Cautious Shot mod advertises a 99% reduction in self-damage on explosive weapons at the expense of a 15% overall damage reduction, but 1% of an Ogris's damage was still enough to gib every warframe that isn't Rhino or Inaros. In the aforementioned update, however, it was completely removed, with all previous self-damaging weapons gaining a self-stagger mechanic instead, where shooting carelessly can result in you getting knocked down.
    • Mastery Tests. On paper, it seems harmless: once your accumulated experience from leveling your gear reaches a certain threshold, you're allowed to take a special test that, when cleared, upgrades your profile emblem and gives you a slew of bonuses, such as an increase in capacity for mods, Void Traces and credits. The problem, however, comes with the fact that as the tests advance, the requirements start becoming increasingly specialized for specific play styles and builds that you may not actively use, most infamously the tests for Rank 9 and 19, which are strictly Stealth Based Missions in a game where stealth has always been notoriously bug-ridden and luck-based. Even worse, rather than being optional challenges, Mastery Rank is required to wield the best weapons and access the late-to-endgame content, meaning you have to complete them otherwise entire gameplay portions will be locked off to you. Oh, and if you fail, which becomes increasingly common the higher rank you go, you have to wait exactly 24 hours before being allowed to try again. Most notoriously, Digital Extremes, while always willing to speak up and converse with the playerbase regarding literally anything else about the game, goes completely silent whenever the topic of Rank Tests come up, as if they are actively ignoring any and all critiques of the system and how archaic its become in recent years.
    • The Ghoul Purge event on the Plains of Eidolon. It comes around far too often (at least twice a month), and if you don't collect all of the lore fragments for the event, the game forces you to open an inbox message from the Lotus telling you the ghouls are back at Cetus. The ghouls themselves fall close to Demonic Spiders territory— they primarily deal shield-bypassing toxin damage, their cries combined with Vay Hek's canned taunts are annoying, they can pop out of the ground anywhere during the daytime, and can juggle you with constant knockdown procs. On top of all of this, the rewards suck— two exclusive Grineer weapons, some okay mods, Nitain Extract, and Cetus Wisps. The only reason to really do this is for the weapons and for the fact that the ghouls can drop the Slicing Feathers stance mod, which is necessary if you want to use Combat Hand Fan melee weapons such as the Gunsen and... that's it at the moment.
    • Once again returning to the Plains of Eidolon, we have the Day/Night Cycle. Nighttime is the only time (barring the occasional bug) that the Eidolons can be fought, and they drop highly desirable rewards, including Arcanes, Riven Transmuters, and Eidolon Shards, which have all have value in Warframe's Endgame content for extra buffs, recycling unwanted mods, and giving free buckets of Focus points. Unfortunately, Nighttime only lasts 50 minutes, and it takes the first Eidolon of three about twenty seconds to spawn, and its spawn location is random. If you miss an opportunity at a Tridolon, you have to wait almost two hours for your next chance. Fortuna's attempt at a day-night cycle instead consisted of a Warm/Cold Cycle, where the only appreciable difference is a change in the lighting and the types of fish that can be caught, and is much more forgiving with the timing, and the Orb Mothers are fought in special encounters that can be activated regardless of the time in the cycle.
    • Loot Pickup— or rather, the inherent lack thereof. Without a special mod on companions (either Vacuum for robotic companions or Fetch for Kavat and Kubrow variants) you have to physically walk over most loot in order to pick it up, and DE is adamant about not changing this for poorly-defined reasons. This used to be even worse— before 2015, the only companion with a loot vacuum was the Carrier Sentinel, meaning that it was essentially the meta to use it if you wanted to collect loot in missions, and Sentinels do not come back after they die, unless you burn a revive or have the Regen mod equipped on it. Fetch, the Kavat and Kubrow equivalent of Vacuum, wasn't released until Fortuna in 2018.
    • The Helminth Cyst. Released with the advent of Nidus, the Helmith Cyst manifests as a giant boil on the neck of your Warframe that can be popped in order to make a Kubrow variant called the Helminth Charger. What makes this a scraapy mechanic is 1) the cyst can spread randomly from player to player just by being in the same session 2) the boil cannot be hidden for and is literally a giant, oozing sore on the neck of your Warframe, ruining Fashionframe potential, and 3) you have to wait a week for it to get to full maturity before you can go through the Infested door on your orbiter to have it popped and the Frame permanently inoculated against it. And you have to do this for every. Single. Frame. As of writing, there are a total of 70 Warframesnote , and that's not counting any duplicates you may want.
    • The token system for ranking up with the Entrati. The system is similar to Ticker's debt bonds, but you need to use the tokens to earn standing, as opposed to getting it from just doing bounties, trading resources, and so on. It is extremely tedious, to the point DE had to release a patch practically the next day reducing the token requirements for each rank up to 1.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The Hema is largely considered not worth it for the effort needed to acquire it. It can only be obtained by researching it in your clan's Dojo, and researching it requires Mutagen Samples, an absurdly rare resource, only dropped on Eris and the Orokin Derelict. Specifically, it requires 5,000 Mutagen Samples at minimum, and that cost scales up depending on your clan size. "Hema's research cost" is a meme due to how absurdly expensive it is.
    • Nothing has ever come close to trash-tier as the Stug, a secondary weapon acquired from the Market that severely underperforms even in its "intended" use as an early-game secondary, functioning like a certain Bio-Rifle which, while it has respectable single-target damage, is completely overshadowed by literally every other weapon due to its unwieldly arcing shots and area-of-denial gimmick not really doing much damage. Even with an amazing riven, it'd be outperformed by any non-riven weapon if only because of how clunky it is.
  • Shipping: It's common to have fanart of the Warframes paired with each other due to similar themes (Ash/Ivara, Loki/Mirage, Oberon/Titania, Banshee/Octavia, Nezha/Ember, Volt/Mag, Nidus/Saryn), opposing themes (Frost/Ember, Nekros/Oberon, Nekros/Trinity), or similar aesthetic (Excalibur/Nyx, Rhino/Valkyr, Harrow/Khora, Mesa/Ivara, Ivara/Titania).
  • Shocking Moments: Several:
    • From The Second Dream: The Reveal of the actual nature of the Tenno.
    • From the Sacrifice: The true nature of the Warframes.
  • That One Attack:
    • Basically anything that can knock you over.
    • The Corpus Jackal is normally a fairly easy Warmup Boss. However, it can and will abruptly decide to launch a huge carpet of missiles in front of it, capable of one-hitting even a level 30 Warframe - and thanks to the peer-to-peer networks, the attack often doesn't show up, unless you're host. Oddly enough, it stops doing this once it has less than 50% health. The icing on the cake is that it also bypasses several Warframe abilities that are pseudo-godmodes in regular play.
    • The Corpus Raptor's missiles are much the same, as a single player can only tank it with Iron Skin, and Raptor will position itself to bypass other defensive skills (such as Snow Globe) if need be. It also has the added bonus of randomly going invincible.
    • In earlier versions, the Stalker was annoying because he could No-Sell crowd control and debuffs, but otherwise could be handled if you met him in a full team. The later addition of Dispel and Absorb enabled him to get rid of buffs to Warframes and do Attack Reflector, making defeating him much harder.
    • Virtually any attack that inflicts a Magnetic proc to a player. The proc scrambles the player's screen, eviscerates their shields and wipes out all of their energy. The Grineer boss Vay Hek fires lightning bolts from his hands that will near-instantly strike players from a vast range to inflict the proc, which can only be avoided with split second timing. As his health gets lower, he upgrades it to a ground wave.
    • Tar Mutalist Moas spit globs of tar at players. Each projectile does obscene amounts of Corrosive damage (a damage type that's stronger versus armored Tenno), they lob three at a time, and they frequently hit with all three. To make matters worse, the projectiles create terrain hazards that slow players and do damage over time.
    • Infested Tenno (Mesa) will spam Peacemaker (read: insta-kill aimbot pistol barrage) whenever it has a chance.
    • Classic Stalker's entire arsenal can be dangerous, but at least it can be reasonably dealt with. The crowner is his Dread longbow; it's not unheard of for it to one-shot Rhino. There's a reason most players recommend melee (thus risking his Cycle of Hurting.)
    • Both Kela de Thaym and the Ambulas boss fight share an orbital bombardment phase; while the attack is telegraphed, it's incredibly difficult to avoid owing to the wide area it covers.
    • The first part of the Exploiter Orb's fight has it use it's cannon, which can do a large amount of damage fast and at a large range. The flamethrower it uses in the second part of the fight is better, due to it's short range, but still can pose a problem when getting near it to either throw thermia canisters at it or picking up coolant canisters that are near it.
    • Depending on which frame you use to kill the Larvling, your Kuva Lich can have some truly brutal abilities. The worst are any with Radiation abilities as you can easily kill your teammates if you're not careful and even destroy your own defense objective, prematurely ending the mission.
      • Aside from that, every Lich also has access to a grab (with some wonky range to boot) that can take a good chunk off your health and also potentially toss you to a pit, removing some of your buffs and even getting you stuck on certain areas. Thankfully its got a decent tell but as mentioned before, its wonky hitbox means you'll still get grabbed even if you're behind it.
    • Sentient Battalysts have an attack that players have lovingly termed the Disco Ball of Death. They curl up and spin in place, while emitting lasers of energy that do massive amounts of Tau damage in an area of effect— it's not uncommon for players do be revived and get immediately killed by the same battalyst once their revive invincibility wears off.
  • That One Boss:
    • The original Corpus Hyena was nothing to laugh at, but the new pack of Hyenas is a real pain especially when going solo. Prepare to rage. There are four of them (though, mercifully, they were patched so solo players only fight two), each with their own unique aura and attack pattern. One can slow you down with a freeze aura, another can create flame shockwaves that can knock you back and a third can take away all your energy just by being in your proximity.
    • Captain Vor's remake coincided with the release of Nightmare Mode. A bug with his scaling coupled with the Nightmare boosts resulted in level 100+ Vors that could disintegrate a whole squad while barely taking damage. He was reined in shortly after.
    • The Corpus Raptor, which doubles as a "Get Back Here!" Boss. He flies rather quickly, which makes it impossible to melee him down and difficult to aim at him. He'll snipe you with a salvo of homing missiles that can block your line of sight and absolutely will OHK you and your teammates if you don't have a defensive skill up. Even if that defensive skill was a Snow Globe or Bullet Attractor (the only two capable of protecting your whole squad), he's been known to fly just close enough to unload a missile from inside the barrier or drop some landmines on you. He also randomly closes his wings in the air and becomes invincible while his shields recharge. To top it off, his location marker isn't always entirely accurate, providing scenarios where players cannot find him until he takes a pot-shot at them. The only way to stop his nonsense is by being Rhino and constantly Rhino Stomping him while his wings are open, which makes the vulnerability window much longer. Oh, and it has theoretically infinite lives thanks to its arena being directly above the Raptor assembly line. There are three elevators requiring three bombs, and Raptor will drop one on each death. Sounds easy enough? Those bombs go off in 10 seconds no matter where they are.
    • Hek used to be one in the earlier builds when Earth was a mid level area of the solar map. He would move around the arena and always into cover instead of exposing himself to gunfire like most Grineer bosses do. Adding to that his shields had an insane recharge rate, starting to go up again the moment he would not receive any damage. Meaning players would need to get close to a shotgun wielding maniac with shields that recharge the moment you need to reload. Not to forget that he would spawn decoys of himself making players waste even more ammo. Most low and even mid level players could easily run out of ammo trying to bring him down. He is now somewhat easier but low level players who now reach him earlier can still have a hard time without the right weapon mods. Also thanks to a bug his decoys are now a different color than him, making them easier to ignore.
      • His retool as of Update 13 once again lands him in this trope. The fight is divided into two parts. In the first phase, he flies around the map, invulnerable everywhere except his rather small periodically-covered face, spamming energy-sapping blasts to annoy players. Once damaged enough, he'll retreat to a different part of the level. Once he's chased down into the final arena and his health is reduced sufficiently, he dons a mechsuit, starting the second phase. His new form can be damaged anywhere, but it is much tankier, and it comes with new tricks. He can sap the health of nearby mooks to recover his own health, and he can spawn two varieties of drones, each with their own annoying effects. The teal Propaganda Drones buff nearby Grineer while weakening the Tenno, while the red Orbital Strike Drones can easily take down the party if left unchecked. Even accessing the fight used to be an exercise in frustration, but as of 15.13, he's freely accessible on the Star Chart to all players who have reached Mastery Rank 5 or higher.
    • The Juggernaut is this for many players. He has a 99% resistance to damage at all times, save for weak spots on his back and stomach... which are only exposed during two of his attacks, and only towards the direction he's attacking, requiring players to put themselves in the line of fire in order to fight back. The kicker? His primary attack is a spine strike fired from his back, which is known to one-shot virtually any Warframe without complete invulnerability and (as evident when Juggernaut is slowed by any means) actually fires the projectiles a few frames before the weak point on his back is exposed; even with an extreme slow effect on Juggernaut, a downed player cannot reach for their sidearm in time to shoot the weak point before it closes again (and frames like Valkyr and Limbo can only survive by disabling the weapons that could reach said weak point). This attack also shares telegraphing with the Juggernaut's forward charge, which does not expose any of his weak points. Dealing with the weak point on his stomach isn't much better, as it only exposes this for a ground-pound attack which it will rarely cast on players outside of melee range. The ground pound also summons several lesser Infested units, which were originally glitched to have over triple Juggernaut's level. Oh, and it can be summoned on any high-level Infested mission with more than one tile, and permanently buffs all Infested units on the map during its warning; if you accidentally summon a Juggernaut on an Eris Capture or Exterminate, don't be surprised if the rest of the team leaves you to deal with it on your own.
    • The Wolf of Saturn Six is the very definition of a Damage-Sponge Boss. They've got an HP Pool that's the size of the Origin System itself, it's immune to all statuses and most Warframe powers, and has 90% damage reduction on all attacks. Here's a clip of a Garuda using a Dread Heart charged up with 15m damage on a level 148 Wolf. It barely does a quarter of its health. On top of that, they've recently been accompanied by three firebomb-throwing minions which are completely invincible until you kill him. On top of all of that, he doesn't give any affinity when you kill him, and can appear on any mission. And on top of all of this, for some ungodly reason, Alad V hybridized him and his goons with Sentient material! It took until the very end of Nightwave Season 1 for him to be nerfed to a degree that he was actually consistently killable. Thankfully, when summoned with Wolf Beacons, he lacks his minions, which were the majority of the reason players were killed.
    • Profit-Taker Orb just plain sucks to fight. The damage output is ridiculous, their Sentient armor means that they're only vulnerable to one damage type at a time (be that elemental or physical), they require an archgun to fight (which are hard to mod for increased damage, due to the fact that archgun mods only drop from Archwing Missions, from transmutation, or from Profit-Taker Itself), and they're accompanied by dozens of Corpus minions, including nullifiers and raknoids, that will ruin your day. On top of this, while they do drop a large amount of credits and toroids (including the Crisma Toroid, which is needed to craft the Larkspur archgun), they can only be fought as part of a bounty mission. Unlike other Bounty missions, which have multiple phases and therefore multiple chances to roll on a reward table, Profit-Taker only has one, and is one of the few sources of items needed to rank up with Vox Solaris. So, you have to fight them over... and over... and over if you want to rank up and get Baruuk and Hildryn without shelling out for platinum. Eidolons look easy by comparison.
    • Kuva Liches. They share the status immunity and damage reduction as the original Wolf of Saturn Six, but add in the joy of requiring players to have farmed up three out of eight mods, and have them in the right order, to be able to kill them... and they "steal" mission rewards, too. If any one mod is incorrect, or in the wrong place, the Lich will shrug off the deathblow (and it has three health bars that all require an individual deathblow) and instead kill the Tenno and level up (until their cap), increasing the damage they do, can take, and increasing the power of their followers too. It's not uncommon for players in public matches to beg a hunted Tenno to fight their Lich even with the wrong mods, just to make it go away.
  • That One Level:
    • The reworked Uranus map was DE's first attempt to integrate the Archwing into normal on-foot missions by making the Tenno use it to explore underwater. It was also so far their last attempt to do thisnote  because the result was awful. The water pressure reduces your speedy Archwing to a sluggish crawl (while still handling like a drunken llama on roller skates), with the added disadvantage of being confined to cramped tunnels rather than open space (where there's not much to bump into) where it's easy to get the camera (or your body) stuck, lose your sense of direction, struggle to find hard-to-see objectives, and have a hard time finding the exact point where you're allowed to jump back out of the water onto dry land. As a result, any Uranus mission with a mandatory underwater section is this trope, and the part of "The Second Dream" where you have to explore a large underwater section playing "hotter, colder" with Alad V to try and find the fragment of Hunhow is universally considered the worst part of the entire story quest.
    • Archwing missions in general can fall into this category, as explained in Scrappy Mechanic above.
    • Pavlov on Lua can be a massive pain in the ass if you don't know what you're doing. It's a Spy mission, and due to the nature of its location, has some quirks about it that make it different from any other spy mission. Due to Lua being pulled out of the void, there are errors in 'continuity' that allow travel between the present and some point in the past where Lua was intact. The data vaults you need to crack into are in the past. This isn't obvious to people doing these vaults for the first time, and not helping is the fact that the vaults are very long and involved, with the longest one taking five or so minutes to solve if you're unlucky. Not helping matters is the fact that the mission is bugged— the Lotus is meant to come in and give hints as to the fact that there are time portals in the area, but she either shows up for only the host of the mission, or not at all.
    • The Entirety of the Kuva Fortress tileset. The majority of tiles are cramped corridors that look exactly the same, but there's enough wonky geometry that you can randomly get stuck on thin air or find yourself in meandering passages, there are unkillable security cameras that activate respawning turrets, mines that are impossible to see, an overall dingy color palette, and it's glitchy to boot— there's at least one tile where waypoints can break and lead you in an endless loop, which is not great for a survival mission, where time is limited by your oxygen supply, and you could need to extract at a moment's notice. Some tiles were so "Mazelike" (in DE's words ) that they even had to be removed.
      • The Defense tile from that same set has its own brand of tomfuckery— most defense missions increase in difficulty by adding in higher-level enemies or more elite units. Kuva Fortress defense spawns unkillable turrets and electrifies the floor. All of which forces you away from the object you're supposed to be defending.
  • That One Side Quest:
    • Trying to farm the blueprints to any Warframe can easily become this. Requiring players to grind for hours, killing the same bosses and repeating missions hoping they will drop, and those are some of the easiest ones to get. For example, Mesa - which requires 30 missions, at minimum (9 for a full set of the nav coordinates you need to farm the boss once, repeat 3 times. 3 for the number of times you need to farm) to achieve.
    • Vauban's component blueprints are rewarded for Alert (Now Nightwave, see Scrappy Mechanic above) missions from time to time. You're completely at the mercy of the RNG system, hoping an alert offering them turns up while you're playing; once you've got one or two, you get to add in the hope that the alert will be for one of the parts that you still need. As of Nightwave, you need the Wolf Creds that was given when leveling up the standing to purchase the blueprints where available in usually four days cycle, which ranging from easy to hard according to missions assigned.
    • Hydroid must be farmed from fighting Vay Hek, whose entry can be seen in That One Boss above.
    • Ash's blueprints are only dropped by Grineer Manics, high level enemies who are difficult to kill and only have a small chance of spawning, with an equally slim chance of dropping any loot.
    • Chroma's blueprints are fairly easy to obtain, but using them to craft his parts is another story, since his components require parts from four other Warframes. Volt's part is the easiest, since you get those through Clan research and can therefore grab only the part you need, but the other three are a pain for various reasons. Ember's part drops from the tedious Sargas Ruk, while Frost's drops from the notoriously-awful Lech Kril. Meanwhile, Saryn's part drops from Kela De Thaym, who requires Judgement Points to fight. Where do you get Judgement Points, you ask? Why, grinding Rathuum, of course. These different parts must then be built so they can be used to make Chroma's real components, requiring two warframes worth of pieces to be crafted before Chroma's actual construction can begin.
    • Equinox is also fairly frustrating to grind, since you need eight parts to build her instead of the usual three. While Tyl Regor's boss fight isn't nearly as bad as some of the others, it's still not all that fun running it that many times. As if that wasn't enough, both the Night and Day aspects take three days to complete, individually. On top of the regular three it takes to craft Equinox once both halves are complete. Requiring nearly a week in real time to craft her, assuming both the Night and Day halves began construction at the same time. Otherwise it could be 9 days.
    • Getting the blueprints and parts to build prime weapons and Warframes take even longer. Requiring you to farm Void Relics by running missions with a high chance of dropping them in hopes of getting the ones you need. While some parts are more common and easily acquired, each build has one or two parts which are much rarer and harder to get. In these cases relics must be refined with Void Traces from completing Fissure missions to increase the chances of yielding the desired item. Taking around 4 or 5 missions on average to get the traces needed to fully refine a single relic. Even after all of this the parts are still not guaranteed, and it all comes down to a random roll.
    • The Glast Gambit, the quest line you need to complete to unlock the Nidus Warframe, is considered by many to be by FAR the worst Warframe quest in the game, if not the worst mission in the game, if only for the sheer amount of time and credits that needs to be invested to complete it and the uncertain nature of each match.
    • Getting the parts for Nidus is no walk in the park either. They only drop from the Infested Salvage mission, a tedious endless mission found on Eris which has pitiful rewards— a potential reward after four rounds is 80 Endo (you can likely pick up double that from dead enemies in the mission), along with some 'rare' mods that most players will probably have two or three copies of by that point in the star chart.
    • Hidden Messages, the quest which provides the blueprints for the Mirage Warframe, requires you to solve three riddles. However there is no indication of what to do with the answers, leaving the player to realize that they're the names of the mission location where they must go. After each mission another piece of Mirage must be crafted, taking 12 hours a piece, and a full 36 hours in total to complete the quest unless the player wants to spend the platinum to rush each.
    • Jordas Precept, an otherwise rather mundane quest that unlocks the Atlas warframe, has an infuriating progression stopper in an item of Pherliac Pods. You need to craft them to progress further, and the components to do so can only be obtained by killing Infested Juggernauts. Finding a Juggernaut is not difficult, if a bit tedious (especially if you do not succeed in luring it out when you get the opportunity - since you can only lure Juggernaut out once per mission, if you did not succeed you effectively wasted the whole mission if you came for the sole purpose of fighting the Juggernaut), fighting it can be very hard as an entry above attests, but the main problem comes from its' drop rates. First, Juggernaut is guaranteed to drop one of the four components needed to craft it, but only one, and if RNG hates you you can spend a long time trying to get the component that you're missing. And finally and most importantly, besides the component you need to obtain the blueprint for crafting - it also drops from Juggernauts, but is not guaranteed to do so, and in fact has a rather low (~10%) chance to drop. What this all results in is a very time-consuming endeavour not unlike panning river sand for gold, that has you fight a very powerful enemy with very slim chances of getting what you need, in between all other things that can go wrong on any mission. Fortunately, if you happened to have some pods before you started the quest you can just use those, but if not - brace yourself for a very long grind.
    • Sands Of Inaros is easier than other Warframe quests, but can still be a pain. For one, you have to "build" the quest with a blueprint that can be bought from Baro Ki'Teer, who only shows up once every two weeks, and the blueprint requires Nitain Extract. After you unlock the actual blueprint for Inaros, you do three Mass Monster Slaughter Sidequests of one of three random mobs per blueprint— the enemies for the Neuroptics and Chassis blueprints are relatively common, but for the systems, you have to find one of three rare mobs: either a Denial Bursa, A Grineer Manic, or a Juggernaut. The last one is especially frustrating— Juggernauts only show up once per mission, and you have to kill Infested very quickly to get them to show up. This has been slightly mitigated due to the Infested Disruption mission adding Demolisher Juggernauts, which count towards kills for the purpose of this quest.
    • Ivara's parts only drop from Spy missions. This wouldn't be too bad, but you have to succeed in all three vaults to get a chance for them to drop, and her Neuroptics only drop from Spy missions on Uranus onwards, which can be very difficult. It doesn't help that the best frame to farm Ivara is Ivara.
    • Harrow's Chassis Blueprints are very, very common, to the point where they're common selling fodder. The rest of him is another matter entirely. His systems are only dropped from Defection missions (of which there are three in the whole game), and his Neuroptics drop from the spy mission on the Kuva Fortress, which is probably one of the hardest spy missions in the game. And, like Ivara, the Neuroptics only get a chance to drop if you succeed on all three vaults.
    • Grendel, Lotus on a BIKE Grendel. Getting his blueprints requires you to get three keys from Arbitrations, which require you completing every node in the game. The keys lead to three missions— an Excavation mission, a Defense mission, and a Survival Mission— which guarantees you the part if you complete it. However, each of these missions has the "No Mods Mode" modifier— as in, the mods you apply to your Warframe and Weapons don't work at all. No damage mods, no range mods, no utility mods nothing. Not even Operator Mode works! And did we mention that the missions have enemy levels 40-60?
    • Riven unveiling quests are essentially an entire genre of these. Clear a high-level survival where you aren't allowed to kill anything? Finish at least three waves of a high-level Intercept where you are only allowed to use a sniper rifle and forbidden from having your feet leave the ground? Or maybe you'd enjoy a challenge where you have to get twenty stealth kills with a shotgun in a row without your feet ever touching the ground. Name a horrible, hair-pullingly infuriating combination of requirements, and odds are Rivens will have you covered.
      • Taken Up to Eleven if you acquire a Riven with the challenge "Complete a level 30 or higher Exterminate mission without being detected (Including an additional random modifier)". At first, this seems like a relatively simple Stealth-Based Mission until you discover that "Detection" means If the enemy becomes even slightly suspicious. If any enemy anywhere at all hears a stray gunshot, sees a dead body, or catches the slightest glimpse that you are there, the challenge fails. And more often then not you will encounter large groups of enemies spread out just enough that killing them all simultaneously is impossible, forcing you to wait extensive periods of time for them to seclude themselves from the others and have enough time for their body to disappear before it's spotted. Sometimes the AI will glitch, locking them in place so you never get a solid opening to attack. The challenge can also include modifiers such as having an extinguished dragon key equipped, dramatically reducing the damage you deal. Players will generally throw rivens like this away simply because nobody will even take them for free. Ironically, you can literally complete the challenge by just doing absolutely nothing if you play with a group - the challenge only depends on whether or not you have been detected.
    • The Mastery Test for rank 9 has become this following Update 18's overhaul of the game's stealth system. To complete this test, you must stealth kill three separate groups of Grineer with only your melee weapon without being detected. However, thanks to Update 18's aforementioned overhaul of the stealth system, these specific Grineer have much more awareness and field of vision than any other enemy in the game, making it very difficult to avoid their notice. Even worse, when you kill an enemy, it is possible for a seperate enemy to see the corpse and instantly go into alert, which counts as detection and thus failure. Finally, trying to cheese the melee only requirement via the Redeemer or the Glaive is all but impossible because the Redeemer's range attack alerts enemies unless you're using Banshee (which is only available to those in a Clan that's researched her), the Glaive's range is too short for most of the enemies, and the last set of enemies includes a sentry positioned at a high point that basically lets him see the entire map. Did we mention that almost every top tier weapon in the game, including the Syndicate exclusive weapons, are locked behind Mastery rank 9+, and if you fail, you have to wait a full 24 hours before you can try again? Even worse, its been discovered that the actual test and Cephalon Simaris' simulation of the test actually use completely different AI, with the actual test's AI being much more attentive and advanced than the simulation's, meaning that tactics you may have used to pass the simulation may not work on the actual test itself.
      • The Rank 19 test is another stealth-based one and arguably even worse. To complete the test, you must destroy six orbs around the level to reach a hostage who you must then escort to the extraction zone. Like in the Rank 9 test, you must remain completely undetected, your abilities are disabled (save for passives) and you can only use your melee weapon. Luckily, the aforementioned strategy with Banshee and Redeemer still works.
    • Ranking up with either the Quills or Vox Solaris. Either one's standing can only be increased by trading in resources, Eidolon Shards for the Quills, and Toroids for Vox Solaris, both of which can take quite some time to acquire. Requiring players to hunt Eidolons on the plains, lengthy affairs which will not reward any shards if they are failed. Or search caves and kill enemies at high alert levels on Orb Vallis and hope to get lucky.
      • On that note, actually building the amps needed to make farming for Quills rep much more bearable is an exercise in tedium, requiring tens and upwards of 100 [[Unobtainium Cetus Wisps]] for each Quills amp, which notoriously only spawn in 5-10 at a time throughout the whole Plains map every time you enter, requiring a specialized build to make the farm feasible. You'll have to put up with 2 loading screens each time you want to refresh the wisp spawns and depending on your computer, could make it absolutely painful. Thankfully, Cetus Wisps count as resources for the purpose of Resource Boosters and Smeeta's Charm, so you can wait until you earn a booster and grind until you get what you need. You also earn the option to buy Cetus Wisps directly from Onkko, but only in the final rank of the Quills by which you probably won't need it anymore OR from Nakak during the bi-annual Plague Star event, but she'll have so many limited items available, you might not be able to buy the Wisps until you've gotten everything else you want.
    • The items needed to craft Garuda's components can only be acquired after reaching a certain level with Solaris United. Forcing players to reach Rank 4 before they can build her.
    • Baruuk is a frustrating combination of the previous two examples. Requiring Rank 3 and 4 with both Vox Solaris and Solaris United respectively. Forcing players to put in twice the work by farming Toroids while doing bounties to raise their Solaris United standing.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: A common complaint of many players after the new Damage 2.0 mechanic was introduced in Update 11. For the most part, complaints have subsided once players figured out the new damage system and its increased focus on faction-specific loadouts and elemental combinations.
    • Also a common reaction to the new UI introduced in Update 14, with the common complaint being that most menus now take an extra click or two to access.
    • Again with the new mod appearances in 14.5. The common consensus is that they look pretty but make it harder to find what you needed.
    • In fact, pretty much ANY big update provokes this in spades, especially before the bugs get fixed.
    • A particularly bad case of this came about with the Jovian Concord update, which nerfed one of the best farming combinations in the game— Nekros's Desecrate ability (which allows him to destroy corpses for a chance at extra drops) and Hydroid and Khora's Pilering mods (which add extra drop chance to enemies kills by their Tentacle Swarm and Strangledome respectively) no longer stack, meaning that farming for rare resources such as orokin cells is much, much harder. The reasons given for the nerf were vague and conflicting, ranging from unintended interactions with the Silver Grove spectersnote  to the team not wanting to 'force' a particular team composition. It doesn't help that this nerf was listed as an exploit fix, was buried deep within the patch notes, and the Hydroid-Nekros combination had been used previously by the developers during their Prime Time streams. Thankfully, after much backlash, they reverted the changes and it's more-or-less back where it used to be.
    • While Melee 3.0 hasn't been released yet, the devs released a "taste" of the new melee system with a small update that changed melee weapons so you don't have to swap to them like you do with your primary/secondary weapons to use the full combos. Most were quick to deride the change as the quick melee, which was removed, allowed you more movement without committing to combos that could leave you a sitting duck. As well, there are a few annoying conflicts and glitches that weren't present before, presumably due to how it handles the weapon-swapping. It's yet to be seen if Melee 3.0 will fix those problems but for the meanwhile, most players aren't impressed by first impressions.
    • Melee 3.0 phase 2 has finally arrived and while most of the features it brings are welcomed, there are a few that have rubbed players the wrong way. Of note is the change to Condition Overload now having a status cap and not reaching a ridiculous amount of damage as it did before with status weapons, "only" doing incredibly good damage. As well, the changes to Blood Rush mean that any other "% crit chance" mods and even crit chance Rivens were seen as obsolete until DE had to buff their percentages to be nearly 3x higher.
      • Heavy attacks, the replacement to charge attacks, are also seen as completely underwhelming except for niche builds as, while they do really good damage, take forever to come out and use up the entire combo counter, meaning you have to stack up hits again to get back at where you were before. Thankfully, its easier than ever to stack your combo but nonetheless, most players forego the heavy attack unless the melee weapon has a great base crit chance and has mods or a passive that gives it an initial combo, making it ripe for heavy attacks.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Damage-based Warframes such as Ash or Ember tend to suffer from this at higher levels, since the damage dealt by their powers doesn't scale nearly enough to keep pace with enemies' health and armor. In Ember's case, she's been Rescued from the Scrappy Heap due to her rework, part of which was changing the way heat damage worked.
    • After Melee 2.0, Scythes were universally inferior to just about any other melee weapon. Prior to the change, they were renowned for their charged attacks' ability to sweep the ground, dealing additional damage to enemies who had been knocked down. Melee 2.0 removed charged attacks and gave them flashy but unwieldy stances, and their stats tended to be lousy. This was made worse by the release of the Anku scythe, an outright upgrade to all other scythes and also one of the easiest to obtainnote ... and even then, it's strictly a mid-tier weapon, ineffective against high level foes. After nearly a year, the other scythes were buffed in Update 18.5.
    • Machetes have been consistently overlooked by DE for years now. Unlike most melee weapon categories at the time, they only received a single Stance with the introduction of Melee 2.0, and the Stance in question is widely understood to be terrible. Furthermore, the category has very few weapons, and almost all of them have very low stats. The Vacuum Within (part of the lead-in to U19) finally added a machete with decent stats, the Gazal Machete, but it only reaches its full potential whenever the underwhelming Djinn Sentinel uses its inconsistent power Fatal Attraction. Eventually, DE made a new stance that was not terrible, and machetes are being grudgingly acknowledged as pretty good. Then Zaws came out and promptly made all conventional machetes obsolete.
    • Khora was panned by a lot of players for being released in a nearly broken state, with very weak abilities and a large number of bugs plaguing her kit. She received a Hotfix buff almost immediately, just to make her usable. Which was followed by numerous other tweaks and improvements in the following patches.
    • Revenant received a mixed reaction for similar reasons. While certainly usable, he drew criticisms from players for how inefficient and largely underwhelming his abilities were. DE would later give him some buffs, and mentioned that they would be reviewing his kit.
    • Vauban was largely considered the worst Warframe in the game. Originally meant to be a Weak, but Skilled, Jack-of-All-Trades, he has not aged well at all since his release. Between poor scaling, and the fact that almost all of his abilities were weaker or inferior versions of another Warframe's, he beaome a Master of None with no real purpose. His fans clamored for a rework for years; in October 2019, they got their wish, and he's finally fallen into his intended niche.
    • Nyx has unseated Vauban as the worst Warframe in the game. She's squishier than Vauban at only 50 base armor in when Primed (vs Vauban Prime's 100), her Mind Control ability is basically a glorified radiation proc that relies on the hope that the enemy AI won't be completely braindead and can do damage, her-armor-stripping Psychic Bolts that can only affect six enemies (which does not scale upwards with power strength), and her Absorb ability gives her invincibility but makes her completely immobile (unless you use an augment mod) and guzzles energy even at max efficiency. Her only viable ability, Chaos, literally is a Radiation proc, substituting the actual status effect with some special overlays, causing enemies to attack each other, but also leaving them open to attack players on your squad. Overall, this leaves you with a Squishy Wizard whose Useless Useful Spells have been left completely in the dust by countless overhauls, and who has very, very few options to make work at even mid-level play, much less anything approaching endgame.
  • Uncanny Valley: Mag Prime invokes this for many players, primarily because out of dozens of featureless, insectoid, and pseudo-ceramic faceplates, her base helmet is the only one with a distinct mouth-shaped orifice in the middle. With lips.
    • Ivara can cause this once you realize those lenses on her Nice Hat appear to be eyes. That follow your camera.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • The Kubrow pets. Fuzzy little hyena-dog things once referred to as "batpuppies" with hideous bat faces that you hatch from eggs. But then you see one curled up in the incubator right after hatching... Even Ordis will pause in his complaints about them to coo over it.
    • As of 19.5, you can now inject Kubrow eggs with a special strain of the Infestation prior to incubation, allowing you to raise and fight alongside your very own crime against nature.
    • Nidus's 4th ability spawns tiny maggots that look more like cute little disgusting puppies that happily trot along when they're not making a beeline towards enemies and latching onto them. It almost makes you feel bad that you have to pop them like blisters to take advantage of the extra stacks they give to your passive.
    • The Diriga sentinel. It looks like a pathetic, slapped together vacuum cleaner that floats and shoots pew pew lasers.
    • Clem can be this. As a Defector from Decadence due to being a defective clone, he still has the misshappen and bulbous body that Grineer generally suffer from. However, a combination of his diminutive size, eternal Quizzical Tilt expression due to his skewed mask, Pokémon Speak, and comical enthusiasm for violence against the Grineer and the Corpus alike by virtue of his Twin Grakata has endeared him to players.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • Some of the Deluxe Skins and Prime variants of Warframes can invoke this feeling— Mag Prime's helmet has been brought up here, but there's also Ember's Vermillion Skin, which takes up her Eastern Phoenix motif and dials it to 11 in all the wrong ways, with the 'mohawk' on her head turning into a crest that goes a foot and a half past her helmet, huge shoulder pads, and despite being named 'Vermillion', the most prominent color on the skin is freaking turquoise.
    • Some people were perturbed by Ivara's Prime resembling a Jellyfish, when her base variant is based off of poison dart frogs. DE's apparent justification is that they're basing her off of venomous animals in general, but still, it's a stretch.
  • The Woobie: Ordis. Or rather, Ordan Karris. Everything he uses to describe himself reeks of a man who knows he's been fundamentally broken, to the point where Ordis erases any memories of Ordan because he doesn't thing he'd be able to live with himself, knowing what he did.
    • Excalibur Umbra has it even worse, being a Dax soldier who Ballas forcefully Infested with a prototype Helminth to use as an anti-Sentient weapon. That would be bad enough, except then Ballas removed all his memories except for the actual infestation process itself, where Ballas proceeded to psychologically torture him even as he was Infested by describing how he is going to kill Umbra's entire family, finishing with his son-with Umbra himself as the weapon. Note that every other warframe lacks memories completely - which leads to an assumption that Ballas purposely designed Umbra with memory persistence solely so that Umbra could always be tortured by a memory of him killing his own son. Small wonder his first action upon being revived is to go on a rampage tearing apart the entire Origin system hunting for Ballas.

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