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Supervillains who operate independently or in smaller organizations.


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Enemies faced by Aquaman

The Ocean Master Conspiracy

    General Tropes 

Appearances: Aquaman (2018)

The allies recruited by Orm Marius for his plot to conquer the surface world.


  • Badass Army: By the film's climax, Orm has the military might of three undersea kingdoms at his command. His battle with the Brine also seems to be going in his favor, given their more primitive weapons along with Orm disabling the Brine King.
  • Co-Dragons: Nereus and Vulko report directly to Orm, with Black Manta being a remote operative.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: Outside of Orm and Black Manta, none of the allies can be truly considered villains. Nereus was tricked into believing the surface-dwellers were a growing threat, while the Fisherman Princess was grieving for her dead father and thus was too emotionally fragile to put up any resistance. After Aquaman and his army neutralize their forces, everyone lays down their arms and allows the battle to be decided by the sons of Atlanna.
  • Standard Evil Empire Hierarchy:
    • The Emperor: Orm, King of Atlantis who seeks the title of Ocean Master to launch a war on the surface world.
    • The Right Hand: Murk, Orm's main enforcer and captain of his guard.
    • The General: King Nereus, who provides most of Orm's military might.
    • The Security Officer: Nuidis Vulko, Orm's vizier. Also The Mole who is undermining Orm.
    • The Oddball: Black Manta, a human mercenary who provides a submarine for Orm to fight off and allies with him for revenge on Aquaman.
  • Super Team: With the majority of Orm's allies being from the sunken kingdoms, they're all blessed with metahuman physiology that allows them to handle high pressures and low temperatures as well as being able to see in the dark and swim faster than the average human can run.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: Nobody's all that keen to be working under Orm. Nereus generally doesn't think too highly of anyone outside his kingdom, the Fisherman Princess was press-ganged after waitching Orm murder her father and the Brine King would rather die than be subordinate to Orm. Beyond that, Vulko was secretly guiding Arthur to be the last line of defense against Orm's forces.

Manta Men

    General 
  • Combat Tentacles: The Octobots naturally have these.
  • Decomposite Character: The Manta Men who appear in Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom wear diving suits similar to Aquaman villain the Scavenger.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: Black Manta is shown to employ men and women in equal measure, and doesn't seem to care about race.
  • Evil Wears Black: The Manta Men all wear black diving suits and they ruthlessly slaughter people when hijacking ships.
  • Red Shirt Army: Anytime they go up against Aquaman, the Manta Men get beaten with minimal effort.
  • Ruthless Modern Pirates: In the first film, Jesse's crew had already acquired advanced military technology such as a stealthy submarine.
  • Submarine Pirates: The Manta Men specialize in the hijacking of conventional submarines, using an advanced prototype of a stealthy submarine they stole prior to the events of the first film. Black Manta would acquire even greater underwater vessels for his next plot.

    David Kane/Black Manta 

    Jesse Kane 

Jesse Kane

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jessekane.jpg
"You need to live so you can kill that son of a bitch!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Manta Men

Played by: Michael Beach

Dubbed by: René Gagnon (Canadian French)

Appearances: Aquaman

The leader of a gang of high-sea hijackers. He is the father of David Kane/Black Manta.


  • Adaptational Villainy: His comic counterpart was a scavenger and boat captain, but there was no indication that he was an outright pirate, hijacker and killer like he is here.
  • Alternate Self: Has one on Earth-19 as Nathan Ellery.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: Pinned to the ground by a torpedo in a flooding submarine, he pulls out a grenade rather than drown. This has the side effect of making his son leave, and Jesse is killed by the explosion.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Will give anything for his son. That includes his life.
  • Evil Virtues: He values his family far more than his own life, keeping his grandfather's blade and passing it onto his son. When he knows he's going to die and his son is trying in vain to save him, he pulls out a grenade and makes it clear that either his son survives or neither of them do.
  • The Family That Slays Together: His son David (who would become Black Manta) partakes in his high sea hijacking operations, and they often kill people doing so.
  • Fatal Flaw: Jesse's is implied to be Pride. He is a successful pirate and being a pirate is a family business. His father started it and he continued it with his son. His family history and his career is obviously a huge source of pride for him. Then Aquaman shows up and effortlessly beats up Jesse's crew, his son, and then Jesse himself while showing apathy towards the men he just defeated and crushed. Jesse just couldn't handle the loss and humiliation and he tried one last time to salve his wounded pride by taking Arthur out. This led to his own demise when he missed and blew out the wall of the sub.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He is no hero, but after he gets trapped under a torpedo while fighting Aquaman, he pulls a grenade pin when it becomes clear his son will not abandon him, even as that sub is flooding and sinking.
  • Never My Fault: Jesse clearly blames Aquaman for his demise, despite the fact that if he hadn't made one last attempt to kill Arthur, he could have walked away from the situation alive. Even in urging his son to live, Jesse rejects any responsibility for his fate, telling David that he needs to live "so [he] can kill that son of a bitch".
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: At some point before his death, Jesse ventured into an underwater temple that was so deep it nearly overpowered Black Manta's diving suit, which was made of more advanced materials than what Jesse would have worked with.
  • Pinned to the Wall: Courtest of a pipe flung by Aquaman, which went through Jesse's shoulder and into some machinery.
  • Revenge Before Reason: Granted, seeing your son beaten up, being pinned to a wall, and suffering the worst setback/loss you've probably ever had in your pirate career would piss off anyone, but given the fact that the guy who just thrashed you and your son decided to leave without even attempting to capture you or kill you, maybe don't fire a grenade at him as he's leaving. Especially when the guy is right next to a wall and you're in a submarine. Doubly so if the man has already shrugged off an identical grenade a minute ago, so in the best case scenario, all this does is piss him off.
  • So Proud of You: What he tells his son on what turns out to be their last job together.
  • Too Dumb to Live:
    • Shooting at the guy that lifted a submarine, curb-stomped your entire posse, withstood the blast from a grenade and spared your life is somewhere north of a bad idea.
    • In general using a grenade launcher in a submarine in general and more specifically in the torpedo storage room. His sole luck is that he didn't accidentally detonate a torpedo, taking out his son with him in the process. Instead he merely breached the Submarine's inner and outer hull, eventually killing himself in the process.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: When Arthur considers sparing him, his response is to launch a missile at him. Unsurprisingly, Arthur refuses to help him out when he is sinking to his death.
  • What Is Evil?: Jesse believes that morality is a construct and that captains should be judged on their competence rather than whether or not they fit into society's values.

     "Manta" 

"Manta"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Manta Men

Appearances: Aquaman (mentioned) | DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special (mentioned)

"This (knife) was your grandfather's. He was one of the Navy's first frogmen during World War II. He was so stealthy in the water, his unit nicknamed him Manta. But after the war, his country forgot about him, so he went back to the sea, scavenging and surviving with his wit and this knife. He gave it to me when I was your age. And now it's yours, son."

Black Manta's grandfather. A former officer in WWII who turned to piracy.


  • Ancestral Weapon: His knife, which has a manta engraved into the base of its blade. It was passed onto his son Jesse upon becoming captain and was eventually given to David. In DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special we see that the knife also acts as a key to a box containing a treasure map.
  • Family Business: His son and grandson would also go into piracy.
  • Legacy Character: He was the first of the Kanes to have the moniker "Manta".
  • Then Let Me Be Evil: Manta's turn to villainy was kicked off because after serving his country he was deemed insignificant.

     "Stingray" 

"Stingray"

Species: Human

Citizenship: Unknown (First sighted in the Strait of Malacca)

Affiliation(s): Spirit of the Claw (formerly), Manta Men

Played by: Jani Zhao

Appearances: DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special | Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom

A pirate that was originally part of the Spirit of the Claw's crew. After Black Manta killed her captain and bested her in a fight, she became his first mate.


  • Allegiance Affirmation: Stingray cements her loyalty to Black Manta by helping him execute any of her former crewmates that refused to join the Manta Men.
  • Animal Motifs: Just like how real-life stingrays are smaller than mantas, she's shorter than her captain. Additionally, while both species are carnivorous, mantas have more conventionally predatory behaviour while stingrays more often than not are bottom-feeders, reflecting her subservience to Black Manta.
  • Bridge Bunnies: Stingray commands the hammerhead sub whenever Black Manta is engaged.
  • The Dragon: Stingray's the Number Two of the new generation of Manta Men.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: In their first encounter, Stingray challenged Black Manta to a swordfight. When he managed to best her, she accepted his offer of allegiance.
  • Pre Ass Kicking One Liner: "Enough! You will leave this ship as a man, or you will leave it as chum. Your choice."
  • The Smurfette Principle: The only female member of the Manta Men.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: Stingray's reaction when she realizes all the whales unleashing their sonar at once is overloading the hammerhead sub, which will explode with her in it.
  • Weapon Specialization: Swordplay. Her skill was impressive enough for Black Manta to offer her a place as his first mate.

Charybdis & The Aquamarines

    Charybdis 

Charybdis

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20231102_120700_samsung_internet.jpg
"You don't deserve what you have. Not power. Not strength. And not your wife-to-be. Fortunately, you can't take her hand in marriage if there's no flesh left on the bone."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Scylla & Charybdis, Aquamarines

Appearances: DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special

"You're right about Aquaman. He's a king, who believes he is above us...Who doesn't notice the victims left in his wide wake. I know. I own a part of him. But with your help, my friends, I will take even more."

A former terrorist, Charybdis was mutated by a meta bomb that absorbed Aquaman's DNA, giving him similar powers while also mutating himself and anyone he enslaved into fish-human hybrids. He blames Aquaman for the death of his lover Scylla.


  • Adapted Out: During his fight with Aquaman, Charybdis grabs his hand and holds it over a high-pressure exhaust vent that's strong enough to corrode his glove. It seems like he's going to destroy Arthur's hand just like in the comics, but instead Arthur gets his second wind and fights back.
  • Black Eyes of Evil: Upon turning into a metahuman, his transformation begins with his eyes turning black.
  • Body Horror: When his powers stabilize, Charybdis mutates into a fish-human hybrid. He can also inflict this onto humans to turn them into his minions.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Despite introducing himself as a nihilist, Charybdis seemed to genuinely love Scylla.
  • Evil Knockoff: Charybdis was exposed to the energies of a meta bomb that Aquaman had left in the sea, not noticing his submarine. The explosion didn't kill Charybdis, but it did make him into a duplicate of the nearest metahuman, which happened to be Aquaman. Now Charybdis can use Aquaman's ability to communicate telepathically with marine life to not only launch an attack on Atlantis just like Arthur did to thwart Ocean Master, but he can also negate Arthur's own telepathic powers. As a side-effect of gaining these abilities through unnatural means, Charybdis eventually mutated into a sea monster.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: A former mercenary turned into a sea monster that can command marine life.
  • Good Lips, Evil Jaws: His lips regress upon transforming, revealing a set of sharp teeth. Given how one of the last things Charybdis did with Scylla was to kiss her, it helps to symbolically illustrate just how much her loss affected him.
  • Moral Myopia: Charybdis is obsessed with proving Aquaman's character flaws, but as a former mercenary he falls well below his own standards. When Aquaman force-feeds him some telepathy, Charybdis reflects on himself and has a breakdown.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Aquaman uses his telepathy on Charybdis to make him realized that while Aquaman may have been negligent in getting Scylla killed, Charybdis was the one who turned her to the life of villainy that put her in harm's way.
  • Outlaw Couple: With Scylla.
  • Psycho Electro: He's been driven mad with grief and his powers manifest as an electric aura.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Charybdis spends his fight with Aquaman pointing out his imperfections.
    "You do things without thinking. You act on every impulse. You see only yourself. Your arrogance took the only thing I ever loved!"
  • Shadow Archetype: Aquaman admits that he used to fear turning into someone like Charybdis, due to his abuse of their powers.
  • Sinister Scythe: His main weapon is a polearm with a hooked blade.

    Scylla 

Scylla

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20231102_120422_samsung_internet.jpg
"Between Scylla and Charybdis"

Species: Human

Affiliation(s): Scylla & Charybdis

Appearances: DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special

"You don't care about anyone or anything but money. It's so hot."

Partner in crime and lover to Charybdis. She was killed when Aquaman disposed of a meta-bomb without realizing their submarine was in the blast radius.


  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Scylla's last words were an expression of love for Charybdis.
  • Foil: To Mera. Mera saw the good in Arthur and prompted him to be the best version of himself. Scylla was specifically attracted to Charybdis because he was a cold-hearted criminal.
  • The Lost Lenore: Scylla is killed early on, giving Charybdis motive to target Aquaman.
  • Outlaw Couple: With Charybdis.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: When Aquaman reflects his telepathy back onto Charybdis, the latter has a sudden realization that he corrupted Scylla into a villain which lead to her death, implying that she only became a Card-Carrying Villain thanks to her lover's toxic influence.

    Great White 

Rhonda Ricoh/Great White

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20231102_120632_samsung_internet.jpg
"Show the king what we think of his kingdom! Bleed Atlantis!"
Rhonda Ricoh 

Species: Mutated human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Charybdis, Aquamarines

Appearances: DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special

"We were trying to show the world we were better than the Justice League. And it wasn't Superman or Batman who beat our asses. When it comes down to it, it wasn't even the Flash or Wonder Woman. It Was! The guy! Who talks! TO FISH!"

A terrorist that was apprehended by the Justice League and mutated by Charybdis.


  • Demoted to Dragon: Great White used to be the leader of the Aquamarines, but was usurped by Charybdis and now serves as his second in command
  • Distaff Counterpart: A Fiery Redhead that hates metahumans just for existing, relies on otherworldly tech to bring them down and ends up losing her hair? Sounds just like Lex Luthor.
  • Evil Reactionary: Great White's team attacked a science and technology conference and holds metahumans in contempt.
  • Fiery Redhead: She's got quite a temper on her.
  • Meme Acknowledgement: Great White lampshades Aquaman's long-standing reputation as something of a joke character due to his fish-talking power having limited practical use. In her defence, she couldn't have witnessed how Aquaman's power allowed him to befriend an ancient sea kaiju and prevent a war between the surface and the ocean.
  • Shark Woman: Inspired by her codename "Great White", Charybdis decides to mutate her into a shark hybrid.
  • The Smurfette Principle: Great White is the only female member of the Aquamarines.

    Aquamarines 

Aquamarines

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20231102_120537_samsung_internet.jpg

Species: Mutated humans

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Charybdis, Aquamarines

Appearances: DC's Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom Special

"Files say these guys were kicked out of the Marines for stealing classified information. Specifically, plans for something called a Meta Bomb that uses "Apokoliptian residual energies to reprogram DNA"."
Barry Allen/The Flash

A terrorist group that tries to challenge the Justice League. Due to being ordinary humans that just happened to have a doomsday weapon, they're easily beaten by only three Leaguers. After being arrested, Charybdis tracks them down and mutates them so they can serve as his minions.


  • Adaptational Species Change: In the comics, the Aquamarines included a lionfish hybrid and a stonefish hybrid. Here they have what appears to be a Black Lagoon-type monster and a seahorse-man.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Barracuda has grey skin instead of purple.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Twice within the space of a single comic.
  • Fish People: Well, 4 out of 6 of them are based on fish, with an orca-man and an octopus-man for diversity.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: As soon as they're subdued, Aquaman goes after Charybdis, leaving them at the mercy of his subjects. It's not known if they were incarcerated or killed after that.

Lost Kingdom of Necrus

    Lost Kingdom 

Necrus

"During King Atlan's time, there were seven united kingdoms of Atlantis. And the black city was a curse upon them all."
Orm

A long-lost kingdom that is shrouded in mystery and erased from the Chronicles of Atlantis' history.
  • Combat Tentacles: They employ this, from having tentacled monstrosities to creating octopus-themed vehicles for Manta's crew.
  • Dark Is Evil: The Lost Kingdom had black buildings and was shrouded in fog before being consumed by the ocean. The inhabitants also turned black after being mutated.
  • The Faceless: The statue representing the ruler of the Lost Nation seen in the site of congregation is missing most of its head, which stands out in comparison to the other statues that are relatively unscathed.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: Everyone influenced by the power of the Black Trident - Kordax included - have bright green eyes.
  • Humanoid Abomination: All of the Lost Kingdom's inhabitants are now zombie-like monstrosities with only the vaguest resemblance to humanity.
  • Irony: For an offshoot of a water-related kingdom, its motif is fire. Wordof God has said that Necrus was hotter than average due to its mining facilities. Added irony is that the realm was later on encased in ice at the South Pole.
  • Lost Colony: Alongside the Trench and the Deserters, the Lost Kingdom broke off from Atlantis only to fade out of memory. There is no hint of their survival or even their civilisation in the Aquaman movie, with nobody giving an explanation as to what happened to them. In the sequel, it's common knowledge that something happened which caused the Lost Kingdom to break away from Atlantis and be removed from the chronicles shortly before the fall of Atlantis, which is why so little is known of them — the historical record was deliberately expunged long before any living Atlantean were around.
  • Meaningful Name: The name is derived from “Necro,” meaning death. This makes sense, given that its citizens have been gruesomely transformed into undead monsters by the power of the Black Trident.
  • Mordor: Compared to the other, more fantastic, kingdoms, Necrus resembles an industrial site.
  • The Necrocracy: They turn out to be this. They used to be a kingdom ruled by Atlan's tyrannical younger brother who wanted to make it a superpower by using the highly-polluting Orichalcum, but the Orichalcum itself drove the younger king mad. As he turned himself, his people and his entire kingdom into this trope for the sake of cementing his power and to fight his older brother.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: The inhabitants have been gruesomely transformed into undead monsters by the power of the Black Trident.
  • Ragnarök Proofing: Their submarines and orichalcum refinery are still functional hundreds of years after their kingdom fell, though the former needed to be retrofitted to make them compatible with modern power sources and fuel.
  • Unperson: Justified. The Lost Kingdom proved to be a threat to both Atlanteans and the climate at large. When they were imprisoned, all records of their existence were erased.
  • Was Once a Man: The denizens were transformed into horrifying monsters through the power of the Black Trident.

    Kordax 

King Kordax

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_2023_12_21_at_18_42_11_kordax_trailer_webp_webp_afbeelding_1656_2160_pixels_geschaald_58.png

Species: Atlantean

Citizenship: Lost Kingdom

Affiliation(s): Lost Kingdom Royal Family

Portrayed by: Pilou Asbæk

Appearances: Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom

The tyrannical king of Necrus and younger brother to King Atlan. Millennia ago, Kordax tried mining the planet of Orichalcum and forged the Black Trident, which proved to be a disaster for the world. Atlan was forced to go to war with Kordax and his kingdom, leading to the latter's imprisonment. But the Black Trident was eventually picked up by Black Manta, allowing Kordax to possess him and to set about releasing himself.


  • Adaptational Ugliness: His comics counterpart looked mostly human, save for having green skin. This version is a corrupted and burnt skeleton.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Blonde in the comics, brunette in the film's backstory.
  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: Kordax was never Atlan's brother in the comics.
  • An Arm and a Leg: In his final battle with King Atlan, Kordax lost his right hand. It spells his undoing; while the revived Kordax easily catches the Black Trident when Arthur throws it at him, he's unable to do the same when Arthur flings his own trident, leaving Kordax helpless to prevent his own demise.
  • Big Bad: Of Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom, as he manipulates Black Manta to become his agent working to free him from his prison and make the royal family pay for Atlan imprisoning him.
  • Cain and Abel: He is Atlan's younger brother as the First King of Atlantis was a blessing to the united seven kingdoms while Kordax became a curse upon them all.
  • Casting Gag: Kordax is not the first evil overlord who comes from a maritime culture rebelling against a kingdom known as the Seven Kingdoms, has a Sibling Rivalry with his brother, and plans to take over the world, that Pilou Asbæk is playing.
  • Composite Character: He is based on Kordax (a monstrous outcast prince), Orin (King Atlan's brother), the Dead King (an insane tyrant imprisoned in ice) and Mongo (the ruler of the Black City).
  • Demonic Possession: During the climax, Kordax moves from simply influencing Black Manta to outright possessing him, and trying to pull the same trick on Orm.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: In the distant past, King Atlan tried to dissuade Kordax from using orichalcum because it was destroying the environment. This angered Kordax so much that he used dark magic to turn himself and all his citizens into undead monstrosities and wage war against Atlantis.
  • Evil Is Angular: While the majority of tridents seen so far have at least a few curves in them. the Black Trident is comprised entirely of sharp corners.
  • Evil Weapon: In order to be equal against his brother, Kordax forged his very own trident with dark magic, allowing him to influence or possess anyone who wields it.
  • Final Boss: As Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom is the last DCEU movie overall, he’s not just this for the movie, but for the DCEU as well.
  • Fire/Ice Duo: Kordax relied on the climate-heating Orichalcum and when he used the Black Trident's power on himself, it left his flesh horribly burned. Compare this to his brother Atlan, who imprisoned Kordax and his kingdom within an iceberg.
  • Green and Mean: He always casts a green glow in Manta's hallucinations surrounded by green flames and is an evil necromancer.
  • It's All About Me: It's no understatement to say that Kordax is willing to ruin the entire world for the sake of his personal ambitions, showing no concern at the damage his use of orichalcum did to the environment. Even his own subjects aren't safe from him, with Kordax turning them into a mindless army of undead slaves to fight the armies of Atlantis.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Per Word of God, Aquaman & the Lost Kingdom was intended to be a light-hearted adventure about two estranged brothers. Anytime Kordax gets involved in the plot, all humor goes out the window. When Orm learns of his existence, he breaks out in a cold sweat.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Kordax tries to tempt Orm by saying that if Orm would help release him, then Kordax will let him become Ocean Master, a title that would rank Orm above Kordax himself. The offer is clearly an empty one, given that Kordax could just pull Orm's strings anytime he felt like it.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Using the Black Trident, Kordax convinces Black Manta to do his dirty work in exchange for promises of revenge against Aquaman. He tries the same tricks on both Orm and Arthur when they grab the Trident, playing to their Sibling Rivalry and Orm's resentment of his brother.
  • Near-Villain Victory: Kordax was released and his trident was in his hand, but then Aquaman threw Atlan's trident through his own, shattering the weapon and taking Kordax with it.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Kordax was more effective through possessing people, as once his body is free Arthur finds it easier to combat him directly with Atlan's trident.
  • Our Liches Are Different: Kordax transformed himself and his people into undead creatures through the toxic orichalchum, and he himself resembles a walking skeleton.
  • The Paranoiac: King Atlan urged Kordax to stop his use of orichalcum for the sake of preserving the environment. Kordax took it as a sign that Atlan coveted his power, so he forged the Black Trident and used its dark magic to turn himself and his entire kingdom into undead abominations, and has spent the subsequent centuries hoping for revenge, never once seeming to consider that Atlan might have been right.
  • Pretender Diss: While possessing Black Manta, he mocks Arthur by claiming he isn't half the man Atlan was.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: King Atlan used blood magic to seal Kordax and his entire kingdom in a glacier to ensure that his younger brother's dark power would never again threaten the world.
  • Shadow Archetype:
    • Kordax parallels Atlan as a King of Atlantis, but more selfish and irresponsible over his kingdom.
    • Kordax is what Orm would have become if Orm were consumed by such a vile level of power and tyranny. His own relationship with his brother Atlan mirrors the relationship between Arthur and Orm.
    • In terms of the wider DC Universe, Kordax is similar to General Zod in that both were willing to endanger the entire planet just to establish their reign. Except for all of his cruelty, deep down Zod cared for his people. Kordax viewed his subjects as nothing more than pawns.
  • Sickly Green Glow: His eyes, chest cavity and magic all glow with a toxic green light.
  • Sorcerous Overlord: A powerful wielder of dark magic, as well as the ruler of the Lost Kingdom, Kordax used his eldritch powers to turn himself and his subjects into undead monsters.
  • Soul Jar: A part of Kordax' spirit is sealed in his trident, making him immortal and capable of manipulating whomever wields the trident. However, if the trident is destroyed, his spirit dies as well.
  • Un-person: After he was sealed away, all records of both him and his kingdom were destroyed.
  • Use Their Own Weapon Against Them: Subverted. Arthur tried to kill Kordax by throwing his own trident at him, but the Lost King just grabs it out of the air before it can connect to his head.
  • Was Once a Man: As the younger brother of King Atlan, Kordax naturally looked just as human as any other Atlantean. After mutating his people, Kordax turned the Black Trident on himself and became the monstrosity seen above.

Belle Reve Inmates

    Kaleidoscope 

Kaleidoscope

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/kaleidoscope.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Natalia Safran

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate from the women's division.


    Calendar Man 

Julian Gregory Day / Calendar Man

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/calendar_man.jpg
"Hey, Polka-Dot Man, I was hoping you'd entertain my kid's birthday party, you fucking pussy!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Sean Gunn

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate with a calendar gimmick.


  • Actor Allusion: Calendar Man gives Polka-Dot Man a hard time. Polka-Dot Man is played by David Dastmalchian, who also played Calendar Man in Batman: The Long Halloween. However, this is an unintentional example of the trope, as James Gunn has said that he had no idea that Dastmalchian played Calendar Man in The Long Halloween, and that the reason why he wrote Calendar Man into The Suicide Squad because of Sean Gunn's striking resemblance to how Calendar Man is drawn in the comics.
  • Bald of Evil: To show off his tattoos.
  • Jerkass: He bullies Polka-Dot Man for no other reason than because he's a dick.
  • Laughing at Your Own Jokes: He makes a cruel jibe about Polka-Dot Man, then proceeds to laugh his ass off. It's easy to miss but ten seconds later after the scene cuts to Weasel, Calendar Man is still laughing at his own "joke".
  • Tattooed Crook: His scalp has abbreviated names of the 12 months etched around it.

    Double Down 

Jeremy Tell / Double Down

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/double_down.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jared Leland Gore

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate that was cursed with skin which peels off.


Intergang

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/intergang2_8.png

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files | Black Adam

A terrorist organization with access to advanced technology. They have troops stationed across America, with a faction deployed to Kahndaq to retrieve their mystical artifacts.


    General 
  • Action Fashionista: A number of them have customized their uniforms. The one Black Adam fried wore a beret, while one of his companions wore sunglasses with red frames, another had a tattoo on the side of his head and the last one had cornrows.
  • Adaptational Badass: While a big criminal organisation that uses technology from Apokolips in the comics; here they are an international mercenary organisation that had been occupying Kahndaq for 27 years.
  • Adapted Out: Their ties to Apokolips and the New Gods.
  • Asshole Victim: Black Adam kills wave after wave of them as soon as he's reawakened. The only people who take issue with it are the ones that Intergang weren't targeting.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: They recruit women and various ethnicities. They even form a partnership with the Kahndaqi citizen Ishmael.
  • Fantastic Terrorists: They've managed to acquire all sorts of advanced technology powered by the rare black magic element Eternium.
  • Forgotten Phlebotinum: Early on they use an RPG with an Eternium-loaded warhead that manages to badly hurt Adam and knock him out for a while. Then it's never seen or mentioned again, despite it's effectiveness.
    • Well, considering that the only witness who'd be willing to spread that information (the soldier who fired said rocket in the first place) was reduced to charred chunks of flesh before he could tell anyone, it can be safely assumed that Intergang simply didn't know Eternium rockets could be effective against Black Adam.
  • Gang of Bullies: Every single one of them is an ill-mannered brute.
  • Hover Bike: Their prime mode of transport. They also double as red herrings when Black Adam and the Justice Society chase them down, as Ishamel sneaks his hostage Amon into a truck to for their getaway.
  • Matching Bad Guy Vehicles: When they're trying to be discreet, Intergang agents drive around in sleek black cars.
  • Mob War: They've had to deal with two gangs in New York getting ahold of their weapons, leading to a shootout.
  • Multi-Mook Melee: Back Adam takes them out by the dozen when he's awakened.
  • Oh, Crap!: They all get this when Black Adam arrives, but the one unfortunate sod who got a live grenade shoved in his mouth stands out.
  • Redshirt Army: As they're all just humans with high-tech weapons, they're effortlessly blown away by Black Adam.
  • Rogues' Gallery Transplant: In the comics they are primarily enemies of Superman.
  • Shooting Superman: They take shots at Black Adam when he fries one of them, which only agitates him.
  • Sleeves Are for Wimps: Some of them leave their arms exposed due to being in the arid climate of Kahndaq.
  • Too Dumb to Live: One of the Intergang agents tries whacking Black Adam in the head with a metal rod, to which Adam doesn't even blink. Not only is picking a head-on fight with a man more muscular than yourself a bad idea, but upon seeing how ineffective the first strike was, the thug tried whacking Black Adam again. Another thug then proceeds to use his assault rifle, empties his entire clip without managing to even put a dent into Adam's skin... Which prompts him to discard his rifle and try using his handgun instead. Adam kills him on the spot before he can even shoot, then kills all the other Intergang mercs in the vicinity for good measure.

    Ishmael 
See here.

    Mannheim 

Bruno Mannheim

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

The head of Intergang.


  • Adaptational Curves: His holographic projection is pretty murky, but from what can be seen he's not as bulky as he appears in the comics and cartoons.
  • Alternate Self: Mannheim has one on Earth 167.
  • Ambiguous Situation: Exactly what he gains from helping Ishmael obtain the crown of SABBAC isn't made clear. Since Mannheim keeps his identity obscure and Ishmael masqueraded as an ally to the Kandaqi resistance, it raises the possibility that Ishmael and Mannheim are the same person.
  • Faux Affably Evil: His interaction with Adrianna has a very unconvincing veneer of politeness, threatening her family and insulting her country while claiming to be "reasonable".
  • The Ghost: He interrogates Adrianna via hologram, but doesn't appear in person.
  • It's Personal: After Adrianna foils his plans, Mannheim orders his troops to focus their resources on capturing her.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He refers to Kahndaq as a "Hellhole of an armpit of a country".
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: His true reason for invading Kahndaq is to retrieve a mysterious black crown. Said crown resides in the tomb where Black Adam is sealed away.

    Gentleman Ghost 

James Craddock / "The Gent" / Gentleman Ghost

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220707_183500_samsung_internet.jpg
"If you had minded your own business...left well enough alone...I'd still be alive — I'd be alive — and you... you wouldn't be about to die!"

Species: Human-ghost

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

"Now I can be anything I want. Thief or terror...gentleman—or ghoul! But you, Carter...you never change. Oh yes. I know who you are behind your mask. They showed me. They showed me everything about you...who you are...what you fear...Look at you...trapped in the past...a shadow of the man...of the hero...you used to be...broken...irrelevant...little more than a relic yourself!"

An expert thief hired by Intergang to steal an artifact made of eternium. He dies while on the run from Hawkman, but makes a pact with demonic forces who agree to resurrect him if he kills Hawkman.


  • Adaptational Superpower Change: In the comics Gentleman Ghost was invisible and wore a period suit. This version has a visible face and wears 21st century formal attire. As a nod to his comics incarnation, he briefly assumes the form before turning into a ghoul to torment Hawkman.
  • Deal with the Devil: Craddock becomes Gentleman Ghost by offering to deliver Hawkman's soul to the demons that greeted him upon dying. Given they were planning to devour his soul on sight, he wasn't exactly holding all the trumps in this agreement.
  • Delusions of Eloquence: Craddock giving himself the codename "Gent" and his waiter disguise make it seem like he's trying to cultivate a sophisticated image. In truth he's a thug who isn't as refined as he believes himself to be. His beef with Hawkman also brings out his Ax-Crazy side.
  • Dragged Off to Hell: Gentleman Ghost fails to kill Hawkman. Instead, Hawkman stabs his soul through the chest with a shard of eternium. The demons he'd made a deal with view this as a failure and drag him off to his eternal damnation.
  • Gentleman Thief: His codename is "The Gent" and he's limber enough to leap across rooftops in formal wear. Personality-wise, he's not as affable as his name would infer.
  • Holy Burns Evil: Craddock was able to abscond the eternium when he was alive, but his deal with the demons to bring him back as a ghost with the power to torment Hawkman came with a cost; he's now vulnerable to eternium. When Craddock grabs a shard of it, his ghostly hand burns. Hawkman sends him to Hell by stabbing Craddock's ghost in the chest.
  • Le Parkour: He manouvers over rooftops using parkour movements.
  • Never My Fault: Craddock blames Hawkman for his death, when the only reason he died was because he was on the run after committing a heist and drove recklessly.
  • Sadist: Once he becomes a ghost, Craddock torments Hawkman with the sight of Doctor Fate as a skeleton and Jeremy getting impaled.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: Craddock isn't the least bit horrified when he sees his dead body.

    "Jumbo" 

"Jumbo"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220907_120830_samsung_internet.jpg
"What is it they say? About good things coming to those who wait?"

Species: Human

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

"Professor, I have a few questions about your extracurriculars."

Mannheim's chief enforcer, deployed to Kahndaq to oversee their activities.


  • Ambiguously Human: He's very large and strong enough to punch through solid steel, but there's no confirmation if he's a metahuman or just abnormally muscular. Since he's severely weakened when his mask is disconnected from the tanks on his outfit, it raises the likelihood that he gets his strength from advanced performance enhancers.
  • Badass Armfold: He assumes this pose when Adrianna challenges him to a fight.
  • Bad Boss: Incensed that Adrianna managed to outsmart him, Jumbo grabs the nearest Intergang member by the throat and orders him to search for the missing artifact.
  • Dragon-in-Chief: The brawn to Mannheim's brains.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Just like his boss, he maintains a calm facade while making it clear he's going to enjoy beating his quarry to a pulp.
  • Gas Mask Mooks: He wears a mask at all times.
  • Giant Mook: Close to 7 feet tall.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: When Jumbo's usual torture methods don't break Adrianna, he tries to threaten her with a portable blowtorch. By this point Adrianna has slipped out of her bonds and catches him offguard. She then uses the blowtorch to sever the tubes connected to his mask, slowing Jumbo down just long enough for her to escape.
  • King Mook: He wears the same uniform as the other Intergang agents, but is much bigger and stronger than any of them.
  • Muscles Are Meaningless: A hulking brusier who gets winded and has his arm broken by a woman of average size and build.
  • Neck Lift: He keeps the other agents in line by hoisting one up by the neck as he gives orders.
  • Paper Tiger: Adrianna manages to stun him by ramming into his midsection before dislocating his arm.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute:
    • He's similar to Nam-Ek from Man of Steel in that he's a large, masked man with super strength.
    • He physically resembles Batman's enemy Bane, up to the point where Adrianna incapacitates him by severing the tubes connected to his mask.
  • Underestimating Badassery: Jumbo didn't count on a lightweight professor being combat-savvy enough to actually give him a physical challenge.
  • Would Hit a Girl: He's got no qualms roughing up Adrianna despite being much bigger than her.

Enemies faced by the Flash

     In General 

    Girder 

Tony Woodward / Girder

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220914_180321_samsung_internet.jpg
"Why can't you just die?! If I don't get paid, my pop's going to be the one six feet under!"

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Inzerillo crime family

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

"I'm not here to rob the bank, Flash — I'm here for you! There's a price on your head and I'm here to collect. You wanted to play hero? Time to pay up!"

A criminal with metal skin.


  • Adaptational Nice Guy: The Girder of the comics was a crude misogynist who got his powers after starting a riot at the metal work plant he worked at after he assaulted a female employee, and in general was written as a sexist thug who constantly made unwanted passes at women. This aspect seems missing from his DCEU counterpart.
  • Bruiser with a Soft Center: He may be a criminal enforcer, but he genuinely cares for his father.
  • Chrome Champion: Girder has a body made of highly durable metal.
  • Driven to Villainy: His father is ill and Girder is unable to pay for his medical expense without turning to crime.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Girder only became a criminal to help his father.
  • Ironic Name: A metallic being with the surname "Woodward".
  • It's Personal: Girder blames the Flash for his boss refusing to pay him.
  • Made of Iron: Duh. The Flash finds out the hard way that punching him at superspeed is quite painful.
  • Mirror Character: Just like Barry, Girder gained his powers through circumstance and he takes on whatever job he can get so he can help his father.
  • No-Sell: Due to his metal skin, the Flash is unable to hurt him until he gets some combat training from Batman.
  • Pet the Dog: Girder pays his father a visit and cools down his father's high temperature by placing one of his metal fingers on his forehead.
  • Starter Villain: Girder is the first supervillain the Flash faces on his own.
  • Then Let Me Be Evil: It's implied that whatever transformed him affected his career prospects to the point where only a crime boss would give him a job.
  • Threshold Guardian: The Flash finds himself out of his depth dealing with a foe whose superpower allows him to withstand high-speed attacks, which compels the Flash to seek out an upgrade to his fighting skills and suit.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: When the Flash hears about his personal issues, he pulls some strings and gets Girder's father the help he needs.

    Tar Pit 

Joey Monteleone / Tar Pit

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220402_202632_samsung_internet.jpg
"I didn't have an accident, Jack. I had an awakening."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Monteleone crime family

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

"I think it's time for a new era for the Monteleone family. And we're going to start by getting rid of our biggest red business expense — The Flash!"

A supervillain whose flesh is composed of molten tar and the heir to the Monteleone crime family.


  • Alternate Company Equivalent: He bears a strong resemblance to Venom.
  • Blob Monster: Tar Pit's the Central City equivalent to Clayface.
  • Cursed with Awesome: Tar Pit isn't the least bit ashamed of his horrifying appearance. Subverted when Barry defeats him by dousing his molten flesh with sea water, causing his body to fall apart.
  • Dem Bones: Stripping the tar off his bones doesn't kill Tar Pit. Even having his skull dislocated from his body only disables him.
  • Dumb Muscle: His role in the crime family is limited to situations where they need to melt something. Due to relying solely on his powers, Tar Pit never gained any booksmarts and is completely unfit to run a crime family. His insistence on commiting crimes in broad daylight while shouting his family's name ultimately runs the family business into the ground.
  • Evil Counterpart: To the Flash. Both suffered a freak accident that gave them metahuman abilities - which include having a flexible molecular structure - and both find out the hard way that their ambitions outpace their personal skills. The big differences being that Barry cares about his family and fights for justice while Tar Pit only values his family for their fortune and is a Card-Carrying Villain.
  • Good Lips, Evil Jaws: His teeth are fully exposed.
  • I'm Melting!: Everything he touches will melt.
  • Jerkass: Unlike Girder, who had a sympathetic reason to turn to crime, Tar Pit is a complete asshole. He throws his weight around the second he faces any criticism, which given his lack of people skills happens quite a lot.
  • The Mafia: His beef with the Flash comes from the speedster intefering with his family's business. Given his Italian-sounding surname, it's pretty clear what business his family is running if they're getting grief from a crime fighter.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Tar Pit emits violet fumes from his eyes and other body parts.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Metahuman he may be, but Tar Pit is hopeless at running a crime syndicate. He has serious entitlement issues stemming from inheriting a crime syndicate and lettng his brother handle the business side of things and throws tantrums when things get too much for him.
  • Transhuman Treachery: Tar Pit was a brute even before his empowerment, but when he gets tired of sharing the business with his non-powered brother, he conspires against him. Being turned into a monster with a corrosive touch hasn't bothered him in the slightest, showing just how lacking in compassion he is.
  • Xenomorph Xerox: Whatever turned him into a tar monster also distorted his skull into an inhuman shape.

    The Top 

Roscoe Dillon / The Top

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220402_203750_samsung_internet.jpg
"I've modernized warfare for the new era—the metahuman era. And it's time to test the merhcandise."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

"As long as I can see you and keep you in range, my psionic abilities can mess with your equilibrium. Letting me knock you in any direction I want. Bottom line? You're a bigger danger to these people than I am, Flash."

A criminal inventor who gave himself the ability to spin at incredible speeds.


  • Adaptational Ugliness: In the comics Roscoe Dillon was one of the more dashing of the Flash's enemies. This version looks far more thuggish.
  • Ax-Crazy: While primarily driven by money, the Top is nonetheless highly sadistic and barely in control of his bloodlust.
  • Battle Tops: He has an array of weapons and gadgets that all resemble spinning tops. These include CPU overrides and explosives. His larger tops can also unleash elemental-themed waves of destruction.
  • Composite Character: Being able to cause wind storms and having gadgets that unleash lightning makes him similar to Weather Wizard.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: The Top plans to test his weapons on the Flash and sell the most effective ones to his fellow criminals. Given the extent to the Flash's power, any weapon that could overpower him would fetch a nifty price. He ultimately shoots himself in the foot when he demonstrates his top's abilities out in the open, driving away his investors.
  • Domino Mask: The Top only covers his eyes.
  • Four Is Death: The Top developed four giant tops that can tear through the city at once and positioned them in different corners where they would converge within a matter of hours.
  • Genius Bruiser: Dillon experimented on himself to become a physical threat to the Flash and his suit shows off his build.
  • Green and Mean: Just like in the comics, the Top wears a green suit with yellow accents.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Out of the three supervillains the Flash has had to deal with, the Top has posed the greatest threat to Central City. Not only did he develop weapons of mass destruction capable of destroying the city, but his powers allow him to use the Flash's speed against him and put innocents in the crossfire.
  • Lightning Bruiser: The Top moves as fast as the Flash and thanks to his heavier build and enhanced intelligence, he can maintain an advantage over the Flash in face-to-face combat.
  • Renegade Splinter Faction: The Top's investors had more mundane ambitions than wrecking the entire city and causing mass panic.
  • Spectacular Spinning: His super-speed manifests as miniature cyclones.
  • Tom the Dark Lord: "The Top" isn't the most menacing name a super-terrorist could come with. That being said, he's no pushover.
  • Underwear of Power: The horizontal striping on his costume makes it seem like the streak of green over his pelvis is actually a pair of briefs.

Enemies from the Multiverse

    Catwoman 

Catwoman

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Eartha Kitt (archived sound)

Appearances: Batman | The Flash (voice only)

"Purr-fectly foolproof!"

A cat-themed member of Batman's rogues' gallery.

See Batman (1966): Rogues Gallery for more information.

  • The Chessmaster: Catwoman's single line of dialogue hints at this, given her smug tone of voice.
  • Unseen Evil: She doesn't appear onscreen, being merely a voice during the glimpse into her Elseworld.
  • Verbal Tic: She emphasizes the "pur" in "purfect".

    The Joker 

The Joker

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Cesar Romero (archived sound)

Appearances: Batman | The Flash (voice only)

"Mwa-ha-ha-ha-ha-hah!"

An Elseworlds counterpart to the Joker.

See Batman (1966): Rogues Gallery for more information.

  • The Hyena: His cameo is little more than dastardly laughing.
  • Noodle Incident: Apparently he'd committed a distinctly Joker-esque crime right when this world was drawn into the Chronobowl.
  • Unseen Evil: He doesn't appear onscreen, being merely a voice during the glimpse into his Elseworld.
  • Villain Ball: Whatever crime he was in the midst of pulling off, Batman deduced that it could only have been plotted by the Joker. This being the Joker, it's not clear if he was even trying to be anonymous.

    Giant Spider 

Giant Spider

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20230723_194819_youtube.jpg

Appearances: The Flash

A foe from an elseworld that confronts a Superman.


Enemies Faced by Blue Beetle

    Victoria Kord 

Victoria Kord

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_kord_company___ew.jpg
"Sacrifices have to be made, for the greater good."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Kord Industries

Portrayed By: Susan Sarandon

Appearances: Blue Beetle

"We are going to change the world with the power of the Scarab."

Head of Kord Industries. She covets the Scarab, prompting Jenny to entrust it with Jaime.


  • Adaptation Origin Connection: In the comics, the OMACs have no real connection to any of the Blue Beetles. Here, Victoria Kord created the OMAC technology by reverse-engineering the Scarab's tech.
  • Ambition Is Evil: Victoria plans to use the Scarab as the basis for her OMAC project, and considering just how many she's built and is keeping hidden in her base, she likely has bigger plans than just selling them to the military.
  • Bad Boss: Not physically, but she berates her underlings several times (such as scientist De La Cruz, whom she keeps misnaming as "Sanchez"). Though she pretends to care for Carapax, it turns out she was considering finding someone else to subject to her OMAC experiments had he died, ultimately seeing him as expendable.
  • Berserk Button: Victoria chastises the importance of family, to the point that she tries to kill Jenny when the latter mentions how great the Reyes’ support each other. Given how her own father treated her after everything she did for him, it’s no wonder why the concept of family bonds trigger her.
  • Big Bad: She is the main villain of the story, seeking to murder Jaime Reyes and steal the secrets of the Scarab for power and profit.
  • Canon Immigrant: The character made her debut in the comics shortly after being created for this film.
  • Composite Character: She's something of a gender-flipped Jarvis Kord (ruthless boss of Kord Industries who views Ted's ethical capitalism as foolish and weak) but also has elements of La Dama (powerful woman who seeks the secrets of the Scarab, and also happens to be the aunt of one of Jaime's friends).
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Victoria is the CEO of Kord Industries and she ruthlessly pursues her goal of copying the Scarab to make OMACs such as trying to kill Jaime, his family and her own niece to do so.
  • Entitled Bitch: Near the end of the film, she fully expects Jenny (whom she often insulted and tried to kill) to give her the device with the Scarab's source code, and is horrified when Jenny simply stomps it out of existence.
  • Evil Aunt: The evil Victoria has nothing but disdain for her niece Jenny and is perfectly willing to kill her.
  • Evil Counterpart: Could be seen as one to Rudy. As he is an uncle, she is an aunt, though one that doesn't love her niece. Also, while Rudy wants the best for Jaime and encourages him to use the Scarab power to be a hero, Victoria treats Carapax as an expendable asset and manipulates him into being nothing but a killing machine to serve her purposes. Last, but not least, Rudy is a massive fan of Ted Kord while Victoria hates him.
  • Evil Old Folks: She's a greedy, sociopathic, racist war profiteer played by the film's oldest cast member, Susan Sarandon (in her mid-70s at the time of filming).
  • Expy: Being a villainous member of the Kord family who provided Carapax with his tech, she's essentially a gender-flipped Jarvis Kord.
  • Faux Affably Evil: She is able to put on a charming personality when dealing with others, but her true colors always end up shining through. She ends up mocking Jenny to her face after arguing over Victoria's development of OMACs and manipulates Carapax through a seemingly affectionate and almost motherly behavior.
  • For the Greater Good: She constantly states that her OMAC is necessary for the country, though it becomes increasingly clear she just wants to make a profit in the military her brother didn't want to be a part of. When Carapax throws her words back at her as he prepares to kill her, she screams that it doesn't apply to her.
  • Freudian Excuse Is No Excuse: Jaime and Jenny agree that Victoria got a raw deal, especially as there's no indication her father gave Ted the company for any reason other than sexism (as Ted was the Black Sheep of the family). However, she is such a loathsome human being that despite empathizing with her for being overlooked, Jenny affirms that she's dedicated her life to stopping Victoria and preserving her father's legacy instead.
  • Girlboss Feminist: While she has a legitimate grievance against her father for favoring his son over her, Victoria's heinous actions and behavior toward her underlings and the Reyes family undercut anything respectable about her.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Her brother Ted inherited the company instead of her even though Victoria put in most of the legwork. This contributed to her grudge against him and her massive sense of self-importance.
  • Hate Sink: Being a Non-Action Big Bad more focused on money than world domination, Victoria is defined by her loathsome personality. She is a smug, power-hungry war profiteer who uses Kord Industries to shut down many local Hispanic businesses and belittles her Hispanic employees to the point of misnaming them even when corrected. She even goes as far as personally ruining her niece Jenny's life just for being Ted's daughter, and then have the gall to demand entitlement from her. Even Carapax, who nearly does all the dirty work for her, is more sympathetic due to the fact all his misery is result of her machinations.
  • I Reject Your Reality: Her response to everything Jenny says to her. Victoria not being able to see the folly of her ways leads to her downfall.
  • Inferiority Superiority Complex: She acts incredibly arrogant and self-assured, but still dwells on the fact her father gave the company to Ted instead of her.
  • Malicious Misnaming: Victoria refers to the doctor as "Sanchez" even though he repeatedly insists that's not his name. Her doing it one time too many precedes his Heel–Face Turn.
  • Non-Action Big Bad: Victoria Kord wouldn't last very long in a fight, which is why Carapax does the fighting for her. Indeed, when Carapax drags her off to destroy them both, all Victoria can do is futilely demand that he release her.
  • Not-So-Well-Intentioned Extremist: She justifies her war profiteering and crimes as "sacrifices needed for the greater good", but it's clear that the "greater good" is her own power and her profit margins. When Carapax echoes back her "sacrifices must be made for the greater good" line to her she just screams that it doesn't apply to her.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: Victoria Kord has a low opinion of the lower-class, largely Hispanic residents of Jaime's neighborhood and frequently calls De La Cruz, her head scientist, “Sanchez”. She eventually disparages the Reyes family as "Edge Keys trash".
  • The Resenter: She holds a tremendous grudge towards her brother Ted for having inherited Kord Industries instead of her. A great part of her personality in the present is a result of her resentment.
  • Secondary Color Nemesis: She has strawberry-blonde hair and wears purple suits to match her company's image.
  • Silver Fox: A rich and well-kept older woman. Even Milagro finds her attractive, in a way she describes as "Cruella-Kardashian", despite not being fond of her.
  • Smug Snake: Exudes a near-constant air of smug superiority, yet is quick to lose it when things stop going her way.
  • Stay in the Kitchen: Despite having co-founded Kord Industries with her father Thomas, Victoria was passed over to inherit the company in favor of her brother Ted; her bitterness and resentment over this apparently helped shape her into the cold and ruthless person she is today. Even Ted's daughter Jennifer, who hates Victoria (and with good reason), is clearly angered that she was a victim of sexism.
  • The Unfavorite: We don't actually know since we never get to see Ted's and her parents, but it is implied the reason she became evil is that she felt left behind when her brother inherited the company and she didn't.
  • Villainous Breakdown: Her calm demeanor breaks down bit by bit as her plans fall apart, until she's reduced to hysterically shrieking as Carapax drags her away to their mutual death.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: She's championed as a pillar of industry and is a global figure, and it's implied her actions have the tacit approval of the US government allowing her to do things like have her private army attack people on US soil with impunity. The only people who disapprove of her are the communities she disenfranchises, whose voices go unheard. Even in the end after she is defeated and killed, Jenny has to pretend she died in an accident and will be sorely missed rather than expose her actions.
  • We Can Rule Together: Victoria does offer Jenny the chance to work with her after capturing her in the final battle, and expresses disbelief that she would choose to side with Jaime, whom she calls "Edge trash", over her own aunt. When Jenny angrily shoots back that Jaime knows far more about what it means to be family than Victoria ever could, she furiously tries to kill her niece.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: It doesn't happen in the story, but Victoria Kord makes it clear in dialogue that she sees Carapax as expendable and has every intention of discarding him once his services as The Heavy are no longer needed.

    Ignacio Carapax 

Ignacio Carapax / OMAC

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ignacio_carapax.jpg
Click here to see the OMAC armor: 

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: Guatemalan

Affiliation(s): Kord Industries

Portrayed By: Raoul Trujillo

Appearances: Blue Beetle

"That love you feel for your family makes you weak."

A war veteran that Victoria fits with bionic enhancements and armor to combat Blue Beetle.


  • Adaptational Name Change: His counterpart from the comics was instead named Conrad Carapax.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: In the comic continuity, Carapax was completely selfish and amoral, killing an entire ship's worth of people just to escape an island he was trapped on. Here, Carapax is still violent and villainous, but is a man tortured by a lifetime of war and manipulated by Victoria Kord. In the end, he realizes the monster he has become and dies ensuring the OMAC will not be used to perpetuate war and fighting.
  • Adapted Out: Comics Carapax was an old rival to the first Blue Beetle, Dan Garrett (although only retroactively, since he first appears in a Ted Kord story). Here, Garrett is long dead before the events of the story and Carapax becomes the first superpowered foe of the third Blue Beetle instead.
  • Adaptation Species Change: His comics self started out as a human until his consciousness was transferred to a robot body. Here, he is gradually augmented with more and more cybernetics, but he never ceases to be a human.
  • Adaptational Job Change: An archeologist in the comics and a career soldier here.
  • Adaptational Nationality: In the comics, Conrad Carapax was American. Ignacio Carapax was instead born and raised in Guatemala, only moving to America later in life to work for Kord Industries.
  • Arm Cannon: In the first iteration of the OMAC armor, one of the main weapons the suit possesses are a pair of machine guns that he fires from either of his wrists.
  • Artificial Limbs: Carapax lost one of his arms and a leg to a landmine while serving in Guatemala and Victoria Kord replaced them with cybernetics as part of her OMAC experiments.
  • Bad Guys Do the Dirty Work: He is the one who blows up the Big Bad Victoria, taking himself in the process, which spares the hero-protagonist Jaime from having to do it.
  • Beta Outfit: When we first see him don the OMAC armor, it's still scrappy and unfinished. It isn't until he absorbs the Scarab's power when he finally brings the suit to its peak, in all its comic-accurate glory.
  • Child Soldier: Flashbacks show he was one during the days of the Guatemalan Civil War.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: He is never called the Indestructible Man like how he was known in the comics.
  • Composite Character: Combines elements of his comics counterpart with the OMACs.
  • Cyborg: Carapax has had numerous cybernetics implanted in his body as part of the process to perfect the OMAC, including a completely artificial foot and hand.
  • The Dark Side Will Make You Forget: The catalyst for him becoming a villain was his mother's death, which caused him to become a child soldier to avenge her and put him on the path to where he is today. However, after years of working for Victoria he's come to the conclusion that familial love is a weakness. When Jaime views his childhood memories, it reminds him that love is a strength not a weakness and he turns on Victoria.
  • The Dragon: Carapax serves as Victoria's right-hand and personal enforcer.
  • Empowered Badass Normal: Prior to his crippling injuries from the landmine, Carapax was a Badass Normal who gained decades of war experience as a soldier fighting in Guatemala. After his injuries, he had enough top of the line cybernetics installed throughout his body to make him an unstoppable walking weapon capable of fighting an alien war machine.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: Carapax still has fond memories of his mother before she died. He even keeps her locket that has a picture of them, to show he still loves her.
  • Evil Counterpart: He's Latin-American and imbued with technology that allows him to wear advanced armor and use flashy weapons courtesy of Kord Industries. Really, the only differences between him and Jaime are their ages and views on family.
  • Evil Evolves: Carapax initially confronts Blue Beetle with no armor or weapons and is effortlessly curb-stomped. He comes back with an unfinished suit of OMAC to put them on equal footing in battle, which is soon further upgraded to be larger and stronger.
  • Evil Knockoff: The OMAC suit becomes this after absorbing the power of the Scarab to utilize for itself. He gains its ability to Think Up Weapons and the power of Flight, giving him the same versatility as Jaime for their final battle.
  • Fur and Loathing: At one point Carapax wears a shaggy pelt that covers his entire upper body.
  • The Heavy: While Victoria serves as the overall Big Bad of Blue Beetle pushing the plot, Carapax serves as the more present and physical threat that Jaime faces, with their final battle serving as the climax.
  • Heel–Face Turn: After Jaime spares him in the film's climax, Carapax repays the favor by sacrificing himself to kill Victoria while telling Jaime and his family to flee from the blast radius so they can live another day.
  • Heel Realization: He has one after reliving his memories and witnessing Jaime sparing his life. Realizing that Victoria was indirectly responsible for killing his mother and never treated him as anything but a disposable test subject similar to Jaime himself, Carapax turns on his former boss and sacrifices himself for the greater good.
  • Hypocrite: Says to Jaime that love for family is a weakness, but still holds love for his mother.
  • Ironic Echo: He ends up on both ends of this trope.
    • At the end of their first fight, Carapax asks Jaime if he really thought he could beat him and states that he should have killed him when he had the chance. At the end of their second fight, a grieving and enraged Jaime asks Carapax if he really thought he could beat him and states that he should have killed him when he had the chance.
    • Victoria often says that "Sacrifices must be made for the greater good." as an excuse for her evil deeds. Carapax says the same to her before killing them both.
  • Kick the Dog: Murders Dr. de la Cruz completely on his own initiative when he helps Jaime escape and defects from Kord Industries.
  • Love Is a Weakness: Carapax twice calls Jaime's bond with his family a weakness, first when he's about to kill him in front of the Kord building, second when he's about to kill him on the island. Jaime finally gets to throw it back in his face after overpowering him and sparing his life, saying that his family makes him strong.
  • Meaningful Echo: He tells Victoria "Sacrifices must be made for the greater good" before killing them both.
  • Murder-Suicide: Kills Victoria by overloading his reactor core and dragging her into an inferno.
  • Painful Transformation: Both times he activates the OMAC armor has him screaming and grunting in pain, indicating that it was far from a pleasant process.
  • Power Gives You Wings: The OMAC's final form gains a set of wing shaped thrustors on its back, signaling both its ability to fly and how much more dangerous Carapax has become in combat.
  • Redemption Equals Death: His final act is to overload his energy reserves while making sure to take Victoria with him, having realized how monstrous she truly is.
  • Red Is Violent: He's a ruthless soldier clad in red armor to contrast Jaime's blue suit.
  • Rogues' Gallery Transplant: Downplayed. Carapax is normally a villain fought by the first two Blue Beetles, Dan Garrett and Ted Kord, but in this film he fights Jaime. So he's fighting the same heroic identity, but a different individual.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: He was a soldier since he was a child, lost his mother in a bombing and almost lost his own life after a landmine explosion. The process of rebuilding him was very painful and so are his transformations into OMAC. Despite his apparent stoic demeanor he displays some rather uneasy expressions on his face in some scenes, as if he was trying to hold back anger or trauma.
  • Superhero Movie Villains Die: Double subverted. Jaime has his chance to kill Carapax, until the Scarab itself talks him out of it. Instead Carapax goes for a Redemption Equals Deathtaking Victoria with him.
  • Together in Death: As he walks toward the inferno consuming Kord's island base, he sees his mother calling out to him with a smile.
  • Tragic Villain: Carapax had his mom killed by a bomb from Kord Industries, and then Victoria took him in as a child soldier, experimented on him, and turned him into her weapon, with the intent of eventually replacing him once he's no longer of use to her.
  • Tranquil Fury: Some of his scenes have him displaying an uneasy expression on his face but never lets it agitate him very much, with his strongest emotion being the pain from his transformations. When facing Jaime, he taunts him with cold arrogance. Even when remembering the death of his mother and the full extent of Victoria's manipulation of him he takes her with him with utmost stoicism, though the full extent of his pain and suffering is made manifest beforehand when at Jaime's mercy and with his memories acessed by Khaji-Da.
  • Villainous Underdog: While he doesn't look it, as a huge, tough mercenary chasing after a college student, Jaime is capable of outclassing him instantly when first fought thanks to the Scarab. Even the OMAC is eventually overpowered, with the only time he fights Jaime with enough power to be a true threat is when he steals the Scarab's tech and powers wholesale to upgrade the OMAC.
  • Walking Armory: The OMAC suit features extensive weaponry, fitting for a piece of technology intended to make the user a One-Man Army. In its initial iteration he employs wrist-mounted turrets, rockets, and an Energy Weapon. After the armor is upgraded, he demonstrates the ability to form weapons like swords, axes, and whips from energy on top of his existing arsenal.
  • We Can Rebuild Him: He was an injured soldier who Victoria healed with her OMAC technology.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: A child soldier who lost his mother in a bombing, got trained at the infamous School of the Americas, got injured in a landmine, and experimented on by Victoria Kord, which still causes him pain.
  • Would Hit a Girl: While fighting Blue Beetle, he doesn't hesitate to fire a missile at him when it would certainly also catch Jenny in the blast radius. In the end, he also makes sure to take Victoria to her death along with him.

Miscellaneous

    White Dragon 

August Ransom "Auggie" Smith / White Dragon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/auugiesmith.jpg
"How did my fuckin' sperm grow into a nancy-boy like you?"
Click here to see him as White Dragon 

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Aryan Empire

Portrayed By: Robert Patrick

Appearances: Peacemaker

"Forty years ago, God challenged me as he did Abraham, but I was too weak to listen. But not no more!"

Father to Christopher Smith, aka Peacemaker. He's also the White Dragon, leader of a white supremacist group known as the Aryan Empire.


  • Abusive Parents: In The Suicide Squad there's a moment where Peacemaker empathizes with Bloodsport over his issues with his own father, and Amanda Waller states that his father trained him to kill. When Chris comes to see him after four years in jail, he's intensely emotionally abusive to his son, and it's heavily implied he was physically abusive to him when he was young. At one point, Auggie berates him with a homophobic slur, despite Peacemaker being so manly he's an outright parody of masculinity. He also has no problems selling out his own son to the police after he finds out Economos framed him for Peacemaker's actions during his first Butterfly encounter, and to make it worse, he tells Peacemaker just what he plans to do to his face when Peacemaker visits him in prison to explain the situation (and how he had no knowledge of it). Then, he takes it even further after being released from prison when he decides to kill his son. On top of that, he had both his sons fight for sport, an incident that got one of them killed.
  • Action Dad: He's a supervillain, and the father of Peacemaker.
  • Adaptational Nationality: Apparently fully American here, while his comics counterpart was an Austrian Nazi.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Named Wolfgang Schmidt in the comics.
  • Archnemesis Dad: To Peacemaker.
  • Asshole Victim: Enforced. Economos frames him for Peacemaker's crimes by changing his fingerprints and car registration number. Peacemaker absolutely hates it, because Auggie was still his father. Other than Peacemaker, nobody really pities him for being framed, since he's an outspoken white supremacist, homophobe, xenophobe, and supervillain who uses his powers to put all of his violent bigotry into practice. Murn is only angry with the decision because it would spoil Peacemaker's cooperation with the team.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: His suit is armed to the teeth, but there are multiple gaps between its armor plating, something Vigilante points out when he first sees it, and later takes advantage of to disable it.
  • Bad People Abuse Animals: Has zero shame in beating up Peacemaker's pet eagle.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Is this with "Royland Goff." It's Goff who serves as the overarching threat behind the alien invasion, but Auggie is the biggest obstacle for Peacemaker's Character Arc and his most personal foe. Episode 6 sees him managing to avoid Goff's massacre of the police station by a stroke of cruel irony, then deciding to suit up and kill his own son. He's killed in the penultimate episode, leaving Goff as the main antagonist.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: While he's his son's most personal enemy and is incredibly dangerous in his own right, Auggie poses nowhere near the threat of the Butterflies. His attack on Chris proves to be an utter failure, with his whole group getting slaughtered before his son finally shoots him dead with one episode left to go. This embarrassing defeat is made even more noticeable by the Butterflies making far better progress in their objectives in the same episode. However, this also winds up being downplayed a bit, since even after Chris has defeated the far more dangerous Butterflies and even made peace with their surviving leader, Auggie continues to haunt him even after he's gone.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity: When he finally has his son cornered, he takes the time to list down all of Peacemaker's transgressions before finishing him off. Unfortunately, this gives Vigilante the opening to sneak back, attack him, and disable his armor, and Economos the time to gun down all of his white supremacist gang. Peacemaker then takes this chance to beat him to a pulp and finish him off once and for all.
  • Boom, Headshot!: How he goes out, courtesy of his own son.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Mocks his son for not having the guts to shoot him while depowered and completely exposed, about a second before Chris finally puts a bullet in his head.
  • Canon Foreigner: Zig-Zagged, Auggie is not the White Dragon from the comics (Daniel Ducannon and William Heller), but an original character based on the White Dragon alias.
  • Churchgoing Villain: Auggie believes his actions are in service of a higher power, even comparing himself to Abraham when he decides to murder Peacemaker.
  • Color Character: The White Dragon.
  • Composite Character: James Gunn confirmed that Auggie is a combination of the comics Peacemaker's father Wolfgang Schmidt and the William Heller incarnation of the White Dragon.
  • Corrupted Character Copy: While still a character of his own from the comics, with Auggie's level of Gadgeteer Genius and the ways his White Dragon armor functions, he almost comes off as a racist discount version of Iron Man.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: He's developed a series of weapons, high-tech armor, and even an armory that can be hidden in a different dimension, all things that could make him fabulously wealthy. But, Auggie has no ambition outside of killing people of color and other minorities, so he lives in a plain house in a quiet town.
  • Dark Messiah: He commands unwavering respect from his fellow white supremacists. As he openly declares his intent to kill his own son, they cheer for him. Since his followers were all killed off before his own death, he won't be martyred.
    • Now that his ghost haunts Chris, he's got the "resurrection" aspect down pat.
  • Death by Irony: Peacemaker shoots him in the head with a Luger pistol, a weapon famously used by the Nazis.
  • Dies Differently in Adaptation: In the comics, Wolfgang Schmidt committed suicide when Christopher was five. Here, an adult Chris himself kills an old Auggie.
  • Even Evil Can Be Loved: He's done nothing but wrong to his son practically his entire life, and Peacemaker is aware that he's a horrible unapologetic bigot. However, Peacemaker continues to seek his approval, and is pissed when he finds out that Economos had him framed for the murder of Annie Sturphausen. Even though Auggie completely deserves it, Peacemaker emotionally falls apart after he puts a bullet in his skull.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Something of an Informed Attribute. Despite being a former supervillain, he supported Chris' turn as a vigilante despite it not being racially predisposed, and apparently shares a dislike of crime with his surviving son.
  • Evil Genius: He's responsible for creating Peacemaker's helmets, the quantum unfolding storage area in his house, and his White Dragon suit.
  • Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor: When Peacemaker tells him about Bloodsport's father torturing him with rats, he finds it hilarious and bursts out laughing.
  • Evil Is Hammy: Becomes this after donning his White Dragon armor to kill Chris, going on a long, shouty rant about religion and moral superiority while promising to murder his own son.
  • Evil Luddite: Auggie considers Peacemaker's taste in 80's glam rock to be a personal failing. Given Peacemaker's taste in music is actually quite popular among right-wing Americans, it goes to show how radical White Dragon's beliefs are that he can't cut loose like a normal person.
  • Evil Old Folks: He's the oldest character in the Peacemaker series, and arguably the vilest villain being a racist terrorist.
  • Expy:
    • He bears a resemblance to Herman Baggerly, another bigoted, self-righteous abusive father who acts as a corrupting influence on his son. They're even played by the same actor, and James Gunn admitted that Auggie's characterization was partially based on Baggerly.
    • Robert Patrick also played a caustic father who blamed his surviving son for his firstborn's death in Walk the Line.
    • While still a character of his own from the comics, Auggie's level of Gadgeteer Genius and the ways his White Dragon armor functions, he almost comes off as a racist discount version of Iron Man.
  • Flat Character: Played for Drama. Beyond his Evil Genius qualities (which are only slightly ever touched upon) and his Pragmatic Villainy, there are not that many layers to Auggie's character: he's a racist, homophobic, generally bigoted conservative, an abusive father, and a white supremacist supervillain with a cult following. He is a straightforwardly vile character who's more interesting as an accessory to Peacemaker's mental trauma and toxic family dynamics than as a character himself.
  • Hate Sink: Aside from his one minor Pet the Dog moment, which is eventually subverted, Auggie Smith is completely and utterly devoid of redeeming qualities. Not only is he extremely racist, a Neo-Nazi, and the supervillain known as the White Dragon, but he's also an awful parent who's largely responsible for Peacemaker being the way he is. During the flashback in episode 4, Auggie is shown to have preferred Chris' late brother over him, and forced Chris to murder a man he had captured, all while laughing sadistically.
    • Episode 7 shows that Auggie made his two sons fight each other in no-holds-barred fistfights while him and his friends drank beer and bet on the winner. When Chris accidentally killed Keith, Auggie immediately blamed Chris for "murdering" his brother, ignoring the fact he forced them to fight in the first place.
  • Horns of Villainy: The White Dragon's mask has a pair of horns. The Aryan Empire all wear makeshift masks reminiscent of KKK hoods that also appear to have horns.
  • Hypocrite:
    • Auggie is a religious man, yet he has a dragon motif. Dragons are meant to be avatars of the Devil, which his costume resembles.
    • He claims that he's not a rat, then immediately threatens to spill everything Chris has told him about his team's actions to the police in exchange for his freedom. Chris even points out that this would make him a rat.
    • In a more symbolic sense, he claims to be a die-hard American patriot and even accuses his son of working to usurp the USA, but his willingness to attack Eagly (who is a bald eagle, the American bird) shows that ultimately he doesn't give a damn about America except as an excuse to be a violent racist.
    • He judges his son Chris for sleeping around, but the first thing he does upon getting out of prison is have sex with a woman decades younger than himself.
    • He hates the criminal element despite being a supervillain himself.
  • Jaded Washout: In his prime, Auggie was a feared supervillain and white supremacist, in the present he's a bitter old man who spends most of his time watching right wing talk shows. By the time he gets back in the game, he's quickly disposed of once his goons are killed and his armor disabled.
  • Jerkass: Auggie is a total asshole. He's a massively bigoted white supremacist and an abusive father who's constantly berating his son for the slightest of failures.
  • Jerk With A Heart Of Jerk: He may be an abusive asshole towards his son, but at the very least he took care of Eagly while he was in prison. That is, until episode 7 where he tries to kill Eagly for getting in his way.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Even after Peacemaker explains to him that he had nothing to do with him being framed for murder, Auggie still verbally berates his son and threatens to rat him out so he can be freed.
    • White Dragon tries to kill Eagly when it gets in his way. This is enough to cause Peacemaker to beat his dad to a pulp.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Auggie is finally killed by his own son, who he's abused his entire life. For added karma, Peacemaker shoots him immediately after Auggie taunts him that he doesn't have the guts to shoot him. Even the weapon that Chris picks up to shoot him happens to be a Luger.
  • Light Is Not Good: His White Dragon armor has white coloration, and he is not a good guy.
  • Lone Wolf Boss: He has no connection to the Butterflies, and is simply a white supremacist who's out for revenge.
  • Moral Myopia:
    • As his rant in "Stop Dragon My Heart Around" proves, he genuinely believes himself to have the moral high ground, in spite of all the awful things he's done.
    • He's a non-powered white supremacist in a world where metahumans exist.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain:
    • It's hinted that the reason Christopher hasn't killed him already despite being aware that he's a horrifically abusive father and that his mishandling of his young children led to his brother's death, not to mention Peacemaker having become very capable of doing so by the present time, is a combination of his twisted childhood making him obedient to him and his guilt and shame over having killed one family member already, meaning he's heavily reluctant to consider doing the same for his sole remaining family. After Auggie attacks him with his Powered Armour and makes it clear he wants to kill him, gives him a The Reason You Suck speech that blames Christopher for his brother's death and makes it painfully explicit that he always considered him The Un-Favourite, and attacks Eagly, Peacemaker is pushed way past his Rage Breaking Point and loses all restraint towards him, subjecting him to a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown and shooting him in the head with only slight hesitation.
    • The helmets he created ultimately prove vital in the main characters successfully thwarting the Alien Invasion, even after his own death.
  • Never My Fault: Blames Chris for the death of his brother, even though he was having them fight for sport in the first place.
  • Offing the Offspring: After getting out of prison, he dons his White Dragon armor and attempts to kill his son, only for his son to kill him instead.
  • Offstage Villainy: It's stated at several points that the White Dragon is a trained killer and a feared supervillain. However, his past crimes as a supervillain are not explored in any depth, and are only alluded to occasionally.
  • Oh, Crap!: He has a hell of a case of this when Chris actually shoots him straight in the head, with his final expression being an expression that screams that he didn't think his son would actually do it.
  • Old Superhero: Villainous version. Agguie is an elderly supervillain, and age really has slowed him down quite a bit. In the end, the main reasons why he is even really still a threat to be reckoned with is because he is still able to command quite a bit of respect and influence amongst the white supremacist group he used to hang with, and because he wears a suit of Power Armor. Otherwise, he is really just a decrepit old man with his glory years decades behind him and he is easily dispatched by Chris when his flunkies have been taken out and his armor is disabled.
  • Outliving One's Offspring: His eldest son Keith died years before reaching adulthood, and he blames Chris for killing him.
  • Paper Tiger: Ultimately, Auggie isn't that big a threat in the end. Sure, he's a former supervillain, but it's clear his glory days are decades in the past, and he spends most of his time watching right-wing news and whining about non-white and LGBTQ people in a dumpy suburb. When he finally gets into a serious fight, he's taken out fast.
  • Parental Blamelessness: Auggie feels insulted when Chris implies that it's his fault Chris got sent to prison even though Auggie was the one who trained Chris to be a killer from a young age. Also Auggie keeps blaming Chris for Keith's death despite how Auggie forced Chris and Keith to fight and even took money from observants as bets over who would win.
  • Pet the Dog: While he holds his son in obvious contempt, he did take care of Eagly for 4 years. As of episode 7, this moment has been subverted, when Auggie outright tries to kill Eagly for getting in his way.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He is openly racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic, constantly dropping slurs left and right, and is the leader of a gang of white supremacists.
  • Power Armor: His White Dragon armor qualifies: it grants him superhuman strength, flight capability, protection from gunfire and explosives, and is armed with some kind of powerful repulser-like energy blast weapons.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: He's an unapologetic white supremacist, but he's smart enough not to be provoked by Vigilante's insults extolling the contributions of black people to American culture, as Auggie knows he's only going to make things worse for himself if he looks like an aggressor on the security cameras.
  • Rage Helm: The White Dragon mask has a furrowed brow with red lenses, evoking a Death Glare.
  • Red Is Violent: His White Dragon armor has red coloration, and he is a violent racist.
  • Reimagining the Artifact: In the comics, Peacemaker's father was a Nazi officer that moved to America. Given the fact that any still-living Nazi would be old enough to be Peacemaker's great-grandfather, Auggie Smith is instead changed to a retired supervillain that beats his son.
  • Retired Badass: He was a former soldier in the U.S. Army and a former white supremacist leader, as the White Dragon.
  • Retired Monster: Although his past as the White Dragon hasn't been fully explored, his status as a supervillain seems to be well known to the public, and his reputation seems to have been a fearsome one. Most notably, Murn is equal parts enraged and concerned at Economos framing him for Peacemaker's crimes and incurring his wrath. His fears are shown to be well-placed in episode 6, which sees him donning his White Dragon armor and rallying his followers to kill Peacemaker.
  • Right-Wing Militia Fanatic: More so than his son, being more openly homophobic and racist on top of having a high-tech arsenal hidden away in his home. Not to mention, he is a white supremacist leader.
  • Scary Impractical Armor: His White Dragon armor sure looks intimidating and its combat capabilities are nothing to sneeze at, but the gaps in the armor are wide enough to serve as weak points that Vigilante has no trouble exploiting.
  • Smug Snake: Extremely, but no more so than in his final minutes alive, where he's so sure that he's got Peacemaker under his thumb that he doesn't see his son actually shooting him coming.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: His comics counterpart killed himself when his son was 5. It turns out to actually be a case of Dies Differently in Adaptation.
  • Straw Character: He is staunchly far-right: watching a Strawman News Media channel and having a dislike for communists and minorities, specifically mentioning blacks and gay people, who make up half of Peacemaker's team.
  • Sub-Par Supremacist: His armor makes him a force to be reckoned with, but as soon as it is damaged by Vigilante, he gets beaten to a pulp and shot by Peacemaker.
  • Undignified Death: He dies getting his brains blown out before he could even finish talking. There's no grandeur to his death, no final words. He just drops dead with a goofy expression on his face on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by the corpses of his followers.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Despite Detective Song being the one responsible for getting him out of jail, he continues to make racist comments towards her.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: As it turns out, he relies heavily on his thugs and White Dragon armor to do anything in a fight. Once Vigilante disables his weapons and Economos slaughters his cult followers, he doesn't even try to throw a punch because he's so used to steamrolling enemies with his wrist blasters, which in turn leads to Chris overwhelming and killing him easily.
  • Walking Spoiler: It's hard to talk about him without mentioning the fact that he's the ex-supervillain known as the White Dragon. His coming out of retirement doesn't actually happen until late in the series.
  • White Anglo-Saxon Protestant: Auggie is an extreme version of this displaying very strong bias against whoever is not this. When Chris is paroled from prison to do military service, Auggie in the midst of supplying him with the helmets asks him to take out Commies, blacks, Catholics and Jews. He then makes anti-Asian racist remarks towards Sophie Song but admits he prefers "her" rice noodles over Italian pasta.
  • Younger Than They Look: Not in the present, where he looks his age, but flashbacks of when Chris was a child, which take place at least 20 years in the past, show that he seemingly was always a wrinkly old fart. The only difference is that he used to have a mullet. This is especially glaring for anyone who has seen Terminator 2: Judgment Day, as they will know that Robert Patrick looked much sleeker around that time.

    Kite-Man 

Kite-Man

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

A kite-themed foe Peacemaker fought earlier in his career.


  • The Ghost: He's only mentioned in a clipping from a newspaper.
  • Harmless Villain: He was enough of a threat to get Peacemaker to save Evergreen from him, but theming yourself after kites doesn't exactly spell "dangerous".
  • Offscreen Villainy: All that's seen of his activities are a mention of him in a newspaper clipping.
  • Rogues' Gallery Transplant: He went from being Batman's foe to one of Peacemaker's enemies.

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