Follow TV Tropes

Following

Characters / DCEU: Other Supervillains

Go To


Supervillains who operate independently or in smaller organizations.


    open/close all folders 
Advertisement:

Enemies faced by Aquaman

    Ocean Master 

    Black Manta 

David Kane / Black Manta

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/blackmanta2.jpg
Click here to see his first suit 
Click here to see him unmasked 

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Jesse Kane's Pirates, Atlantis (in service of Orm)

Portrayed By: Yahya Abdul-Mateen II

Voiced By: Erick Selim (Latin-American Spanish), Baudouin Sama (European French), Martin Desgagné (Canadian French)

Appearances: Aquaman | Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom

Other appearances: The Adventures of Aquaman & Mera

Arthur: You're that guy from the submarine.
Black Manta: That's right, but now I have Atlantean steel! Call me Black Manta!

A ruthless pirate and mercenary equipped with a powered diving armor he made using Atlantean technology. He has a score to settle with Arthur Curry/Aquaman after the latter let his father die.


  • Adaptation Name Change: Given the last name Kane, in the comics Black Manta's last name is either Hyde or unknown. Since his real name is never said out loud in his film debut, it's easy to overlook.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: Only slightly, but in the comics Black Manta is typically depicted with no redeeming qualities whatsoever. In the movie he at least loves his dad.
  • Adaptational Sympathy: Relating to the above, Black Manta's grudge against Aquaman for killing his father does help to make his motives seem understandable without downplaying the fact that he's an unrepentant villain.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: When his father is in danger, Black Manta begged Aquaman to save him. However, due to what they did (namely, ruthlessly killing sailors), he refuses.
  • Alternate Self: Black Manta has one on Earth-167.
  • Ancestral Weapon: His father gives him a dagger that had belonged to his grandfather. Though he initially scoffs at it, he ends up keeping it to honor his grandfather's legacy. When he fights with Arthur in Sicily, Black Manta makes a point of stabbing him in the shoulder with that same dagger.
  • Animal Motifs: He's deliberately trying to emulate a manta ray by using weapons that cause intense pain and adding rockets to his suit to glide around. Downplayed as his fiery temper is unlike real manta rays, who have a very laid-back disposition. Not to mention making his new suit bulky and extravagant is at odds with a manta's streamlined body and natural camouflage. Essentially Black Manta is a prime example of a guy who tries too hard to act cool and intimidating without trying to understand the very thing he's emulating.
  • Arch-Enemy: Black Manta regards Aquaman as his for the death of his father.
  • Armored Villains, Unarmored Heroes: Both times that he's gone up against Arthur, Black Manta has worn some kind of protective gear, while Arthur dresses plainly. Necessary, as Black Manta is an ordinary man while Arthur is acclimated to the ocean depths and thus much more physically gifted.
  • Astonishingly Appropriate Appearance: He's a hothead, so it stands to reason his Black Manta helmet would come equipped with two high-pressure plasma blasters that give him Fire Ball Eyeballs every time he uses them.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: Though Aquaman's skin is too dense to be pierced by ordinary steel weapons, after Black Manta stabs him with an Atlantean steel blade, he then stabs him in the wound with his ancestral dagger, which is extremely painful.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Black Manta's first two helmets that he reverse-engineered from an Atlantean plasma cannon.
    • The prototype helmet was smaller and made of metal, which meant the charge from the plasma blasters caused it to overheat far too quickly and self-destruct.
    • The second helmet was made from more heat-friendly materials and had a wider surface area, but was not as durable as a metal helmet would have been, as Arthur was able to smash it with a chunk of cement.
  • Badass Normal: Black Manta's the only "human" antagonist of the first film, and he requires Atlantean tech to even match Aquaman in battle. That being said, he is the *only* person in the film who came close to actually killing Arthur, as Mera had only precious moments to heal him.
  • The Berserker: Black Manta's fighting technique is based around just charging at his quarry using whatever weapons he has at hand. When he first confronted Aquaman he used an automatic rifle and his swords, but when that didn't work he started using Atlantean tech in much the same way.
  • Beta Outfit: The prototype Black Manta helmet was smaller and made from metal, but couldn't handle the blowback from its laser vision. The perfected helmet is not only larger but looks to be made of materials that won't absorb the excess heat generated.
    • When Black Manta replaces his damaged suit in the sequel, he goes back to the original design's metallic helmet, only with a wider surface area.
  • BFG: Defied. While experienced in the use of firearms, this guy clearly prefers using various blades for killing. When given the large plasma rifle by Orm, he instead reworks it into a diving helmet and refitted the plasma emitters to work as optic lasers so he could keep his arms free for close-quarter combat.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Black Manta aspires to be the death of Aquaman, but since he's a regular human who can't keep his cool going up against a superpowered being that's previously dealt with a god-tier invader, he's thwarted twice.
    • He's not even the central threat in his debut film, being little more than Orm's assassin, who himself views Aquaman as a minor annoyance in the big picture. Adding to his humiliation is that Black Manta has zero impact on the story, with even the wounds he inflicted on Arthur healing up overnight thanks to Mera's medical expertise. That being said, out of all the antagonists in the film, Manta is the one who came closest to killing Arthur, and even then Aquaman's victory was still a pyrrhic one...
  • Black Knight: Black Manta fits the archetype in more than just appearance. He's an enigmatic villain who engages the hero in combat while wearing black armour that was gifted to him by a villainous monarch and his character arc involves clashing with a future king.
  • Blade Below the Shoulder: Both of his suits include retractable blades on the arms.
    • The first suit's blades were plain steel, were of no use against Aquaman's super-durable skin and ended up broken in combat.
    • Those of the Black Manta suit are made of a much tougher metal (Atlantean steel) and they can definitely hurt Aquaman.
  • Blade Enthusiast: Black Manta seems to favor short blades. After beating down Arthur with his Atlantean weapons, he drove his grandfather's knife into an open wound as a symbolic gesture.
  • Blood Knight: At the beginning of Aquaman, Black Manta reveals that he looked forward to fighting the half-human half-Atlantean, but the latter proves to be too tough for conventional weapons and the situation degenerates into It's Personal territory. On their next encounter, he delights in stabbing Aquaman several times.
  • Brick Joke: Black Manta's first test of his helmet lasers, before he has the firing mechanism down, causes him to nearly shoot himself and blows a hole in the roof. When Dr. Shin is studying the damaged suit after rescuing him from the ocean, Manta warns him about that problem, and it similarly blows a hole in Shin's roof after a near-miss.
  • Cape Buster: The Black Manta armor is entirely designed to track and kill Aquaman. The Atlantean steel-made armor provides mostly No-Sell level durability against the human-Atlantean's Super Strength, the blades can hurt him and the plasma beams also leave him with burns to some extent. Whilst he doesn't succeed, Manta wounds Arthur to the point of exhaustion, causing him to lose consciousness. Not counting the full synchronization of the Unity that the Flash undid, Black Manta's the one opponent in this timeline who has come the closest to killing Arthur in the entire DCEU.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Black Manta makes no attempt to justify his actions. He openly states to the submarine captain that he is a pirate, tells Aquaman that he "plunders the seas" and seems amazed at the fact that his group's reputation precedes them.
  • Category Traitor: He's an ordinary human that allies himself with an Atlantean who plans to wage war on humanity. Being a pirate, misanthropy would come naturally to him, but to let his entire race be conquered (with himself possibly among the casualties) shows he has no principles whatsoever.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Despite being an ordinary (or at best, Badass Normal) human, he wears a Powered Armor made of Atlantean steel that allows him to go toe-to-toe with super strong Atlanteans, including Aquaman.
  • Color Character: Black Manta.
  • Composite Character: The initial Black Manta armor was a composite of his most classic look with a more tactical design akin to his appearance in Young Justice. He switches to his classic look for the sequel.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: To Steppenwolf. Steppenwolf was an extraterrestrial working for an overlord that wanted to scorch the Earth and he saw the likes of the Justice League as little more than a hindrance to his plan. Black Manta is a regular human working for an overlord who wants to flood the Earth and he's made it his life's mission to kill Aquaman.
  • Cool Helmet: Black Manta's visual signature, as in other media. We actually see him create it from modifying Atlantean tech, with the signature manta-shape being a practical design choice rather than a purely aesthetic one. This is because when he added eye beams the helmet exploded due to being too small.
  • Costume Evolution:
    • He initially wears the same diving combat suit as his father and the rest of their gang of hijackers. Then he builds himself a more powerful and distinctive one out of the Atlantean technology Orm gives him and becomes Black Manta.
    • After his first suit was damaged in his confrontation with Aquaman, Black Manta reappears in Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom wearing an outfit with an even closer resemblance to his comics incarnation. His new helmet is silver and his diving suit flaunts his muscular build.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Black Manta is in WAY over his head trying to use conventional human-made weapons against Aquaman during their first fight on the submarine and Arthur easily wipes the floor with him. By the time of their second fight in Sicily, he's equipped with the Black Manta suit of Power Armor, making for a much more evenly matched fight.
  • Dark Is Evil: He favours black outfits to the point where he customises some Atlantean armor with black spray paint. Adding the word "black" to an epithet previously owned by his grandfather also shows his obsession with the color.
  • Dartboard of Hate: Black Manta turns Stephen Shin's string theory board into one by throwing his knife at a newspaper article with a silhouette of Aquaman on it.
  • Death Glare: Black Manta's default expression.
  • Determinator: Black Manta gets his ass handed to him twice, yet still doesn't give up his vendetta against Aquaman.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Downplayed. While he's a very formidable opponent once he gets a suit made from Atlantean tech, he's defeated well before the climax and remains out of the picture for the plot to focus on stopping Orm. Unlike other examples of the trope, however, he survives.
  • The Dragon: He was the second-in-command of his father's pirate crew, until they were all wiped out by Aquaman. Kane later plays with the role for Orm when he becomes Black Manta, but it was mostly to avenge his father.
  • Dragon Their Feet: Black Manta outlasts both his father and Orm by being the only villain still active at the end of the movie, but he isn't finished with Aquaman yet.
  • Dragon with an Agenda: While more of an associate of Orm than an official henchman, Black Manta's clearly only in it to kill Aquaman and doesn't care for Orm's own goals.
  • Dual Wielding: Black Manta regularly fights with both his retractable arm blade and handheld sword in conjunction with one another, with deadly effectiveness. The reason he developed the Atlantean plasma cannon into a helmet was so he could continue using his preferred fighting style.
  • Empowered Badass Normal: Black Manta and his dad gave Aquaman as much of a fight as any unaugmented humans could. Then he got a power suit and was able to almost defeat Aquaman.
  • Entitled Bastard: Black Manta seriously expected Aquaman to save his father from certain death, even when his dad shot at Aquaman seconds after being shown mercy. Arthur responds with no sympathy.
Arthur Curry: You killed innocent people. Ask the sea for mercy.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Black Manta kills the submarine's captain without batting an eye, then charges at Aquaman guns blazing. Even when he sees Aquaman withstand automatic gunfire, Black Manta shows no sign of fear (or even common sense) as he switches to using blades with similar results. When Aquaman injures his father and leaves him for dead, Black Manta fully develops his infamous grudge.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Black Manta was very close with his father. He begs Aquaman to save him and, when he refuses, spends the entire movie seeking revenge against Arthur for letting him die. He even tells Orm to Keep the Reward, considering revenge to be a reward in and of itself.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": The name "David Kane" is never spoken out loud in his debut film. Arthur just refers to him as "that guy from the submarine" and he introduces himself by his moniker. This is more or less true to the comics, where Black Manta's name was added decades after his creation.
  • Evil Is Hammy: Once he has the Black Manta suit on, every line of dialogue out of Kane's mouth is loud and looking for scenery to chew.
    Arthur: Who the hell are you?
    Black Manta: Perhaps THIS! WILL JOG YOUR MEMORY!!!
  • Evil Only Has to Win Once: Black Manta's goal is simple; kill Aquaman. He doesn't have any long-term ambitions such as conquering Atlantis or taking on other metahumans, so his threat level would theoretically go back to piracy if he ever succeeded, never getting involved in future conflicts.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: His suit augments and deepens his already quite intimidating baritone.
  • Evil Virtues: Ambition, Determination, Diligence, Passion and Valor (he will keep coming after Aquaman no matter how many losses he endures), Camraderie and Cooperation (he's a team player and Orm trusts him), Love, Loyalty and Selflessness (he would risk his life to rescue his father and swore to avenge his death), Creativity and Resourcefulness (he built his own Black Manta armor).
  • Evil Wears Black: Every suit Black Manta has worn is black. When Orm offers him some white Atlantean armor, Black Manta adds a coat of black paint to it.
  • Eye Beams: The main weapon of his suit consists of red water-powered plasma beams shot through the helmet's eyes.
  • False Flag Operation: Orm hired Black Manta to assist him in manipulating Nereus to his side, first by hijacking a submarine that would strike at Nerus without warning, then by ordering Black Manta to track and kill Mera.
  • The Family That Slays Together: David took part in his father's sea hijacking operations before becoming Black Manta, and they killed people doing so.
  • Fatal Flaw: Black Manta is way too hot-headed to claim a decisive victory over Aquaman. Their first fight ended in absolute defeat and the second was a draw, with Aquaman managing to trick Back Manta into knocking himself out.
  • Foe Romance Subtext: Black Manta's obsession over killing Aquaman leans a bit into this, especially as he's crafting his iconic suit to Depeche Mode's "It's No Good" — which is often interpreted as an obsessive love song.
  • Foil:
    • Black Manta contrasts Aquaman in numerous ways. Aquaman is a good samaritan while Black Manta is a pirate. Aquaman wants nothing to do with Atlantis and relies on his own innate strength to get by, while Black Manta relies on Atlantean technology. Arthur put his mother's death behind him to the point where he convinced himself he resents her, while Black Manta is fixated on his father's death.
    • He also has a few contrasts with Orm. Orm has his own kingdom, can keep his cool unless pushed hard enough, sees Aquaman as little more than a minor obstacle in his quest for world domination, was able to beat him with no effort in their first fight and in a moment of vulnerability admits his reluctance to kill Arthur. Black Manta is a pirate, has a foul temper, dedicates his entire life to killing Aquaman with little interest in any higher purpose, couldn't beat him in a fight without the aid of Orm and is a cold-blooded killer.
  • Forging Scene: A villainous take on this trope. After Orm provides him with Atlantean armor and artillery, David tinkers with it, reworking the plasma cannon into a prototype helmet (which blows up on activation) and painting the armor black.
  • Freaky Electronic Music: His leitmotif incorporates a repeating, low, electronic growl and other unsettling techno sounds.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: Originally just second-in-command to a well-stocked team of pirates, he gains some Atlantean technology and customises it to become a serious threat to Aquaman.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: He is good enough of an engineer to adapt some high-tech Atlantean Powered Armor given to him by Orm into something more to his liking, and to completely rework a prototype water-powered plasma rifle into his suit's helmet.
  • Genius Bruiser: While a courageous, strong warrior first and foremost, he's also a skilled engineer and Gadgeteer Genius who can work with and even improve Atlantean technology. That's in addition to being a very skilled tactician who also knows how to operate the submarines he takes over.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Black Manta's face was injured after his attack in Sicily which necessitated some heavy bandaging, but by the time he recovers and makes his comeback his face has healed to the point where he's got a single faded scar.
  • Hell Is That Noise: Black Manta's every appearance in armor is accompanied by an ominous metallic buzzing noise, aptly titled "The Black Manta" on the first film's soundtrack.
  • Heroes Prefer Swords: Inverted. He's Aquaman's archnemesis who uses mostly bladed weapons as opposed to Arthur's trident. (Amusingly, Arthur did at one point during his training days with Vulko ask if he could fight with a sword rather than his mother's quindent.)
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: His armor's targeting system gets damaged in his fight against Arthur/Aquaman in Sicily, and when Arthur throws a chain with stone stumps at him like a bolas, those entangle his helmet and the plasma beam backfires in his face.
  • How Dare You Die on Me!: Black Manta's last words to his dying father were an anguished "Damn you!".
  • Iconic Attribute Adoption Moment: Once Orm offers him some new Atlantean weapons and armour, Black Manta gets a montage where he customises it into something more his style. Most notably, this involves converting the plasma cannon into a wide metal helmet...that immediately self-destructs. In Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom, he's figured out how to develop a metal helmet that's safer to wear.
  • Iconic Sequel Outfit: Black Manta's new suit in ''Aquaman & the Lost Kingdom" looks even more comic accurate than his first suit, with its sculpted muscles and silver helmet.
  • Imported Alien Phlebotinum: Black Manta's suit was reverse-engineered from Atlantean technology, with the lasers in the helmet originally being part of a heavy rifle which he converted so that he wouldn't lose mobility.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: In The Stinger, even when injured and resting on a bed, he manages to throw his grandfather's knife and hit one specific newspaper clipping of a human silhouette under the headline "Who is Aquaman?"
  • Incoming Ham: He explodes the area around Aquaman and Mera before showing up to them quoting Lovecraft in that deep voice ("Loathsomeness waits and dreams in the deep, and decay spreads over the tottering cities of men.").
  • It's Personal: After a submarine hijack turns sour thanks to Aquaman, David is forced to abandon his father in the sub, having previously begged Aquaman to show mercy but the latter denying help and basically leaving the two men for dead. Kane then focuses entirely on tracking and killing Aquaman, even disdaining gold in favor of any way to enact revenge on the man who let his father die.
  • Jet Pack: His Black Manta suit includes a jet pack complete with rocket boots, making him as mobile in the surface world as he is in the water.
  • Keep the Reward: After the death of his father, David became so obsessed with revenge against Aquaman that he refuses the payment Orm promised him for the remote controlled submarine that served for the False Flag Operation to rally King Nereus to Orm's side.
    Orm: Kill [Arthur] and the woman he's with and you will be rewarded.
    David Kane: Killing him is my reward!
  • Kubrick Stare: His helmet exaggerates this expression.
  • Legacy Character: He is the second "Manta" of his family, the first being his grandfather.
  • Let Me at Him!: Black Manta's interactions with Orm tend to be variants on this phrase, with Black Manta caring more about killing off their mutual foe instead of Orm's master plan.
  • Made of Iron: Despite his armor's eye beams backfiring and being sent falling into a cliff (which he struck at least twice), and spending an unknown amount of time adrift at sea, Manta manages to survive and, after some medical attention, he's eager to get back into a fight with Aquaman.
  • Master Swordsman: He prefers his swords and blades in combat, and would have landed a killing blow in his and Arthur's first encounter on the sub had it not been for the latter's Atlantean physiology.
  • Meaningful Name: His name is David Kane and his father's name is Jesse Kane. In the Bible, David, son of Jesse, becomes a great king of Israel. So Black Manta is essentially destined to become a great, epic supervillain.
  • Mighty Glacier: He was a borderline Lightning Bruiser during his first encounter with Aquaman, landing a few strikes with his blades that would have been fatal if not for Arthur's Atlantean durability. After donning his iconic suit, his movements are noticeably more clunky due to the suit's bulk and weight, but the tradeoff is better protection against heavy blows and having more access to weapons that can actually hurt Arthur, and the suit's thrusters grant him flight and brief bursts of speed.
  • Moment Killer: When Arthur and Mera are about to share their first kiss in Sicily, he throws a bomb at them, arriving in the scene to settle his score with Aquaman.
  • Moral Myopia: He wants revenge on Aquaman for leaving his father to die, but Aquaman only did so because the two of them just murdered numerous innocent Russian sailors and the captain while seizing their sub (and likely would have killed the entire crew had Aquaman not interfered), and worse, the only reason his father got injured in the first place was due to trying to kill Aquaman!
  • No-One Could Have Survived That: On both ends.
    • Black Manta is stunned when he sees Arthur take a missle to the torso and survive with only bruising.
    • After their second fight ends with Black Manta tumbling off a cliff, Mera assumes the fall killed him. He shows up in The Stinger alive but in need of medical attention.
  • Not Quite Dead: Black Manta is shown alive in the post-credits stinger, although admittedly Aquaman and Mera spoke of him in the present tense even after Aquaman last saw him falling down a cliff wall with heavy balls and chain around his neck, his armour badly damaged to boot, so this might be more of a twist for the audience than the heroes.
  • One-Way Visor: The Black Manta helmet has one on its forehead as a holdover from his original diving helmet.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Even when he's trying to give a wicked smile after testing his latest weapon, he still looks like he's scowling.
  • Plasma Cannon: Orm provides him with an Atlantean weapon technology that converts water into plasma. He manages to reverse-engineer it to adapt it to his Black Manta suit's helmet.
  • Powered Armor: His Black Manta suit doubles as this, being reinforced with Atlantean technology and Atlantean steel.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner: He delivers one to the Russian submarine captain right before running him through.
    David Kane: I'll make you a deal: I don't tell you how to captain, and you don't tell me how to pirate.
  • Psycho Knife Nut: He was already an Ax-Crazy Blade Enthusiast, but upon inheriting his grandfather's knife and developing a grudge against Aquaman, Black Manta develops a habit of sheathing and unsheathing the blade in a quietly agitated fashion.
  • Ray Gun: The eyes on his helmet are repurposed plasma emitters.
  • Reconstruction: Black Manta's classic bubble-head deep sea diver design has been a difficult thing to process in the modern era, coming across as a silly, impractical top heavy look. This film shows Kane building the suit from scratch, adapting Atlantean weaponry alongside his own high tech armor designs, and specifically making the helmet huge so that it could fire a plasma blast without frying his own head. When he finally shows up he is almost a Walking Tank, believably fighting Arthur on even footing.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: His Black Manta suit is an all black armor with red eyes. It was adapted from a white Atlantean suit.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: His Black Manta suit's eyes glow red and can shoot red plasma beams.
  • Red Is Violent: Black Manta's high-tech weapons all emit a red light, from his laser-eyes to an electrified grappling cable in his arm.
  • Revenge Myopia: He utterly hates Aquaman for leaving his father to die, not caring that they were pirates attacking an innocent submarine and said father actually attacked Aquaman when he tried to spare him.
  • Ruthless Modern Pirates: He accompanies his father and several others to hijack a submarine. The crew also possess high-tech diving gear and weapons.
  • Save the Villain: Averted. Black Manta begs Aquaman to save his injured father after the submarine they're on beings to flood, only to be told that they've exhausted what little sympathy he had for them.
  • Scary Black Man: Despite being an ordinary human, his arsenal makes him incredibly dangerous. He becomes even more menacing with his lust for revenge against Aquaman.
  • Shooting Superman: Black Manta unleashes a spray of bullets as soon as he sees Aquaman, which knocks him down but doesn't cause any injury whatsoever. Not learning from this, Black Manta tries fighting him using his blades only to have them broken.
  • Sinister Stingrays: He adopts the Manta moniker as tribute to his grandfather and wouldn't think twice about murdering innocent people. His mode of transport/base of operations also resembles a stingray.
  • Spandex, Latex, or Leather: Black Manta's outfit in Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom is nowhere near as bulky, being fashioned to look like a second skin.
  • Stab the Picture: In The Stinger Black Manta asks Dr. Shin where Aquaman is so he can kill him, and makes his intentions clear by throwing his knife at a newspaper on the wall showing Aquaman's silhouette.
  • Starter Villain Stays: Black Manta's the first of Aquaman's rogues gallery to appear and manages to survive their first two encounters, eventually making a reappearance in Aquaman's sequel.
  • Submarine Pirates: His father's gang specializes in the hijacking of conventional submarines, using an advanced prototype of a stealthy submarine they stole.
  • Superhero Movie Villains Die: Averted. Black Manta does get to appear in his full armor and fight Aquaman, only to be sent tumbling off a cliff and swept away by the sea. You'd be forgiven for believing that was it for him, but Black Manta shows up in the mid-credits scene having been rescued by Dr. Shin and ready for another round.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Downplayed. He's a skilled fighter, but due to Aquaman's Atlantean biology, his weapons are largely ineffective. Once he's provided with Atlantean weaponry and crafts power armor to boot, he's able to put those skills to good use and become a serious threat to Aquaman. He gets cocky and ends up losing again, which does nothing to curb his determination.
  • The Unfettered: You'd think after getting beaten by Aquaman twice — the second time with Atlantean tech on his side — would convince Black Manta to back down. It doesn't. He comes back for the sequel with a new suit, new tech and a new crew.
  • Unknown Rival: When David Kane meets Aquaman, Kane says as a pirate, he's dreamed of fighting the protector of the ocean for some time and considers him his Arch-Enemy. Aquaman is just meeting him for the first time and has no idea who he is and doesn't care. After Aquaman defeats him and refuses to rescue his father from death, Kane reinvents himself as Black Manta, obtains some Atlantean technology, and forces Aquaman to take him seriously.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Black Manta's humiliating defeat coupled with his father's indirect death at the hands of Aquaman have filled him with a need for vengeance that will never be satisfied until Aquaman is dead.
  • Use Your Head: The broad shape of Black Manta's helmet combined with the thrusters in his boots allows him to ram targets with considerable force.
  • Villainous Legacy: Played With. David's grandfather was one of the very first frogmen of the United States, during World War II. He was so good at being unseen he was nicknamed "Manta", before turning to scavenging and piracy after being disrespected by the US government note . David's father Jesse is a pirate as well and hands David the knife that originally belonged to that grandfather. David fittingly ends up calling himself Black Manta, combining his grandfather's nickname with the black outfits belonging to his father's crew.
  • Villainous Underdog: His first fight against Aquaman is completely one-sided, with Aquaman's strength, durability, and skill easily outclassing David and forcing his father to help him. As in the comics he's a regular human going up against a super-human and uses armor to compensate. The scene where he crafts his armor reinforces this and shows off his ingenuity and fallibility as he incorporates the plasma blaster into his helmet but nearly kills himself when the first attempt fails.
  • Villainous Valor: During their first meeting, he continues to try and fight Arthur, even though he is clearly outmatched, with none of his weapons working against the Atlantean.
  • Villains Want Mercy: Begged Arthur to save his father from drowning. Since neither David nor his father had given Arthur any reason to value their lives, the plea is ignored.
  • Walking Armory: Initially he attacked Aquaman with just knives and an assault rifle. After donning his iconic suit, Kane had access to his signature plasma beams, Atlantean steel swords, wrist blades, and an electrified harpoon launcher.
  • Weapon of Choice: Blades. The reason he customized a plasma cannon into a helmet was so he could keep his hands free for stabbing and slashing.
  • Wicked Cultured: Has enough literary knowledge to quote H. P. Lovecraft:
    "Loathsomeness waits and dreams in the deep, and decay spreads over the tottering cities of men!"
  • Wrecked Weapon: Twice. One of his swords is broken fighting Aquaman and his first Black Manta helmet is blasted by its own plasma beams.
  • You Are a Credit to Your Race: Orm has no problems working with Black Manta in spite of his misanthropy, likely because he knows that pirates don't have any empathy for their own either. This is emphasized with Orm being a white man of high status while Black Manta is a black man who is a pirate and mercenary.
  • You Killed My Father: The reason for his hatred of Arthur. While fighting Arthur in a submarine, David's father Jesse got trapped under a torpedo. David begged Arthur to help him out as the sub was sinking, but he refused, as a punishment for all the deaths the Kanes caused with their piracy.

Advertisement:

Belle Reve Inmates

    Kaleidoscope 

Kaleidoscope

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/kaleidoscope.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Natalia Safran

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate from the women's division.


    Calendar Man 

Julian Gregory Day / Calendar Man

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/calendar_man.jpg
"Hey, Polka-Dot Man, I was hoping you'd entertain my kid's birthday party, you fucking pussy!"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Sean Gunn

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate with a calendar gimmick.


  • Actor Allusion: Calendar Man gives Polka-Dot Man a hard time. Polka-Dot Man is played by David Dastmalchian, who also played Calendar Man in Batman: The Long Halloween. However, this is an unintentional example of the trope, as James Gunn has said that he had no idea that Dastmalchian played Calendar Man in The Long Halloween, and that the reason why he wrote Calendar Man into The Suicide Squad because of Sean Gunn's striking resemblance to how Calendar Man is drawn in the comics.
  • Bald of Evil: To show off his tattoos.
  • Jerkass: He bullies Polka-Dot Man for no other reason than because he's a dick.
  • Laughing at Your Own Jokes: He makes a cruel jibe about Polka-Dot Man, then proceeds to laugh his ass off. It's easy to miss but ten seconds later after the scene cuts to Weasel, Calendar Man is still laughing at his own "joke".
  • Tattooed Crook: His scalp has abbreviated names of the 12 months etched around it.

    Double Down 

Jeremy Tell / Double Down

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/double_down.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jared Leland Gore

Appearances: The Suicide Squad

A Belle Reve inmate that was cursed with skin which peels off.


Advertisement:

Intergang

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/intergang2_8.png

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files | Black Adam

A terrorist organization with access to advanced technology. They have troops stationed across America, with a faction deployed to Kahndaq to retrieve their mystical artifacts.


    General 
  • Action Fashionista: A number of them have customized their uniforms. The one Black Adam fried wore a beret, while one of his companions wore sunglasses with red frames, another had a tattoo on the side of his head and the last one had cornrows.
  • Asshole Victim: Black Adam kills a few of them as soon as he's reawakened.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: They recruit women and various ethnicities.
  • Fantastic Terrorists: They've managed to acquire all sorts of advanced technology that no real terrorist organization could even dream of getting without the backing of a corrupt government. Their goals are currently focused on uncovering the tomb of Black Adam and harnessing the powers it holds.
  • Hover Bike: Their prime mode of transport.
  • Matching Bad Guy Vehicles: When they're trying to be discreet, Intergang agents drive around in sleek black cars.
  • Mob War: They've had to deal with two gangs in New York getting ahold of their weapons, leading to a shootout.
  • Shooting Superman: They take shots at Black Adam as soon as he fries one of them, which only agitates him.
  • Sleeves Are for Wimps: Some of them leave their arms exposed due to being in the arid climate of Kahndaq.
  • Too Dumb to Live: One of the Intergang agents tries whacking Black Adam in the head with a metal rod, to which Adam doesn't even blink. Not only is picking a head-on fight with a man more muscular than yourself a bad idea, but the thug tried whacking him again.

    Bruno Mannheim 

Bruno Mannheim

Species: Human

Citizenship: TBA

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

The head of Intergang.


  • Adaptational Curves: His holographic projection is pretty murky, but from what can be seen he's not as bulky as he appears in the comics and cartoons.
  • Alternate Self: Mannheim has one on Earth 167.
  • Faux Affably Evil: His interaction with Adrianna has a very unconvincing veneer of politeness, threatening her family and insulting her country while claiming to be "reasonable".
  • The Ghost: He interrogates Adrianna via hologram, but has yet to appear in person.
  • It's Personal: After Adrianna foils his plans, Mannheim orders his troops to focus their resources on capturing her.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He refers to Kahndaq as a "Hellhole of an armpit of a country".
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: His true reason for invading Kahndaq is to retrieve a mysterious black crown. Said crown resides in the tomb where Black Adam is sealed away.

    Gentleman Ghost 

James Craddock / "The Gent" / Gentleman Ghost

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220707_183500_samsung_internet.jpg
"If you had minded your own business...left well enough alone...I'd still be alive — I'd be alive — and you... you wouldn't be about to die!"

Species: Human-ghost

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

"Now I can be anything I want. Thief or terror...gentleman—or ghoul! But you, Carter...you never change. Oh yes. I know who you are behind your mask. They showed me. They showed me everything about you...who you are...what you fear...Look at you...trapped in the past...a shadow of the man...of the hero...you used to be...broken...irrelevant...little more than a relic yourself!"

An expert thief hired by Intergang to steal an artifact made of eternium. He dies while on the run from Hawkman, but makes a pact with demonic forces who agree to resurrect him if he kills Hawkman.


  • Adaptational Superpower Change: In the comics Gentleman Ghost was invisible and wore a period suit. This version has a visible face and wears 21st century formal attire. As a nod to his comics incarnation, he briefly assumes the form before turning into a ghoul to torment Hawkman.
  • Deal with the Devil: Craddock becomes Gentleman Ghost by offering to deliver Hawkman's soul to the demons that greeted him upon dying. Given they were planning to devour his soul on sight, he wasn't exactly holding all the trumps in this agreement.
  • Delusions of Eloquence: Craddock giving himself the codename "Gent" and his waiter disguise make it seem like he's trying to cultivate a sophisticated image. In truth he's a thug who isn't as refined as he believes himself to be. His beef with Hawkman also brings out his Ax-Crazy side.
  • Dragged Off to Hell: Gentleman Ghost fails to kill Hawkman. Instead, Hawkman stabs his soul through the chest with a shard of eternium. The demons he'd made a deal with view this as a failure and drag him off to his eternal damnation.
  • Gentleman Thief: His codename is "The Gent" and he's limber enough to leap across rooftops in formal wear. Personality-wise, he's not as affable as his name would infer.
  • Holy Burns Evil: Craddock was able to abscond the eternium when he was alive, but his deal with the demons to bring him back as a ghost with the power to torment Hawkman came with a cost; he's now vulnerable to eternium. When Craddock grabs a shard of it, his ghostly hand burns. Hawkman sends him to Hell by stabbing Craddock's ghost in the chest.
  • Le Parkour: He manouvers over rooftops using parkour movements.
  • Never My Fault: Craddock blames Hawkman for his death, when the only reason he died was because he was on the run after committing a heist and drove recklessly.
  • Sadist: Once he becomes a ghost, Craddock torments Hawkman with the sight of Doctor Fate as a skeleton and Jeremy getting impaled.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: Craddock isn't the least bit horrified when he sees his dead body.

    "Jumbo" 

"Jumbo"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220907_120830_samsung_internet.jpg
"What is it they say? About good things coming to those who wait?"

Species: Human

Citizenship: TBA

Affiliation(s): Intergang

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

"Professor, I have a few questions about your extracurriculars."

Bruno Mannheim's chief enforcer, deployed to Kahndaq to oversee their activities.


  • Ambiguously Human: He's very large and strong enough to punch through solid steel, but there's no confirmation if he's a metahuman or just abnormally muscular. Since he's severely weakened when his mask is disconnected from the tanks on his outfit, it raises the likelihood that he gets his strength from advanced performance enhancers.
  • Badass Armfold: He assumes this pose when Adrianna challenges him to a fight.
  • Bad Boss: Incensed that Adrianna managed to outsmart him, Jumbo grabs the nearest Intergang member by the throat and orders him to search for the missing artifact.
  • Dragon-in-Chief: The brawn to Bruno Mannheim's brains.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Just like his boss, he maintains a calm facade while making it clear he's going to enjoy beating his quarry to a pulp.
  • Gas Mask Mooks: He wears a mask at all times.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: When Jumbo's usual torture methods don't break Adrianna, he tries to threaten her with a portable blowtorch. By this point Adrianna has slipped out of her bonds and catches him offguard. She then uses the blowtorch to sever the tubes connected to his mask, slowing Jumbo down just long enough for her to escape.
  • Muscles Are Meaningless: A hulking brusier who gets winded and has his arm broken by a woman of average size and build.
  • Neck Lift: He keeps the other agents in line by hoisting one up by the neck as he gives orders.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute:
    • He's similar to Nam-Ek from Man of Steel in that he's a large, masked man with super strength.
    • He physically resembles Batman's enemy Bane, up to the point where Adrianna incapacitates him by severing the tubes connected to his mask.
  • Underestimating Badassery: Jumbo didn't count on a lightweight professor being combat-savvy enough to actually give him a physical challenge.
  • Would Hit a Girl: He's got no qualms roughing up Adrianna despite being much bigger than her.

Enemies faced by the Flash

    Girder 

Tony Woodward / Girder

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220914_180321_samsung_internet.jpg
"Why can't you just die?! If I don't get paid, my pop's going to be the one six feet under!"

Species: Enhanced Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Inzerillo crime family

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

"I'm not here to rob the bank, Flash — I'm here for you! There's a price on your head and I'm here to collect. You wanted to play hero? Time to pay up!"

A criminal with metal skin.


  • Alternate Self: Has one on Earth-Prime.
  • Bruiser with a Soft Center: He may be a criminal enforcer, but he genuinely cares for his father.
  • Chrome Champion: Girder has a body made of highly durable metal.
  • Dragon-in-Chief: He works for a non-powered Gotham mobster.
  • Driven to Villainy: His father is ill and Girder is unable to pay for his medical expense without turning to crime.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Girder only became a criminal to help his father.
  • Ironic Name: A metallic being with the surname "Woodward".
  • It's Personal: Girder blames the Flash for his boss refusing to pay him.
  • Made of Iron: Duh. The Flash finds out the hard way that punching him at superspeeds is quite painful.
  • Mirror Character: Just like Barry, Girder gained his powers through circumstance and he takes on whatever job he can get so he can help his father.
  • No-Sell: Due to his metal skin, the Flash is unable to hurt him until he gets some combat training from Batman.
  • Pet the Dog: Girder pays his father a visit and cools down his father's high temperature by placing one of his meatl fingers on his forehead.
  • Rated M for Manly: He's ridiculously tall with a muscular build and wild facial hair.
  • Starter Villain: Girder is the first supervillain the Flash faces on his own.
  • Then Let Me Be Evil: It's implied that whatever transformed him affected his career prospects to the point where only a crime boss would give him a job.
  • Threshold Guardian: The Flash finds himself out of his depth dealing with a foe whose superpower allows him to withstand high-speed attacks, which compels the Flash to seek out an upgrade to his fighting skills and suit.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: When the Flash hears about his personal issues, he pulls some strings and gets Girder's father the help he needs.

    Tar Pit 

Joey Monteleone / Tar Pit

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220402_202632_samsung_internet.jpg

Species: Metahuman

Citizenship: American

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

A supervillain whose mind inhabits molten tar.


  • Alternate Company Equivalent: He bears a strong resemblance to Venom.
  • Blob Monster: Tar Pit's the Central City equivalent to Clayface.
  • The Mafia: His beef with the Flash comes from the speedster intefering with his family's business. Given his Italian-sounding surname, it's pretty clear what business his family is running if they're getting grief from a crime fighter.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Tar Pit emits violet fumes from his eyes and other body parts.

    The Top 

Roscoe Dillon / The Top

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20220402_203750_samsung_internet.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Appearances: The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive

A criminal inventor.


  • Alternate Self: Has one on Earth-Prime as Rosa Dillon.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: The Top plans to test his weapons on the Flash and sell the most effective ones to his fellow criminals. Given the extent to the Flash's power, any weapon that could overpower him would fetch a nifty price.
  • Domino Mask: The Top only covers his eyes.
  • Green and Mean: Just like in the comics, the Top wears a green suit with yellow accents.

Miscellaneous

    White Dragon 

August Ransom "Auggie" Smith / White Dragon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/auugiesmith.jpg
"How did my fuckin' sperm grow into a nancy-boy like you?"
Click here to see him as White Dragon 

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Affiliation(s): Aryan Empire

Portrayed By: Robert Patrick

Appearances: Peacemaker

"Forty years ago, God challenged me as he did Abraham, but I was too weak to listen. But not no more!"

Father to Christopher Smith, aka Peacemaker. He's also the White Dragon, leader of a white supremacist group known as the Aryan Empire.


  • Abusive Parents: In The Suicide Squad there's a moment where Peacemaker empathizes with Bloodsport over his issues with his own father, and Amanda Waller states that his father trained him to kill. When Chris comes to see him after four years in jail, he's intensely emotionally abusive to his son, and it's heavily implied he was physically abusive to him when he was young. At one point, Auggie berates him with a homophobic slur, despite Peacemaker being so manly he's an outright parody of masculinity. He also has no problems selling out his own son to the police after he finds out Economos framed him for Peacemaker's actions during his first Butterfly encounter, and to make it worse, he tells Peacemaker just what he plans to do to his face when Peacemaker visits him in prison to explain the situation (and how he had no knowledge of it). Then, he takes it even further after being released from prison when he decides to kill his son. On top of that, he had both his sons fight for sport, an incident that got one of them killed.
  • Action Dad: He's a supervillain, and the father of Peacemaker.
  • Adaptational Nationality: Apparently fully American here, while his comics counterpart was an Austrian Nazi.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Named Wolfgang Schmidt in the comics.
  • Archnemesis Dad: To Peacemaker.
  • Asshole Victim: Enforced. Economos frames him for Peacemaker's crimes by changing his fingerprints and car registration number. Peacemaker absolutely hates it, because Auggie was still his father. Other than Peacemaker, nobody really pities him for being framed, since he's an outspoken white supremacist, homophobe, xenophobe, and supervillain who uses his powers to put all of his violent bigotry into practice. Murn is only angry with the decision because it would spoil Peacemaker's cooperation with the team.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: His suit is armed to the teeth, but there are multiple gaps between its armor plating, something Vigilante points out when he first sees it, and later takes advantage of to disable it.
  • Bad People Abuse Animals: Has zero shame in beating up Peacemaker's pet eagle.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Is this with "Royland Goff." It's Goff who serves as the overarching threat behind the alien invasion, but Auggie is the biggest obstacle for Peacemaker's Character Arc and his most personal foe. Episode 6 sees him managing to avoid Goff's massacre of the police station by a stroke of cruel irony, then deciding to suit up and kill his own son. He's killed in the penultimate episode, leaving Goff as the main antagonist.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: While he's his son's most personal enemy and is incredibly dangerous in his own right, Auggie poses nowhere near the threat of the Butterflies. His attack on Chris proves to be an utter failure, with his whole group getting slaughtered before his son finally shoots him dead with one episode left to go. This embarrassing defeat is made even more noticeable by the Butterflies making far better progress in their objectives in the same episode. However, this also winds up being downplayed a bit, since even after Chris has defeated the far more dangerous Butterflies and even made peace with their surviving leader, Auggie continues to haunt him even after he's gone.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity: When he finally has his son cornered, he takes the time to list down all of Peacemaker's transgressions before finishing him off. Unfortunately, this gives Vigilante the opening to sneak back, attack him, and disable his armor, and Economos the time to gun down all of his white supremacist gang. Peacemaker then takes this chance to beat him to a pulp and finish him off once and for all.
  • Boom, Headshot!: How he goes out, courtesy of his own son.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Mocks his son for not having the guts to shoot him while depowered and completely exposed, about a second before Chris finally puts a bullet in his head.
  • Canon Foreigner: Zig-Zagged, Auggie is not the White Dragon from the comics (Daniel Ducannon and William Heller), but an original character based on the White Dragon alias.
  • Churchgoing Villain: Auggie believes his actions are in service of a higher power, even comparing himself to Abraham when he decides to murder Peacemaker.
  • Color Character: The White Dragon.
  • Composite Character: James Gunn confirmed that Auggie is a combination of the comics Peacemaker's father Wolfgang Schmidt and the William Heller incarnation of the White Dragon.
  • Corrupted Character Copy: While still a character of his own from the comics, with Auggie's level of Gadgeteer Genius and the ways his White Dragon armor functions, he almost comes off as a racist discount version of Iron Man.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: He's developed a series of weapons, high-tech armor, and even an armory that can be hidden in a different dimension, all things that could make him fabulously wealthy. But, Auggie has no ambition outside of killing people of color and other minorities, so he lives in a plain house in a quiet town.
  • Death by Irony: Peacemaker shoots him in the head with a Luger pistol, a weapon famously used by the Nazis.
  • Even Evil Can Be Loved: He's done nothing but wrong to his son practically his entire life, and Peacemaker is aware that he's a horrible unapologetic bigot. However, Peacemaker continues to seek his approval, and is pissed when he finds out that Economos had him framed for the murder of Annie Sturphausen. Even though Auggie completely deserves it, Peacemaker emotionally falls apart after he puts a bullet in his skull.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Something of an Informed Attribute. Despite being a former supervillain, he supported Chris' turn as a vigilante despite it not being racially predisposed, and apparently shares a dislike of crime with his surviving son.
  • Evil Genius: He's responsible for creating Peacemaker's helmets, the quantum unfolding storage area in his house, and his White Dragon suit.
  • Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor: When Peacemaker tells him about Bloodsport's father torturing him with rats, he finds it hilarious and bursts out laughing.
  • Evil Is Hammy: Becomes this after donning his White Dragon armor to kill Chris, going on a long, shouty rant about religion and moral superiority while promising to murder his own son.
  • Evil Luddite: Auggie considers Peacemaker's taste in 80's glam rock to be a personal failing. Given Peacemaker's taste in music is actually quite popular among right-wing Americans, it goes to show how radical White Dragon's beliefs are that he can't cut loose like a normal person.
  • Evil Old Folks: He's the oldest character in the Peacemaker series, and arguably the vilest villain being a racist terrorist.
  • Expy:
    • He bears a resemblance to Herman Baggerly, another bigoted, self-righteous abusive father who acts as a corrupting influence on his son. They're even played by the same actor, and James Gunn admitted that Auggie's characterization was partially based on Baggerly.
    • Robert Patrick also played a caustic father who blamed his surviving son for his firstborn's death in Walk the Line.
  • Flat Character: Played for Drama. Beyond his Evil Genius qualities (which are only slightly ever touched upon) and his Pragmatic Villainy, there are not that many layers to Auggie's character: he's a racist, homophobic, generally bigoted conservative, an abusive father, and a white supremacist supervillain with a cult following. He is a straightforwardly vile character who's more interesting as an accessory to Peacemaker's mental trauma and toxic family dynamics than as a character himself.
  • Hate Sink: Aside from his one minor Pet the Dog moment, which is eventually subverted, Auggie Smith is completely and utterly devoid of redeeming qualities. Not only is he extremely racist, a Neo-Nazi, and the supervillain known as the White Dragon, but he's also an awful parent who's largely responsible for Peacemaker being the way he is. During the flashback in episode 4, Auggie is shown to have preferred Chris' late brother over him, and forced Chris to murder a man he had captured, all while laughing sadistically.
    • Episode 7 shows that Auggie made his two sons fight each other in no-holds-barred fistfights while him and his friends drank beer and bet on the winner. When Chris accidentally killed Keith, Auggie immediately blamed Chris for "murdering" his brother, ignoring the fact he forced them to fight in the first place.
  • Horns of Villainy: The White Dragon's mask has a pair of horns. The Aryan Empire all wear makeshift masks reminiscent of KKK hoods that also appear to have horns.
  • Hypocrite:
    • Auggie is a religious man, yet he has a dragon motif. Dragons are meant to be avatars of the Devil, which his costume resembles.
    • He claims that he's not a rat, then immediately threatens to spill everything Chris has told him about his team's actions to the police in exchange for his freedom. Chris even points out that this would make him a rat.
    • In a more symbolic sense, he claims to be a die-hard American patriot and even accuses his son of working to usurp the USA, but his willingness to attack Eagly (who is a bald eagle, the American bird) shows that ultimately he doesn't give a damn about America except as an excuse to be a violent racist.
  • Jerkass: Auggie is a total asshole. He's a massively bigoted white supremacist and an abusive father who's constantly berating his son for the slightest of failures.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Even after Peacemaker explains to him that he had nothing to do with him being framed for murder, Auggie still verbally berates his son and threatens to rat him out so he can be freed.
    • White Dragon tries to kill Eagly when it gets in his way. This is enough to cause Peacemaker to beat his dad to a pulp.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Auggie is finally killed by his own son, who he's abused his entire life. For added karma, Peacemaker shoots him immediately after Auggie taunts him that he doesn't have the guts to shoot him. Even the weapon that Chris picks up to shoot him happens to be a Luger.
  • Light Is Not Good: His White Dragon armor has white coloration, and he is not a good guy.
  • Lone Wolf Boss: He has no connection to the Butterflies, and is simply a white supremacist who's out for revenge.
  • Moral Myopia:
    • As his rant in "Stop Dragon My Heart Around" proves, he genuinely believes himself to have the moral high ground, in spite of all the awful things he's done.
    • He's a non-powered white supremacist in a world where metahumans exist.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain: It's hinted that the reason Christopher hasn't killed him already despite being aware that he's a horrifically abusive father and that his mishandling of his young children led to his brother's death, not to mention Peacemaker having become very capable of doing so by the present time, is a combination of his twisted childhood making him obedient to him and his guilt and shame over having killed one family member already, meaning he's heavily reluctant to consider doing the same for his sole remaining family. After Auggie attacks him with his Powered Armour and makes it clear he wants to kill him, gives him a The Reason You Suck speech that blames Christopher for his brother's death and makes it painfully explicit that he always considered him The Un-Favourite, and attacks Eagly, Peacemaker is pushed way past his Rage-Breaking Point and loses all restraint towards him, subjecting him to a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown and shooting him in the head with only slight hesitation.
  • Never My Fault: Blames Chris for the death of his brother, even though he was having them fight for sport in the first place.
  • Offing the Offspring: After getting out of prison, he dons his White Dragon armor and attempts to kill his son, only for his son to kill him instead.
  • Oh, Crap!: He has a hell of a case of this when Chris actually shoots him straight in the head, with his final expression being an expression that screams that he didn't think his son would actually do it.
  • Old Superhero: Villainous version. Agguie is an elderly supervillain, and age really has slowed him down quite a bit. In the end, the main reasons why he is even really still a threat to be reckoned with is because he is still able to command quite a bit of respect and influrence amongst the white supremacist group he used to hang with, and because he wears a suit of Power Armor. Otherwise, he is really just a decrepit old man with his glory years decades behind him and he is easily dispatched by Chris when his flunkies have been taken out and his armor is disabled.
  • Outliving One's Offspring: His eldest son Keith died years before reaching adulthood, and he blames Chris for killing him.
  • Paper Tiger: Ultimately, Auggie isn't that big a threat in the end. Sure, he's a former supervillain, but it's clear his glory days are decades in the past, and he spends most of his time watching right-wing news and whining about non-white and LGBTQ people in a dumpy suburb. When he finally gets into a serious fight, he's taken out fast.
  • Pet the Dog: While he holds his son in obvious contempt, he did take care of Eagly for 4 years. As of episode 7, this moment has been subverted, when Auggie outright tries to kill Eagly for getting in his way.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He is openly racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic, constantly dropping slurs left and right, and is the leader of a gang of white supremacists.
  • Power Armor: His White Dragon armor qualifies: it grants him superhuman strength, flight capability, protection from gunfire and explosives, and is armed with some kind of powerful repulser-like energy blast weapons.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: He's an unapologetic white supremacist, but he's smart enough not to be provoked by Vigilante's insults extolling the contributions of black people to American culture, as Auggie knows he's only going to make things worse for himself if he looks like an aggressor on the security cameras.
  • Rage Helm: The White Dragon mask has a furrowed brow with red lenses, evoking a Death Glare.
  • Red Is Violent: His White Dragon armor has red coloration, and he is a violent racist.
  • Reimagining the Artifact: In the comics, Peacemaker's father was a Nazi officer that moved to America. Given the fact that any still-living Nazi would be old enough to be Peacemaker's great-grandfather, Auggie Smith is instead changed to a retired supervillain that beats his son.
  • Retired Badass: He was a former soldier in the U.S. Army and a former white supremacist leader, as the White Dragon.
  • Retired Monster: Although his past as the White Dragon hasn't been fully explored, his status as a supervillain seems to be well known to the public, and his reputation seems to have been a fearsome one. Most notably, Murn is equal parts enraged and concerned at Economos framing him for Peacemaker's crimes and incurring his wrath. His fears are shown to be well-placed in episode 6, which sees him donning his White Dragon armor and rallying his followers to kill Peacemaker.
  • Right-Wing Militia Fanatic: More so than his son, being more openly homophobic and racist on top of having a high-tech arsenal hidden away in his home. Not to mention, he is a white supremacist leader.
  • Scary Impractical Armor: His White Dragon armor sure looks intimidating, and its combat capabilities are nothing to sneeze at, but the gaps in the armor are wide enough to serve as weak points that Vigilante has no trouble exploiting.
  • Smug Snake: Extremely, but no more so than in his final minutes alive, where he's so sure that he's got Peacemaker under his thumb that he doesn't see his son actually shooting him coming.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: His comics counterpart killed himself when his son was 5. It turns out to actually be a case of Dies Differently in Adaptation.
  • Straw Character: He is staunchly far-right, watching a Strawman News Media channel and having a dislike for communists and minorities, specifically mentioning blacks and gay people, who make up half of Peacemaker's command staff.
  • Sub-Par Supremacist: His armor makes him a force to be reckoned with, but as soon as the armor is damaged by Vigilante, he gets beaten to a pulp and shot by Peacemaker.
  • Undignified Death: He dies getting his brains blown out before he could even finish talking. There's no grandeur to his death, no final words. He just drops dead with a goofy expression on his face on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by the corpses of his followers.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Despite Detective Song being the one responsible for getting him out of jail, he continues to make racist comments towards her.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: As it turns out, he relies heavily on his thugs and White Dragon armor to do anything in a fight. Once Vigilante disables his weapons, he doesn't even try to throw a punch because he's so used to steamrolling enemies with his wrist blasters, which in turn leads to Chris overwhelming and killing him easily.
  • Walking Spoiler: It's hard to talk about him without mentioning the fact that he's the ex-supervillain known as the White Dragon. His coming out of retirement doesn't actually happen until late in the series.
  • Younger than They Look: Not in the present, where he looks his age, but flashbacks of when Chris was a child, which take place at least 20 years in the past, show that he seemingly was always a wrinkly old fart. The only differentiation is that he used to have a mullet. This is especially glaring for anyone who has seen Terminator 2: Judgement Day, as they will know that Robert Patrick looked much sleeker around that time.

    Kite-Man 

Kite-Man

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

A kite-themed foe Peacemaker fought earlier in his career.


  • The Ghost: He's only mentioned in a clipping from a newspaper.
  • Harmless Villain: He was enough of a threat to get Peacemaker to save Evergreen from him, but theming yourself after kites doesn't exactly spell "dangerous".
  • Offscreen Villainy: All that's seen of his activities are a mention of him in a newspaper clipping.
  • Rogues' Gallery Transplant: He went from being Batman's foe to one of Peacemaker's enemies.

    Demons 

Demons

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20221004_163250_samsung_internet.jpg
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screenshot_20221004_163459_samsung_internet.jpg

Appearances: Black Adam - The Justice Society Files

Diabolical entities that have a score to settle with the Justice Society.


  • Baphomet: The demon that torments Doctor Fate has goatlike features.
  • Bird People: The demon that turns Craddock into Gentleman Ghost has wings and a bird's head.
  • Expy:
    • The first demon has a bit in common with Hawkman's enemy Thasaro, being a bird-themed apparition that has it in for Hawkman and treats his human minions like cannon fodder.
    • The second demon is similar to Trigon from the Teen Titans. Like Trigon he has two pairs of eyes and can only interact with Earth by possessing a young girl.
  • Red Is Violent: Both demons are red.
  • Spikes of Villainy: The demon who confronts Doctor Fate has quills on his head and forearms.
  • Winged Humanoid: Both demons have wings. One has bird wings while the other has bat wings.

Top