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Films with their own pages


  • A minor example in the 2011 film The Fifth Quarter, an American football flick based on the true story of linebacker Jon Abbate and the 2006 Wake Forest team for which he was one of the central figures. In the film, Wake ties for the Atlantic Coast Conference championship. The real Demon Deacons team won the title outright.note 
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  • 1930 biopic Abraham Lincoln is just full of this. It includes Lincoln dramatically collapsing on Ann Rutledge's grave during a thunderstorm, while historians still aren't sure just how serious Lincoln's thing with Rutledge was; and Lincoln giving a speech from his box at Ford's Theatre, right before he gets shot, and the speech itself is a mashup of the Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural Address.
  • Adrift: The film seemingly has Richard surviving the storm that wrecks their yacht. In reality, Tami was knocked out then awoke to find herself alone on the boat. Ultimately subverted when it's revealed that Richard was a delirious vision by Tami, and was Dead All Along.
  • Numerous movies have inaccurately portrayed The Alamo with the curved roof at the time of the eponymous battle—in truth, the roof had crumbled due to neglect, and it was 1912 before the familiar facade was restored.
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  • Alien vs. Predator presents an odd historical scenario where a whaling station has been abandoned in 1904, the year the first whaling station was established.
  • One of the major gripes with All Eyez on Me was how several aspects of Tupac Shakur's life were fabricated or twisted for the movie, going hand in hand with Anachronism Stew:
    • Not long after the film's release Jada Pinkett Smith went on record saying that there were several inaccuracies surrounding her relationship with Pac, including:
      • Tupac never read her the poem he wrote about her, and she didn't know about it until it was posthumously published in The Rose That Grew From Concrete.
      • He abruptly left Baltimore, and never disclosed why he had to leave, nor did he say goodbye, to Jada.
      • Jada also didn't attend any of Tupac's shows by request, nor did they have an argument backstage.
    • Tupac's (truncated) House of Blues set was fairly accurate, except for the addition of "Hail Mary", which was never performed live during his lifetime, and was likely added in for fanservice more than anything.
    • During the scene where Tupac meets Faith Evans and discussed collaborating, tracks from All Eyez on Me can be heard in the background. In real life, the album wasn't out yet, and the 2Pac/Evans collaboration ("Wonda Why They Call U Bytch") was recorded the very same night they met at the club.
    • After Tupac is shot in a drive-by and taken to a hospital, Big Frank gets out his car and shows his LAPD badge to the Las Vegas police officers on the scene. Big Frank was never a LAPD officer.
  • Allied:
    • Max is told that if Marianne's a traitor, he'll have to execute her himself or be hanged for treason as an accomplice. If any such arrangement ever existed, it was well hidden. Spies were arrested and dealt with through the regular legal system.
    • The fact that there are two Nazi agents in Hampstead running Marianne. Though they wouldn't find out till after the war, MI 5 successfully turned or imprisoned every single German agent from relatively early on. When it turns out she is a traitor, it would be much more likely they'd turn her or secretly Feed the Mole, especially when she was clearly acting under duress and willing to turn. So close to D-Day (which used these techniques to successfully mislead the Nazis) executing an agent whose cover was considered "safe" would be a blatant waste of resources for MI 5.
  • American Gangster, presented as a biographical film about Harlem drug dealer Frank Lucas, is inaccurate concerning real events from Frank Lucas' life. Denzel Washington admitted much of the film was fabricated for dramatic effect. Lucas did not have a child and was not involved with the Drug Enforcement Administration to the extent portrayed in the film.
  • Amistad:
    • Martin Van Buren didn't campaign actively for re-election, let alone from the back of a train, as it was in fact considered ungentlemanly for people to actively seek the presidency until near the end of the 19th century.note 
    • The initial hearing ends with the U.S. Navy officers having their salvage claim thrown out, and the two surviving Amistad crewmembers being arrested for slave trading. In reality, the navy officers did get awarded a third of the remaining salvage aboard the ship — which was admittedly more a gesture than anything else, as said salvage value was close to zero once you took out the slaves and perishable goods on-board — and the surviving crewmembers were actually arrested before the case was heard; they subsequently posted bail, returned to Cuba, and the charges against them were quietly dropped on the understanding that they'd really get the book thrown at them if they were ever caught slave trading again.
    • The Lomboko slave fortress was not destroyed until 1849, at which point US Secretary of State John Forsyth had been dead for eight years, and thus Captain Fitzgerald wouldn't be dictating a letter to him (or assuming that he didn't know Forsyth had died, it would never be delivered).
  • Ammonite: Mary and Charlotte have a romance. In reality, there's no evidence Mary and Charlotte were anything but close friends. Further, Mary's portrayed as much older than her (to match the actress's ages). Charlotte was actually a decade older than Mary.
  • Animal House has an in-universe example:
    Bluto: Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? Hell no!
  • The Assignment (1997): Obviously, the film is fictional. Carlos never actually lived in the Soviet Union (though he was connected to the KGB through the East Germans). As a result of Western pressure several states denied him sanctuary before the Sudanese arrested him while he was there in a deal with the French and US governments. There's no evidence any of the rest happens, despite it being framed as possibly Based on a True Story (at least very loosely).
  • Atonement sees a main character die in the Balham station disaster (a German bomb was dropped on the road above the station - the tube platforms of which were being used as air-raid shelters - causing the northbound tunnel to partially collapse, flooding both platforms with water and earth from the ruptured water mains and sewers above), but stated that it happened a day later than it actually happened.
  • Birdman of Alcatraz: Stroud's original crime was actually shooting dead a man who'd refused to pay his girlfriend (whom he acted as pimp for) and then beating her up, not in revenge over her rape. While first in prison, he became notorious as one of the most violent inmates, getting six months more on three assaults. He killed a guard for denying Stroud a visit with his brother, not his mother (Stroud hadn't seen him in eight years).
  • BlacKkKlansman:
    • The whole third act of the film about the bomb was invented to give the story a satisfying climax. The real success of the undercover operation was discovering that several of the KKK members were stationed at NORAD, which happens in the middle of the film.
    • A civil rights leader played by Harry Belafonte lectures a group of students and states that The Birth of a Nation was hailed by Woodrow Wilson as "like writing history with lightning." This is an urban legend that was probably started by the author of the original book upon which the film was based.
  • Black Knight (2001): Neither King Leo or the Queen were real. The actual king in that era was Edward III. Probably this indicates it really was All Just a Dream.
  • Bridge of Spies:
    • When attorney James Donovan is recruited to defend accused spy Rudolf Abel, he protests that he is primarily an insurance lawyer. However, the film does not mention that he was also General Counsel for the Office of Strategic Services (the forerunner to the CIA) during World War II (between 1943 to 1945, to be exact) and so was fully experienced dealing with spies.
    • Donovan was also fully experienced in dealing with big, controversial cases: he became assistant to Justice Robert H. Jackson at the Nuremberg trials. While he prepared for the trials, he was also working as an adviser for the documentary feature The Nazi Plan. Donovan was the presenter of visual evidence at the trial.
    • The Real Life Frederic Pryor has noted that his movie counterpart's romance with a German girl was created out of whole cloth, and that his arrest had more to do with genuine confusion than helping out dissidents. More importantly, his East German lawyer wasn't an Amoral Attorney, but did his best to represent Pryor's interests.
  • The opening narration for A Bridge Too Far goes thusly: "In 1944, the Second World War was in its fifth year and still going Hitler's way. German troops controlled most of Europe. D-Day changed all that." By 1944, the war was quite definitely not going Hitler's way anymore. A constant barrage of defeats on the Eastern Front and Anglo-American air raids over German cities meant that, by the time D-Day happened, Hitler's defeat was only a matter of time. It was launched to help accelerate the end of the war in Europe. And by this point German troops did not control "most of Europe" (outside of its Axis allies) anymore.
  • Captain America: The First Avenger: While it's hard to expect historical accuracy from a comic book movie, we're shown multiracial American troops serving together. In fact, the US Army wouldn't be desegregated until 1948. Also, Steve Rogers is shown reading a newspaper at the recruiting office that mentions the Nazis retaking Zhitomyr. Who would they have retaken it from? The city was in their hands from 1941 until 1943, and the movie is set in 1942.
  • The Damned (1969): The Night of the Long Knives compresses numerous disparate murders and arrests, spread over three days and across different parts of Germany, into a giant massacre of SA members at a single location in one, well, night. Not to mention Visconti's depiction of the SA staging a gay orgy just before being killed.note 
  • Dances with Wolves: Although more accurate than previous films in its depiction of the West and native peoples, it still has inaccuracies. First, the whites are shown as hunting buffalo solely to take skins. This was not yet the case in 1865, and would only begin in 1871. At that point buffalo were still hunted by the whites for meat. Secondly, the Lakota are portrayed as simply defending themselves, and the Pawnee are evil allies of the US government. However, it was actually the Lakota who had been the aggressors against the Pawnee, moving into the Plains in the late 1700s from the northeast. This is why tribes such as the Pawnee, Arikara and Crow were allies of the US government against the Lakota (not that it helped them later, of course), since the Lakota had been pushing them out of their land. While the Pawnee could be brutal, they were no more so than the Lakota. Of course, this is simply to show the viewer who the good and bad guys are, without complicating matters.
  • Defiance: The real Bielski Partisans simply hid in the forest protecting Jews, and never fought the Germans openly.
  • Donovan's Reef takes place on an island in French Polynesia where there had been fighting between US and Japanese forces during World War II, only French Polynesia was some 2,200 miles away from the actual Pacific campaign and did not see any battles.
  • Dreamgirls has a scene with the Dreams recording "Heavy" while there's a riot going on. This riot is actually the Detroit race riot of 1967. This, at first, is important for the sake of the era and to show how life was in Black America during the 60's. However, the next scene states that the year is actually 1966, making the riot scenes irrelevant.
  • As legendary as Martin Landau's performance as Bela Lugosi was in Ed Wood, Lugosi's family took umbradge with certain things. Namely, Bela Lugosi was not prone to fits of swearing, especially in front of women. It's also debatable what his actual opinion of Boris Karloff was.
  • Europa Europa:
    • The film implies that Solly’s entire family was killed, except for his brother Isaak. His brother David actually survived the war by fleeing to Palestine.
    • They also had a sister who fled to the Soviet Union, with her fate being unknown.
    • Solly's actual alias was Josef Perjell.
    • The final sequence, where Solly is set to be shot and then his brother recognizes him, didn't happen. He was captured and soon released (not by the Soviets, but the US Army) and spent some time searching for his relatives, finding Isaak months later.
  • The Experiment: Depicting a fictionalized account of the Stanford Prison Experiment, the organization responsible for conducting the experiment is the "Monad Corporation"; the word Stanford is never used.
  • FairyTale: A True Story: Aside from the fairies being shown as real, there's...
    • Elsie was sixteen as opposed to twelve. This is presumably why you don't see any of the real photographs of Elsie - because she looked it in real life. Frances is said to be eight in the film, but she was nine when she went to stay with the Wrights.
    • Frances's mother is dead in the film. She was alive and well in real life, and stayed with the Wrights as Frances did.
    • The photographs didn't become public until 1919 - after World War I was over. The Theosophical Society meeting Polly Wright went to was on fairy life itself, as opposed to angels. And the second set of photographs was taken in 1920 - when Frances was already back living with her family.
    • Harry Houdini did not visit Cottingley with Sir Arthur, nor did the girls meet him in real life. He also never endorsed the idea that the fairies were real, and didn't even start his debunkings until the 1920s.
  • A Fistful of Dynamite — John Mallory, being an Irish nationalist in 1913, owns an IRA flag, but the IRA did not exist until 1919. He would have most likely been an Irish volunteer for the IRB (Irish Republican Brotherhood) if part of any official organisation whatever.
  • Fist Of Fear Touch Of Death, possibly the most awful of all awful Brucesploitation films, states during a biographical sequence that Bruce Lee's grandfather was 19th Century China's greatest samurai.
  • For a Few Dollars More is set during the American Civil War, as shown by a safe full of Confederate money. One character comments that the bank's vault "weighs three tons and can't be opened with dynamite." Indeed it couldn't — dynamite wasn't invented, patented, or named until after the Civil War was over. But the line is delivered so effectively it's hard to picture it working as well with any other word.
  • Free State of Jones: Serena Knight actually left shortly before her death in 1889, rather than living out her life with Newt. It's possibly because he had begun an affair with Rachel's daughter (from a previous relationship), who at the time was fairly young (the film does not mention this). They later had children, like he'd done with Rachel. This omission ends up painting Newt in a better light. It's also unclear if the Knight Company actually flew the Union flag (one Northern newspaper reported this, but no other sources do) or engaged in full on battles with the Confederates.
  • Gangs of New York:
    • The New York City Draft Riot scene takes a few liberties with the events that actually transpired. The film exaggerates the extent of the riot and the sort of events that took place.
    • It is not known whether or not the US Navy actually fired artillery on Paradise Square, but it's probable that it didn't actually happen, though some historical evidence suggests artillery was used, albeit on land.
  • Gauguin: Voyage to Tahiti:
    • Paul Gauguin wasn't a Starving Artist anymore by the time he left France for Polynesia, he had managed to sell a number of his paintings whereas it's said he hasn't sold any in the film. His disillusion with bleak modernity in France in the late 19th century is still part of his motivations to go at the other side of the world in the film, that said.
    • Tehura was mentioned by Gauguin in his writings, but she might not have existed at all. Some scholars have speculated that Gauguin made her an amalgamation of several girls he was involved with.
    • Speaking of which, Gauguin had, ahem, relations with Tahitian teens or preteens (which causes controversy pretty much anytime there's an exhibition of his works of art these days), and these are not depicted (for understandable reasons).
  • Green Book: Don Shirley is depicted as being culturally distant from both his family and also other black people generally, though his living family insists that he was good friends with them and other prominent black musicians.
  • The Godfather Part III features the death of Popes Paul VI and John Paul I in the year 1979, while all these events actually took place in 1978!
  • Gold Through the Fire:
    • Christians are portrayed as completely underground in the Soviet Union and persecuted simply for printing the Bible. While persecution indeed occurred, it wasn't this systemic and extensive (by the time of the film at least).
    • Peter's lawyer claims separation of church and state isn't a concept that came from the Founding Fathers, implying it was invented later by anti-religious secularists. In fact, it was coined by Founding Father Thomas Jefferson.
  • Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters: The events take place in and around Augsburg, located in modern-day Germany. Except it's shown as a backwater village instead of the prosperous city it's been since almost the Roman times.
  • Harriet:
    • The Gideon Brodess character is a fictional creation of the movie. Harriet's real life owner at the time of her escape was actually a woman: Eliza Brodess, and she most certainly didn't hunt Harriet down personally. The son of Edward Brodess was actually called Jonathan, and very little is known about him historically.
    • The movie implies that the Meaningful Rename of Araminta to Harriet happened as soon as she reached freedom. It actually happened earlier, around the time she was married.
    • While Harriet did indeed pray for the death of Edward Brodess, she was not sold as punishment for this. Additionally, the movie leaves out the fact that her two brothers escaped with her on the first attempt (but ended up going back out of fear).
    • After the passing of the Fugitive Slave Act, William Still gives a speech about how it allows slave catchers to go after slaves in any state of the Union. This had always been allowed, thanks to a previous law. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 actually just gave more power to those hunting slaves, and weakened the protections of those accused of being escaped slaves.
    • The Marie Buchanan character is completely invented for the film - although it is possible someone like her did exist.
    • Harriet's first trip back south was actually to rescue her niece Kessiah Jolley Bowley and her two children. Her trip to rescue John came after that - but he did remarry in her absence.
    • The movie depicts the Brodesses hiring Bigger Long - a black slave catcher - to recapture Harriet and her brothers. There's no evidence suggesting the Brodesses hired a slave catcher and, while it was possible that there could be black slave catchers, they would have been extremely rare.
    • The will says that Harriet and her siblings would be freed when their mother turned forty-five. In reality, the will stipulated that the siblings would be set free when they turned forty-five - not at the same time as their mother.
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: At one point the protagonists journey on the London Underground, where Mr. Weasley is fascinated by an Oyster card reader - even though the film's meant to be set in 1995-1996 like the book, while the Oyster card only first appeared in 2003.
  • A Hidden Life: Franz is offered an alternative of serving in a noncombatant role. He refuses this too. In reality, Franz actually offered to be a combat medic, but this was refused.
  • Highlander
    • The film is unusual in getting the fact that Masamune was a swordmaker rather than a sword correct, but then claims that Masamune made Ramirez's katana thousands and thousands of years before he was born or katanas even existed. Lampshaded by Brenda as she explains that she wants to find this katana because it's dated to over a thousand years before katanas even existed, like finding a modern vehicle made in ancient times.
    • The villain is referred to as "the Kurgan" even back in medieval times. In reality, a "kurgan" is a burial mound, and "kurgan culture" is a modern archaeological term for a wide range of Proto-Indo-European cultures that are known primarily through study of their burial mounds. People in centuries past would not be calling him a "Kurgan."
    • The idea that kurgan cultures were Always Chaotic Evil people who would throw babies into pits for fun is pure Hollywood invention.
  • The Hoax tells the story of Clifford Irving's hoax involving publishing a made up biography of Howard Hughes, but author Clifford Irving claims the movie is a very distorted version of events, missing large coverage of what really happened while adding entirely fictional scenes, such as Irving receiving a mysterious package of files.
  • Hot Tub Time Machine:
    • Mötley Crüe's "Home Sweet Home" was already released in 1985; a year before it would have been possible for Lou to create the song.
    • A poster for Rambo III is seen on Blane's bedroom wall, despite the film being set over two years before Rambo III was released in May of 1988.
    • Poison performing at Kodiak Valley is seen as a big deal and April is covering the band for Spin Magazine, but in 1986 Poison had not yet achieved mainstream fame (that wouldn't happen until 1987).
    • Blaine references 21 Jump Street when he's arguing that the mains are Commie spies, but that didn't debut until 1987.
    • The first time Blaine and Chaz see Jacob, they act as though they've never seen a snowboard before and don't know what it is. Snowboarding has existed as a sport as far back as the 1970s, although in 1986 it was still a niche sport and most ski areas did not allow snowboarders. Still, the ski patrol personnel at Kodiak Valley would definitely know what a snowboard was.
    • The Denver Broncos' game winning drive in the AFC Championship game is lampooned despite it taking place in 1987.
    • Adam references Sweet Child O' Mine. Appetite For Destruction didn't come out until 1987, and the song itself wasn't released as a single until 1988.
    • A downplayed example. When Nick asks a girl "What color is Michael Jackson?" she responds "Um, black." Michael Jackson had shown signs of vitiligo early on in his career and his skin was already several shades lighter by 1986. Though Michael wouldn't turn completely white until around 1992.
  • In Houdini (1953), Harry Houdini dies from being unable to escape a water tank. The real Harry Houdini died from a ruptured appendix after receiving a series of punches from a university student, but many still believe in the film's presentation of his death.
  • The Hurricane starring Denzel Washington has a few problems:
    • The film portrays boxer Rubin Carter as a totally innocent man who is wrongly convicted of two murders thanks largely to a racist cop who's had it out for him since his boyhood. No evidence exists that the lead detective held any grudge against Carter, and he was described as a jovial man, very different from Dan Hedaya's scowling, tight-lipped portrayal.
    • The film whitewashes Carter's criminal history, depicting Carter as defending himself in boyhood against a pedophile, then being arrested and sent to a juvenile facility by this same racist detective. In reality, Carter was arrested for assaulting and robbing a man, a crime that is not disputed. This was only one of many offenses he committed.
    • Moreover, while Carter's actual guilt or innocence continues to be debated, the film portrays him as having been exonerated by the efforts of three Canadian activists and a young African-American who wrote to him in prison. They did not find evidence showing he was innocent, however, but only some pieces of evidence that had not been presented by the prosecution. He was ordered released or retried; New Jersey appealed this ruling, lost, and chose to not retry him again (he had already been retried before in 1976, with another guilty verdict resulting). Carter was thus never exonerated, or even acquitted.
    • To build up the idea of Carter being victimized by racism in the 1960s, he is shown defeating white boxer Joey Giardello, who is then declared to have won anyway. Everyone who was at that fight, including Carter himself, agreed that he lost and that Giardello was the better boxer in the ring that day. Giardello later sued the film's producers over this portrayal, settling for a hefty but undisclosed sum.
  • Hussar Ballad:
    • When Shura meets the wounded messenger in the beginning of her army career, he tells her that the message he carries is sent by a Field Marshal. At this time, there were no Field Marshals in the Russian army; both army leaders in this war, Kutuzov and de Tolly, would be promoted to this rank later.
    • When Shura first meets Rzhevsky, the latter addresses "Cornet Azarov" and declares that Shura's uniform is that of the Pavlograd Hussars. In fact, the uniform Shura's wearing is that of the Sumy Hussars. For reference, the Pavlograd uniform was green, while the Sumy one was gray. Some viewers suggest that Rzhevsky was merely testing the youngster.
    • Shura has a doll named Svetlana, which she got as a little girl. She was born in 1795. Except that name has no historical roots and was made up to be "kinda Russian" during the age of sentimentalism and romanticism in Russian literature. It first appeared in print in 1806 in a little-known poem titled "Svetlana and Mstislav". The name became widely known in 1813 with the publishing of Vasily Zhukovsky's ballad "Svetlana". Attempts to turn it into an actual name didn't start until the early 19th century and didn't really succeed until after the Red October, when church restrictions on names were removed. Furthermore, no one would be baptized under that name until 1943. Between 1917 and 1943, any girl registered as Svetlana would be baptized as Photinia (assuming a baptism even took place). There is still some debate about the name in the Russian Orthodox Church, with some accepting it, and others preferring Photinia. Presumably, Josef Stalin naming his daughter Svetlana and raising the church's status during World War II played a part in getting the church to recognize the name. Ancient Slavs had a similar female name Svetla and a male name Svetel.
  • Played for Laughs in Idiocracy (where the entire world has become less intelligent) a theme park of the future thought that Adolf Hitler and Charlie Chaplin were the same person, and both sides rode dinosaurs. "And then the UN un-Nazied the world forever."
  • I'm Not Ashamed:
    • The film is decried as horribly inaccurate and religiously biased. Dylan and Eric did NOT taunt Rachel for her religious faith, nor did they ever talk to Rachel before the shootings! This is not the first movie Pure Flix made that attacks atheists (previously as teachers, here students).
    • The question about God was asked of Valeen Schnurr, who had hid in the library, when she cried "Oh my God, no" after being shot once. Instead of killing her, she was spared after saying "Yes" to the question whether she believed, which goes entirely against the message the film gives. Schnurr survived, and it was misattributed to Cassie Bernall, who died. The whole story appears to be based on this, since Bernall is often hailed as a martyr for her supposed answer to the question since then (Rachel Scott's brother Craig is the one who related the story, though his words were misunderstood).
    • In real life, Rachel took Caucasian student Nick as her date to the prom before the shooting. In the movie, Rachel takes Asian-American student Kevin as her prom date.
    • Eric and Dylan are portrayed as console gamers whereas they preferred to game on the PC in real life.
    • Rachel is shown to be killed by Eric using Dylan's TEC-9, but in real life she was killed by Eric using his Hi-Point 995.
    • Rachel's suicide attempt. In the movie she's depicted as trying to jump off a building to kill herself, but in reality she tried to do it with carbon monoxide poisoning via car exhaust, but decided not to at the last second.
  • Indiana Jones plays fast and loose with facts quite often, although this was typical of the old adventure movies that served as the franchise's inspiration.
    • Tanis, Egypt, from Raiders of the Lost Ark is a real place. It could not have been rediscovered by the Nazis in 1936 because it was never lost in the first place. In fact, there were numerous archaeological digs in Tanis before the Nazis even came to power. Egypt was also under British rule in 1936, when the movie is supposedly set, and thus the Germans could never have just gone in to dig it up.
    • The third act of Raiders takes place in a secret Nazi submarine base in Greece, which would have been objected to by the Greeks in real life, naturally.note 
    • In Last Crusade, set in 1938, Indy and his father drive from Venice to Berlin (passing a road sign with these two names on and no other place in between) to retrieve a book from a Nazi book burning and escape Germany in a commercial Zeppelin flight (all canceled after the Hindenburg's disaster in 1937). The third act takes them to Hatay, a short-lived (but real) Turkish republic that is portrayed as an Arab monarchy. Even the Hatay flag is fictional.
    • On the matter of the Nazi book burnings, those all took place around May 10, 1933, not in 1938. Neither Adolf Hitler nor Heinrich Himmler attended them, they involved the SA and not the SS (nor the military), and the crowds of people burning books were German students and not random citizens of various ages.
    • In addition, the Hatay army is shown using Volkswagen Kübelwagens, which not only didn't exist in 1938, but were never exported by Germany.
    • Crystal Skull has a Mayan-speaking civilization in the Amazon and Indy claiming that he learned Quechua (Peru) from two guys in Pancho Villa's army (Mexico).
  • Ironclad:
    • Historically, the King's forces successfully captured Rochester. Prince Louis would not arrive until a few months later.
    • Reginald de Cornhill really survived the siege, he didn't kill himself, going on to serve as a high official.
    • William D'Aubergny did command the garrison, but survived the battle. After John died, he became a loyalist to young Henry III and helped capture Lincoln in 1217. He died of natural causes in 1236.
    • Louis and the rebellious barons were defeated in 1217, unlike the "victory" described at the end of the film.
    • The Magna Carta, while retrospectively regarded as setting an important precedent for limitation on the king's power and setting the foundations for modern democracy, was at the time mainly intended to protect the authority of the barons. King John merely sealed it rather than signing it (he was probably illiterate).
    • The Danes had been Christianized for some time prior to the events of the movie, yet are here played as still pagan and fighting specifically due to John's promise that he will convince the Pope to leave them in peace. Additionally, very few of John's mercenaries were actually Danes. Their leader also has the very Roman name Tiberius.
    • Although the longsword began to develop in its early forms in the late-12th century, such early examples were little more than arming swords with longer handles. The fully two-handed longsword as used by Marshall did not begin to appear until the 14th and 15th centuries.
    • Rochester castle is impressively realized, albeit with a couple of goofs such as modern cement stonework, but there's no sign of the Norman Cathedral that should be right next door, nor of the city of Rochester itself on the river bank.
    • The historical accounts do say that King John and his army sent for forty fat pigs to fuel the fire in the tunnel under the walls, but they were pig carcasses, not live ones as depicted in the film. You would not want the hazard of forcing a herd of live animals into a fire, and live pigs have too much water in them to properly set them on fire anyway.
  • In-universe example in Iron Sky, where Renate uses a heavily edited version of The Great Dictator to teach schoolchildren that Hitler was a good and kind man who only wanted the best for the world. Renate herself has been fooled by the same propaganda and is utterly crushed when she later sees the full version.
  • I, Tonya:
    • The real Tonya did confront the judges about her scoring only to be told her outfits needed improvement, but it happened off the ice rather than on it. She also insists that she didn't swear nearly as much as the film's Tonya did.
    • The real Shawn didn't call in the death threat on Tonya, nor did he wear a wire to a meeting with Jeff (though he was on the receiving end of a wire-tapped meeting, which he sniffed out quickly).
    • Tonya never fired her coach Diane Rawlinson in a fit of rage; it was a mutual split that resulted from Tonya losing focus on her training. Dody Teachman was actually Rawlinson's first student and assistant whom she delegated to become Tonya's new coach.
    • At one point, Diane approaches a forlorn Tonya and informs her the next Winter Olympics will be held in 1994 instead of 1996. In reality, the change in the scheduling of the Olympics had been decided and made public in mid-1980s. Everyone who participated in the 1992 Albertville games knew full well there would be another one in Lillehammer just two years later.
    • Though Tonya was told to get a fur coat to help fit the "Ice Princess" image, her father didn't make one from rabbits he hunted. He just saved up to buy her a rabbit fur coat. And instead of Tonya getting mocked for her coat, and flipping off the girls who did it, she had a Deadpan Snarker moment with a girl who bragged that her coat was mink, Tonya said "Thanks, mine's paid for."
  • Jack the Ripper (1976) plays with very fast and loose with the details surrounding the Jack the Ripper murders. The Ripper did not move the bodies of any of his victims, nor did he capture any of them alive to vivisect them, and he almost certainly did not have a secret lair under the botanic gardens. He might have been a doctor, however.
  • Jesus Camp: Levi believes Galileo gave up science for Christ. In reality, Galileo was hauled to the Inquisition because he wanted his theories to have the theological backing of the Church, that is: he wanted for his views to become dogma. Given that he couldn't satisfactorily explain inconsistencies in his theories (he had circular orbits, not elliptical ones, his theory of tides was off the rocker, etc.) he was condemned to house arrest and given a rather large stipend, as well as the freedom to talk about his theories as theories and not dogma. Meaning Galileo actually didn't give up much in terms of science, and he wanted them combined with Christian (Catholic) doctrine.
  • Judgment at Nuremberg: Mrs. Bertholt's husband is said to have been executed as part of the Malmedy trial. All the accused in that trial received clemency, and were released inside of a decade (many weren't even sentenced to death at all). They were also all SS men on trial, while her husband is said to have been regular army.
  • Kate & Leopold: While chaperoning Kate to a date with another man, Leopold puts the guy down for lying about going to see La Bohème in "the original French". As Leopold puts it, La Bohème is very rarely performed in French, having been written in Italian. It's all very nice, but Leopold is supposed to have come from the year 1876, 20 years before La Bohème was written. The Italian dub did a Translation Correction, replacing La Bohème with La Traviata, which premiered in 1853, so Leopold could have conceivably seen it.
  • Last Christmas: The film opens with a title card reading "Yugoslavia 1999", despite the fact the nation was broken up by 1992 as a result of The Yugoslav Wars and given that Kate's family are Croatians who moved to the UK following the wars. Though some would justify the date on that it takes place in what was FR Yugoslavia (later renamed Serbia and Montenegro in 2003, before splitting up three years later), her mother later says they come from Croatia (which had been independent since 1991). It's also unclear why they would emigrate later "because of the wars" when Croatia had been at peace for four years in 1999, after having won its independence in 1995.
  • The Last Command: The film seems to be conflating the February revolution (which toppled the Romanovs) and the October Revolution (in which the Bolsheviks seized power). In the movie the Tsar's government is apparently directly replaced by the Bolsheviks, which did not happen in Real Life.
  • Legend (2015): Real Life Ronnie Kray actually identified as bisexual (he was in relationships with women, too, including two marriages). The film portrays Ronnie as strictly gay.
  • The Legend of Zorro: The movie has plenty. It's set in 1850 and already has the Confederate States of America (which weren't formed until 1861), the First Transcontinental Railroad (which wasn't completed until 1869; in fact, California wouldn't gain its first railroad until 1856), and the California Statehood Referendum which is entirely fictitious. On top of that, Abraham Lincoln, who is shown welcoming California into the Union, never travelled to the state, as president or otherwise.
  • The Life of David Gale: During a drunken ramble, David says Socrates was sentenced to death for insulting the judges by, after he was convicted, suggesting as his punishment a fine of only thirty mina, comparing that to thirty bucks. In reality though, Apology of Socrates says he suggested a fine of a hundred drachma, soon raised to three thousand-a very substantial sum. Being a literature professor, David likely would be aware of this.
  • Look Who's Back: Hitler lost the presidential election in 1932 and didn't ever have an absolute majority at the federal election that same year, but as far as most people are concerned, the people of Germany elected him, and that is how this movie treats it, not taking time to make the distinction. The Nazi Party received the most votes in the federal election, but it wasn't enough for a clear majority, and despite this, President Hindenburg (under heavy pressure) still appointed Hitler chancellor — the Nazis came to power without a coalition, which usually forms when no party has the absolute majority. They briefly formed a coalition with the German National People's Party, though the Nazis weren't able to take control entirely until March, when the Reichstag Fire had been used as an excuse to purge their main opponents (the Social Democrats and Communists). After this they got the center-right parties to grant them full "emergency" powers and the dictatorship was born.
  • The Man from Earth: The immortal John Oldman says that Columbus discovered that the world is round and recalls suspecting at the time that Columbus might just fall off the edge. Later, he describes the "news" of the world being round as traveling slowly. It's a common misconception that most people thought the Earth was flat when Columbus set sail. Many cultures had already figured out that the Earth is round centuries before Columbus's voyage, and it was generally accepted by Europeans of Columbus's day. Columbus was simply the first explorer who tried to exploit it by seeking a western route to Asia.
  • Memoirs of a Geisha: Though set in 1930's-40's Japan, the Geisha's traditional attention to detail given to kimonos is not present, some scenes are clearly California Doubling, and the "Snow Dance" performed is not accurate to any Japanese traditional dance.
  • The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc: Luc Besson said he didn't really care about retelling the Joan of Arc history so we get...
    • The rape and murder of Jeanne's sister is fictional. In real life her whole family fled the village before it was attacked. What's more is that it was attacked by Burgundian soldiers - not English.
    • Jeanne has visions as a young child. In real life she claimed they didn't start until she was 13.
    • Jeanne finds the sword also as a young child. She didn't find it until many years later on her journey to Chinon.
    • The Duke of Burgundy is portrayed as stating he doesn't believe in God or the Devil to Joan in front of witnesses. Not only is there no evidence of this (which would be very unlikely in that era) but no one would ever say this publicly (for he might be convicted of blasphemy).
  • Midway (2019) actually gets a lot of really obscure stuff right, including incidents that audiences and critics wrote off as dramatic license. However:
    • The film depicts the Japanese correctly deducing they had sunk an American carrier (Yorktown) in retaliation for the destruction of Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu. In truth, and significantly, they thought they had sunk two: Hiryu launched two attacks, and while Yorktown sustained heavy damage from the first one, its crew was able to repair the damage so effectively that, when a second attack came, the Japanese assumed it was a different ship altogether. After destroying it, Nagumo assumed the Americans had only one carrier left and decided to let his pilots take a break, unaware that they actually had two; thus, the final attack on Hiryu caught the Japanese by surprise. It's also worth noting that while the second attack put the Yorktown out of action, she was not actually sunk until three days later thanks to a Japanese submarine attack as she was being towed back to Pearl Harbor.
    • Four US Army B-26 Marauders from Midway attacked the Japanese carriers on the morning of the 4th, but they did not bomb from high altitude. The Marauders were armed with torpedoes and came in at wavetop height under heavy fire from fighters and antiaircraft guns. No hits were scored with the torpedoes, but one B-26, Susie-Q flown by 1LT Jim Muri, skimmed Akagi's flight deck while bombardier 2LT Russ Johnson fired his nose-mounted .30-cal machine gun, knocking out an antiaircraft mount and critically wounding two men. Another B-26 nearly crashed into Akagi, but was confirmed by American and Japanese witnesses to be spinning out of control. The suicide attack was made by a USMC dive bomber piloted by Capt. Richard Fleming, who took an antiaircraft hit and reported that he was badly wounded and his gunner was dead, then dove his SB2U Vindicator into the cruiser Mikuma. A flight of B-17 Flying Fortresses out of Midway airbase did make a high-altitude bombing run against the Kido Butai, but scored no hits.
    • When discussing the odds against them before the battle, Best notes the Japanese have the world's largest battleship (the Yamato and Musashi). In real life the Americans were unaware of the type's status as such until after the war.
    • Very few of the B5N torpedo/level bombers used by the Japanese were armed, carrying only a flexible gun for defense. However they are shown joining the Zero fighters strafing the American fleet at Pearl Harbor.
    • Two important aircraft from the battle are missing entirely:
      • The Japanese D3A dive bombers, which were used extensively at Pearl Harbor and Midway, including causing severe damage to Yorktown in the first wave of Hiryu's counterattack.
      • However more egregious is lack of the American F4F Wildcat fighters. As much as the devastating blow to the Japanese fleet, Midway was important as a turning point for the Navy's fighter pilots, as it was the first opportunity for Thach to use what would become the Thach Weave in a major combat with the Japanese.
    • Doolittle's raiders are shown flying B-25Js. This later model was distinguished by the top turret having been moved forward directly behind the cockpit. The historical Raiders flew the earlier B-25B, which had the dorsal turret located much further aft.
    • Dick Best's Dauntless is accurately painted with the number B1 and two diagonal white stripes on the vertical stabilizer, as shown in this color plate. The other Enterprise SBDs and TBDs show a similar marking scheme (such as Scouting Six's Dauntlesses using an S# fuselage number). However this was only the aircraft's markings at the time of Midway, but is used throughout the film. As shown here, from 1941 through May, 1942, US Navy aircraft featured red and white stripes on the rudder, and red disks in the middle of the roundel. The red was removed to reduce the chance of American gunners mistaking the red disk for the Japanese Hinomaru, (aka, the "Meatball") and prevent friendly fire incidents. Additionally, Enterprise's air wing adopted comically oversized national insignia for the first few months of the war as a result of the loss of several aircraft and their crews to friendly fire when they arrived at Pearl Harbor in the aftermath of the attack. None of the aircraft in the film are shown with these early markings.
  • In My Way during the climax D-Day scene:
    • D-Day at Normandy was cloudy with rough waves and almost non-ideal weather for an amphibious landing. The movie depicts D-Day with clear, sunny skies and relatively calm waves.
    • Tatsuo at the end is captured by recently landed American paratroopers; no paratroopers landed on the beach during the invasion, only at pre-dawn and evening.
  • The history of witchcraft given in the narration at the start of The Naked Witch is riddled with errors and bears very little resemblance to actual history. One of the more egregious errors is the claim that the Dark Ages followed the Middle Ages.
  • The Name of the Rose: Pretty much the only thing the film version gets right about the historical Bernardo Gui is that he was an Inquisitor during the fourteenth century. While Gui did convict large numbers of heretics during his tenure, only about five percent of them were executed; he far preferred to prove heresies wrong and to reconcile heretics with the church rather than kill them, and he was always more scholar and administrator than zealot and crusader. He's less of a cackling arch-villain in the novel, but not by much. Neither he nor the Inquisition accused people of witchcraft either, for at the time the Church officially disbelieved it existed. Even later, the Inquisitions dealt mainly with heresy.
  • No God, No Master:
    • First off, the title: "No Gods, No Masters" was then and is now an anarchist slogan-it isn't clear why they changed it.
    • Flynn, who's investigating the bombings (April-June 1919) is shown with a free Emma Goldman-but she was in prison until September 1919, making this impossible. Her Mother Earth magazine had also been banned in 1917.
    • Luigi Galleani was deported in June of 1919, while the Palmer Raids took place in November 1919-January 1920.
    • Palmer himself suffered a bomb attack on his house in June, which the film strangely does not include, though it would have added to its drama and given him a personal motive in his heavy-handed response to the bombings.
    • Flynn was actually made chief of the BOI in July 1919, before the raids. While the People's Institute did exist (and still does), they did not give Galleani a scholarship, with him then turning on its members-this does not appear to serve any real purpose in the film but giving him a motive as John Rockefeller (a target of the bombings) was said to be its backer (in reality Galleani had been an anarchist for years already, openly advocating violence, while the story implies this had made him take up the ideology).
    • Sacco and Vanzetti had actually known each other since 1917, and left the US to evade the World War 1 draft. Both of them were anarchists who openly advocated violence, and possibly also followers of Luigi Galleani. They were known associates of Carlo Valdonoci, the Italian anarchist who delivered a bomb to Palmer's house, then accidentally blew himself up in the process. However, the pair were probably not guilty of the payroll murders, but had their political beliefs used against them. Unlike in the film, however, they were convicted in 1921 (a year after the final bombing, that of Wall Street) and only sentenced to death in 1927, as years of appeals delayed it.
    • J. Edgar Hoover was actually appointed by Flynn to monitor suspected radicals, whereas the film contrasts them with each other unfavorably.
    • Last, this was hardly the first terrorist act on US soil. Most of these deviations don't really seem necessary to the film's dramatic purposes.
  • 1978's The Norseman mangles history on a level few others could touch. Even ignoring the Horny Vikings outfits and Lee Majors as a Leif Erikson expy with a Kentucky drawl, the film's depiction of the failed settlement of Vinland is way, way off. Given that the one confirmed Viking site in North America is in Newfoundland, the Florida location for the film seems way too sunny and tropical. Also, the film's promo material says the Vikings fought against "the savage warriors of the Iroquois Nation." The actual Skraelings were ancestors of the modern Inuit people. Also, there's no such thing as "the Iroquois Nation"; the Iroquois is a confederacy of several different nations, located in modern-day New York state, that formed long after the Vikings left Vinland. And those are just scratching the surface of the film.
  • In The Outlaw Josey Wales, character Lone Watie (implied to be a relative to Confederate general Stand Watie), tells the title character that, when the The American Civil War broke out, the Cherokee chiefs declared war on the Union due to their mistreatment on the Trail of Tears and on the reservation. Actually the real Watie family was in favor of removal to Oklahoma, and settled there voluntarily before troops were sent in to force the matter. In addition, the Cherokee tribe was split on the matter; despite being slaveholders, many of them remembered that they were forced out from a Southern state by a Southern president. Principal Chief John Ross (who had always been opposed to removal) paid lip service to the Confederates at first, then emphatically threw his weight behind the Union as soon as he could without fear of reprisal.
  • Outlaw King: While the film clearly wanted to avoid this for the most part with clothing, historical characters and events (unlike Braveheart, the events of which directly precede those of Outlaw King), there are still some inaccuracies:
    • The leather bracers Robert wears, which are an ubiquitous Hollywood myth.
    • The main liberty taken is Robert and Prince Edward meeting in battle for a one-on-one duel at the end of a battle, which never happened. The idea that the prince would be simply abandoned on the field, while a duel between him and Robert could go on without any interference from either side, strains all credulity. And the Scots certainly would have insisted that Edward be ransomed for a huge sum rather than simply released.note 
    • Edward I only died two months after the Battle of Loudoun Hill.
    • Nigel de Brus was hanged, drawn and quartered for holding off an English force so that Elizabeth and Marjorie could get away, not just refusing to give up their location.
    • Alexander de Brus was not ambushed and killed while trying to retreat from the shore along with his brothers, but during a failed offensive landing. His brother Thomas was captured in the same battle and later beheaded in London.
    • Robert de Clifford, the English nobleman who was awarded the Douglas family's lands, was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn, rather than the Battle of Loudoun Hill as depicted in the film.
    • Apart from the duel between Edward and Robert and the death of Clifford, the Battle of Loudon Hill is accurately represented save for one detail: The Scottish army was uphill of the English, rather than on the same level.
    • It was Edward I who swore by the swans (and by God), not his son.
  • Paranormal Asylum: A few liberties were taken with the life story of Mary Mallon. For starters, it's believed that Mary got typhoid from her mother while she was pregnant with her, not from being raped by a pedophile who also had typhoid. Also, there doesn't seem to be any record of Mary having any other relatives besides her mother and her father, especially a half-sister.
  • In Pathfinder (2007), Horny Vikings is in full effect, making them look like warriors of Chaos in Warhammer Fantasy. They're also wearing plate armor, something that wouldn't exist for another few centuries and bring along rottweilers (which were first bred in the mid-18th century). Just to make them more monstrous, all of them are dark-haired, which is odd for Scandinavians, who are mostly fair-haired.
  • In Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, Singapore would have been a small Malay fishing village, instead of a Chinese port town. Because Singapore was the name given by the British Colonists in the 19th century, it would likely have been called by its earlier name, Singapura, during the time of the film.
  • Princess of Thieves: Philip was not legitimized, and thus never the heir to the throne. It was lawfully John's.
  • An example occurs during the Quantum Leap episode "Disco Inferno": part of the plot revolves around Sam doing stunt work during the filming of Earthquake. The problem? The movie came out in 1974. This episode takes place in 1976.
  • The 1994 film Quiz Show takes license with the Quiz Show Scandals, specifically the NBC show 21. On the December 5, 1956 telecast, Herb Stempel takes an instructed dive by incorrectly answering "At The Waterfront" as the 1954 Oscar winner for Best Picture. In actuality, the game was decided when Stempel and eventual champ Charles Van Doren played to a tie, then after the second question of the next game Van Doren chose to end the game with him in the lead and thus giving him the championship. Robert Redford, the film's director, eschewed everything past the dive and ended the game there. What also wasn't disclosed in the film was that a contestant on Dotto was the first to blow the whistle about answers being fed.
  • The Ribald Tales of Robin Hood: Unsurprisingly, the film is riddled with historic inaccuracies. The most egregious is the inclusion of Prince John's sister Lady Sallyforth as one of the main villains. Prince John (and King Richard) had no sister named this of course (two of their three real sisters were in fact dead by the time John had become King in any case) and their title was Princess, not Lady (two became queens, the other a duchess).
  • Riverworld: Nero in the 2003 film is portrayed as happily greeting a Praetorian Guard who he sees there in Riverworld, along with other Romans. The real man would probably have been far more wary, since the Praetorian Guards had defected from him to a governor who rebelled against Nero, and he'd also be unaware of whether the rest would follow him (his usurper had been popular). Here, he's portrayed as undisputed Emperor whom they immediately hail as their ruler. Also, he orders a human sacrifice, which Romans by his time viewed as anathema. They even claim that Nero's rule brought down Rome itself-it actually endured over three more centuries, so this is ridiculously off.
  • Seabiscuit:
    • Seabiscuit's regular jockey Red Pollard is depicted as having been raised in an affluent family that lost its fortune in the 1929 Wall Street crash. While the real Pollard was indeed born into a wealthy family that lost its fortune, he had left home to become a jockey back in 1922, and the family had lost its fortune when a major flood of the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton destroyed the family business in 1915.
    • War Admiral's portrayal is embellished to make Seabiscuit more of an underdog. He's portrayed as a gigantic coal-black horse with superior breeding. In reality, War Admiral was small, nicknamed the Mighty Atom, and at most 0.3 hands taller than the famously small Seabiscuit. The horses were also closely related. Both descended from the racing juggernaut Man 'o War, and Seabiscuit was essentially War Admiral's nephew. Finally, War Admiral was dark brown (bay) in only minor contrast to Seabiscuit's light brown coat.
  • Season of the Witch: The film has systematic witch hunts/trials begun early. In reality, they started after the Black Plague (probably as a way to blame someone, like the film shows) though the Church wasn't involved like this. Mostly witchcraft was considered superstition by the Church and not formally recognized then as real. They certainly had no Inquisitors or equivalent set up to prosecuted supposed "witches" then, since it wasn't yet recognized as a crime by the Church.
  • Sergeant York, while mostly accurate, takes some liberties with the real events of Alvin York's life:
    • York's friend "Pusher" Ross is killed by a captured German soldier who managed to get hold of a grenade. York then shoots the German in revenge. Pusher is fictional, and although one German did refuse to surrender, threw a grenade and was shot by York in response, the grenade didn't kill any Americans.
    • The German troops are shown being commanded by a major. They were actually commanded by Paul Vollmer, who was only a lieutenant. The fictional major in the movie isn't named.
    • York is seen using a Luger he takes from a captured German after losing his US Army Colt M1911. In truth, he never took a gun from a prisoner to use, and kept hold of his Army Colt for the entire battle. This was changed because the Luger the armorers provided was the only blank-adapted handgun available on the set. He is also seen using an M1903 Springfield, as opposed to the M1917 Enfield he had in real life.
    • The battle occurs in a very open and frankly desert-like environment, as compared to the thickly-wooded hills of the actual ravine in France. It's possible the filmmakers wanted to give the battlefield a more harsh and desolate-looking appearance in order to add tension.
  • Shakespeare in Love:
    • The real Shakespeare didn't create the plot of Romeo and Juliet, let alone make it up as he went along — as is the case with pretty much all of his work, he was adapting preexisting poems, stories or historical records for the stage; in this case he used The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet.
    • Royalty at this point in time would never have set foot in a public theatre. Theatrical companies were often invited to play in the Elizabethan court though. The Queen does not go to the theatre, the theatre goes to the Queen.
    • Obviously, the entire plot is fictional except for the fact he did write and stage Romeo and Juliet.
  • The Social Network claims to be the real life story of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, but most of the scenes are made up for the film. There are several anachronisms with the 2003 time period: the Samsung SyncMaster 941BW was not available in 2003, Serato Scratch Live wasn't released until 2004, a can of Mountain Dew uses a newer logo introduced in 2005, the site "Cats That Look Like Hitler" wasn't there until 2006, Windows XP Service Pack 3, Fallout 3, and Dennis de Laat's "The Sound of Violence" weren't released until 2008, Bing wasn't around until 2009, traffic to Facemash slowed down Harvard's network but did not cause a "network crash", Harvard had a "@fas.harvard.edu" e-mail address instead of "@harvard.edu", Harvard dorms at the time required swiping a keycard instead of keyless entry. The film's ending claims Facebook is available in 207 countries; the last count has been no greater than 196 countries. The film depicts Mark as creating Facemash and Facebook as payback and an appeal to an ex-girlfriend, when he had a girlfriend (now his wife) during most of the film's events. Mark Zuckerberg reportedly spent the time sitting, programming and eating pizza with friends during Facebook's development.
  • If you really want to get technical with Space Jam, while we all know that the reason Michael Jordan returned to basketball wasn't to rescue the Looney Tunes from intergalactic aliens who run an amusement park, his retirement from and eventual return to basketball and his time in baseball are either major exaggerations or simplifications.
    • Yes, Jordan retired from basketball, but it was a number of reasons behind it including burnout, which was accelerated due to participating in the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics (which he considered the height of his career due to being part of the "Dream Team") and his father's murder.
    • The movie treats Jordan as a Fish out of Water as a baseball player and constantly mocks him for it. Granted, he wasn't the best - he batted .202 as part of the Birmingham Barons and .252 with the Scottsdale Scorpions - but he wasn't Space Jam bad.
    • There was a lockdown, but it wasn't caused by a mysterious illness (let alone that the cartoon aliens were leeching off of other basketball players' talent) and it wasn't with basketball - the 1994-1995 Major League Baseball Strike would hit around that time. This would be the reason why Jordan returned to the game, as he didn't want to be pigeonholed into being a replacement player during that time (the other reason was because the Chicago Bulls fell apart without him).
  • Stargate: Naturally, even aside from the aliens, the film premise depends on this. Jackson claims the Pyramids are much older than Egyptologists have found them to be, the evidence for them being made for the Pharoahs was forged and that Egyptian culture sprang up without precursors. Obviously this is not supported by the evidence for this. The film itself portrays Jackson's theories as laughed at, though naturally he turns out to be right nonetheless. He is genuinely correct that Budge has long been debunked however. Hilariously though, while this is clearly fictional, it has precedence in Egyptian history. Countless pharaohs actively rewrote their own history to take credit for past events now attributed to their predecessors. The best case is Ramses the Second (Ozymandius for those familiar with Percy Shelley) whose countless achievements were either claimed by other pharaohs either claiming to have accomplished them or have simply been Ramses.
  • Stealing Heaven: Though largely accurate, some liberties are taken.
    • The film portrays Héloïse as a novice who leaves her convent school, abandoning that path for the University of Paris. In reality there's no evidence she ever was a novice or studied in a convent school, and when Abelard met her she was a well-known scholar on her own already.
    • Abelard actually stated he tried to seduce Héloïse, when in the film it's portrayed as her doing so. He said this was because of her fame noted above.
    • Whether Canon Fulbert was punished isn't recorded.
    • What became of Astrolabe isn't known, as Abelard only mentioned him once and Héloïse did not at all.
    • Abelard actually married Héloïse to appease Fulbert, rather than it being kept from him (in secret, for his University career).
    • It's unknown if Fulbert actually ordered Abelard attacked, though as some friends of his did it, that's possible.
    • The film also omits Abelard's later troubles after becoming a monk (he was expelled from one abbey over antagonizing the monks with a dispute, plus twice accused of heresy and officially sanctioned for it).
    • Héloïse conversely has her radically proto-feminist ideas in later life (drawn from her letters to Abelard) wholly unmentioned (saying she preferred love to marriage, describing the latter as prostitution etc.).
  • Stonehearst Asylum: "Mickey Finn" as a term for knockout drugs didn't originate until 1915, based on a real case in 1903 of a Chicago barman by that name drugging and then robbing customers. The film has it used in the 1899 UK.
  • Sully: Both the real-life events that inspired the film and the memoir Cpt. Sullenberger wrote (Highest Duty) are largely exaggerated or misrepresented for Rule of Drama, to such an extent that it was called out by technical experts for completely misrepresenting the ensuing investigation that was put together to ascertain the circumstances of the plane's famous glide-landing into the Hudson. Part of this narrative exaggeration was laid at the feet of director Clint Eastwood, who has stated in interviews that he went along with the script without first finding out whether it was actually based in reality or not, while at least one NTSB investigator has said the film publicly smeared his reputation.
    • The three investigators from the NTSB act needlessly hostile and antagonistic towards Sully and his co-pilot, Skiles, insinuating that one or both of them were drinking on the job and repeatedly voicing their concern that Sully is in the spotlight and making public appearances instead of staying quiet. This continues all the way to the end of the film, in which they either ignore or try to downplay concerns about the incident until Sully has to essentially shame them in public by asking them to make use of a variable (the 35-second delay it took for Sully to understand the situation) before he tried to act on his decision. In reality, the investigators were completely cooperative with the pilots, and once they had run the initial tests, they were practically certain that Sully and Skiles had made the right decision. The subsequent NTSB report even publicly praised both men for their actions, while in the film, the investigators have to be shamed into submission.
    • Investigators said that Sully and Skiles were comfortable and cooperative. In the film, the investigators antagonize Sully and Skiles several times, calling him out for holding media appearances in the wake of the incident and implying that it was all his fault.
    • In the film, the cockpit recordings are played mere days after the incident, in a packed inquiry hearing with dozens of onlookers present. In reality, the recordings were played for the first time four months after the event, to a room of six people.
    • In addition, it is illegal for the NTSB to release the actual cockpit recordings. They can only release the written transcript.
  • In Teaching Mrs. Tingle, one of the main characters is a girl we're constantly told is a great brain, and she produces a final project for her History class that's an "authentic recreation" of the diary of a girl who was killed during the Salem Witch Trials, right down to the book being authentically aged to resemble a diary that had survived the period. The eponymous teacher opens the diary at random, and finds an entry on how the fictional girl fears she'll be burned at the stake tomorrow. No one was burned at the stake in the Salem Witch Trials, and a person of that time period would have known this. They hanged those convicted, while one was crushed under weights for declining to enter a plea, and while people were burned in Europe, it was usually for heresy, not witchcraft (though, to be sure, the two were sometimes linked). The student gets a C, though not for this mistake.
  • In Testament of Youth, a civilian notices that a British soldier leaving for the front in 1914 is sick and identifies the illness as Spanish Flu, claiming that it's both ripping through the troops and in all the newspapers. The first known case of Spanish Flu was in 1918, in the United States, and it was called that because reports of the disease weren't subjected to wartime censorship in neutral Spain.
  • A minor example in Time Bandits: The fourth and final time period the characters visit before they end up in Evil’s time period is on the Titanic in 1912. A life preserver shows it being called the S.S. Titanic, when the actual title was the R.M.S. Titanic.
  • Timeline: The film has the English treat a Frenchman as suspicious just for being French, and kill him as a spy. At the time however, most of the English nobles were themselves Norman-French, spoke French, and had French allies. The French and English did not wear red or blue uniforms at the time either. In that era there were no standard uniforms at all. If any, each lord's men wore his colors/emblem, not a national one.
  • Confused Matthew went to great lengths to explain how Titanic (1997) went beyond Artistic License and outright falsified what happened on the Titanic to make the upperclassmen on the ship as unsympathetic as possible and thus try and make the main characters more sympathetic. His two biggest beefs seem to be: falsely portraying First Officer (third in command of the ship, Chief Officer is 2nd in command) William Murdock as a corrupt individual who took bribes and shot people to ensure certain people spots on the lifeboats, and making up the idea that the ship's crew tried to keep the lower class men down in third class to let them all die.
  • Transformers claims that many of the advancements in technology in the 20th century were a result of reverse-engineering Megatron, who had been hidden under the Hoover Dam by the US government. The filmmakers include cars in this list of technologies. In reality, Karl Benz (as in Mercedes-Benz) patented the first internal combustion-powered car in 1895, thirty years before the Hoover Dam was even thought of.
  • The Trial of the Chicago 7:
    • The sentencing is wildly changed from the court record. In the film, Judge Hoffman asks Hayden to give a short statement about his sentencing, to which Hayden replies with a list of the 5000 soldiers who have died since the trial began.note  In real life, each one of the seven remaining defendants took the stand to give Judge Hoffman separate "reason you suck" speeches. Dick Schultz is depicted as having stood up during the aforementioned name list as "respect for the fallen." Schultz himself confirmed that did not happen.
    • In the film, Bobby Seale's case is declared a mistrial almost immediately after he's dragged back to court in a gag and chains, which is a compression from reality — he was brought into court this way for four days. Sorkin said in an interview with The Economist that this was done to not have the audience get used to seeing him that way and therefore not normalize it.
    • Further, the film depicts that Seale's anguished outburst over the killing of Fred Hampton is what led to this appalling treatment. In reality, Hampton's killing happened after Seale's trial had already been separated from the other seven defendants.
    • The real Abbie Hoffman was quite a bit more radical than he's portrayed as here. While the film character praises American democratic institutions, saying the problem is corrupt people are in charge, Hoffman actually felt that they were imprisoning people, part of a decaying system. He was an anarchist and "hedonistic communist" in his words, wanting a revolution rather than simply reform.
    • The "take the hill" scene in Grant Park was much the opposite from what was portrayed here. In reality, protesters had "taken" it already, climbing onto the statue there. After that, the police moved in and arrested/attacked them.
    • Jerry wasn't arrested while rescuing a female protester from assault (there's no evidence that even happened) but later on the street.
    • There was no undercover agent who seduced Jerry. Rather, one served as his bodyguard, while two more also infiltrated the protestors (all were male).
    • The film portrays the violence as wholly one-sided. While it's true the police did often engage in brutality against protestors, journalists and even bystanders caught up in the fracas, almost two hundred officers were also injured (largely by hurled objects, such as makeshift weapons). This is all on film. It's not to say this justified the police brutality, but it also omits this.
    • Schultz was actually strongly onboard with the prosecution, verbally attacking the defendants and their lawyers often.
    • It's portrayed here that Bobby Seale is only on trial to make the white defendants appear more dangerous by association with a scary black man. However, he'd made a speech calling for people to shoot police who were threatening them, saying that it would be self-defense and he would congratulate those who did. Based on this he was indicted for crossing state lines to incite riot. It's probable the government wanted him indicted regardless though since they were seeking to destroy the Black Panther Party, which is shown in the film.
    • David Dellinger never punched a marshal in reality (he did push officers who were trying to drag his daughters out of the courtroom, but that's not the same thing).
    • Ramsay Clark didn't discuss any call with LBJ which contradicted the prosecution.
    • Tom Hayden's contentious quote about "blood flowing all over the city" wasn't used as evidence in the trial.
    • Hayden and Abbie Hoffman didn't actually disagree the way this is portrayed. Though Hayden was more civil and restrained, he also said some explosive things just as Hoffman did. Additionally, they had less contrasting hair and dress styles (Hayden was long-haired as well, for instance).
  • Truman, a Biopic about Harry S. Truman based off the novel by David McCullough and starring Gary Sinise as the titular president, has a number of notable inaccuracies:
    • When confronted on whether to drop the atom bomb in order to end World War II, Truman believes that he must go forward with it in order to save millions of lives. While this was certainly one of the pros of the bombings, and Truman would later take credit for saving lives, in actuality Truman was convinced by his advisors that dropping the bomb would display American superiority over the Soviet Union, an idea which was representative of the escalating Cold War tensions between the two powers.
    • In the movie, Truman is shown racially integrating the military in around late 1945 or 1946. In reality, Truman did not sign Executive Order 9981, which de-segregated the armed forces, until July 1948.
    • In a conversation with Truman, General Douglas MacArthur claims that he defeated the Japanese "alone" in the Eastern Theatre of World War II. In reality, the United States was not the sole Allied force fighting the Japanese; the Australians, Chinese, Dutch, and various colonial guerilla forces all played substantial roles in deterring Japanese expansion in the Far East and Pacific, with the eight-year long Second Sino-Japanese War being the second-bloodiest front in World War II. This case could be somewhat justified in that the movie is told from Truman's perspective, and given that Truman had a personal grudge against MacArthur, it would make sense for the general to be portrayed in the movie as annoyingly arrogant.
    • At the end of the movie, Harry and Bess Truman are seen boarding a train at Washington's Union Station after leaving the White House, while crowds cheer them on. In reality, Truman left Washington after his presidency in a rather humble and anti-climactic manner; he simply got in his car and drove all the way back to his home in Missouri.
  • U571 caused some controversy in the UK as it portrays an American submarine crew capturing a German Enigma code machine from a stranded U-Boat. In reality the British Royal Navy were the ones to board a sinking U-boat and capture the device.note  Also the depiction of German destroyers in the Atlantic hunting US and UK submarines is inaccurate as the German navy concentrated their resources on U-Boats; their surface fleet was unable to maintain any kind of presence in the Atlantic. The fact the British captured the Enigma code machines rather than the US is acknowledged just prior to the credits.
  • In Undercover Blues, it is said that Paulina Novacek (villain of the movie and former STB agent) "left Prague two jumps ahead of the firing squad." There were no executions in Czechoslovakia after the Velvet Revolution (Czechoslovakia abolished the death penalty in 1990); before the revolution, executions were carried out by hanging.
  • It is doubtful anyone was expecting historical accuracy from Up the Chastity Belt, but suffice it to say that Richard the Lionheart did not have a twin brother named Lurkalot, not did he ever marry a woman named Lobelia.
  • Valkyrie: A banner uses the Fraktur typeface, which was very popular in early Nazi Germany, but was banned by the Nazis in 1941, before the events of the film.
  • Welcome to Marwen: Mark wasn't able to get much of the health care that is shown in the film since the state would not cover it any longer. He left the hospital early because it was beyond his coverage. Mark lived with a friend and his mother, who also cared for him (she wasn't shown in the film at all). The men who attacked Mark were not actually Neo-Nazis, just thugs (one was black). Mark also had to testify three times (the preliminary hearing, trial and sentencing), never running from the courtroom as a result of the stress. Nicol was already married and had children-there was no abusive boyfriend. Mark consequently never proposed.
  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit:
    • Judge Doom's ultimate goal is to build the Pasadena Freeway on the land where Toontown stands; his shutting down LA's trolleys is a Shout-Out to the Great American Streetcar Scandal. However, the film is set in 1947 - the Pasadena Freeway was already built in 1940.
    • In that same film Eddie and Roger watch the Goofy cartoon "Goofy Gymnastics", which was released in 1949.
    • Several cartoon characters in the movie would only make their debut several years later: Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner ("Fast and Furry-ous", 1949), Tinkerbell (Peter Pan, 1953), the penguin waiters (Mary Poppins, 1964)... However, the makers defended themselves by saying that these characters were simply not employed yet by their studios in those years.
    • The window of Eddie Valiant's office overlooks the Hollywood sign, but in 1947 it should still read "Hollywoodland". (The "land" wouldn't be removed until 1949.)
  • Wild Wild West shows President Grant attending the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869 (he didn't). It also has him creating the Secret Service with the purpose of protecting the president. In reality, it was created in 1865 to investigate counterfeiting. The first president to be placed under their protection was Theodore Roosevelt in 1902 following the assassination of William McKinley the year before.
  • Witchboard: Brandon claims that Ouija boards were invented in 540 BCE. The first recording of anything like an Ouija board was in 1100 CE, and modern Ouija boards were invented in the 1800s.
  • Since Wonder Woman (2017) is mainly Historical Fiction, and Alternate History, it is justified; nevertheless, key differences from the factual record include:
    • It is mentioned throughout the final act that the Armistice Negotiations were taking place with Imperial Germany under the Kaiser Wilhelm II. What isn't mentioned is that Germany was in the middle of a revolution by the end of 1918 (inspired by Red October that had broken out in 1917) and that the armistice was actually proclaimed and negotiated after the abdication of the Kaiser and the proclamation of what came to be known as The Weimar Republic under Social Democrat President Friedrich Ebert. Indeed this was the very source of the infamous propaganda used by Nazis of the "stab-in-the-back" myth (spread by Erich Ludendorff incidentallynote ).
    • The film also implies, via Ares, that the Armistice negotiated and imposed on Germany was of such a magnitude that it would create another war by itself. This is considered Dated History by most historians, and it was indeed part of Nazi propaganda as they wanted to write-off the Weimar Republic, and democracy itself, as doomed to failure. Most historians today no longer consider the Armistice and the later Versailles Treaty as being decisive determining causes of the next war.note  The Armistice was necessary because of the Hundred Days Campaign that brought great advances to the Allies and put them on course to occupying Germany, and likewise a revolution and mutiny had broken out inside Germany in 1918 that led to the Kaiser's abdication.
    • The film's context and background is implied to be the time of Erich Ludendorff's Spring Offensive, Imperial Germany's last smash-and-grab to defeat and conquer the Western Front, making their greatest advances. The film implies that the armistice and peace negotiations are what is leading to the end of the war, rather than Ferdinand Foch's Hundred Days Campaign, the great Allied counteroffensive that brought them to the gates of Germany and actually caused them to surrender, alongside the Revolution in Russia and its spread into Germany.
    • Prisoners of war were treated fairly, much better than in WWII. They definitely weren't experimented on by Imperial Germany. That being said, Imperial Germany was the first nation to use deadly gas as a combat weapon.
    • Erich Ludendorff dies in the movie, while in real life he lived until 1937 and played a major role in German post-WWI politics.
    • The German plane Steve steals and eventually crashes near the Amazon Island is a Fokker E.III. Though the E.III dominated the skies of WWI in 1915, by November of 1918 (when the movie takes place) it was obsolete and was no longer in service.
    • Erich Ludendorff is depicted as a murderously ruthless commander whose only thought is winning the war, no matter the cost to civilians or his own men. The real Ludendorff was a highly competent but incredibly ambitious officer who ignored others' opinions and micro-managed things, but enough of a realist to know that Germany would at best hold expanded territory after the war. It was Ludendorff who gave the German Navy authorization to begin unrestricted submarine warfare in February 1917, which had the direct effect of bringing the United States into the war, and his desire to have command of everything meant that he was ultimately made the scapegoat of Germany's surrender. In his later years he became a pagan, actively worshipping the Nordic god Wotan (Odin) and co-writing several books with his second wife that blamed most of the world's troubles on Judeo-Christianity.
  • X-Men Film Series:
    • X-Men Origins: Wolverine: The movie claims to start in 1845 Northwest Territories, Canada... Except that the Northwest Territories would not become a part of Canada until 1870 (and the borders of the vast area were gradually changed until 1905, which resulted in the creation of 4 provinces and 2 territories, with one of those territories split into two in 1999). Canada itself was only granted Dominion status in 1867.
    • X-Men: Days of Future Past:
      • RFK Stadium is shown with a baseball diamond. The film is set in 1973, while in real life the stadium did not host baseball from 1972 (following the second Washington Senators' relocation to Texas) to 2004 (the Montreal Expos became the Washington Nationals the following year and played at RFK for three years before opening a new ballpark).
      • Hank tells Logan that most of the students and teachers were drafted for the The Vietnam War, which is why Charles had shut down the school. In real life, most—if not all—of them could have stayed through a student deferment, and it's hard to believe that Xavier couldn't push such a thing through if he really wanted to.
    • X-Men: Apocalypse:
      • It is nigh-impossible that a CNN reporter would have been allowed to film in a Polish town, especially given that Poland in 1983 was under martial law.
      • When Apocalypse is addressing the world, he speaks in Russian to a large group of churchgoers at a solemn Russian Orthodox Christian service. It is also highly improbable that the church would have that much attendance (religious life in the USSR was very strictly policed).
  • The X-Files: Fight the Future starts off 35,000 years ago in North Texas, and depicts a pair of Neanderthals running through the snow. Evidence of humans in the New World so early is thin and disputed; if they were there, they were certainly not Neanderthal, who never ranged outside Eurasia.
  • Young Guns:
    • In real life, Alexander McSween died in the middle of a furious shootout, while the movie shows him being gunned down by US army soldiers for no apparent reason at a time when there was no other shooting by anyone.
    • Lawrence Murphy was not present at the actual final battle of the Lincoln County War, nor was he shot by Billy the Kid as the movie depicted. In fact, he was in extremely poor health at the time, and died of cancer a few months later.
  • Young Guns II:
    • The character "William Henry French" is a composite of two real-life members of the Regulators (Jim French and Henry Brown), though he bears little resemblance to either one of them.
    • Doc and Chavez both die in the movie. In real life, both of them survived their exploits with Billy the Kid and went on to live full lives, both passing away from natural causes in the 1920s. Chavez died in 1924 at age 73, while Doc died in 1929 at 80. Oddly enough, the end of the first movie actually gets it right, explaining what they both went on to do after the Lincoln County War, but the sequel decides to change course and kill them off for some inexplicable reason.
    • Also, rather than be famously shot dead by Pat Garrett, Billy's portrayed as surviving to old age by faking his death (though the first film accurately says what happened to him, aside from his supposed dying note reading "Pals"). This is based on the real-life case of "Brushy" Bill Roberts, an old cowboy who claimed to be Billy the Kid shortly before his death in 1950.
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