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Kingdom Come: Deliverance is a first-person open world RPG set in medieval Europe. Described by its creators as "Dungeons & no Dragons" and Braveheart: The Game, it is developed by Warhorse Studios, a new Czech studio comprised of industry veterans, including developers of Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven and Mafia II. It was released on February 13, 2018.

The game is set in Bohemia, and follows our character Henry; son of The Blacksmith in Skalitz. This peaceful life however changes when the village is raided by an army of mercenaries, who massacre the inhabitants. Having survived the massacre, and vengeful as it resulted in his parents' deaths, Henry joins the service of Lord Radzig Kobyla as he works his way through the ladders of society.

The game uses a classless system, allowing players to specialize in whatever skill they desire. The gameplay places heavy focus on realism, with layers of clothing for armors and different levels of protections. Equipment, food, and clothing degrade over time, requiring players to keep in tabs with their inventory and repair what's necessary. The game's combat emphasizes physics interactions, with damage depending on the weapon type, speed, and weight of the blow. This, combined with the game's nonlinear structure and quests, give it an Immersive Sim-like quality.

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On May 23, 2018, a road map for DLC releases was announced, both free and paid:

  • Hardcore Mode: a Harder Than Hard difficulty that cranks the realism Up to Eleven (free; June 26, 2018)
  • From the Ashes: Henry is appointed the bailiff of Pribyslavitz and is tasked with rebuilding the village (paid; July 5, 2018)
  • The Making of Kingdom Come video (free)
  • The Amorous Adventures of Bold Sir Hans Capon: help Capon with his love life (paid)
  • Tournament Mode (free)
  • Band of Bastards: a battlefield scenario (paid)
  • the Combat Academy video (free)
  • A Woman's Lot: the female main character quest line (free for backers, paid otherwise)
  • and proper mod support (free)

A sequel is also in the planning stages, with development to start after Warhorse is finished updating the first game.

Compare Darklands, a much older RPG based on European history (albeit German, rather than Czech).

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You can visit its Kickstarter here and the official website here.

Unrelated to Kingdom Come or Deliverance.


Kingdom Come: Deliverance provides examples of:

  • 24-Hour Armor: Nothing prevents Henry from wearing a full set of metal armor and padded clothes at all times. Sneaking in full plate armor may prove too much of a challenge, though.
    • Also played straight with most guards and soldiers. They never, ever, take their armor off.
  • Abhorrent Admirer: Johanka, one of the survivors of Skalitz, has to deal with the amorous Custodian of Sasau - who's also married.
  • Absurdly Low Level Cap: The player character's main level, as well as all stats and skills, cap at level 20. The game is, however, finely balanced in this regard. You will need to put quite a lot of effort (and/or money on skill trainers) to reach level 20. Plenty of sidequests, exploration, combat and 'extracurricular' activities will be needed to bring several stats and skills - and therefore the main level, which is dependant on these - to the max. If you stick to the main questline and pay little attention to secondary tasks and Stat Grinding, it's perfectly possible to finish the game without even coming close to the level cap.
    • Before it was patched out players could do an exploit similar to the infamous Final Fantasy II exploit. Since leveling up stats all your stats save for speech can be done by hitting characters, that's exactly what players did. A player could grab a plot-important character, knock them out, then repeatedly whack them with whatever weapon at hand. Since the NPC couldn't die, you could quickly max out Henry's stats simply by repeatedly bashing a person until satisfied.
  • Acceptable Breaks from Reality: While Kingdom Come: Deliverance focuses on providing a realistic late medieval experience, some concessions had to be made for gameplay reasons.
    • As long as the game recognizes a horse as "owned", whistling anywhere will prompt it to appear out of nowhere right behind Henry - very much the same as in The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.
    • Henry can change his whole equipment, plate/mail armor pieces included, in the blink of an eye and without any help. This was actually addressed by Warhorse in one of their development diaries, explaining that being unable to change certain pieces of gear without assistance from NPCs' would have been impractical from a gameplay perspective.
    • Murdering half of a town's population, then submitting to arrest will result in Henry getting a severe punishment... of a couple weeks in a local cell.
    • The Bane Potion is not only absolutely lethal, but also tasteless and odourless. No such Perfect Poison has ever existed, and some potions (like Nighthawk) have enhancing effects that go well beyond what herbal concoctions can do to human senses. But without spicying things up a bit, alchemy would have been a very boring feature.
  • The Alcoholic:
    • Kunesh, the "official" town drunk of Skalitz, who owes Henry's father a debt. The fact that he will give many a confident new player the beating of their life with his bare, drunk fists speaks volumes about one of the defining characteristics of this game.
    • Henry can potentially become one himself if he drinks enough. There's even an achievement for getting addicted to alcohol.
  • All Swords Are the Same: There are several types of sword; Longsword, shortsword, sabre, and hunting sword. While they are governed by the sword skill, sabres have a certain agility requirement, while the rest are all predicated by strength. Additionally, each type of sword does different types of damage better than others; a longsword is more suited to stabbing than a sabre. Different unlockable combos can only used by particular types of swords, axes, and clubs.
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us: Both main factions in the game (the local nobles supporting King Wenceslaus, and the Cuman-bandit mercenary army following Sigismund) attempt this several times over the course of the Main Quest. Sir Radzig's attack against Pribyslavitz and the joint assault on Vranik are only partial successes, while the antagonist Istvan Toth actually manages to seize Talmberg while the Wenceslaus faction is distracted at Vranik. The effort of conquering Talmberg back takes a good chunk of the second half of the game.
  • And the Adventure Continues: The final quest of the main story involves a lot of political back-and-forth that eventually ends with Henry and Hans heading out of the fief to deliver a message to some lords of uncertain or wavering loyalty.
  • Annoying Arrows: Handled realistically. Arrows are very dangerous for targets not wearing some good armor, and unarmored characters can indeed go down quickly when faced with opponents equipped with bows. Mail and plate armors however, if properly combined with underneath padding, provide excellent protection against ranged attacks, being only vulnerable to the strongest war bows. Of course all of this applies to the player as well, so early game bandits wielding bows can be a real threat while ranged enemies in the late game become a mere nuisance as long as Henry gets his hand on some good protective gear.
  • Anti-Armor: Hammers, maces and military picks are specially effective against heavily armored opponents. As part of the Tactical Rock–Paper–Scissors combat system however, they put users at a disadvantage against sword-wielding opponents.
    • Some perks increase the amount of damage the player can inflict to the opponents' weapons and armor with non-countered strikes.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Despite being one of the most realistic medieval role-playing games, there are some features where adding more realism wouldn't have added any value.
    • Whistling for your horse always makes it appear just right behind you, regardless where you left it.
    • The contents of the chests are shared in all the rooms you own in any town.
    • You don't have any clocks, but when you go to sleep you can still set up exactly when you want to wake up.
  • Armor Is Useless: Averted. Armor is crucial to guaranteeing your survival in combat. This extends to enemies as well: unarmored bandits and highwaymen are almost trivial to handle in a fight, whereas a fully armored knight or mercenary can be almost impervious to damage, requiring you to use the correct weapons or techniques to handle them instead.
  • Army of Thieves and Whores: The army being gathered by the Big Bad, and lead by lieutenants like Runt or Erik, is this to a certain degree. They are recruiting Cumans, mercenaries, bandits, outlaws, brigands and misfits like Zbyshek in order to create a fighting force powerful enough to overthrow the Wenceslaus loyalists in the region. And due to the Civil War and general political turmoil in Bohemia, there is certainly no shortage of potential recruits. That's why the antagonists manage to remain smug and confident despite important setbacks - they have reserves.
  • Artificial Brilliance: The enemy AI during melee combat is very responsive to your actions. However...
  • Artificial Stupidity: Their AI has absolutely no clue what to do if you whip out a bow, letting you turn them into pincushions. Enemy archers will often try to shoot you through their buddies as well, resulting in the fight getting easier rather than harder.
    • The AI also has trouble dealing with non-violent deaths. Should an alarm be raised after some NPC drops dead due to consuming poisoned food, the guards will gather around the corpse with their weapons drawn, frantically searching for a "killer" whom they simply cannot identify.
    • When playing Farkle, the AI opponent often continue to throw the dice even after they already scored enough points to win in that turn, often result in them getting busted and giving you another turn.
  • Artistic License – History: While the game is well-researched, there are some minor issues.
    • Much of the clothing, especially the nobles, is a mix between Early Medieval and 16th Century fashion. Codpieces are more widespread than they were historically, and pointed shoes are significantly less common. Crossbows also weren't implemented (though they are referenced), though they were common in Bohemia historically.
      • On the nobles' clothing, special mention goes to Sir Hanush's poofy sleeved doublet and Sir Radzig's metal-studded vest. Unlike Sir Divish (who normally wears a more sensible pourpoint jacket), they don't even bother to change out of those clothes when going into battle, instead just wearing cuirasses over them for some reason.
    • Some armor pieces more resemble modern reenactment armor than period-appropriate armor. This is most noticeable with eye pieces and visors, which are usually several times larger than they would have been historically. Although the development team may have went with this in order to not obscure the player's field of view too much while the visor was down during combat.
    • Some carts dotted around the various towns in the game sport solid wheels, especially annoying given that they might only be a few feet away from other carts which with accurate spoked wheels.
    • One Codex entry (titled Beverages) seems to perpetuate an old myth that arose in the Victorian period which claimed that medieval people had to constantly chug beer and ale to avoid getting sick by drinking filthy water. In reality, as mentioned in the Drinking Water Codex entry, clean water was readily available almost everywhere in medieval Europe, even in large cities, where there were complex systems of waste management to avoid the contamination of the drinking water. Medieval beer and ale didn't have a high enough alcohol content to have any real sanitizing properties, for that you'd need whiskey or vodka, which would just dehydrate you anyway. Modern historians of medieval food and drink do have something of an explanation for this: the idea comes from a combination of records from connoisseurs who could afford the good stuff waxing lyrical about it and the weakest commonly available beer/ale (small or table beer) being something of the medieval equivalent to a natural energy drink.
    • The Cumans speak Hungarian, even though at this point in history they were not yet completely assimilated, and spoke their own language. Possibly justified, since Cuman is a dead language with not very many surviving textsnote .
    • Jan Ptáček (Hans Capon in the English version) is a teenager, despite being born around the time the game takes place.
  • Attempted Rape: Three Cumans attempt to rape Theresa during the sacking of Skalitz, which Henry can avert by either distracting them long enough for her to get away or outright killing them. If he doesn't intervene, Theresa later reveals that she took a dagger from one of them and "cut their throats," though her tone implies that this might have been after she was "despoiled". If Henry does save Theresa, it's later reflected with in the dialogue with Lady Stephanie.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Weapon combos, specially the most complex ones which include up to four different motions before the blow is struck. They're still somewhat useful in one-on-one fights and duels, and there is no denying how satisfying it can be to pull them off against a smug opponent. But getting the whole attack pattern right is just too much of a hassle when dealing with several enemies at once. In such cases, the Boring, but Practical master strikes are more useful due to combining offence and defence in a single motion. Somewhat Truth in Television, as fighting more than a single adversary at once can always be a challenge, and in such cases flashy and complicated techniques are out of the question.
    • Poaching can be relatively safe way to make some easy groshin, provided you don't get caught by a lord's game warden and don't try to sell the meat raw. Boars in particular have a lot of meat on them that is highly valuable... and so heavy it is almost certain to encumber you. Add to that, because there is so much of it and it is so valuable, it is hard to actually sell all of it, since merchants only have so-much coin available at once, and the ones who take boar meat (butchers, innkeepers, grocers, general traders) have relatively little cash on hand and don't offer much that Henry needs to buy in quantity or expense to justify it's value. Selling off an entire boar generally requires visiting multiple merchants since so few can absorb an entire one into their inventory.
  • An Axe to Grind: Axes are one of many weapons that Henry can use.
  • Back Stab: Henry can deliver these, as long as he has a dagger in the inventory and has unlocked the Stealth Kill perk.
  • Badass Grandpa: Quite a few in this game. Experience counts when it comes down to sword combat.
    • Sir Ulrich is more than capable of single-handedly taking down a caravan guarded by several armed mercenaries.
    • Captain Robard arrives just in time to drive the bandits out and save Henry's life at the conclusion of the Prologue. Later, he commands the Talmberg soldiers in the assault against Pribyslavitz.
    • Captain Bernhard is the no-nonsense captain of the guard of Rattay. He will be tasked with teaching Henry the basics of combat, and more. Make sure you have a good provision of bandages before daring to ask him a combat practice with real weapons...
  • Badass Preacher: Theologian and church reformer Jan Hus is described as this by Father Godwin.
    • Godwin himself more than qualifies.
    • Henry can become this as well, even if temporarily, should he play his cards right during a certain quest.
  • Bag of Holding: The player's personal chest, which can be accessed from any location the game considers "home". At the beginning, only the chest inside of the Miller's house near Rattay and Henry's room at Talmberg are available. You can also rent a room at inns for a single night, and they always include a chest from where this personal storage can be entered - rent the room permanently, and you will be able to use the associated chest at any given time. Also, over the course of the Main Quest, Henry will be rewarded with additional "homes", with connected personal chests at his disposal.
  • Bar Brawl: Henry will be able (sometimes forced to) participate in a few of them over the course of the game.
  • Bathtub Bonding: Henry and Hans Capon in the "Next to Godliness" quest visit the Rattay bathhouse together, with Hans sneaking out of the castle and Henry meeting him there later. Has invites Henry to join him in the tub, and this represents the point that the two of them really start to open up to each other as friends after their rocky earlier meetings. The rest of the evening is spent drinking, throwing dice, and Hans sending Henry off for some caper-like drunk errands that earn his admiration and trust.
  • Beef Gate: The player is not supposed to be visiting some parts of the map until advancing a bit in the main questline and adquiring some decent gear, but they're still completely open for exploration.
    • In the Prologue, Henry is warned the area surrounding Skalitz (after the town is plundered by Sigismund's army, of course) is a dangerous place due to all the deserters and brigands roaming around the field. Many a new player will learn the truth behind these words the hard way after wandering just a bit too much from the main road.
    • Pribyslavitz is crammed with skilled and well geared bandits and Cumans, including patrols in the surrounding area. Exploring around the place without leveling a bit the combat skills and obtaining some decent fighting equipment will usually mean a quick and brutal death sentence.
  • Being Good Sucks: Playing as a generous, honourable, nice guy can potentially lead to a bunch of heartwarming moments and also obtaining some extra gifts. On the other hand, being too naïve will also punish Henry sometimes. As a rule of thumb, don't always believe what an NPC tells you, even if it sounds fairly convincing.
  • Bilingual Bonus:
    • If you know Magyar, you may understand what the Cumans are saying. Especially interesting in a side-quest where the player has to find a translator to translate for a captured Cuman. The translator lies, but the Henry doesn't know it. A player who understands Hungarian, however...
    • Some of the attempts Henry makes at Latin can be quite funny. "Pater noster quee est in canis."
  • Bittersweet Ending: The organized Bandits are dealt with, the counterfeiters get their operation halted and you manage to retake Talmberg, rescue Sir Radzig and teach Hans Capon some humility. However the Big Bad manages to escape - with your father's sword - to his allies beyond the fief, the woods are still plagued by Cumans, the man who actually killed your parents is nowhere to be seen (and historically died before the sack of Skalitz) and the Greater-Scope Villain Sigismund is ultimately fated to triumph - which may mean ill tidings for your Wenceslas-supporting allies.
  • The Blacksmith: Henry is the son of one. The option to continue the tradition was intended as a feature, but was cut during development due to being harder to implement than the alchemy system. The closest the game proper gets is using repair kits to maintain your gear and grindstones to sharpen your bladed weapons.
  • Body Horror: Not too much in the game, but a few specific examples do qualify. Limpy Lubosh may have been a thief and a rascal, but noone deserves something like that.
  • Boring, but Practical: Maces and hammers. The amount of available combos is quite lacklustre if compared to the swords' (both short and long) flashy repertoire, but they are extremely effective when dealing with plate-armored opponents, whom after a while are the only real enemies worth worrying about.
    • The Master Strikes themselves, due to combining defence and offence in a single motion, and usually leaving opponents open for an additional strike in the inmediate aftermath. They require a bit of practice to master, but once the player begins to get the timing right, they become much more efficient than the Awesome, but Impractical combos (whose attack patterns can include up to four different motions). Also Truth in Television according to many historical european fencing treatises - the german tradition held the "hidden" or "master" strikes in a very high regard.
    • Having trouble against multiple opponents? Switch to the bow and retreat backwards. Even if your archery skill, nor your ability to shoot without a targeting reticule isn't up to much, it's not difficult to pepper enemies with arrows at point blank range.
  • Breakable Weapons: Weapons, armor, clothes and certain tools (repair kits, lockpicks) degrade with use. Weapons and gear merely become less efficient (i.e. getting diverse maluses to the damage/protection they provide) while repair kits and lockpicks will eventually "break" completely and need to be replaced. Upon release, no matter how damaged a weapon or a piece of armor was, it could still be wielded/worn by Henry and used indefinetely. This was eventually changed via patches, so when an item falls beyond a certain durability threshold, it cannot be equipped again until repaired back to an usable condition.
  • But Liquor Is Quicker: Gets done to Henry at the climax of a drunken bender with Father Godwin in Uzhitz. The bar maid who was serving them the night before mounts Henry as he wakes from a drunken stupor in the stables as Godwin and his mistress can be hear coupling in the next stall over. Notably, the barmaid was naked before she left the stall with Godwin and his mistress...
  • Changing Clothes Is a Free Action: Played straight under normal conditions. Henry can completely change his outfit (plate armor included) in the blink of an eye. NPCs will enter a room at night, closing the door behind them, then instantly come out with their sleeping clothes on. Averted while in combat; as long as the game considers you're in fighting mode, no change of equipment is allowed.
  • Chekhov's Skill: Reading. Henry begins the game as illiterate and at some point is advised to visit the Scribe of Uzhitz should he want to learn to read. While it costs some money and requires a bit of time, it will pay off big time in the long run. More than once the game will require the player to personally obtain information from books, thus being able to read is absolutely imperative to resolve a certain amount of quests. There's even a trophy/achievement in the From the Ashes DLC for rebuilding Pribyslavitz while illiterate.
  • City Guards: Present in pretty much every noteworthy settlement. Each town has its own force, and keeps track of the player's dastardly deeds independently. This means the guard of Rattay will never try to apprehend Henry for crimes committed in Sasau, and viceversa. They can be also found sometimes on the roads, battling against bandits and Cuman raiders.
  • Civil War: The core issue which drives most of the plot. Actually a fratricide one, between the supporters of King Wenceslaus and the invading forces of his brother Sigismund, King of Hungary and Croatia.
  • Combat, Diplomacy, Stealth: According to update #47, all three play styles are represented in the Game System. The final game offers player mutually-exclusive traits that give bonus to skills related to the chosen playstyle while debuffing skills of unchosen playstyles.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Wise players will make Henry behave this way if he wants to survive this fairly realistic and unforgiving setting.
    • Considering that Helmets Are Hardly Heroic enjoys a permanent aversion here (see below), keep an eye out for enemies wearing little to no head protection. A well delivered strike at the precise moment will likely remove the need to strike again. Attentive players may finish relatively challenging fights (like against sir Jezhek) with a single blow.
    • If a band of brigands is proving to be specially painful to deal with, it is always an option to wait until dark, sneak into their camp and plunge a dagger into the leader's throat while he sleeps. His cronies will probably be alerted immediately and attack, but getting rid of the better armoured foe first - who may also be equipped with a quality mace, easily smashing through whatever armor Henry is wearing - will make things way easier. You can also poison their food and drink so you can fight them while they were in pain.
    • Likewise, even if you are not a stealthy character you can do a hit and run at night, doable even if you are in heavy armor. Jump at a lone bandit patrolling the camp and strike him down quickly before he can even draw his weapon then quickly disappear into the shadows as his buddies come to investigate, and while that happens do the same to another bandit at the other side of the camp, or kill any that are still asleep, preferably the better armed leader, this way you can thin the horde a bit before you deal with the rest of them.
    • If you manage to make horse archery work for yourself, then you can draw your enemies out of their camps and out into into more open areas and dance around them while picking them off at your leisure.
    • If you have the strength and stamina for it, repeatedly getting right up in the enemy's face with a cinch and pushing them back with kicks, knees, elbows, and shield bashes can limit an opponent's defense and get them pressed back against a wall or fence or other obstruction where they have no room to dodge, no space to deflect, and can be battered into submission.
  • Combos: One of the features of the combat system. They are delivered by correctly following an specific attack pattern, and many of them are named after real techniques of medieval and renaissance european martial arts systems - in example, the Zorn Ort or "Wrath Strike" finished with a thrust, from the german tradition. Captain Bernard will teach Henry one longsword combo during their training and sparring sessions, the rest are perks to be unlocked after levelling up each weapon skill.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: The Wenceslaus loyalists tend to come out on top in any engagement with Sigismund's forces despite generally having smaller numbers. This extends to the story as well: they are generally outnumbered by their foes (as they have only about hundred between the Lords Radzig, Divish and Hanush), but the quality of their men exceeds that of their enemies'.
  • Content Warning: The cover promises players will get the full Game of Thrones treatment not because of violence or language but because of rape.
  • Corrupt Church: The game purposefully goes out of its way to portray diverse members of the church in different degrees of light. Simon, the former priest of Rovna, is compassionate to the point of being naïve (and griefing due to an unfortunate event of the past). Godwin, the priest of Uzhitz, regardless of his "debauched" ways proves to be really kind-hearted and gets a pass from his fellow citizens due to living a humble life despite his noble upbringing. The monks of the Sazau Monastery are mostly decent people in spite of their aloof relationship with the outside world. The trope is played full straight with the Vicar (an intolerant zealot with Burn the Witch! tendencies) and the priest of Rattay (a cynical, unscrupulous hypocrite). Overall, most of the townsfolk Henry meets have a negative opinion of the clergy, considering them to be corrupt, greedy and power-hungry. Truth in Television to a good degree, as the XV century was pretty much the prelude of the religious reformations and turmoil of the XVI, with a less-than-exemplary clergy and growing criticism against the ecclesiastical hierarchy.
  • Cowardly Mooks: When battling against several opponents, take down the leader and a few more of them, and you can expect the rest to turn on their heels and start running away at amazing pace - actually a wise choice, since you will have it difficult to chase all of them down. Some perks can exacerbate this by boosting Henry's "intimidating presence".
  • Crazy-Prepared: Healing items cannot be used during combat, and the save system is restrictive. So making sure your blade is always in good condition - and also coated in poison - is advised. Do not hesitate to employ an enhancing potion if you are not sure what may be waiting around that road turn. The Nighthawk potion is almost a must at night since Hollywood Darkness does not apply to this game, and resorting to torches means enemies will see you coming.
  • Creator Provincialism: The game takes place in the medieval Kingdom of Bohemia, in the modern-day Czech Republic. Daniel Vávra, the director of the project, is Czech.
  • Critical Existence Failure: Averted. Taking damage of any kind reduces maximum stamina and makes combat much more difficult, specific injuries result in Subsystem Damage, and even a very minor injury can be fatal if Henry doesn't bandage himself before he bleeds out.
  • Critical Hit: In a rather realistic fashion, any powerful enough strike to an unarmored head can become this.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: Downplayed. Most cutscenes depict only dialogues, with the whole fighting left for the player to deal with. The few ones which include some action like the beginning of the duel agains Runt in Pribyslavitz tend to depict Henry as fairly competent. There are a few exceptions however. After finding the bandit fortress in Vranik, Henry is surprised and caught off guard by Istvan Toth's appearance, thus allowing a mook to knock him out from behind.
  • Cycle of Hurting: Since maximum stamina is linked with health, taking a lot of damage during a fight results in lower maximum stamina, making it harder for Henry to mount an effective defence, since attacking and sprinting both use stamina.
  • Dangerous Deserter: Relatively well armed brigands tend to roam around the Skalitz area and sometimes stalk the roads all over the entire region. And they can be very dangerous indeed in the early game, when Henry is still poorly equipped and has yet to develop his combat skills.
  • Deadpan Snarker: One blacksmith character to Henry.
    Henry: What are you doing here?
    Blacksmith: Me? I thought I might prattle about, perhaps bake me a cake. Yes, a great big one here in the forge. Certainly I couldn't be, you know, smithing.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: Mostly averted, as fights in this game tend to be relatively short and brutal, but may be - realistically - played straight when a sword-wielding Henry faces against plate-armored opponents. Some of those enemies can certainly take many hits before going down if the player has developed Henry towards a non combat-oriented build and/or wields a low-damage sword. Poisons can help mitigate this problem and make such builds viable. Emphasizing the "cuts" part of this trope, bleeding enemies saps their stamina, making it harder for them to defend against attacks or follow-through as aggressively on their own, so for well-armoured foes a combat may indeed be decided by a several non-fatal cuts that slow them down over the course of a fight before they slow down enough for a Finishing Move.
  • Defector from Decadence: Sir Jezhek, should the player let him live when he surrenders, and later advice Sir Radzig to accept him into his service.
    • Late in the game, Zbyshek. Downplayed since he's mostly motivated by personal, selfish reasons: he's the youngest, weakest and hence most vulnerable individual at Vranik, and feels that in such an environment he'll be getting the short end of the stick sooner or later. He also demands a monetary remuneration in exchange for his services - knowing well it's an offer Henry simply cannot refuse. The player can later honour the deal... or turn against Zbyshek and hand him the reward all traitors deserve.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: The game does not shy away from depicting a medieval society accurately:
    • Lord Divish believes that running a stable is a job for men, which is why he stops getting horses from a stable run by a woman. Virtually no one even challenges the idea that all women should Stay in the Kitchen; the closest is the approval that Lord Hanush and the Nightingale have for Theresa's rescue of Henry, albeit with some light teasing by the former for Henry owing his life to a woman.
    • Questioning one's rulers isn't tolerated at all in medieval Bohemia - even Henry doesn't question that a man insulting the king has gone too far and should be immediately punished.
    • Virtually everyone is Catholic, and the dialogue is filled with religious references down to the greetings they use - a particularly sharp contrast to the modern Czech Republic, which is one of the world's least religious countries! You do meet some undercover Waldensians in a quest though (after all, this game takes place before Martin Luther's reformation).
    • Though Henry is brash, impulsive, and quick to speak his mind to the lords in Rattay, he is repeatedly reminded that he is only being allowed to get away with it because his father was a close friend with one of them. Trying to behave the same way to the Custodian of Sasau, who has no such scruples, is a good way to get thrown in jail. Even the otherwise indulgent Lord Hanush sends Henry on a punishment assignment for insulting a nobleman, even though he agrees with Henry's criticisms of Lord Capon.
  • Developers' Foresight: Lots of them in the game.
    • Early on in the game, you have to run from the Cumans attacking Skalitz, and both the dialog as well as cutscenes heavily imply that Henry simply fled the town and barely survived the ordeal, never actually fighting any Cumans himself (Henry shows up in every cinematic wearing his default civilian garb, with no equipment looted off the enemy). Nonetheless, through cheats, or exploits, it is possible to kill every single Cuman you encounter, including the ones attempting to rape Theresa. If you actually kill them (instead of the game's chosen approach of simply distracting them to allow her to flee), Henry will comment on it when recalling his story to Lady Stephanie and she will reply with a unique comment of her own, different from her response if you had left Theresa to fend for herself, or simply distracted the soldiers.
    • During the Next to Godliness quest, Henry is asked by a noble to fetch some wine from an area that restricted to commoners. Normally, many players would pick the lock then go in and the dialogue would later reflect the trouble Henry has to get into to acquire the wine. Except, if the player simply take the key to the area from the noble and get the wine without trouble, Henry will bring up this fact and the noble will compliment Henry for being crafty. If the player is caught by guards in the area, there's an option to show the key as proof that Henry was sent by the noble. None of the above is mentioned or suggested anywhere by the quest.
    • The quest ...Is a Friend Indeed involves Henry trying to resolve a dispute between his two carpenter friends, Fritz and Matthew, and the foreman of the Mill they work at. There are three options to resolve the quest directly presented to the player. note  Both friends discourage Henry from trying to bring it up with the Miller, as they consider him too old and out of touch with what's happening to be of any help. Should the player actually try to bring it up with the Miller (which is not presented as an option at any point during the quest), they actually will unlock a fourth route presented by the Miller's daughter, which involves exposing that the foreman stole a scarf from the Miller's dead son, thereby driving the foreman in to leaving the mill out of shame.
    • An early quest which requires Henry to escape a castle has the local noblewoman suggesting Henry to steal some guard's armor. However, this approach has another problem: the guard at the gate does not recognize you as one of his fellow guards and immediately ask who you are and thus requiring a speech check (by pretending you are an envoy from a nearby town of the same lord) or a bribe. Conversely, if you win him over with an argument before getting the armor, he'll let you out once you obtain and equip it.
    • During the Robber Baron quest, you have to deal with the notorious bandit lord Wolfin of Kamberg. You can assault his camp with Captain Bernard and his scouting corps, or choose the much more difficult option of persuading them to leave. If you're feeling suicidal, you can also head to the camp yourself and try to kill Wolfin and his entourage of well-armored goons all by your lonesome. If you should through some miracle succeed, Captain Bernard will have unique dialogue when you return.
    • In the Waldensians quest, Sir Hanush tasks Henry with dealing with the vicar investigating heresy in Uzhitz - Hanush doesn't really care how the player resolves the problem, his main concern is for the vicar to be gone as soon as possible. As such, the quest will be marked as resolved as soon as you tell the vicar the results of your inquiries, leaving only the task of reporting back to Sir Hanush. However, should you choose then to murder the vicar, the final dialogue with Hanush will reflect it, leaving Henry with a scolding (whose severity will depend on a Speech check) and without a reward.
    • Henry shouldn't have a horse until after the main quest The Prey. If he does have one, he will ride with Hans after the boar in the later part of the quest (as opposed to running and searching for them on foot) and you will see him unhorsed and knocked out instead of being ambushed and tied up, after which you will immediately clash swords with the two encamped Cumans (having no chance to sneak up on them).
    • City guards may randomly search people while entering the gates or just walking around the city, making it risky to walk around with stolen goods in your pocket, since this was often the case in other games. Further, the frequency and severity of these searches will increase depending on how much theft has been going on in the area, since the guards will be extra alert for people potentially carrying stolen goods.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Archery is this by design. There are no crosshairs and the sway of the arrows has to be adjusted for, making aiming difficult, but bows are some of the game's most powerful and effective weapons. This simulates the demanding path to using an actual warbow in the real world.
    • Taking shortcuts during the race quest can be this. Since races in Bohemia have no predetermined track, contestants are free to go whatever path they want to reach the destination. This means that while other racers are going around a forest or a mountain range on a road, you can cut straight through the rough terrain and get far ahead of other racers. With the forests in this game being rather realistic with branches that knock you off your horses and bushes that impair your movement, you will fail the race more often than you can succeed. However, once you manage to get a hang of the geography, it's possible for you to fall off your horse multiple times and still have enough time to beat other racers because taking shortcut is just that rewarding when done right.
    • The Stealth skill, a bit difficult to level up, but once you hit level 5 of it, you can walk almost silently (with proper gear of course) and allows you to silently Back Stab enemies.
  • Dirty Coward: Emphasis on "Dirty", as Zbyshek not only ran off to join a group of bandits within a day of the town being pillaged, but he was only able to do so by pushing his sister out the door to serve as a distraction for the Cuman soldiers, buying himself time to flee. Worse still, he shows absolutely zero remorse for any of it. And that group of bandits he joins? They are working with Sigismund's army and thus Zbyshek is indirectly working for the same people who destroy his town.
  • Disc-One Nuke:
    • You can knock out some guards in Skalitz during the prologue and some of them has some expensive high level gear. Sure you cannot use them or even walk while carrying them but you can stash them in your house' chest since you will come back to it just before fighting Runt. Not to mention that after the prologue ended all stolen tags in your items will disappear. Also, it is possible to kill some of the Cumans during the attack on Skalitz and loot their gear.
    • Grinding the Herbalism skill in Skalitz at the beginning of the game by collecting every plant in sight can grant Henry several perks. Collecting 100 nettles will grant Henry a permanent boost to his vitality, the herbs can be sold for a good bundle of cash, the Flower Power perk gives a Charisma boost when enough fragrant herbs are in Henry's inventory, and the Leg Day perk allows Henry to grind his Strength stat just by collecting herbs.
    • Scarmaker is this for weapon combos. Unlike pretty much all of them, it is very simple to perform (bottom left attack-stab-stab; stabbing is done by pressing button rather than aligning the attack from proper direction) and can be done as mindless Button Mashing. All while hitting enemies directly in their faces for massive damage. It only starts to lose power once full helmets show up, but remains a viable, if cheap trick to instantly get through defenses of your enemies.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: As befitting the time period, the punishments given sometimes don't fit the crime. If Henry tries to tell off the Custodian in Sasau, he'll get locked in jail for the night because nobody talks to the Custodian that way.
  • The Dreaded: Henry will eventually become this if he bothers to kill enough Cumans, unlocking a free perk (aptly named Cumanslayer) as a result - it makes Cumans more prone to fleeing should Henry start turning the tables against them in a fight.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: Possible to do, but be wary as often city guards or Cumans can still notice you somehow.
  • Drop the Hammer: Hammers are available and are very effective against plate armor, though face disadvantages fighting against other weapon types, such as swords.
  • Drunken Montage: With the Priest of Uzhitz, no less!
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Averted and played straight at the same time. On one hand, Henry's heroic deeds (and social climbing) will make other characters give him due respect, better prices in exchange of their services, etc. On the other hand, no matter what an impressive and dreaded fighter he becomes or how far he rises in the social ladder, NPCs will keep offering him the same menial tasks, and poorly armed cutthroats will still try to mug him on the roads.
  • Early Game Hell: Probably one of the game's most defining aspects. Henry starts out with absolutely no skills, skill books and alchemical recipes can't be read, trainers are expensive for a comparatively small benefit, and improving skills directly is very difficult. He can't hold a bow correctly or stop shaking long enough to hit the air surrounding the broad side of a barn, lockpicking is the game's Scrappy Mechanic, pickpocketing is risky and largely luck-based, almost everyone encountered in the early game is a more capable fighter than Henry even before you meet trained soldiers, there's no healing during combat, and the save system is limited enough for a fall off a rock to cost hours of progress. It really says something that fighting a destitute town drunk is too much for most players to handle early on.
  • Easter Egg: The 1.4 Easter update added the chance for looting actual Easter eggs from chicken coops and a new weapon (a pomlázka, or Easter whip) that can be found in Sasau.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Pious' Bandit gang are robbers and thieves, but they are not murderers. They even refused to kill anyone during Neuhof Massacre, both people and horses.
  • Faceless Goons: Unless you manage to look like a Knight in Shining Armor by wearing some good looking armor pieces, wearing a face covering headwear will reduce your charisma.
  • Fast-Forward Mechanic: As usual in this kind of RPG, it's possible to "wait" at any given time, or alternatively sleep in a bed, large enough bench or similar place.
  • Fetch Quest: For an open-world RPG, the game has a relatively small amount of these, mostly revolving around poaching (a leatherworker asking for pelts, an innkeeper asking for meat, etc.) and bandit-slaying.
  • Finish Him!: You have an option to finish off dying enemies, with a third person view.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: Henry and Hans Capon utterly loathe each other when they first meet, regularly butting heads until the former rescues the latter from Cumans during their hunting trip. They are far more amiable to each other after that, becoming drinking buddies and brothers-in-arms.
  • Foreshadowing: The game constantly reminds you to retrieve your father's sword. That has two meanings when you realize it later in the game - not only is it his father's sword - the blacksmith who raised him, it's also his biological father's sword, Sir Radzig's.
    • Related to the above, there are a few hints about Henry's parentage that come up early in the game. The first is how indulgent Sir Radzig is with Henry, even as he's being chewed out for leaving Talmberg. Henry is referred sarcastically as a noble several times. For example, in the beginning, his mother mentioned to her husband that he is "sleeping like a lord". Another is a possible Speech skill you can get, 'Highborn', which may simply be a gameplay thing but is otherwise an odd ability for a commoner to have.
    • One of the loading screens depict a fairly well-equipped Henry passing by a large group of soldiers with a castle in the background. It's Talmberg. Guess where the siege at the climax of the story takes place?
  • Friendly Fireproof: Averted. Once an arrow is shot, virtually every living thing in its path is fair game. The player can exploit it by moving cleverly when facing groups of enemies, but should also be careful in the rare instances where archers happen to be on their side as well.
  • Game Engine: Kingdom Come: Deliverance is powered by Cry Tek's CryEngine.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Henry is not meant to own a horse until being gifted one at some point during the main quest. However, it is possible to obtain a mount before that, either by earning enough money to buy one from the stables of Neuhof or Uzhitz, or by simply taking ones found sometimes at bandit camps (the game will not recognize these as "owned", but you can still ride them wherever you want). In any case, when Hans Capon asks whether Henry has a horse at the beginning of The Prey, he answers no, even rhetorically wondering where could he had got one from. This can happen even if said horse is waiting in the background of the cutscene.
  • Gargle Blaster: The 1.4 patch added one in the form of a perk respec potion called Lethean Water, which has a 101% alcohol content. Drinking it instantly knocks you on your ass blind stinking drunk and the hangover is strong enough that you "forget" all the perks you chose.
  • The Good King: Charles IV is still fondly remembered by both nobles and commoners alike as a righteous ruler who brought peace and prosperity to Bohemia.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: The Unarmed skill. Unlike other fighting styles, it does not include any kind of perk. Hand-to-hand combat is mostly intended for bar brawls and one-on-one "boxing" matches in certain moments of the game. While it's possible to overwhelm and pummel armed opponents with Henry's bare fists, such a tactic is unlikely to succeed against a decently armored enemy. So make sure you bring a proper weapon to serious fights.
  • Guide Dang It!: The Queen of Sheba sword quest. One of the sword pieces is in the hand of Pickman, who will only hand it to you as a reward for a completely different quest, the Aquarius quest. The game never even hints at this. What is more, you not only have to give him a job as a water bearer during the Aquarius quest but basically blackmail him - a penniless refugee from your hometown - into giving you a reward as well. If you complete the Aquarius quest without doing this, Pickman's piece of the sword winds up in the possession of the Rattay blacksmith, but no dialogue from Pickman or the smith will tell you as much.
  • Harder Than Hard: The Hardcore difficulty mode added in update 1.6 cranks up the realism. Your HUD is greatly reduced, there are no autosaves, fast travel is disabled, monetary rewards and money gained from selling items are reduced, equipment repair is more expensive, healing takes longer, combat is rebalanced and harder, the economy is rebalanced, survival is harder, you actually have to navigate due to the player map marker and cardinal directions on the compass being removed. You're forced to take at least two of the nine added negative perks at the start of the game, you can't remove them, and some of your other perks have been rebalanced for Hardcore mode.
  • Heavily Armored Mook: When dealing with groups of bandits and Cumans, the leaders will usually have better gear than their lackies. Bandit leaders from the third batch of bandit/Cuman camp quests (the ones you take from the Sasau custodian) are specially well equipped, sometimes with hammers which can easily smash through the best armor Henry may be wearing at the moment.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Mostly averted. The helmet, along with the appropriate padded and mail coifs, is just as vital a part of your armor as everything else, and most characters in the game will wear some form of head protection accordingly when going in to battle. On the other hand, most cutscenes will depict Henry without any sort of headgear, as to ensure his face and expressions can clearly be seen. Although taking the Claustrophobia negative perk in Hardcore mode limits you to helmets without a visor, as visored helms will cause your attacks to weaken due to a claustrophobia-induced panic attack.
  • Hollywood Darkness: Averted. It's pretty dark at night in the outside, and completely pitch black in most caves and mines. Dynamic range comes into play here too, carrying a torch at night can make everything nearby easier to see, but the light will wash out details further away. Likewise, an open field at night is easier to see by the star and moonlight and the silhouette of the horizon, while the underbrush of a forest is almost completely blacked out due to the canopy and long shadows.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: All over the place during the prologue. Almost every single Cuman soldier during the prologue quest "Run!" may as well be a Boss in Mook Clothing, as they can all kill you in a couple of hits, can take over a dozen hits or more themselves, and will parry/block/dodge/counter 90% of all your feeble attacks. Although they can be killed with exploits/cheats, the dialog and cutscenes heavily imply that Henry is meant to simply flee from them (Although if you do beat them, he will mention how he only barely survived by the skin of his teeth trying to save at least one person). A straighter example is Runt during the quest "Homecoming". He WILL beat you in one to three hits, and the story requires him to beat you, so winning against him is more or less impossible. It's that kind of game.
  • Hordes from the East: Cumans — a nomadic group from the Eurasian steppes that eventually settled in various lands east of Bohemia — are one of many enemies that the players can fight against.
  • Hot-Blooded: Henry, specially at the beginning of the game. He improves a bit through the events of the main questline.
    • As much as he likes to scold Henry for it, Hans Capon also has his moments.
    • The villagers of Merhojed after the bandit attack that left several of them injured, and one dead. They want blood, more precisely the prisoner's blood.
  • Hyperspace Arsenal: Averted at first, downplayed as the player levels up and unlocks certain perks. At the beginning of the game, Henry is not even capable of carrying an entire suit of armor without becoming overencumbered - which renders him unable to sprint and also slows him down in combat. Later, some perks (like Mule) increase his weight limit, while others (specially from the Defence list) make equipped armor weight less for encumbrance purposes. In the end, it's possible to be running around carrying several weapons and a couple sets of armors. The same applies to the horses: the best ones are able to carry their own weight in gold, so to speak.
  • Hypocritical Humor: The Zany Scheme in Uzhitz has Father Godwin requesting that Henry give the sermon condemning the sins and excesses of the church in his stead, as Godwin is too hungover to do it himself.
  • I Gave My Word: Discussed at the end of the game. Sir Hanush speaks for the rest of the loyalists in negotiating with Toth, saying that they will let him and his remaining men (and lover) leave the fiefdom unmolested if he surrenders Sir Radzig and Lady Stephanie. Henry and Hans want to jump him immediately when he shows himself but are stopped, with Sir Hanush saying that a knight and lord's honor must mean something and that it would be a whole lot messier and more difficult if a noble's oaths mean nothing. Sir Radzig concurs with this.
    • After the escape from Vranik, Henry can stick to his word and make sure Zbyshek is duly rewarded for his services. It's also possible to backpedal and reward him as traitors deserve, though.
  • I Surrender, Suckers: Averted in the case of the AI. Once an NPC kneels down, he's surrendered for good, and won't fight any longer - at most, he will run away as fast as his legs allow. Can be played straight by Henry however - it's always possible to surrender to an enemy, then choose the option to continue fighting in the following dialogue.
  • Iconic Item: Henry's father's sword. Its recovery is one of the player's long-term goals and motivations throughout the whole story. It's also prominently featured in the game's box artwork.
  • If You're So Evil, Eat This Kitten: The quest Needle in a Haystack, part of the main questline. In order to prove his willingness to do "anything", the bandits task Henry with infiltrating the Sasau monastery and murdering one of the novices, a former bandit himself.
  • Illegal Religion: Waldensians. While during the events of the game the movement has not been declared heretical yet (such a thing happened a few years later, in the Fourth Lateran Council), persecution from church authorities has already begun. The quest Waldensians centers around assisting a Vicar to track down a Waldensian community in the Uzhitz area.
  • Impossible Item Drop: Averted. The game is quite similar to the Gothic series in this regard: looting dead or incapacitated [NPCs] will only yield the clothes they were wearing and reasonable amounts of items they were carrying. If killed or knocked out in combat, they will also drop their weapons to the ground, which then can be picked up by the player.
  • Improbable Antidote: Averted. The common, humble Antidote will cure any kind of poison effect. It can even asepticize cooking pots poisoned with a Bane Potion.
  • Inadequate Inheritor: The King of Bohemia, Wenceslaus IV, is a naive and unambitious monarch who cares more about drinking and revelry than running his kingdom effectively, and is seen as a disappointment coming off the reign of his father, Emperor Charles IV. His ineptitude leads the lords of the land to complain to his half-brother (and the king of Hungary), Sigismund the Red Fox. This ultimately leads to Sigismund kidnapping his half-brother and invading Bohemia.
    • The people of Rattay dread the day Hans Capon is declared an adult as he is seen as totally inadequate when compared to his father, or to his guardian, Sir Hanush.
      • Averted in Real Life. Hans Capon actually grown up to be a competent commander during the Hussite Wars, a skilled politician, and a mentor of the future Bohemian king George of Poděbrady.
  • Informed Attribute: The bandit Timmy is said to be a great hulking brute of a man, with characters referring to him as "a colossus" and "The Ox". When you finally meet him, he's quite scrawny and even shorter than Henry.
    • Applies to Henry himself due to What Could Have Been. Several characters believe that Henry can work the forge due to being a blacksmith's son, but he doesn't have the option to do so in-game.
      • You still don't see any smithing done, but Henry's background does weigh in when he's the bailiff of Pribyslavitz. In one judgement interlude, there is issue with Baker Sylvester's portions and the surveyor brings up the idea of buying new scales, but balks because precise equipment like that is pricey. Henry has the option of telling them that he could make a set because he and his father have done so enough times in Skalitz.
  • Infinity -1 Sword: The Queen of Sheba's sword. It's the second-best longsword in terms of damage but has absolutely crap durability (the worst in the game). Oddly enough, it's actually harder to get than the first and third best longswords (St. George's sword and the Magdeburg sword, respectively), being available only through a somewhat annoying quest, while these two can be found in treasure sites or by pick-pocketing certain people.
  • Interface Screw: The screen starts going blurry if Henry is excessively tired or drunk. In a very unconventional instance, if you have a helmet with a face guard equipped, then you'll be looking through the visor's slots during combat, instead of the face guard being "invisible" while in the first person view like in The Elder Scrolls series.
  • Intimate Healing: The bath house wenches are the only thing in the game able to completely restore Henry's nourishment, energy and health meters in a single go. He even gets a temporary charisma boost afterwards.
    The Bathmaids will make a new man of you!
  • Invulnerable Civilians: Averted. Almost any NPC can die, and bandits and other outlaws will eagerly attack unarmed civilians when given the chance. Played straight in a few specific cases though. As much as many players would like to, it's not possible to murder the Custodian of Sasau.
    • Before the patches fixed it, sometimes bandits could spawn inside walled settlements like Rattay, going inmediately on murderous sprees. That's why certain NPCs, mostly questgivers or story-related characters, while being killable will respawn after a few days - likely to prevent certain quests from becoming unresolvable. However some secondary quests will be automatically failed if Henry himself is the one doing the murder.
  • Joke Weapon: The pomlázka added in the Easter update, which does 1 damage across all three damage types.
  • Justified Tutorial: The game provides you the option to adquire basic proficiency in all available skills via early quests. A bit of a special case, as most (if not all) of the tutorials are actually optional, and can be skipped if the player wishes so: Henry can actually refuse to be trained in certain skills, even if it may end up biting back in his ass later.
    • The most iconic example? Captain Bernard's combat training. You can do just the very basic, mandatory part, and leave after the duel against Hans Capon. Or you can spend an entire real time hour learning everything he's willing to teach - including proper parries, combos and master strikes - and enjoying sparring sessions with all available weapons. It's perfectly possible for Henry (and the player as well) to become a pretty proficient combatant from Bernard's lessons alone, also leveling up basic skills as Strength or Agility which will help towards meeting the requirements for mid-tier weapons. Or you can just not bother with it, and spend the rest of the early game being mauled by any pack of bandits willing to gang up on you.
  • Karl Marx Hates Your Guts: Prices are pretty much the same everywhere. They can fluctuate as a result of Henry's reputation with each settlement (and within that settlement, with each social group) but still making money from a "buy low, sell high" strategy is virtually impossible - even taking full advantage of haggling perks.
  • Karma Houdini: Thanks to his links with the nobility and also due to all the unstability Bohemia is going through at the date of the game, Henry can end up getting away with anything. Stay away from a settlement for long enough, and they will end up forgetting any crimes you may have commited. Certain unlockable perks can make things even easier.
    • The system has its limits, though. Very serious crimes, like a killing spree right in the middle of town, will be punished with long (in game terms) prison sentences. Henry will need to stay away for a very long time in order for such things to be forgotten.
  • Last Chance Hit Point: The Last Gasp perk.
  • Level Scaling: Averted. Everything in the game will retain its stats, abilities and gear from the beginning to the end. One of the causes for the Early Game Hell the game has become somewhat notorious for, and also for the nearly unstoppable, plate armored behemoth Henry can become in the mid-late game if you bother with adquiring quality equipment and honing his combat skills.
  • The Lightfooted: Most Agility perks are geared towards turning the player character into this. One of the main perks, Juggler, also qualifies.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading:
    • The game attempts to avert this by design - only a very few places are built outside of the main game world, thus requiring a loading screen when accessing them. However, upon release, due to poor optimization, it actually became infamous due to this trope: entering dialogue with any NPC usually required waiting through a loading screen of around three or four seconds, thus visiting towns and interacting with the inhabitants potentally became a truly exasperating experience. Luckily, these problems were mostly addressed by patch 1.3.
    • The game's backstory regarding King Wenceslas IV, however, is unskippable as the game loads. It gets pretty tiring watching the same cutscene every time you boot the game up.
  • Lockpicking Minigame: Lockpicking in the game revolves around finding the correct spot to place the lockpick and then rotating the lock while tracing the spot's changing location. While this is relatively easier with a keyboard and mouse (hold down 'D' and using the mouse to trace the hotspot), it's difficult enough with a controller for some people that Warhorse made improvements to the minigame in the 1.3 update.
  • The Loins Sleep Tonight: One of the items sold by the Charlatan in Sasau is Powdered Unicorn Horn, used to treat "impaired manliness".
  • Mercy Kill: Named as such by the game itself. Henry has the option to deliver it to downed, mortally wounded enemies - they will die in a matter of a few seconds if left alone. What animation is used depends on what weapon Henry has equipped. If he's unarmed, he'll just stomp the other guy's head in.
  • Morale Mechanic: Enemies are subject to a morale system, and will either surrender (kneeling to the ground) after sustaining enough damage, or flee (real fast) if enough of their cronies have already bitten the dust. A handful of unlockable perks have further effects on these morale mechanics, making Henry look more intimidating and so on.
  • Mook Chivalry: Averted. NPCs will eagerly gang up on outnumbered enemies when given the chance. Fighting alone against groups of well-armed opponents can be quite a challenge no matter how well geared Henry is at the moment of how strong and agile he's become.
  • Mushroom Samba: A quest received in Uzhitz has Henry following a trio of survivors from Skellitz who had bought a special ointment from a reclusive herbalist in the hopes that they'd see visions of their loved ones after applying it. Should Henry be spotted after they've applied it, they mistake him for Lucifer come to grant them their wish, only to smear the ointment on him as well. Hilarity Ensues.
  • Mutually Exclusive Power Ups: Several perks, unlockable after reaching certain stat or skill levels, are mutually exclusive from each other. In example, the main perks Burgher (minor bonuses when in or around towns or villages) and Savage (same bonuses, but when on wild areas) cannot be combined together, and picking one of them automatically writes the other off.
  • Never Learned to Read: Being the son of a blacksmith (who himself was likely illiterate as well), Henry's lack of reading ability is showcased with opening a book; the letters look jumbled beyond recognition, making the actual task of reading for players impossible. Even once a helpful scribe helps him learn, at low reading levels the letters of certain words make it seem almost as though he has dyslexia.
    • Most people outside of the nobility and clergy are illiterate. This is punctuated when the bailiff of Uzhitz threatens to report Father Godwin to the bishop for his mischief, to which the priest retorts he'll be the one to write the letter anyway as he's the only one capable of doing so in the whole town.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Behaving like a morally unblemished hero can reap certain rewards, but sometimes Henry may get the short end of the stick as well. A few sidequests will make you lose money - and feel a bit like a fool - if you complete them in an honourable way.
  • No Cutscene Inventory Inertia: Mostly averted. Cutscenes are usually rendered in real time so Henry will appear wearing exactly what the player has equipped at that point. Sometimes the helmet will not be visible so Henry's motion-captured facial features can be shown. That said, there are a couple of exceptions here and there, like after escaping Vranik. Even if the player has gone through the trouble of getting all his gear back, or just obtained some looting knocked-out guards, the cutscenes depicting the inmediate aftermath of the escape will depict Henry still battered and wearing basic clothes. Cut to the next scene at Rattay however, and Henry will appear with his full gear on. The most obvious one is just before Payback, Henry is always wearing the same armor there and still has Pebbles as his horse.
  • Noiseless Walker: With a decently leveled Stealth skill and an appropiate choice of gear, it's possible to crouch around enemies without them noticing. The Slim Fit perk helps to reduce the noise produced by equipped clothes and armor.
  • Non-Combat EXP: The game employs a levelling system clearly inspired in some installments of the The Elder Scrolls franchise (Oblivion and Skyrim, to be precise). Skills improve by making use of them, and as Henry's skills level up, so does his level. While combat-related skills obviously rise by fighting against enemies, actually defeating or killing said enemies does not provide experience points, and the same skills can be upgraded by repeated "friendly" sparring with Captain Bernard.
  • Non-Nude Bathing: During the quest Next to Godliness, Hans Capon and Henry have a relaxing evening in a tub inside the Rattay bathhouse. They bathe in their underwear... which in this game consists of a shirt and ankle-long pants.
  • Nonstandard Game Over: If you are hauled to jail during the hometown tutorial, you will die in jail when the Cumans invade and burn the keep down.
  • Not So Different: Sir Hans Capon and King Wenceslaus IV are uninterested in the burden of ruling and would rather seek the pleasures of wine, women and the hunt. This actually concerns Hans post-Character Development as he had always been under the impression that he ultimately answered to a wise and noble king. As he and Henry set off for Lichtenstein at the end of the game, he shows more interested in proving himself and seeing more of the world.
  • Not So Stoic: Hermann, the Executioner of Rataje. A sidequest involving a certain sorrowful widow will show that, despite the rough facade befitting of a true social pariah, he is a pretty upstanding, sensitive and considerate individual. A later sidequest will also prove Hermann is not beyond petty sabotage when it comes down to defending his territory as executioner. That said, he will still react with disgust should Henry suggest more "drastic" measures.
  • Obvious Beta: The initial release of the game included quite a number of bugs and visual glitches. The performance of the PC version also received criticism, as depending on each computer's build and components it could range from "somewhat acceptable" to "utterly horrifying". The game developers inmediately set out to correct these issues, releasing several patches within the month which dealt with the most severe annoyances. After patch 1.4 the majority of problems had been fixed and the game was stable and mostly enjoyable, although a few irritating quirks still remained.
  • Only in It for the Money: Some of the mercenary bandits encountered in the game will openly admit to work this way. A few of them will actually explain they mostly make a living out of armed conflicts among nobles, fighting for the highest bidder.
  • Off with His Head!: The traditional punishment for nobles who commit serious crimes. Such was the case with Kubin "the Buck", Baron of Milotitz, murderer and thief. Consequently, it's the fate reserved for one of the prisoners in the quest Money for Old Rope. As part of Hermann's Sabotage to Discredit plot, Henry can dull the sword of the executioner of Kuttenberg - so instead of an instant death by a swift and clean decapitation, the people of Rattay will be "delighted" with a really messy and gory spectacle.
  • Pacifist Run: Henry is only obligated to kill Runt. If he doesn't kill anyone else, there's an achievement for this.
  • Perfect Poison: The Bane Potion. The ingame description bluntly states that "the slightest amount brings instant death". It's also implied to be odourless and tasteless, as NPCs will never notice anything strange with their food or wine. Any character without Plot Armor who consumes food from a cooking pot poisoned with Bane Potion will drop dead in less than a minute after finishing the meal.
  • Poisoned Weapons: Melee weapons and arrows can be coated in poison in a pretty traditional RPG way.
  • Politically Correct History: Averted. Daniel Vávra (the game's lead designer) was criticized by a few people when he revealed that the game would have no black characters because there is zero historical evidence for black people being present in medieval rural Bohemia; the historians he consulted with laughed when he told them about the controversy. Which isn't to say there aren't non-Europeans who were historically present at the time; you'll be coming across plenty of Cumans, a nomadic people originally from the Eurasian steppes who settled in Hungary and form the core of King Sigismund's invading army.
  • Potion-Brewing Mechanic: The game has alchemy as a crucial (and complex) minigame, which produces potions—pretty much the only type of "magic" in an otherwise magic-less setting.
  • Plot Armor: Averted with most NPCs. Many quests will end in failure if the associated NPCs are killed before completion. Played straight however with plot-relevant characters, whom you're not even allowed to attack - you can successfully make counters to their own attacks, but they will not sustain any damage.
    • Vanyek, the mercenary that teaches Henry basic swordplay in the prologue, is one of these unkillable characters. This means that, during the escape from Vranik, the player should be extremely wary of crossing paths with him. He will attack you, and even chase you outside the palisade should you manage to jump over with him in tow.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner: If you choose not to spare a surrendering Bandit or Cuman.
    Henry: You will pay for Skalitz you bastard!
  • Random Encounters: Plenty. Curiously for this kind of game, they will happen regardless of fast-travel use. In certain points in the map Henry may encounter beggars, shady individuals, traveling merchants, wandering knights/mercenaries seeking duels, poachers, cutthroats, brigands, murder scenarios... even actual confrontations between guards and bandits, or guards and Cumans... or even Cumans and bandits! In the latter case, it usually ends up becoming a Mêlée à Trois if the player wishes to get involved.
  • Rape, Pillage, and Burn: All three are present in the opening scene, and Henry can help to avert the first by successfully distracting the Cumens long enough to allow Theresa to flee.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • Henry can disguise himself as a guard or a Cuman in certain situations. Unfortunately, he'll face a Language Barrier if he's asked a question in Hungarian, the Cumans' language. As a result, there is a chance for his cover to be blown if he either A. makes the wrong response, B. speaks Czech in-game instead, or C. botches an attempt to emulate their language.
    • No matter how strong and well-armored an opponent is if he happens to not wear a helmet, if you manage to hit him in the head with a mace, out he goes. This is true even for boss fights.
    • The first few levels are gonna give you a very hard lesson about just how weak you start out in this game:
      • Henry isn't a knight or a professional soldier, but the son of a blacksmith and thus has next to no combat experience. Until he's given actual training in swordfighting by a trained soldier, he essentially just swings his sword about like a baseball bat. As such, getting in to a fight with the Cumans in the opening scene is almost always suicide, and Henry's attempt to fight Runt one-on-one results in him being quickly and effortlessly beaten to submission.
      • At Talmberg, Henry is repeatedly warned that going back to Skalitz in his current state is pretty much suicide, as the area is crammed by bandits, scavengers and all other kinds of unfriendly folk. The small-time looters he encounters in the main road are not too much of a concern, but stray just a bit too much in the surrounding area and you may end up encountering much better geared and skilled brigands, perfectly able - and willing - to butcher Henry in seconds. And this is even before meeting Runt.
      • Want to get proficient with a bow? Well make sure Henry wears vambraces or another form of arm protection until he's leveled up sufficiently, because otherwise he'll take damage with every shot from the string slapping against his arm; a fairly common injury among newcomers to archery.
      • So you just got yourself a shiny new set of armor, whether you steal it from a town's armory, knock out a guard or a wayfaring knight on the road and taking it from them, looting the bodies from a recent skirmish, or just got enough money to buy it from the armorer. Then you realize you can barely walk in it because it weighs more than you can carry even when not wearing it.
      • Found an Infinity +1 Sword early? You will still have trouble using it if you are not strong or agile enough to use it properly.
    • It is perfectly possible - even uplifting - to beat the game as a honest, chivalrous and law-abiding hero. But shying away from skills like lockpicking also means Henry will not be able to open highly difficult locked chests. Thus upstanding white knights in shining armour will be barred from obtaining certain quality and expensive gear contained in said chests.
    • Unlike most other games, reading skill books takes time. Often you may not finish a book in one sitting. It is always good idea to read books if you need to wait. Of course learning how to read is compulsory before you can get anything from a book.
    • Blindly follow the quest markers to investigate Ginger's disappearance without bothering to report in after finding that he's missing? Captain Bernard will give you an absolute reaming for dereliction of duty, almost puts you in the pillory, and threatens to have you hanged for desertion if you do it again. Keep in mind that at this point Henry is working for the Rattay guard and thus the dressing down is very much deserved.
  • Reality Is Unrealistic: In-Universe. When two of Henry's friends and an innkeeper come up with a Zany Scheme for a theft, they plan to use salvaged or stolen Cuman equipment for the task. Only, they decide that the gear has to be dressed up to look menacing and to conform to the accounts of several people they consult. Henry finds this frustrating as none of these "witnesses" have ever even seen a Cuman while he has fought them multiple times.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: The three main followers of King Wenceslaus depicted in the game (Radzig, Hanush and Divish) qualify. While not without a few character flaws - specially Hanush - the three of them are reasonable, sensitive rulers who treat their subjects fairly and are willing to lend an ear to good advice.
    • Averted though with the petty and arrogant Custodian of Sasau. Caution advised when treading around him.
  • Regenerating Health: Averted, at least until the Revenant perk is unlocked. This perk makes Henry's health regenerate "gradually", which means quite slowly. Certainly not a regenerative superpower, and don't expect it to save the player's backside in tight life-or-death situations.
  • Romance Sidequest: Courtship, which consists of several dates between Henry and Theresa.
  • Sabotage to Discredit: If Henry befriends Executioner Hermann, he may later be tasked with an elaborate sabotage scheme aimed to discredit a rival executioner in front of the whole town. The quest requires the player to learn about the crimes committed by three prisoners to be executed, to investigate the traditional punishment for such crimes and then to sabotage the tools that will be employed to carry out the executions.
  • Scenery Porn: The game's graphics shine at their brightest when traversing across the countryside, with pretty good-looking fields and dense forests, specially if the HD textures are enabled.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: Convenient timing saves Henry big time when Zbyshek, of all people, pulls this one in Vranik. He does it mostly out of fear for his own life (playing with the bad boys can be dangerous when you're the youngest and weakest of the bunch) and also wants to get some coin out of it, hoping to dissappear and quietly begin anew somewhere else.
  • Sequel Hook: A lot of plot threads are left hanging by the time the game ends, setting things up for the final act.
  • Shout-Out
    • A few Easter Eggs to The Witcher series can be found.
      • One of the Alchemist skill perks that can be taken is outright called "Witcher", is represented by a wolf's head, and it lets you imbibe more potions.
      • Henry can actually get a horse named Roach as a mount. When asking about her, the stablemaster selling her will say he got her off an "odd Polish fellow" who'd "settled down with his wife and was afraid she'd want him to stuff her", referencing Geralt, Yennefer, her (in)famous stuffed unicorn and the ending in the Blood and Wine DLC where the both of them retire to a vineyard Geralt gets. Another horse that can be gotten is Ciri's horse, Kelpie.
    • All the horses are shout-outs to mounts from various religions, myths, legends and pop-culture.
    • In one of the graves you can dig up, one grave has corpse with a decapitated horse's head at his feet. Which is obviously a reference to The Godfather.
    • The trophy/achievement for beating the game on Hardcore Mode is named Hardcore Henry.
  • Shot in the Ass: Hans gets shot in the ass during the night raid on Talmberg. From which he recovers the next day.
  • Shown Their Work: Other than just being a fun game, Kingdom Come can also teach you a thing or two about medieval society:
    • The game reproduces the complex socio-political ecosystem of 15th-century Bohemia, with attention given to contemporary clothing and even fighting styles.
    • Reportedly, the game's developers spent over a thousand man-hours painstakingly recreating a real-life medieval monastery based on historical accounts of what it would have been like.
    • While we cannot confirm how historically accurate the castles actually are, it's been noted (such as in this Shadiversity video) that the make of the castle/keep/city (of Rattay, at least) is perhaps the most historically authentic found in fiction thus far. It's not without its flaws, such as with its postern, but it easily surpasses most other examples in video gaming.
    • All of the Codex entries relate the true-to-life story of the characters, places, and events listed, even if it contradicts the fictional account in-game.
  • Sinister Minister: Downplayed; while Father Godwin of Uzchitz isn't exactly what most people today would consider "evil", he is most certainly a non pious heavy drinker and womanizer who doesn't care much about the teachings of Catholic Church. Godwin is still a very noble man who advocates peaceful solutions to every quest involving him, however.
    • Many of the people you meet are of this opinion about much of the clergy, as they consider a great many of them to be corrupt and only interested in amassing wealth and power rather than properly taking care of people's spiritual affairs. The people of Uzhitz can be convinced that Father Godwin is an exception given that he lives in the same conditions and engages in many of the same activities they do.
    • The Vicar you meet in a quest in Uzhitz is an even worse example. If the townsfolk (and Godwin) is to be believed, they are infamous for burning people on stakes, whether they are suspected witches or heretics. These are the guys who later on become the infamous Inquisition.
    • Oddly enough, it's Averted with the Prior and the senior Monks of the monastery who, despite a somewhat aloof and obstructively bureaucratic relationship with the outside world - not to mention their own internal political sparring behind the scenes, are for the most part decent and pious people. Indeed, most of the ill-will the player is likely to develop towards them sources from the strict and constraining routine they force upon the player which, in fairness, they do under the presumption that the player is sincere in trying to join the monastery.
  • Some Dexterity Required: Melee combat is not a simple case of pressing a single button to perform a strike. Angle of attack, type of attack, position of an opponent's weapon, and movement during attack are all factors when performing an attack. This makes combat more difficult than in other games of this type. A novice player will not be mowing down hordes of enemies from the get go, as fighting multiple opponents can prove quite challenging.
  • Space Compression: The game takes place in a section of the Kingdom of Bohemia circa 1403, highly accurate in historical and geographical detail save for the fact that locations have been comparatively jammed together to keep the player from getting bored by travel.
  • Stat Grinding: If you want to level your abilities, you have to make use of them - or find a trainer you can pay to give you a level in it.
    • A nice way to train both the Stealth skill and the Strength attribute is to stalk random travelers in the roads and silently choke them from behind.
  • Storming the Castle: Several battles involve this.
  • Stupid Crooks: Most bandits you encounter in the streets are quite well armored. However, at times you encounter unarmored bandits armed with just a machete or woodcutter axe who try to rob you, even if you are in heavy armor and fresh blood still dripping from your weapon.
  • Subsystem Damage: As the combat system allows the targeting of different body parts, specific injuries result. An injured arm will make combat more difficult, and an injured leg will impair movement.
  • Succession Crisis: The old king died, and the new king is kidnapped by his brother, before said brother takes over the country.
  • Tactical Rock–Paper–Scissors: The game has a complex system of certain weapons being more effective against certain armor. For instance, swords are good against all armor except plate armor, while hammers work against plate armor but put the character at a disadvantage against opponents with swords.
  • Take Your Time: Sometimes averted, sometimes played straight. If the player does not manage to complete certain errands in due time, then some NPCs are assured to kick the bucket - and Henry will be consequently blamed and/or scolded for it, potentially missing potential rewards. Other times however, no matter how long the player stays away from dealing with a quest, everything will be patiently waiting for his direct intervention to happen. As a general rule of thumb, whenever an NPC puts extra emphasis on being on a hurry, it's because the game actually treats the situation as such.
  • Tap on the Head:
    • The "Headcracker" perk adds a chance to knock out an opponent with a blunt blow to the head. This can be anything from Henry's fist to the pommel of a longsword, potentially ending fights with even heavily armored opponents in seconds if it triggers, leaving them down for the better part of a minute.
    • If Henry comes across someone while sneaking, he can slam their head against something to instantly knock them out. Like the example above, this only knocks them out briefly, but they seem none the worse for wear after it. However, if this was done in a town guards may fine Henry for causing injury.
  • Team Switzerland: Despite the ongoing war, Sasau maintains its neutrality and sends no men to support either side.
  • Thieves' Guild: The millers. They're involved in all kind of shady dealings, are the only merchants in the game willing to buy stolen items at full price note  and will offer Henry diverse unscrupulous - but profitable - tasks. They're also trainers for the Stealth, Pickpocketing and/or Lockpicking skills.
  • Tome of Eldritch Lore: The Necronomicon itself makes an appearance as a needed item for a secondary quest.
  • Torches and Pitchforks: Invoked by the few instances in the game where the common townsfolk attempts to stand up to invading soldiers and raiding bandits.
    • In the sack of Skalitz during the Prologue, some individuals bravely attempt to fight the attackers. Deutsch is mentioned in later dialogue to have attempted to protect his wife and son with a pitchfork from the fully armored Cumans - it went as well as one would expect. Averted in the case of Henry's adoptive father, since he uses a sword and is rather proficient with it.
    • While Henry and Sir Raditz's men assault the bandit bulwark of Pribyslavitz, a group of bandits perform a raid on Merhojed and the townspeople mount an improvised defence which surprisingly succeeds at driving the bandits out, killing several and capturing one of them.
  • Trauma Inn: Downplayed, sleeping will heal your wounds (including crippling injuries), but not immediately. You will need hours of sleep to allow your HP to regenerate. Sleeping is still required even if you are not injured anyway, as you will get stat penalties (and heavy eyes if you haven't slept for long) in particular to your stamina. Bleeding still requires special treatment however, or you will die from blood loss.
  • Treasure Map: Lots of them. Having them is not mandatory for obtaining the treasures themselves (not even in the case of the "ancient" ones, which contain highly valuable equipment), but will certainly help as many of the treasures are well hidden in quite remote and obscure places.
  • Understatement: In the text box explaining archery in the early prototypes of the game.
    Equip your bow with '1'. Use Left Mouse Button to shoot. Killing people not yet supported. And also not very nice!
  • Unexplained Recovery: Certain NPCs will respawn a while after being killed. According to Word of God (patch 1.4 notes) it was done to prevent secondary quests from becoming unresolvable due to NPCs dying because of bugs and unintended glitches.
  • The Usual Adversaries: Cumans and bandits are running wild throughout the whole region. The first ones form the bulk of Sigismund's invading forces, and the second ones are the resulting fallout of any politic and economic crisis. The antagonists taking advantage of the chaos and unstability to build an entire bandit-mercenary army also help make matters worse. Henry will spend the entire game killing scores of Cumans and bandits, sometimes even holding back and witnessing them killing each other in random encounters.
  • Vendor Trash: Plenty of items in the game have no other purpose than being sold to a merchant in exchange of cash. Some of them, like decorated chalices or jewelry, are pretty valuable. Always keep an eye out for bird nests - one never knows what that clever magpie may have snatched out!
  • Vestigial Empire: Downplayed. Pretty much every politically-conscious individual, from nobles to peasants, acknowledges the Holy Roman Empire has certainly seen better days, and is in a weakened state from constant infighting and turmoil (these are the Late Middle Ages after all).
  • Videogame Caring Potential: The game offers plenty of chances to be extremely nice and generous towards beggars, pilgrims, struggling outcasts and people in need. Doing so will usually improve Henry's reputation with the different settlements.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: It is perfectly possible to play Henry as an unrepentant murderous psychopath. Enter homes at night and silently stab/choke the sleeping denizens to steal their goods, or just for fun. Make wandering merchants smile by paying them an extra, backstab them after the deal is sealed to get your money back. Make promises in order to get what you want from people, then backpedal and betray them at the first chance. Drop a Bane potion into that cooking pot when nobody is looking, come back later to loot the corpses. Almost all characters in the game can be killed - although some may respawn - and the possibilities are almost endless.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Even if you are a very good thief who can slip in and out a house undetected, too much theft in a town will make everyone nervous and angry. Merchants become more annoyed at any haggling attempts and guards will search people more often.
    • If you're caught comitting crimes repeatedly in or around a certain town, your reputation with said settlement will plummet to the point many of its denizens will refuse to have anything to do with you. This including providing their usual services, like vendor functions or reparations... until you personally compensate them in monetary terms. This can prove extremely taxing in the early stages of the game, when Henry's purse is far from overflowing with groschen.
  • Videogame Stealing: Averted. The pickpocketing minigame only allows the player to steal reasonable items from other characters' inventories. Robbing people naked à la Skyrim is not possible.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Henry and Hans, especially later into the game. Even after they work out their differences, they still constantly rib and snark at each other. That said, they become each other's best ally, which is highlighted in their talk when they rush to Skalitz to retrieve Sir Radzig after which Hans leads the chase for Toth immediately after (as Sir Hanush had promised to let them go only until the edge of the fiefdom).
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: A rather impressive one in Uzchitz, as Father Godwin vomits from the top of the belltower. It's shortly followed by a Mood Whiplash Vomit Discretion Shot.
  • The War Sequence: Certain segments of the game have you marching in formation with other soldiers against enemy armies.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: The brawl with the drunkard Kunesh will immediately warn new players that in this game you cannot win a fight by just button mashing.
  • War Is Hell: The sack of Skalitz during the Prologue provides a rather graphic portrayal of what war means to the common folk. Several times later in the game, Henry states the memories of what he witnessed will haunt him for the rest of his life, and that what happened in Skalitz is certainly not "a tale of adventure" for him to "share over a tankard of ale".
  • We Have Reserves: The men under Sigismund are rather unconcerned with losing who knows how many men in their campaign and manage to stay smug despite their setbacks. Somewhat justified in that the levies of Skalitz, Talmberg and Rattay altogether number near a hundred soldiers for Wenceslaus' loyalists (not counting the men they leave behind to secure their territories) while Sigismund's faction easily has that many men in Vranik alone with more coming in from outside the fief.
  • Wide Open Sandbox: Level 5. The game puts emphasis on the Main Quest, which also forces Henry to do a bit of wilderness exploration and travel between the main settlements, but from the very moment the prologue is over, the player is perfectly able to roam around as they wish. Be careful with those outlaws, though. Some following of the main quest for at least the first few hours of gameplay is advisable though, as that equips the player with skills, techniques, and even a horse that will make the rest of the sandbox play much easier, not that the game tells the player that.
  • What the Hell, Player?: Behave like a selfish, careless prick and you will be receiving rations of these from incensed NPCs quite often.
  • With Friends Like These...: Matthew and Fritz start out as mere troublemakers in Skalitz who drag Henry into acts of vandalism and such. Should Henry help them get back on their feet, settle their debts and seek honest employment opportunities, they decide that they're too good for such things and go immediately into theft, muggings and outright banditry and try to pull Henry into it. Their efforts ultimately culminate in a robbery attempt on the Talmberg quarry that could see them hanging from the gallows in short order.

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