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See also Deconstruction Game.


  • Metal Gear has several deconstructions of various cliches and tropes. For example it shows just how much of a tragedy the Fake Defector would be in real life, what would happen to a Tyke-Bomb when they reached adulthood (one is a bitter man almost incapable of making emotional attachments, another spent a good portion of his adulthood being controlled and manipulated), just how mentally unstable or fairly screwed up a real life Quirky Miniboss Squad would probably be (FOX-HOUND, Dead Cell, Cobra Unit) and just how disturbing and yet fairly tragic a real life Cloning Blues plot would actually be.
    • The issues of the Quirky Miniboss Squad is further deconstructed in a Webcomic based on the first Metal Gear Solid: The Last Days of FOXHOUND. As are some of the cloning woes and the other issues the game explores, though usually to humorous effect because when it comes to genetics, the author gleefully exploits Hideo Kojima's research mistakes.
    • At a more meta level, Metal Gear Solid 2 deconstructs a lot of the tropes of video gaming itself.
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    • Arguably the whole franchise is a deconstrucion of the badass trope, when you consider how much the heroes suffer to get to where they are.
  • Mass Effect makes it a point to deconstruct the Planet of Hats and the Proud Warrior Race Guy in the form of the krogan, who are universally bad-tempered, violent, brutal, and selfish... and have exactly the interspecies relations this should earn them. They got themselves slapped with a nice, unpleasant Depopulation Bomb for being an entire species of jerkasses.
    • In an interesting subversion, Urdnot Wrex (one of the first named krogan we meet) not only starts out as much more mellow than his brethren but goes on to reconstruct the Proud Warrior Race Guys culture of his kind almost singlehandedly, much to the annoyance of more two-dimensional Krogan.
    • In a similar fashion, the batarians get their comeuppance in the third game, with the survivors becoming much more sympathetic and a possible War Asset against the Reapers.
    • The geth came off as the typical evil robot mooks in the first game (along with the setting assuming any true AI is gonna turn on their creators by default), but the second and third games deconstruct the idea entirely.
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  • Amongst many tropes it skewered, Planescape: Torment deconstructed the standard RPG trope of your character always being the center of the story by turning the story into a personal quest for identity rather than a standard 'save the setting from Evil Overlord X while most people sit by and watch'. Furthermore, The Nameless One leads the outfit because all the joinable NPCs are bound to you by the Mark of Torment, interlocking their destinies with your own; they could not leave you even if they wanted.
  • E-102 Gamma's storyline in Sonic Adventure was an unexpected deconstruction of Eggman's robotic mooks...or more specifically, the fact that Eggman's robots are powered by animals. (Well, technically, Gamma was an Elite Mook, but whatever.) After seeing Amy's flicky in the Egg Carrier's prison chamber, his power source's memories and emotions began to conflict with his programming, eventually leading to his seeking out and destroying the other E-100 models (and himself) to free the animals inside.
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  • All-Loving Hero is semi-deconstructed in stages across all three routes in Fate/stay night as being impossibly idealistic yet not necessarily a bad thing... but only if you can keep your sense of perspective. A handful of other tropes are touched upon in this - such as The Dulcinea Effect - but are generally props for the main point that there is something basically wrong with Shirou.
  • Killzone deconstructs the glorious D-Day style liberation in a hideous situation as it becomes obvious that with a corrupt military brass whom sold out your forces twice, that going in after recovering from a devastating attack on your planet and how putting down the leader will not make things better at all.
  • Deconstruction, along with subversion, is a prominent focus in the plots of the Tales Series games.
    • For example, Tales of Symphonia starts out as a Cliché Storm, but it quickly begins deconstructing tropes. The most ripped-apart trope being The Chosen One; it shows what a shitty life a person would have if they were expected to save the world, and the psychological effects such a title and life would have on them. In this case, both of the chosen's become stepford smilers, with Colette always covering up her problems because she doesn't want to worry people, and Zelos covers up his suicidal tendencies with his apparent stupidity.
    • Tales of Berseria takes a hatchet to the idea of The Needs of the Many being anything less than morally repugnant. Shepherd Artorias and his Abbey rule the world with this as their absolute philosophy, and it's thoroughly demonstrated that no matter what people think, follow this code makes Artorias an inherently abhorrent person, murdering his own family for a ritual, consigning whole villages to die of starvation because relief supplies are an economic loss, and sacrificing his own exorcists, all without a second thought because it furthered the welfare of "the many". Sure, Velvet is no saint, but at least her endgame isn't the elimination of all free will in the name of an efficient society.
  • Grand Theft Auto V deconstructs the Villain Protagonists that have frequently featured in the GTA games.
    • Michael is this character after he's already won. Having "beaten the game," so to speak, he's decided to get out of the game, enter Witness Protection, settle down, and raise a family using his earnings, but he finds "normal" life to be boring. It's implied that him pissing off a drug lord is only part of the reason why he returned to a life of crime, since it's the only thing he really enjoys and knows how to do. The phrase "getting back in the game" is even used to describe it.
    • Trevor, meanwhile, deconstructs the Video Game Cruelty Potential inherent in many open-world games through liberal application of You Bastard!, showing exactly what sort of person would run around causing death, destruction, and mayhem for his own amusement. He is violent to the point of genuine psychopathy, one scene strongly implies that he raped Floyd, and The Stinger implies that he's schizophrenic on top of it. It's not for nothing that he's the only one who takes part in the returned Rampage missions.
    • Franklin takes Carl Johnson's journey to become a successful crook. Unlike CJ, his newfound wealth only serves to alienate him from his neighborhood to the point where the end of the game only Lamar can be considered his friend as everyone else ignores or hates him. The gangbanging aspect is also downplayed, being an unsuccessful endeavor by Lamar as the Families and Ballas aren't really at odds with one another except them like in the original. Working for people on his own volition also is of little help as Devin and Haines treats him as what he is really is: a disposable tool lucky enough to be alive.
    • Furthermore, unlike past games, V makes no excuses for the fact that its three protagonists are all morally bankrupt. Once they've settled their debt to Madrazo, their only motivation for their continued crime spree is pure greed and self-interest... solving the problem of Gameplay and Story Segregation by demonstrating just who would casually run people over and steal cars without a shred of guilt.
  • Grand Theft Auto IV: The Lost and Damned, meanwhile, deconstructed the mystique of the "outlaw" biker gang. The lifestyle of the Lost Motorcycle Club is shown as being filled with slick leather jackets, tricked-out hogs, kick-ass fights, camaraderie, and badass mannerisms, just like in the movies... yet it's also a gang no different from the Ballas or the Grove Street Families, and with it comes backstabbing, death, and eventually the total destruction of the Lost as an organization due to a brutal gang war. The deconstruction is completed in GTA V, where we see that Johnny, the protagonist of The Lost and Damned, has become a strung-out meth addict who gets killed minutes after his introduction — the logical conclusion of his downward spiral at the end of The Lost and Damned.
  • While Shin Megami Tensei was always a darker version of Mons (despite preceding Pokémon by several years), Devil Survivor took it to Narutaru levels of brutality by showing exactly what kind of world would result in people gaining control of extremely powerful creatures that would follow any order.
  • Cody from Final Fight's appearances in Street Fighter deconstruct the Blood Knight. He went to jail despite saving Metro City from the notorious Mad Gear gang, even despite his connections with Mayor Mike Haggar. He's apparently lost the will to fight for any meaningful reason, and claims to do it simply because he wants to relieve his intense prisoner boredom.
    • Evil Ryu is a deconstruction of the same trope, but from a different approach. Ryu himself is a Nice Guy who only wants to be the better martial artist, but within him there's an horrifyingly powerful aura known as the "Satsui no Hado", which can potentially corrupt his whole mind and heart to make him a mindless killing machine. Evil Ryu is the incarnation of that Superpowered Evil Side, starting in the Alpha games as a cockier version of him and evolving in Super SFIV into a nightmarish and purely evil being; therefore, SFIV!Ryu is shown to be deeply distressed at the prospect of giving into this massive power that will be his perdition. When it almost happens in the Ties That Bind movie, he's driven to a short but very intense Heroic BSoD.
  • Suikoden III deconstructs the Mayfly–December Romance of many characters, most notably the Flame Champion as he gave up his immortality by retracting the True Fire Rune in his body so he can age with his loved one, but the act caused his body to break down and eventually die.
  • Action RPG Metal Walker deconstructs the empty overworld found in many RPGs. Besides your character and a select few NPCs with Mons, no one is outside, even in towns—because killer robots populate the landscape, even right outside buildings. Since you yourself are attacked very frequently, you can imagine why defenseless humans don't go out...
  • Fallout and Fallout 2 both deconstruct the Idiot Hero trope to a hilarious degree. By creating your character with an intelligence of 3 (out of 10) or lower, you are locked out of approximately 90% of the quests in the game, because almost nobody has the patience to try and figure out what you want to tell them. That said, you do get to have some pretty funny dialogues as a bit of compensation.
  • Too may deconstructions to list here, but a particularly important one is the motivation for the antagonist in the Fallout: New Vegas DLC, Lonesome Road. For the Courier, it was an ordinary package like any they'd normally deliver. For Ulysses, it was the package that detonated the nukes stored beneath the Divide, destroying the place he saw as his home, teaching him the power of a single person to reshape the world and sparking off a dangerous obsession.
    • And if you want the dialog options allow you to play out this trope entirely when speaking with Ulysses.
  • Fallout 4 deconstructs Hard on Soft Science with the Institute. Being a cabal of Mad Scientists descended from the Falloutverse version of M.I.T., they have a complete lack of any manner of social scientific endeavors, instead basing their society around the creation of Artificial Humans and other hard sciences. The deconstruction comes into play in that while the Institute has plenty of answers of "Can we?", their lack of social sciences leads them to time and again choose the wrong answer to "Should we?". This has resulted in the Institute suffering through over a century's worth of terrible relations with the Commonwealth, to the point where they're generally seen as the local boogeyman instead of the force of good and progress they view themselves as.
    • Hidden Elf Village is also deconstructed with the Institute. Their initial attempt to pretend that "nobody's home" was impossible to keep up since they still require resources from the Commonwealth. This has resulted in them instead ruling over Post-War New England through The Conspiracy, and their foreign relations have only gone downhill since then.
  • Fire Emblem: Blazing Blade deconstructs Attention Whore through Serra, who not only annoys her friends and prospect love interests with her demands for attention and vassalage, but acts this way because she was badly neglected and abused in the Elimine convent where she was raised, so her behavior is somewhat less about her being conceited and more about a massive cry for help hidden behind her facade. But her own behavior actually ends up pushing almost everyone away (specially Erk and Oswin), who aren't able to see her Hidden Depths until much later.
  • Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones deconstructs The Ace with Ephraim. For the first part of the story, it seems he can get through anything. However, when he gets back to Renais, Seth tells him that the citizens are not cheering for his return. They're only happy because Orson's reign of terror is over. Ephraim takes this as the sign that his Leeroy Jenkins tendencies haven't been great for his people and begins to mature from then on.
    • Not to mention, Ephraim's seeming perfection is the reason why Innes and Lyon show quite the degree of inferiority complexes and covert/not-so-covert envy. In the first case, Ephraim only sees it as normal Friendly Rivalry, but Innes takes it more seriously to the point of telling Eirika that he'll only propose to her after defeating Ephraim; in the latter, it's massively Played for Drama since Ephraim adores Lyon and never ever sees him as inferior, so is struck hard (read: he's driven to tears) when he learns about Lyon's psychological troubles and how a part of them can be linked to seeing himself as inferior to Ephraim.
  • Fire Emblem Awakening has some deconstructions:
    • The Perfectionist: Cordelia. Her perfectionist nature make her quite disliked by the rest of the Ylisse Pegasus Knights for seemingly looking down upon the others, even though she only becomes that way because she seeks her seniors' approval. And then her A support with Avatar reveals that despite their teasing, the other pegasus knights really did admire her, to the point that they were willing to give up their lives for her. Being called a genius reminds her of their sacrifice, which is why she dislikes being called one. And not to mention, her "perfect" and "genius" post-mortem fame will cause her daughter Severa to have quite the inferiority complex...
    • Severa and Cordelia deconstruct Calling the Old Man Out and Anger Born of Worry. In the Bad Future, Severa didn't take kindly how her mother held an Undying Loyalty to Prince Chrom, the guy whom she once held an Unrequited Love for. At some point, she was both so upset at what she saw as a borderline betrayal to her dad and so scared about Cordelia possibly dying in the war, that she yelled at her mother for it. The result? Cordelia went out to fight, died in battle and never returned home, and Severa was totally traumatized for that. When Severa returns to the past with her friends and she's recruited by the Shepherds, she again questions Cordelia and her thoughts on Chrom... but this time it's more of a desperate facade, as she's very aware that this Cordelia isn't the same mother she lost (Timey-Wimey Ball and all) and doesn't want to emotionally connect to her only to probably lose her again.
    • King Gangrel of Plegia is revealed to be a deconstruction of The Caligula. How so? His cruel and tyrannical actions quickly turn around to bite him in the ass. After Chrom's sister Emmeryn commits a Heroic Suicide, his own army starts defecting en masse, and the next chapter you fight a group of Plegian soldiers who honestly do not want anything to do with this war Gangrel started and were traumatized by Emmeryn's death. By the time the Shepherds confront Gangrel, all but a small group of loyalists have abandoned him, and Emmeryn has become a folk heroine among the people of Plegia. Not to mention, Gangrel can be recruited into your army in the first SpotPass chapter; his supports also reveal that he did not start as a madman but as a mixture of Self-Made Man who wanted to unite the continent against Valm, but fell into Motive Decay after he went mad with power and well... ended up as the War for Fun and Profit motivated madman the group met and fought. And damn, he now regrets having been such an asshole. (Not to mention, Chrom still can't forgive him, and his potential best friend/girlfriend the Avatar does NOT trust him either at first.)
    • There's also a deconstruction of Cartwright Curse and Cannot Talk to Women in regards to Lon'qu. His first friend was a young girl his age, Ke'ri, who was killed by bandits while he couldn't do anything to save her. As a result, he started to believe he suffered from this trope, to the point where he developed gynophobia, in that he does not loathe women or believe they're weak — but is deeply afraid of approaching them in fear that they'll get killed because of him. Pretty much the only women he can talk to without much drama are the lady he reaches an S-level support aka marriage and the prospect daughters he may have with her.
    • Sumia's archetypically moe traits include her tripping around, plucking flower petals for fortune telling, reading novels, and being super cute and dorky. If one looks at them closely, they're proof of severe self-esteem problems. A good part of Sumia's supports have her acting extremely awkward towards her friends and potential love interests (like the infamous "pie baking" support with Chrom, or her causing trouble to Gaius and Frederick while trying to help them), and not to mention it's believed that her very low pools of potential boyfriends and female friends come from Sumia believing herself to be The Load and thus not approaching more people (and especially men) since she feels she's undeserving of either friendship or romantic love.
    • The C-support with Vaike deconstructs Nowi's Genki Girl trait, but from another perspective. What happens when somebody has near eternal life? Nowi, being a manakete and already at least a millennia old, chooses to spend her days happy rather than depressed by the fact that she will outlive all of her friends: she's very aware that this will happen no matter what and is frequently saddened by that (and shows it, so she doesn't qualify as a Stepford Smiler), but she ultimately decides not to waste her time crying for too long.
  • Fire Emblem Fates also has its share of trope deconstructions and analysis:
    • Silas's supports with a Female Avatar deconstruct Love at First Sight. He acknowledges the absurdity of the concept, which is why it takes until S-rank for him to accept that it was the case for him for the Avatar, and even then with embarrassment.
    • King Garon deconstructs Marry Them All. He never could sever ties with a woman he'd once liked, and he ended up with a vast extended family of children from many different women. However, the ladies's infighting for his favor didn't result in a very happy home life, and while he tried to be a good father to all of his children, many of his mistresses actually murdered one another and/or one another's kids for political gain. The whole situation more-or-less only sorted itself out once most of his women were dead, and the surviving kids (his sole legitimate son Xander; Xander's half-siblings Camilla, Leo and Elise, plus "adopted" kid the Avatar) banded together). The whole thing left him the bitter tyrant he is at the start of the story... or, rather, it provided a convenient cover for his much-crueler doppelganger to neglect and abuse the remaining princes and princesses for its own ends. The real Garon was a very bitter tyrant at the end of his life, but the audience never gets to learn whether he would've gone THAT far.
    • Charlotte, the stripperiffic Girly Bruiser, is quite the deconstruction of The Fake Cutie and Gold Digger. In her past, whenever she tried to be herself with men, her The Lad-ette traits scared them away; in her supports she explains to several of her suitors and some of her female friends that she pretends to be a pure-hearted girl not just to fleece men out of their money, but because she's damn bitter after said experiences. If a rich guy does show romantic interest in her, Charlotte is scared because she isn't sure if she actually likes the guy back or just wants his power and money.
    • Princess Azura painfully deconstructs Mysterious Waif. She certainly fits the archetype, being a solemn princess with mysterious powers and a close relationship to the protagonist... But the only reason she has such a detached and aloof exterior is because of her issues, which cause her to have a hard time opening up to people. However, this often intimidates some members of the army (like Keaton, who first freaks out at her apparent emotionlessness) and causes others to view her with suspicion (like Saizo, who cannot trust her easily until at least their B support), making it even harder for her to bond with them. And for worse? her mysterious powers are slowly killing her, but she's so determined to help the Avatar's cause and save the world that she can't bring herself to stop using them, leading to her death in two of the three paths of the game.
    • The Conquest route deconstructs a Pacifist Run. The Avatar tries to prevent as many deaths as possible when fighting to the point that enemy forces are only injured when battling. He / she is told by various people over the course of the game that this is a bad viewpoint to have when fighting a war and it is shown repeatedly that avoiding all deaths in a war is impossible. Also, while the members of the Avatar's army respect this decision and abide by his / her desire to reduce bloodshed, Iago, Hans and Garon do not.
    • Nyx deconstructs A-Cup Angst and Older Than They Look: she looks like a young teenager because of a curse coming from her Dark and Troubled Past as a Creepy Child, so she hates being stuck in a body that doesn't fit with her mental age and seriously believes that she'll never be able to have a loving husband and children. Several of her potential boyfriends will have to reassure her that they love her despite this.
  • Fire Emblem: Three Houses:
    • Edelgard repeatedly justifies her many morally questionable actions by I Did What I Had to Do, believing that she has to go the route she has chosen. This becomes a Fatal Flaw as she becomes unwilling to compromise and refuses to accept that there might be other solutions.
    • The Crest system is a brutal deconstruction of the Birthmark of Destiny and the social dysfunction that would entail if they were more mainstream than expected from a fictional setting, the people with them have a lot responsibility placed on them, and an entire nobility culture was built around them. Crests are usually taken as a sign of being a descendant of one of the Four Saints or Ten Elites (who were said to have been gifted Crests by the continent's patron Goddess) and most of those descendants are nobles, but not only is lineage not a guarantee for inheritance, commoners have just as much of a chance of getting them too. This leads to situations such as commoners trying to marry Crest-bearing nobles in the hopes of increasing their own social status, non-Crest-bearing nobles marrying into families with Crests, and nobles adopting Crest-bearing commoners. Children of noble lineage born without Crests can lose their inheritance to a younger sibling with a Crest, leading to violent internal power struggles. Noble children born with Crests also have high expectations placed on them and are frequently subject to loveless arranged marriages for producing more Crests or political advantages for their House. There is also at least one Crest (the Crest of the Beast) that nobody wants due to the storied past of its first human bearer, and so their descendants have experienced persecution and self-loathing in one known case. Meanwhile, the Crests of the Four Apostles were lost to history due to the Apostles going into exile after a horribly botched ritual to resurrect the Goddess, with the intent of making the Crests all but disappear to prevent the ritual from being performed again, and no public records of their history besides Rhea (being Seiros herself) and becoming Shrouded in Myth. However, the Apostles' descendants were very dedicated to making sure that their Crests are as rare as possible to ridiculous extremes (such as the implication that Noa's descendants in House Nuvelle resorted to Royal Inbreeding to keep her Crest out of circulation while preserving her bloodline), making themselves relatively isolated from the rest of Fódlan and experiencing all sorts of hardships regardless of social status, which sometimes left them with no outside allies if threatened (and this was a factor in the near-extinction of House Nuvelle). In two known cases in recent times, the desire of a certain cult to get more power out of Crests led them to perform lethal experiments on children to give them two Crests (something conventionally considered impossible), and those who survived the experiments without being crippled or driven insane have a shortened lifespan of varying length. Also, the part about Crests originally being gifted by the Goddess is a historical revision made by Seiros and the Church to cover up the fact that they were stolen by humans, ingesting the blood of Nabateans like her family. Only the Crests of Seiros, the Saints and the Four Apostles were actually gifts made to combat Nemesis (nothing has been said about the Crest of Ernest); the rest were obtained by Nemesis and the Ten Elites (the latter getting a Historical Hero Upgrade) after killing Sothis and the other Nabateans in a massacre.
  • Mega Man Zero is known for its deconstruction of White-and-Grey Morality and Rousseau Was Right in the first two games by showing the tragedy that ensues from such an event.
    • When you factor in Zero's origin as the last creation of Dr. Wily the series is also a deconstruction of Joker Immunity, Thou Shall Not Kill, and probably a few other related tropes as well. Because Dr. Wily was not executed after Mega Man 6, or killed in the next game because of Mega Man's Three Laws-Compliant nature, he lived on to build Zero, the latter being the cause of the wars in from the Mega Man X series all the way to his own. Then we have Dr. Weil, the main villain of the Zero series, who was also not killed when captured in the Zero series back story, and came back to wreak havoc.
  • Dragon Age deconstructs one major fantasy concept: The Wizarding School is more of a prison and re-education camp than a school, as it seems to be the only way to avoid devolving the world into a bunch of mage-controlled city states.
  • Condemned: Criminal Origins and Condemned 2: Bloodshot does a good job deconstructing the Vice City setting of most crime games. By placing it in a Survival Horror context, it shows just how terrifying the concept of a rotting, crime-filled metropolis with a demoralized and incompetent police force could be in real life.
  • Yggdra Union deconstructs tsunderes with Kylier by giving a realistic reason to her constant bitchiness towards Yggdra instead of a simple Love Triangle. She resents Fantasinia and its royal family as a whole for their Fantastic Racism towards her people, displaying a little Fantastic Racism herself.
    • Not to mention the deconstruction of the resistance, how in spite of Yggdra being not vilified, her weapon has caused more pain and suffering to the empire than what the empire does. And the Sadistic Choice(s) she must make.
  • Chrono Cross mercilessly deconstructs Time Travel, specifically the Time Travel used in Chrono Trigger, by asking a simple question: "If you make it so a certain event never happened, what happens to the world, and the people in it, that came to being because of that event?"
  • Viewtiful Joe, while in homage to lots of things, has a particularly interesting Deconstruction of Trapped in TV Land, Joe doesn't demonstrate it, but Captain Blue certainly does, the game shows that he got caught up in his fantasy in Movie Land, showing he went insane because he couldn't visit his wife or daughter, and eventually tried to destroy everything, it shows that being Trapped in TV Land sucks, and isn't really something to take lightly.
  • Iji manages to deconstruct the One-Man Army trope... By making the protagonist slowly go insane from all of the slaughter, while the few enemies she tries to talk to refuse to listen to her and label her as a mass murderer. Though it's completely possible to avoid killing anyone at all.
    • The game also deconstructs the Pacifist Run. If you want the best ending where both Dan and Iji live, Iji will still have blood on her hands via indirect kills, whether it's using the Resonance Reflector to deflect enemy shots back at them, setting a trapmine to foil Asha's hostage plan with Dan (which results in the unavoidable death of a Komato soldier), or allowing Ansaksie to kill Iosa to prevent her from coming back later to kill Iji after the Final Boss battle. Iji may not be going on a murder spree, but strict pacifism in the middle of a warzone isn't going to help her, either.
    • The Komato are a deconstruction of the Proud Warrior Race. What do you think will happen when they eventually succeed (or at least are tricked into believing that they succeeded) in destroying their sworn enemy and no longer have a reason to fight? General Tor suspects that they'll eventually turn on each other.
  • Far Cry 2 deconstructs badass with the player character. The enemies attack you on sight, no one bothers to check if you're enemy or not...solution? You kill everything on sight, becoming just like them and racking up hundreds of kills, and by doing that, become the epitome of badassitude with enemies running from you in fear if your reputation is high enough. Of course, this reputation doesn't just affect enemies, it affects friendly people as well, which you need for malaria medicine...
  • Knights of the Old Republic 2 deconstructs several video-game RPG tropes such as how the main character seems to gain power by slaughtering others and how upon meeting you, the other members of your party become entirely dependent on your continued existence. It also deconstructs the Star Wars universe itself, including notions of good and evil and ideas about The Force.
  • X-COM deconstructs the monster and alien-fighting cartoons popular during the 90's where you had an elite team of heroes able to travel anywhere in the world in order to fight cheesy villains and win despite having inferior technology and numbers. Then look at X-COM, who travel the world in a Cool Plane to fight goofy-looking aliens... and suffer a high fatality rate, have barely enough funding, and have to desperately struggle just to get good enough weapons to fight 3/4 of the things that keep coming down.
    • XCOM: Enemy Unknown also deconstructs a lot of the tropes that X-COM set up: you can't capture alien weapons easily, because they explode when you kill the alien using them. You can't just do some basic research and understand how alien tech works, you need to build a solid basis for understanding and then build on it until you're able to safely replicate the technology. The sequel also deconstructs the "heroic organization saves the Earth from overwhelming powerful alien invaders" by making it so that the second it looks like XCOM is a threat, the aliens attack and destroy the organization, letting them take over the world easily.
  • Gundam Senki 0081 deconstructs the young vs the old generation. If you are playing as the Federation, the male lead is at a rather old age for Gundam leads (32 years old! That is just screaming for a death wish) while all of the cast on the Federation side are pretty much adults. The Zeonic side consists of young adults who attempt to cause trouble, for a series that usually favors the younger side. The older generation defeats the younger generation in battle.
  • After completing the first loop of DonPachi, it's revealed that the events of the game have thus far been a deconstruction of the One-Man Army present in many shmup Excuse Plots. The player character, as part of his training, has been fighting against his own army, with his comrades willingly giving up their lives in order to help him become the ultimate Super Soldier. And when you start the second loop, the player character has been doing this same training for the past seven years. Only when he's pretty much slaughtered the entirety of his allied forces is he finally admitted into the elite DonPachi Squadron.
    • Its second-degree sequel DoDonPachi dai ou jou is a deconstruction of Robot Girls. Set in a future crawling with Element Dolls, robot girls used as little more than slaves (of both the standard variety and...not-so-standard variety), the protagonist embarks on a mission against the forces of Hibachi with the assistance of one of three dolls. Depending on which doll you use, the ending has her choking the protagonist to death and going back in time to cause shit in DOJ's sequel DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu, falling for him despite him not reciprocating her feelings, or becoming so protective of the pilot that she has to be forcibly removed from the ship. Regardless of which doll, it's clear that your doll has gone batshit insane.
      • Finally, in DaiFukkatsu, the enemy is a series of giant robot girls, manipulated by Colonel Longhena into destroying humanity.
  • Each of the romantic routes in Katawa Shoujo features a deconstruction, depending on the girl you pick for Hisao. Not all of them are intentional, but it still counts due to the effects on each relationships:
    • Rin: Cloudcuckoolander: Feels dissonant with the rest of the world, and falls into depression due to nobody being able to understand her or her art. Becomes self-destructive and compulsive in an attempt to keep up with her art and gain inspiration. One of her Bad Endings implies that she's liable to kill herself due to these emotional problems. Hisao tries to be the Cloudcuckoolander's Minder but it seriously affects his own mental stability.
    • Emi: Plucky Girl: Tries to deal with her issues as much as she can, but this means she can't bring herself to get close to others.
    • Lilly: The Stoic: Represses her emotions to the point of utterly neglecting them, and it's not easy to know what she needs and wants.
    • Hanako: Declaration of Protection: Eventually gets fed up with Hisao and Lilly coddling her, and the more you try to protect her, the more resentful she is.
    • Shizune: Spirited Competitor: Is so competitive that she drives away almost all of her friends except for Hisao and Misha. And in her Bad Ending she breaks up with Hisao since she thinks she's driving him and Misha away too.
  • Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun deconstructed Enhance Button. The processing power the A.I. CABAL requires in general and for this operation in particular comes from human brains and the resulting picture looks exactly like one would expect: grainy, except in the parts made up which are very smooth and Oxanna also does not know who the woman on it is, only she's a mutant.
    • Also, the sequel Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars deconstructs the concept of using giant mecha in combat; the GDI phases walkers like the Titan out of service because they are way too expensive and, on top of that, extremely vulnerable to some bloke running up and slapping a demo charge on the walker's legs.
  • Danganronpa:
    • The first game initially deconstructs Declaration of Protection and The Dulcinea Effect: Sayaka Maizono recognized whiffs of these tropes in her childhood classmate Makoto Naegi and exploited them to her benefit — planning to first worm her way into his affections and make him swear to help her, so she would be able to kill another student and pin the blame on Makoto himself. She would've possibly gotten away with this, had the guy whom she wanted to murder not killed her in self-defense.
    • As the later games explore Sayaka's reason for her actions in the first game, she turns out to be a deconstruction of other tropes: I Just Want to Be Loved and Attention Whore. Her desire for attention has a rather sad background, as she was raised by a single father who also was very workaholic and left her alone all the time. Young Sayaka spent several hours on her own in front of the TV and fell in love with the Idol Singer way of life, thinking that if she became one of these she would be given the affection and love she lacked; thus she worked hard, became a part of an idol group, and was so good at it that she became the Ultimate Pop Sensation, loved and admired by everyone in Japan. Then Monokuma exploited Sayaka's massive terror at the idea of being left behind and discarded, showing her a video of what would happen if she didn't leave Hope's Peak: that her group would be disbanded and she'd be totally abandoned by her fans... which ultimately made her snap hard enough to plan killing someone and use Makoto as a scapegoat — and finished when she actually TRIED to kill someone and ended up dead for it. All because Sayaka felt that, if she lost her fans's love and support, she would be literally worth NOTHING.
    • Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair deconstructs Reluctant Fanservice Girl with Mikan Tsumiki. A Shrinking Violet who has the misfortune of landing in inexplicably revealing positions whenever she trips. Embarrassing herself in front of everyone else. As it turns out however, she actually does this on purpose. Being so afraid of being ignored that she willingly makes a spectacle of herself in order to get attention from others. Not to mention it is strongly implied in Mikan's backstory that she was sexually abused.
    • Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony:
      • Shuichi's backstory deconstructs Asshole Victim. After exposing the culprit of a murder case, he found out that the man who was killed was an irredeemable piece of scum who had wronged his killer. As a result, he gained a fear of trying to expose the truth.
      • Maki is a Deconstruction of the Violently Protective Girlfriend, as her attempts to protect Kaito only make everything worse. In Chapter Five, when Kokichi kidnaps Kaito and holds him hostage in the hangar, Maki steals an electrohammer to break in and takes a crossbow and poison from her lab with the intent to save Kaito. She finds Kokichi and ruthlessly interrogates him about being a Remnant of Despair, but Kokichi has no idea what she's talking about. Given he's a chronic liar, she doesn't believe him and tries to kill him, only for Kaito to take the shot. Then when it turns out Kaito drank the antidote she brought, not Kokichi, everything Maki did becomes completely moot because he dies of a fatal illness he'd been hiding the entire time. Then Tsumugi reveals in the final chapter that Maki's feelings for Kaito were implanted in her during the brainwashing process to boost the show's ratings. Maki does NOT take this well.
    • Danganronpa Another Episode: Ultra Despair Girls viciously deconstructs the touching minigame found on handheld games like Criminal Girls or the countless fanservice games found on the Vita. Rather than prodding the girl to arouse her in the limited time, you are tasked with preventing the hands from groping Komaru before she is sexually harassed into obedience by Kotoko. In addition, Kotoko herself was a victim of molestation, which makes this situation more repugnant.
  • The Disciples series deconstructs God of Evil by showing what exactly could make a god evil in the first place. Neither of the two evil gods started out evil. They were even two of the nicest gods before their fall. Their villainy is entirely due to the callous actions of the other supposedly good gods.
  • The main quest of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim deconstructs Villain: Exit, Stage Left. When you first defeat the Big Bad, Alduin, he just throws a few taunts at you, then leaves. However, this causes many of the dragons serving under him to see him as a Dirty Coward unfit to rule them. Eventually, due to this act of cowardice, Alduin's right-hand dragon makes a Heel–Face Turn and helps you reach the place where you can kill Alduin for good.
  • The Stanley Parable is a massive deconstruction of video game tropes, specifically tropes that involve narrative in video games. Even attempts to break the game are deconstructed in a humorous light.
  • Little Busters! deconstructs a couple of tropes:
    • Kud's route deconstructs Funny Foreigners and other characters whose entire appeal is that they're not too foreign by having her feel extremely isolated by the fact that, in her true home, she's still treated as though she isn't really Japanese and that all her attempts to be so are hilarious.
    • At another point, it uses Riki, who is narcoleptic, to deconstruct the sleepyhead trope and show how randomly falling asleep and being unable to control it can seriously limit one's options, with Riki trying to help out on a farm to provide for Rin after they run away, losing a whole day's work due to falling asleep, and being driven to tears over the fact that he could only ever become an office worker in life since his narcolepsy would prevent him from being able to put an honest day's work in for anything else.
  • Deponia deconstructs the Kleptomaniac Hero as an aspect of Rufus's self-centered personality; his tendency to take whatever isn't nailed down to further his own schemes is a major part of why he's generally disliked, not to mention that he gets thrown in jail at one point for, you know, theft.
  • The Hope Bringer is deconstructed and reconstructed in Final Fantasy X. For 1000 years, the summoners acted as bringers of hope by going on pilgrimages to obtain the Final Summoning capable of defeating Sin. Each time this happens, there is a period of time with Sin absent that the people of Spira hopes will last forever called a Calm. The Church of Yevon's teachings also provide hope to Spira by claiming that if they atone for the sins of the past, Sin will never return. Except it's all a huge lie. The teachings of Yevon and the Final Summoning are total hogwash meant to give false hope. The Final Summoning is even more insidious because it is the means of Sin's rebirth, making the sacrifices of the summoners and their guardians (who become the new incarnations of Sin) utterly senseless. Each Calm was essentially nothing but a Hope Spot. The whole system has trapped Spira in what Auron describes as a "spiral of death". Hope Bringer is then reconstructed when Yuna and her companions learn of the spoilered bit above and refuse to go along with it, preferring to risk everything to find a real solution without false hope. It's at this point that the story becomes less cynical and more idealistic.
  • Valkyrie Profile: Covenant of the Plume is a deconstruction of Roaring Rampage of Revenge and Powered by a Forsaken Child. The moment Wylfred, the main character, gets his hands on an item that can give him power to take revenge on the one who killed his father. Thing is, the thing grows in power by eating souls of the dead. This leads to Wyl killing his best friend in one of the first chapters due to not fully understanding how the item works. Oh, and you can only sacrifice souls of those who trust you. While there are ways to get around killing your allies, you're openly encouraged to kill them (and even need to do so to unlock certain routes)! Also, the person Wyl wants to take revenge on? Not only is it not her fault for why Wyl wants revenge, but she's the only reason he's even alive. Even the best ending has Wylfred's father condemned into that universe's version of Hell because of Wyl's actions.
  • Live A Live gives us Oersted, a massive deconstruction of the Knight in Shining Armor. You see, he really is a valiant, brave and chivalrous knight to the very end, always seeking to help everyone around him and following his moral code: "As long as there is one person believes in you, you can't give up". Said last person kills herself after Oerstred sacrificed literally EVERYTHING to save her, right after being betrayed by his best friend and finding out that everything he believed in was a lie. Despite acting as The Hero through the whole game, in the end everyone who ever cared for him is either dead or now hates him due to a scheme by said best friend. It really shouldn't go without saying that he snaps... but in his own twisted vision, he's just helping humanity to "see the folly of their selfishness". And, once defeated, he finally realizes the mistakes on his own ways and openly admits being wrong. Noble to the very end.
  • Dungeon Keeper deconstructs the Elaborate Underground Base. You build the base, while the enemies invade.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, done in contrast to its previous game, takes apart Coming-of-Age Story. A lot of the NPCs that Link, who was once aged up into a young man, encounters are dealing with very adult issues and most, children and adults, don't know how to cope or deal with it. A father grieves for the loss of his son who is presumed missing and dead, while a child mourns for the death of his parent. A man laments that he will never know his unborn children after failing to rescue them; meanwhile a child is about to lose her father to an illness. A man refuses to show his face to his fiancée because he broke a promise while said fiancée fears he had abandoned her because he no longer loves her. Several guards are torn between doing their duty or flee for their lives. Soldiers obey orders for a war that has long ended. A woman is forced to grow up too soon after the death of her father who must run the family business that's being threatened by a rival company.
    • The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker deconstructs The Chosen One harshly. The legend of the Hero of Time results in the people of Hyrule believing that he will return should the time come that Hyrule is in danger again. When Ganondorf returns they continue to believe this and Ganondorf remains unopposed until the Gods take matters into their own hands leaving Hyrule in ruins. The incarnation of Link that is the protagonist of this game also has to earn his title as the successor of the legendary hero rather that just getting it.
      • It also takes apart typical post-apocalyptic After the End stories. The game's bright and upbeat art style and music shows that life moves on. Centuries later, an old civilization will be forgotten and unmourned. A Reset Button on everything can be both a good and bad thing.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild deconstructs Lady Land through the Gerudo. Due to culture and tradition, the Gerudo's city was entirely cut off from men. However, this posed problems for the Gerudo interacting with men, especially when they want to find a man to marry. They even need classes to educate themselves how to talk and woo men. Several Gerudo that Link encountered across Hyrule are shown to be awkward when trying to speak with him. At least one actively flew into a panic when speaking with Link, whispering to herself to remember the lessons she learned.
  • Persona 4 has many deconstructions, usually resolved by completing a social link:
    • Yosuke deconstructs the Stepford Smiler and/or Sad Clown tropes, as his Shadow calls him on the fact he's basically just bored and aimless and so he's throwing himself into anything that seems interesting for the hell of having something to do. His social link ultimately culminates in him realizing that he doesn't need to be special as long as he has friends that believe him to be special.
    • Chie deconstructs the tomboy trope, as it's made clear from encountering her Shadow that she is quite uncomfortable with her lack of femininity. She also mildly deconstructs the Big Eater trope, as she mentions that her ravenous appetite is one of the things she finds unfeminine about herself and is thusly ashamed of. Her social link involves finding out what kind of person she wants to be regardless of how feminine it makes her, and how to realize her goal of wanting to protect people, whether they see her as feminine or not.
    • Yukiko deconstructs the Yamato Nadeshiko trope, as it's noted she feels powerless and weak, as well as not truly wanting to accept her expected inheritance. Her social link eventually has her realize that she wants her expected inheritance, rather than trying to run from it, because everyone around her wants her to be happy, and she wants the same for them.
    • Kanji deconstructs the Real Men Wear Pink trope, as his personal storyline is all about how his "un-macho" interests have led to ridicule and rejection from others, especially women, and how he doubts himself as a result of that. His social link has him coming to terms with the fact that he likes something that's considered "girly" and how that's not something to be ashamed of.
    • Rise deconstructs the Idol Singer and Kawaiiko tropes, having originally gone into the music business because of a love of singing and a desire to make friends, only to grow fearful of the idea that people only see her for her idol persona. Her social link has her realizing that the idol personality she feared was masking her true self was actually inspiring people, and that she can be Rise and Risette.
    • Naoto deconstructs the Kid Detective (nobody takes her seriously due to her age, so she has to fight to be recognized) and Bifauxnen (she only dresses like and pretends to be a guy because it's the only way she can get around the chauvinism of the Japanese police system) tropes. Her social link has her realizing that she loves being a detective and solving mysteries, and always has, and that if society says she's too young or not a man and can't do that, she'll have to convince them otherwise.
    • Exclusive to the anime, but Yu deconstructs I Just Want to Have Friends. His fight against Shadow Mitsuo foreshadows this aspect of his personality where he undergoes an existential crisis over the idea of the case being solved and his friends abandoning him. His fight against Izanami solidified this where he almost willingly succumbed to the fog so that he could be in a reality where he remain with his friends.
    • Mitsuo Kubo deconstructs Attention Whore and/or I Just Want to Be Special. He repeatedly tries to take responsibility for the murders to get attention, and even goes so far as to commit an actual murder to this end. This ends up landing him in a mental hospital.
    • Ms. Kashiwagi, the Investigation Team's second homeroom teacher, deconstructs Sensei-chan; rather than see her immaturity and behavior as endearing, her students view her as nothing more than a pathetic Attention Whore.
      • She also deconstructs Hot for Student as her Christmas Cake status has left her so bitter and desperate for attention from males that she is willing to settle for anyone.
  • Dark Souls is not kind to Golden Age. Neither the Dragons nor Gwyn could let go of their "perfect eras" and did everything in their power to keep it the way it was. The result? In the case of the dragons? A gigantic war that almost completely anihilated their kind. In the case of Gwyn? well...
  • Iva's Story in Panzer Dragoon Orta deconstructs the Littlest Cancer Patient. In a Crapsack World where Everything Is Trying to Kill You, predominantly run by a fairly corrupt Empire, there's just no place for a person, even a child, who is terminally ill and needs looking after, so Iva is still conscripted into the Imperial Army. When he learns the truth about his condition from a letter left by his father in his final packet of medicine, he willfully goes on a Suicide Mission to put an end to a dangerous monster threat.
  • Phantasy Star IV deconstructs the idea of The Chosen One with Chaz. Being informed that he's one of the Protectors of the Seal, destined to defend Algo from the forces of evil, he outright rejects it, saying that mindlessly following the orders of an uncaring, distant god would make them no different than the story's villains.
  • The pros and cons of Thou Shall Not Kill and Pay Evil unto Evil are explored in both Injustice: Gods Among Us and Injustice 2. One of the bigger reasons why Superman and Batman have come to blows over the years is the argument of when and where is breaking the no-kill rule beneficial and nobody finding a middle ground... or backing down. Both sides even jab Armor Piercing Questions at each other about the policies they adhere to post-Metropolis.
    • Batman ardently sticks to not killing, aware that if he does so in the name of justice, he's Not So Different from the criminals he just killed, but couldn't fix the Joker's Karma Houdini problem, which backfired horribly when the Monster Clown caused Superman's Start of Darkness in the first game by tricking him into killing his own wife and nuking Metropolis. Superman frequently chides him for not having the spine to kill those who deserve to die for the greater good, even when he has desires to do so.
    • Likewise, Superman no longer believes in the no-kill rule and thinks only Pay Evil unto Evil matters post-Metropolis, especially in regards to villains like the Joker or Brainiac, but Batman still believes that it's an easy path to Jump Off The Slippery Slope, which brought out the worst in Superman. In Brainiac's case, while Superman wants to kill the Coluan in revenge for blowing up Krypton, Batman warns they need to keep Brainiac alive if they hope to restore all of the cities.
  • Doki Doki Literature Club! explores what would happen if the Not Love Interest in a Dating Sim VN was just as in love with the protagonist as the other girls can be, and possessed Medium Awareness to know that no matter what, the game will never allow them to be together. The results aren't pretty.
  • Persona 5:
    • Sae Nijima was Promoted to Parent for her younger sister Makoto after the untimely death of their father. While Sae genuinely cares for Makoto, the pressures of managing her line of work and caring for Makoto has caused her to become jaded, bitter and cynical. She despises her father for dying and leaving his children to deal with the fallout and she is secretly terrified that either she or Makoto will die a similar death like their father in a fruitless pursuit of justice. In the main story, in a fit of anger, Sae told Makoto that she saw Makoto as a burden and later on, reveals that she was jealous of Makoto's idealistic views and how carefree Makoto's life is as a high schooler. Meanwhile, Makoto only wants to make Sae proud and wishes to have the relationship they had prior to their father's death.
    • Happiness in Slavery is deconstructed through Yusuke. Like many abuse victims, he is aware that Madarame is mistreating him and that he is plagiarizing Yusuke's work but feels that he can neither leave nor confront Madarame about this out of a sense of obligation towards the man who raised him after his mother's death. To cope with this, Yusuke continually rationalizes Madarame's behavior, hindering the Phantom Thieves' attempts to change Madarame's heart. Even after Madarame's Shadow reveals he indirectly killed Yusuke's mother, Yusuke continues to have conflicted feelings of love and hate towards his adopted father, who it is eventually revealed did care for him as a doting father would when he was younger. Yusuke's social link is about trying to reconcile these feelings.
  • In God of War (PS4), Baldur was blessed with the ability to Feel No Pain and invulnerability to all threats - physical and magical. But because of this, he cannot feel the most mundane stimuli such as pain, temperature, taste or pleasure. This lack of sense drives him insane, as well as destroying any level of empathy he possessed. He even flat out said he would rather die than to not feel anything.
  • The Kiseki Series deconstructs the Kid Hero archetype that most JRPG games play straight. Most playable characters tend to skew as teenagers, most of the adults are very competent at their jobs in comparison. Thanks to their inexperience and lack of authority, the kids lose far more than they win and need to be frequently bailed out by their adult counterparts. Unless the younger characters have received specialized combat training which frequently is depicted as traumatizing or are flat out used to harsher living conditions, (just ask Renne, Joshua, or Kevin), they won't be able to catch up with the adults, no matter how many special powers and abilities they may have compared to years of experience. Ultimately this results in a case of The Bad Guy Wins more often than not, leaving the protagonists to scrape by with personal victories at best while only making a dent in the villains' plans.
  • In Until Dawn, Josh's character traits of "complex, thoughtful, loving", especially in regards to his sisters, actually bring out the worst in him. Losing his sisters caused him to be driven to madness and fixated on getting revenge on his friends who caused the prank. Josh's "prank" was far more traumatizing on his friends and after stopping his medications, he quickly loses the rest of his sanity.
  • Shadow of the Colossus: Easily the most famous and most influential aspect of the game is how it handles the idea of a Boss Battle. The Colossi are unique, glorious creatures, each with their own physical and behavioral quirks, and are great opponents to anyone who challenges them. The problem is that they're not monsters. They're not villains. They're just territorial creatures that would be of no threat to anybody if you would just leave them alone. The tragedy of their deaths is highlighted by "End of the Battle", a sad song that plays whenever a Colossi is killed. When all of the Colossi are defeated, our hero Wander is transformed into a Colossi lookalike attacked by archers, followed by a scene of Controllable Helplessness where, in order to roll the credits, Wander must die. That's right - as punishment for what they've done, Wander, and by consequence, the player, both function as the game's Final Boss.
  • Darkest Dungeon shows that going into a confined, dark space full of highly-aggressive, inhuman monsters with limited supplies takes a massive toll both physically and mentally on even the hardiest soldiers.
    • It also shows exactly what type of people would sign up for such a quest: broken, desperate, and occasionally insane people.
  • Stiff Upper Lip in We Happy Few is taken to the logical extreme where everyone in Wellington Wells is forced to maintain a cheerful facade in the face of disaster. They do not take kindly to anything that is sad or troubling, especially if it reminds them of A Very Bad Thing, and they will brutally attack and/or murder anyone who isn't on Joy. They are so dependent on taking their Joy and remaining blissfully ignorant than face the fact there is a major food crisis and people are starving to death.
  • Dragon Quest Builders thoroughly deconstructs the The Chosen One and But Thou Must! tropes its parent series embraces so often:
    • The game is set in a world where the hero of Dragon Quest I had been groomed all his life to go on a quest to defeat the Dragonlord. He ended up taking the Dragonlord's Deal with the Devil, just to have some agency over his own life and see what would happen. The game is set in the resulting Bad End Bad Future.
    • The Builder is repeatedly told they are not a hero. They aren't supposed to defeat evil, simply help get civilization back on its feet so humanity can carry on until one arrives. They eventually make the goddess Rubiss admit she doesn't know when the Hero will be born - it could be tomorrow, it could be another thousand years, and people will just have to suffer until then. The Builder realizes this makes everything they're accomplished a meaningless stopgap and decides to Screw Destiny and fix the source of the problem themselves. They're not a hero, but they can choose to be heroic.
  • In Resident Evil, Chris Redfield was Promoted to Parent for his sister Claire after their parents died in a freak accident when she was fourteen. Chris was given new responsibilities suddenly and he became overprotective over her, training her in firearms and combat skills from a young age and apparently often bossed her around. Even though Claire loved her brother, she still harbored some bitterness over his parenting as an adult.
  • The Five Nights at Freddy's series deconstructs Incompetence, Inc. in the most horrific ways possible. The generally incompetent (and possibly morally bankrupt) owners of the in-universe pizza franchise are not only willing to cut corners on costs whenever possible (Meaning equipment tends to malfunction or not work at all), but don't even bother doing background checks on their employees (Which results in a serial killer murdering several children) and have a general negligence of safety for their employees and customers (They refuse to claim responsibility for the deaths of night guards caused by their own animatronic mascots, and a child is horribly maimed in a Deadly Prank due in part to no one even bothering to stop it). Not surprisingly, the restaurant is closed down after the events of the first game due to just how poorly run it is.
  • Soulcalibur VI deconstructs Badass Normal...twice (at least as far as the story goes):
    • Seong Mi-na, in any story where magic didn't exist, would be a fearsome warrior lady. Being Locked Out of the Loop ends up with her suffering a humiliating defeat by the alchemist Ivy.
    • Newcomer Groh also suffers a Curbstomp Battle. Though unlike with Mi-na, he was aware that magic existed. This didn't prevent him from being nearly murdered by the magically infused Nightmare due to how freakishly strong the latter is.
  • While the Kingdom Hearts series as a whole has largely played The Power of Friendship straight, Kingdom Hearts III has a rather brutal deconstruction near the end of the game. Sora is a firm believer in the trope, as he always believes that together people can do anything, and regularly attributes his power to his friends and connections with them, but Xigbar points out that he attributes too much of his strength to his friends, and during the climax, he's proven right; when the other Guardians of Light are ensnared by a Heartless swarm and apparently killed, Sora breaks down hard, declaring that since all his strength came from his friends, he's worthless on his own.
  • Yakuza: the series deconstructs the entire concept of Civil War. Most games in the series feature some form internal conflict in the Tojo Clan. In the first games, this is mostly treated as a bog-standard Plot Device to get the ball rolling but the later games in the series show more and more of how much a decade or more of near constant internecine warfare has weakened the Tojo Clan to the point that when Yakuza: Like a Dragon rolls around, the Tojo Clan has been driven from their traditional home territory by less powerful but more cohesive and decisively led groups.
  • Fable II shows how normal people would eventually react to the existence of Evil Heroes. Turns out the citizens of Albion did not care for Heroes being able to just casually take on evil quests from the Heroes' Guild without taking consideration of the people they were supposed to protect. All that talk of the old Guildmaster giving Heroes freedom to choose? Apparently that freedom isn't extended to normal people. Once guns were invented they quickly armed themselves and attacked the Guild, destroying it and killing everyone inside.

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