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Decoy Protagonist / Live-Action Films

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Decoy Protagonists in live-action movies.


  • In the original Alien movie, Sigourney Weaver's Ripley was not played as the main protagonist. For the first half of the movie, the presumptive lead was Captain Dallas (Tom Skerritt) AKA Victim #3. In fact, Sigourney Weaver was probably the least famous actor in the cast. John Hurt, the most established actor, dies first in the iconic Chest Burster scene.
  • Aziz in An American Carol. He doesn't die, but it is Michael who is the actual hero. Interestingly, Aziz is portrayed as a Villain Protagonist. Michael effectively replaces him, but is portrayed as a well-meaning, dim-witted Action Survivor.
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  • In Annabelle: Creation, it looks like the movie focuses on Janice. Until she gets possessed by the demon at the end of the first half of the film, becoming the antagonist, and the movie goes on to focus on Linda instead.
  • At the Devil's Door initially follows a lonely real estate agent who is tasked with selling a foreclosed home inhabited by an evil demon, which seeks to impregnate a young woman with a spawn. When it's revealed that the agent is infertile and she comes face to face with the entity, she is killed off and her younger (fertile) sister becomes the protagonist when the demon picks her to carry its offspring.
  • Avengers: Infinity War splits its focus between nearly every hero ever to have appeared in the Marvel Cinematic Universe—but most of the focus in the first half of the film is, somewhat unexpectedly, on the second-in-command of the Guardians of the Galaxy, Gamora. Due to her personal connection to the Big Bad, Thanos, Gamora pulls much of the film's focus until a little over halfway through, when Thanos is forced to sacrifice her in order to obtain his fourth Infinity Stone. By the end of the film, it's clear who the real protagonist is: Thanos himself.
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  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs: If you didn't already know that the film is an Anthology Film, you'd be forgiven for assuming that Buster Scruggs is the protagonist since his name is in the title and he spends the whole first chapter introducing himself. But he's killed at the end of his chapter, and the film goes through five more chapters with their own casts.
  • In Blindness, it might appear at first the movie's main character would be the Japanese man or the Doctor, but after a while, it is made clear that the Doctor's Wife is the real main character of the story.
  • In Boar, Ken is the central character for about 45 minutes, and it looks like he is going to be the one to track down and kill the boar. Then the boar kills him, and the focus shifts to Debbie and Bernie, who have been peripheral characters up to this point.
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  • Paul Taylor in The Blob (1988) is the likable jock dating the heroine Meg while Brian Flagg is a James Dean-like anti-authority dude with more than a few run-ins with the Man. Then Paul becomes the Blob's second victim, and Flagg takes over the Hero role.
  • During the first 1/2 hour of The Boys from Brazil, it seems pretty clear that Barry (Steve Guttenberg) is the main character. Then he has a run in with some Nazis...
  • In Bram Stoker's Dracula, Jonathan Harker appears to be the heroic protagonist for the first quarter until the focus shifts to his fiancee Mina for the rest of the film and Jonathan fades into the background as a supporting character. Mina is even the one who vanquishes Dracula in the end.
  • The Brides of Dracula, Marianne looks to be the main character but halfway into the film, Helsing soon takes over. Though Marianne manages to narrowly survive the events of the movie.
  • Unless you had seen the poster or trailer for the first Bring It On movie, the opening sequence would lead you to believe that Big Red is the main character. Then, mid-song, the focus shifts to Torrance. Granted, Torrance is there in the first part of the song too, but she's off to the side or in the background. No one dies, but it otherwise fits this trope.
  • In By the Sword, in the first half, we seem to focus more on students Erin Clavelli and Jim Trebor and their romance at the fencing school. About halfway through, they become more background characters and shown as differences in teaching styles between the real main characters, Max Suba and Alexander Villard.
  • In Chronicle, Andrew is the primary character for the first half of the film. However, the focus shifts to Matt when Andrew starts to abuse his powers and go further off the deep-end.
  • Citizen Kane is a double subversion. Even though Kane is the title character, he's actually the person we learn about through multiple third-person perspectives of him, since he died at the beginning. The real protagonist is Jerry Thompson, whose goal throughout the film is to find out what "Rosebud" meant.
  • Ilios from Lucio Fulci's Conquest is The Chosen One, possesses one of the few bows in the film's world, and is on The Quest. He tends to screw up and gets rescued by his sidekick, Maxz. And then the minions of the Big Bad kill him and Maxz takes up his bow, completing the quest.
  • Boris in The Cranes Are Flying. He seems to be the protagonist but dies halfway through the movie.
  • Alderson in Cube. The beginning of the movie shows him getting up and beginning to explore his surroundings... only to be unexpectedly sliced into cubes moments later. The movie pulls it again by making Quentin look like the heroic protective leader-type within the group before pulling a Face–Heel Turn. Worth, who initially appears to be an Anti-Hero, eventually steps up to be the true protector of the survivors.
  • Viggo Mortensen's character in Daylight, an adventurer who becomes the de-facto leader of the survivors, is killed while trying to look for an exit of the collapsed tunnel, coincidentally just as Sylvester Stallone's character arrives.
  • A rare third-act POV switch in Death Becomes Her: Bruce Willis's character takes over as the protagonist, leaving the previous main characters played by Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn sidelined until the movie's coda.
  • In Deep Blue Sea, the adventurer/executive played by Samuel L. Jackson gets bitten in half by a shark. And later, Saffron Burrows who got billing as the lead character, is the only character on the cover and posters and looking like the presumed Final Girl... gets eaten. It wasn't written that way, but the test audiences felt she shouldn't survive after causing that much death.
  • The Satanic B-movie The Devil's Rain stars William Shatner, but his character gets possessed and turns into a minion halfway through the film.
  • Dollars Trilogy:
  • The 1973 version of Dracula (aka Dan Curtis Dracula) likewise started with Harker as the protagonist and coming to Castle Dracula. Though unlike Horror of Dracula, he has no ulterior motives and just an unlucky visitor. He likewise dies in this version (this time by the brides) and comes back as a vampire at the end of the movie. Oddly it's more Arthur who's the hero of this movie.
  • Sarge in the Doom movie has a psychotic break and later (for unrelated reasons) turns into a demon. He even lampshades this when he is caught by the demons and shouts out "I'm not supposed to die!", because he assumed he was the main character..
  • The first half of Dressed to Kill follows Kate ... until she gets killed.
  • Done surprisingly well in Bollywood movie Dum Maaro Dum, where the whole movie focuses on ACP Vishnu Kamath (Abhishek Bachchan)'s attempts to root out the drug traffickers. He suddenly gets killed by a corrupt cop about 3/4th into the movie and supporting character DJ Joki (played by debutante Rana Daggubati) assumes the lead role and ends up foiling the Big Bad's plan.
  • Evil Dead:
    • The Evil Dead (1981) clearly sets up Scott to be the likeliest to the survive the story. As the story continues, he's the one who is continuously doing things, trying to save the rest of the group's lives, and eventually decides to go get help, only for the camera's focus to shift to Ash, the character whose defining moment up until this point had been getting trapped under a bookshelf. Scott makes it back...but not in one piece
    • Evil Dead (2013) Reboot sets up David as the group leader and protagonist. He leads the group and takes charge. The shift occurs when Mia changes from the dead to the living, and David is killed.
  • Executive Decision: With Steven Seagal being prominently featured in the trailer, and receiving co-billing alongside his two big co-stars, you would expect that Seagal's character, as usual, is the hero of the film. He dies at the end of the first act.
  • Falling Down: It seems like the story's main character is Bill Foster and Prendergast is a Hero Antagonist, but as the movie progresses and Foster becomes increasingly villainous they switch roles as well.
  • In Fargo, Jerry Lundegaard seems to be the main character, as would be typical for the Coen brothers' ordinary-schmuck-commits-a-crime-gone-wrong genre, until Marge Gunderson is introduced about a half hour into the film.
  • The first Feast movie has the characters named "Hero" (Life Expectancy: Pretty Good. Occupation: Kicking Ass) and "Heroine" (Occupation: Wear tanktops, tote shotgun, save day. LIFE EXPECTANCY: Hopefully Better Than The Last Hero) both end up dying, the former a few minutes after being introduced. The second Heroine (Occupation: Career waitress, single mom. Life Expectancy: Expects nothing from life. upgraded to Occupation: Heroine #2. Life Expectancy: Let's hope for the best) is the one to make it through, even after her son is eaten. Needless to say, this movie loves subverting the Sorting Algorithm of Mortality.
  • In the 2017 remake of Flatliners, Ellen Page is the biggest name in the main cast, and her character serves as the leader and catalyst of the flatlining experiments. However, she dies halfway through the film, leading the rest of the cast to figure out how to handle the repercussions of the experiments.
  • Fog Over Frisco: It comes as a surprise when Arlene, the Femme Fatale thief who seems to be the central character, disappears barely halfway through and eventually turns out to have been murdered. The main characters after that are her stepsister Val and Val's boyfriend Tony, as they first try to find her and then try to figure out who killed her. The fact that the actress who played Arline, Bette Davis became a much bigger star than anyone else in the movie, makes it even more surprising for a latter-day viewer. (Davis followed this film with her Star-Making Role in Of Human Bondage.)
  • Footloose: Ren is certainly the instigator of the conflict when he challenges the local reverend's ban on dancing, but by the end, it becomes clear that the reverend is the true protagonist, and the conflict is resolved when he realizes he's in danger of losing everything he holds dear.
  • Friday the 13th franchise:
  • In Fright Night (2011) Ed is actually the focal character for the first 20 minutes, as he's the only one to realize that Jerry is a vampire and does his best to stop him. Then he gets bitten and turned into a vampire by Jerry, and the film immediately switches all its focus on to Charlie who only appeared briefly in the first act. Anyone who's seen the original film will quickly figure the twist out, especially since the characters have the same names that they do in the remake.
  • Rare antagonist example in G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. A lot of fans familiar with the mythology expected the Doctor to actually be the Rise of Cobra version of Doctor Mindbender. Only at the end, was it revealed that the Doctor is actually Cobra Commander.
  • The Godfather: Marlon Brando had star billing and a Best Actor Oscar for his role as Vito Corleone, but he was gunned down less than forty minutes in and spent a good deal of the rest of the film lying in a hospital bed before dying of a heart attack. His son Michael was the hero of the film. Similarly, the second movie initially appears to be about Vito's character, but once again Michael ends up being more the protagonist and Vito eventually drops out of the narrative.
  • Though Joseph Brody is given a lot of development early on in Godzilla (2014), his son is The Hero of the story as far as human characters go.
  • Grave of the Vampire starts off with a vampire attacking a young couple (killing the man, raping the woman). A police detective, after hearing the woman's story, goes to the cemetery. So far, so good. It doesn't end well for him.
  • Quentin Tarantino takes this to the point of having an entire decoy cast in the Grindhouse film Death Proof. Half of the movie focuses on a bunch of characters where they very distinctly focus on one character who just screams Final Girl only for her and all of the characters introduced to be killed off all at once. After that, the rest of the movie focuses on a completely different bunch of characters in a completely different area and filmed in a completely different style. It was like watching a sequel to the movie in the middle of the first one!
  • The Halloween franchise.
    • Although Jamie is clearly the main protagonist in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers, we're led to believe that Rachel will once again be at her side for the duration. She's one of the earliest victims in the film. Then, the annoying girl who you'd expect to die first (Tina) ends up outliving her friends (bar Jamie).
    • Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers: Jamie herself. She is killed very early on in the movie.
    • Laurie Strode in Halloween: Resurrection. After being the main protagonist in 3 films, she's the first victim in the final outing.
  • The Hidden Fortress has Tahei and Matashichi as the protagonists of the film, and while they continually drive the film, the focus is on General Makabe and Princess Yuki.
  • Horror of Dracula, the film begins as the same of the book, with Harker coming to Castle Dracula to discuss with Dracula some property in England to move to. Then it's revealed that he's really a vampire hunter sent there to kill Dracula while under the guise of a realtor. However he gets bitten by Dracula's bride and, while he manages to stake her, takes too long to do so to Drac before the sun sets, allowing Dracula to wake who quickly kills and turns him. Helsing later comes looking for Harker, finds his undead body and stakes him, effectively taking over as the main protagonist.
  • Hostel primarily focuses on Josh, the nice, shy, virginal guy for most the film before killing him and revealing Paxton, who'd be among the first to die in most horror movies, as the lead and survivor. The second movie does this for Paxton, setting him up to be the protagonist and quite possibly trying to take down the organization after what he suffered in the first movie. Instead, he gets his head chopped off five minutes in.
  • In the 1970 Spanish slasher film The House that Screamed, Teresa is the new girl at a boarding school where there are some strange things going on, including girls mysteriously disappearing. Teresa has all the hallmarks of a Final Girl (despite the movie well predating the films that would be the Trope Codifiers of the concept). But about two-thirds of the way through the movie, she is murdered, and the focus shifts to Irene, who had been a villain up to that point. She doesn't survive, either.
  • The opening scene of The Hurt Locker focuses on Thompson, played by Guy Pearce, who seems to be the hero until he dies and gets replaced with the real main character.
  • The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus starts with Anton as the protagonist at the film's beginning. Then it's Tony in the middle of the film. The ending makes it clear that the film's protagonist all along was Parnassus himself.
  • Irreconcilable Differences: Casey kicks off the plot by suing her parents, but she's a side character for most of the movie. Most of the focus is on her parents, especially her father.
  • A superhero appears at the beginning of Kick-Ass, prepared to make the dive of a skyscraper. He's hailed by a bad-ass soundtrack and the voice-over about superheroes. He dies from the fall. And the movie moves on. Turns out he was just some random crazy person.
  • The slasher flick/cop movie Maniac Cop 2 focuses largely on the two survivors of the previous film, who get killed before the film is halfway through.
  • Mindhunters: Christian Slater's character gets killed first.
  • Marilyn Monroe gets top billing in Niagara but not only is she the villain, she dies halfway through!
  • Happens in a few of A Nightmare on Elm Street films:
    • In the first movie we're introduced to Freddy through Tina Grey's dreams, hearing about Tina's fears in regards to the nightmares, and generally being led to believe that this movie will be about Tina's escape from Freddy. And then Tina becomes Freddy's very first victim, and focus soon shifts to Nancy, the true main character of the film.
    • Part four starts out focusing on Kristen, the protagonist of the previous film, but she is rather quickly killed off and focus completely shifts to her schoolmate Alice. In her debut film, the focus quickly shifts to Nancy, The Hero of the first film. While Nancy does get killed off, it happens at the end of the movie.
    • In Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare the apparent main character confronts Freddy, telling him that he knows that he's his son. He promptly learns, the hard way, that Freddy had a daughter.
    • The 2010 remake employs a use of this trope. Kris is actually the second victim but most of the first twenty minutes focus on her and the actual heroine, though already introduced only becomes important after Kris is killed. This works significantly less well considering the real heroine Nancy shares the same name as the original's heroine.
  • No Country for Old Men: Llewelyn Moss gets the attention for the first 2/3rds of the film, then is unceremoniously Killed Offscreen by a group of Mexican bounty hunters who had been treated as little more than cannon fodder previously. Sheriff Bell is the real protagonist and delivers both the opening and closing monologues. The story is about an old man not adapting to the reality of the brutal environment he works in.
  • Northwest Passage sets up Towne and Marriner to be the main characters. However, the film actually focuses on Major Rogers, played by Spencer Tracy.
  • Contrary to what the advertising for Now You See Me suggests, the Four Horsemen aren't the leads, Agent Dylan Rhodes is, though they (and Thaddeus Bradley, for that matter) are Deuteragonists. Taken to a new level when you learn that Dylan is the fifth Horseman.
  • The One starts showing Lawless, played by Jet Li. Naturally, people assume that he's either the hero or the villain, as the trailers claimed that Jet Li is Acting for Two. Lawless is killed by the real villain Yulaw a few minutes into the film, the latest in the long line of doubles he's already killed.
  • In One Day, given that the movie, at first, appears to focus primarily on Emma, she appears to be the protagonist. However, with about fifteen minutes of the film to go, she gets hit by a truck and dies, completely transferring the focus to Dexter.
  • In Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones, Jesse is the protagonist at first. The movie opens with him getting a camcorder for his high school graduation present. After he fully gets possessed by the demon, his best friend Hector takes over the protagonist role, and the second half of the film shows him trying to save Jesse from the covenant of witches that 'marked' and chose him.
  • In highly realistic Bollywood film Parinda, Karan is the hero who is our introduction into the Crapsack World of Mumbai gangland where his brother is a Mook for the Big Bad. Then, Karan and his wife get murdered brutally and his brother performs a Heel–Face Turn and avenges his death.
  • A Perfect Getaway. The seeming main characters are not only not the protagonists, but they also turn out to be the villains. The actual protagonists only show up twenty to thirty minutes into the film.
  • The Place Beyond the Pines: The film follows Luke for the first hour of the film, until he's killed. The film then follows the police officer who kills him and then Luke's son fifteen years later. There is no real main character.
  • The Trope Codifier (if not the Trope Maker) and easily the most famous example is Psycho. Marion Crane is set up as the main character through the first half of the film. Then she takes a shower. She's the reason Hitchcock asked for a "no late admission" policy, as he thought that if people entered the theater late and never saw the star actress Janet Leigh, they would feel cheated. Leigh's agent didn't want her to take the role because of how quickly the screen time ended. Leigh's response was "Ah, but who are they talking about the rest of the film?"
  • In Purgatory, it looks like Blackjack and his gang of outlaws are going to be the Villain Protagonists of the movie, and the early scenes focus on them exclusively. However, this all changes once they arrive in Refuge.
  • A Quiet Place: The film's marketing strongly emphasized the family patriarch Lee Abbott as the hero of the film, especially given the fact that he is played by the director. Around three quarters in, however, he takes a mortal wound from a monster and sacrifices himself to draw it away from his teenage daughter Regan; it is she who is the true hero of the story, and is the one who figures out how to defeat the monsters.
  • Watch the first hour of The Return (2003), and it's pretty clear that Ivan is the main character. Watch the final 20 minutes, and it's pretty clear that Andrei has taken over the role. According to Word of God, Andrei was the main character for the entire movie but was metaphorically "hidden in the shadows" up until that point.
  • Rise of the Planet of the Apes: Despite James Franco getting top billing for the movie, the chimpanzee, Caesar, is the true hero of the story. By Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Andy Serkis, who does the motion capture for Caesar, got top billing.
  • Runaway Jury starts off following a man who is killed in an event that drives the rest of the plot.
  • Saving Private Ryan sets up The Squad in the opening battle at Omaha by cutting between the faces of several men in the landing boat, with Captain Miller shouting out orders and a Rousing Speech. Then to show this isn't one of your dad's classic war films, all of these men save Miller either are immediately riddled with bullets when the door goes down, or they jump over the side and drown because their gear weighs them down. The real squad make appearances during the battle, trying to stay alive - they only get folded together after the battle.
  • The horror movie Scarecrow 2 started off with an older farmer telling a flashbacked story about how the titular monster murdered his father when he was a kid to a reporter. It sets up as if he's (one of) the main protagonist(s), but he's chopped up by the scarecrow to the point of Ludicrous Gibs while handcuffed to a hospital bed within 20 minutes of the opening credits.
  • Scream:
    • In another Wes Craven film, the trailer for the first Scream movie had audiences assuming that Drew Barrymore's character Casey was a main character. She's killed in the first ten minutes.
    • Played with in Scream 4. Jill is set up as an Expy of her cousin Sidney, her actions mirroring those of Sidney in the first film, and everything seems to be on the way for her to become the Final Girl. Turns out she's the killer.
  • Seven Samurai first focuses on a bunch of peasants before shifting to the samurai. The peasants continue to play an important part, including in fighting and defeating the bandits (and the ones who go out in search of samurai at the beginning are shown to have stories of their own, in particular, Rikichi), and Kambei at the end of the movies states that the peasants are the real winners.
  • Silver Tongues opens with Rachel and Alex, a newly married and already fraying young couple on their tense honeymoon. A few minutes in they run into a couple in their 40s and have dinner with them. The older couple turn out to be con artists who trick Rachel and Alex into believing they are swingers, manipulate the frustrations the younger couple have and leave the newlyweds with a seemingly broken marriage. The plot then sticks with the con artists as they run into other people - Rachel and Alex are never seen or mentioned again after the first act.
  • In Southland Tales, the final minutes reveal that the character of Boxer Santaros was the false messiah - the primer being the Taverner brothers.
  • The President's daughter from Spy Kids 2: Island of Lost Dreams, whose prologue made the film look like if it was actually about her and her adventures at an amusement park full of wacky CGI rides.
  • In Star Trek Into Darkness, it's actually Spock who defeats Khan, not Kirk. The movie focuses on Spock's growth as a character through Kirk's actions. Unlike most cases though, Kirk doesn't stay dead.
  • Star Wars:
    • With A New Hope, Luke Skywalker doesn't appear until around 20 minutes in. C-3PO and R2-D2 are the focus of the movie until then.
    • Watching the first six films in release order doesn't clue you in that the entire series is about the rise, fall, and redemption of Anakin Skywalker until well over halfway through.
    • Finn is made out to be the de facto hero in The Force Awakens trailers and marketing, what with him wielding Anakin's lightsaber and all. While he does get a lot of focus, he ultimately takes on the role of the Deuteragonist, with Rey who is ultimately the Hero. While Finn does use the lightsaber, he's pretty clumsy with it and is nearly killed by Kylo Ren when they duel at the climax of the film, with Rey ultimately felling him. In fact, Maz gave the lightsaber to Finn so he could give it to Rey, as she initially rejected it after a series of terrifying visions which implied that becoming a Jedi was her destiny. It's entirely possible that Finn is Force-sensitive like the marketing implies, though it's never explicitly stated in the film itself that he is.
  • Jim Ogilvie in the first of The Stepfather films. He spends most of the film looking for his sister's killer and in the end, when he does finally find the stepfather, he's knifed in the stomach before he can even pull his gun out.
  • At the end of Sucker Punch, the protagonist Baby Doll has a revelation that the movie isn't actually her story at all, but actually Sweet Pea's. She sacrifices her own freedom for Sweet Pea once she realizes she was only ever meant to be the catalyst for Sweet Pea's escape from the mental asylum. Unless you view the movie as a nested series of traumatic dissociation within Baby Doll's own mind, in which case all the other girls we see in the Burlesque and High Fantasy scenes are fractured aspects of her consciousness, which kinda changes the entire meaning of the film.
  • Things Change uses this briefly: the opening credits are mandolin music, and the film opens on a man playing the mandolin. He adjusts the tune, tries it some more, trades the mandolin for another mandolin, plays another tune, and brings it to a cash register to purchase. Along the way, he passes by two mobsters who are spying on the real protagonist. The mandolin player is never seen again.
  • A deleted scene from This Is Spın̈al Tap has bassist Derek Smalls showing a clip from a cheap Italian action film he acted in. He gets an impressive amount of screen time, playing the sniper in an extended assassination set-up. In the end, he is unceremoniously shot, and he must admit that his killer is the real protagonist.
  • In the Brazilian film The Trace We Leave Behind, João is set up as the main character. At least until about three fourths in, when he's killed off and his wife takes over as the main character.
  • Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil initially looks like it's going to be a Hillbilly Horrors movie told from the perspectives of a group of preppy college kids who get on the wrong side of a pair of sinister hillbillies while partying in West Virginia. It then rewinds the first scene to show us how it happened from the point-of-view of the hillbillies, revealing them to be the titular Tucker and Dale, a pair of well-meaning and friendly types merely intending to fix up a dilapidated old shack to use as a holiday home. We then follow the movie from their perspective as the college kids, now revealed to be mostly a bunch of smug jerks still labouring under the mistaken impression that they actually are facing Hillbilly Horrors, end up killing themselves in all sorts of creative ways as a result.
  • The cop at the start of Ultraviolet looks like the typical Big Brother Is Employing You hero. He goes on about the harshness against hemophages and believes the whole thing is just a witch hunt. Then, he gets infected and his partner shoots him dead.
  • "Safe Haven" from the anthology V/H/S/2 seems to follow the producer of the film crew until he is killed by the Apocalypse Cult early on, at which point Adam becomes the new POV.
  • Lucius Hunt is clearly the protagonist of The Village, right up until he is stabbed viciously and his blind girlfriend Ivy must make the journey to rescue him that takes up the rest of the film. Notably, this is the only plot twist in the film that isn't telegraphed very early on and actually feels twisty as a result.
  • What Have You Done to Solange? has Elizabeth as the Final Girl until she gets killed viciously midway through the movie. An especially well-done example of the trope as it comes out of nowhere.
  • X-Men: Days of Future Past:
    • Even though Wolverine Publicity is in full effect, Charles is the true protagonist of the film. Wolverine even gets taken out before the climax.
    • Mystique is presented as a villain throughout the movie, but her motivations (to kill the man who tortured and murdered her friends) are heroic, and she's the one who saves the day and stops Magneto at the end.


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