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    The Entire Franchise 
  • Awesome Music: Now has its own page.
  • Broken Base:
    • Exactly which branch of the series is the best? Largely split between the original games, Doom 3 and Doom (2016) for the most part, with a bit of this showing for the novels, movie, comic and other sources. Many consider Doom 3 to be genuinely scary, intense, and visually appealing, but the combat and general pacing are slow and clunky when compared to the original games. Meanwhile, Doom (2016) returns to the fast-paced action and has astonishing visuals, but leaves little room for the player to feel frightened by the game's enemies.
    • Brutal Doom also has this. Some consider it the best mod made for the game, period. Others consider it to be excessive and overhyped, if not a bit buggy. The arguments over the mod itself are also hurt greatly by Sgt_Mark_IV (the mod's creator) having alienated and/or angered a good chunk of the Doom community with racist remarks, a general bad attitude and even encouraging a member of the community to commit suicide- acts which led to him being banned from several Doom message forums. The creators of the Metroid Dreadnought mod also refused to make it compatible with Brutal Doom, in part because they have been in contact with Nintendo's legal department over their mod and are afraid that Nintendo might C&D them if they associate with Mark in any way (their concern is that Nintendo would learn what Mark is like and associate his behavior with their team, and when you have a major company watching your unauthorized project based on their IP, it may be a valid concern).
    • A relatively minor one since it never actually leads to any heated conflict, but one sometimes wonders whether or not fans will ever have a consensus on how to spell the game's title. Is it "Doom", "DOOM" or "DooM"?
    • "Thy Flesh Consumed" is either a worthy follow-on to the original three episodes included with the initial release of Doom that provides a decent challenge for people who mastered them, or is a poorly designed mess full of Fake Difficulty that follows a much different and inferior design philosophy that meshes poorly with the first three quarters of the game.
  • Cargo Ship: Doomguy X his guns is a very common one usually Played for Laughs, especially in the comic where he openly weeps at the sight of the BFG-9000. The most common weapon used is either the aforementioned BFG or the Super Shotgun.
  • Complete Monster: Dr. Malcolm Betruger; Dr. Olivia Pierce; Khan Maykr & the Hell Priests, Deag Ranak and Deag Grav; and Demon Overlord. See those pages for details.
    • Doom RPG: Kronos was a UAC scientist who was experimenting with teleportation to Hell and merging flesh and steel. After he went too far with his research, UAC authorities promptly closed his project and sealed the portal to Hell. After becoming a demon, Kronos maintains his human mind and comes back to Mars under the guise of Dr. Guerard. He then proceeds to brainwash the base supervisors with the help of Mr. Nadira to open the portal again. After demons invade the base, he orders Dr. Jensen to be fired and locked up for standing in his way. When Guerard's treachery is discovered, he has Nadira killed by a demon and later overloads the portal, unleashing an even bigger horde of monsters and his past masterpiece, the Cyberdemon, before trying to kill the Marine himself.
    • Doom II RPG: Virtual Icon of Sin, or VIOS, is an AI of demonic origins that leads Hell's invasion on one of the Earth's moons. When the Player Character arrives to clean up the station, VIOS constantly attempts to intimidate him/her into feeding him a database of several UAC terminals; said database is implied to consist of human souls. Upon invading an Earth base, VIOS assimilates a UAC computer designated SAL and continues his attempts to manipulate the player, even torturing him/her with his telekinesis at one point. When confronted, VIOS tries to kill the player for good, even if the latter had been choosing to feed human souls to VIOS during the gameplay. VIOS clearly revels in the carnage he causes and displays a particular sadism in doing so.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • Oddly enough, people have started shipping Doomguy with Charlie from Hazbin Hotel. Nobody is really sure where that came from, especially when you consider how different they treat demons, but a lot of people seem to like it. The general premise being that he gains a soft spot for her, due to her being the only good-natured demon in Hell, as well as that she's only person that could stop him from doing more damage than the purges. As seen here. Probably counts as Crack Pairing as well.
    • Some also like to pair Doomguy with Satina, though mostly in a Parental Substitute or surrogate siblings kind of way. The former can go hand in hand with the Charlie/Doom Slayer ship, with them being Satina's adopted parents.
    • In an even odder example, people are shipping Doomguy with Isabelle from the Animal Crossing series since Animal Crossing: New Horizons and Doom Eternal were set to release on the exact same day. This can go hand-in-hand with the Charlie/Doomguy ship, with all of them being friends.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • With Wolfenstein. Pretend to be surprised.
    • With Warhammer 40,000, due to both franchises being set in grim and gritty sci-fi universes and centering on Rated M for Manly Space Marines who slaughter The Legions of Hell as a matter of course. Some 40k players even consider the Doomguy/Doom Slayer an honorary Astartes.
    • An odd one in the form of Animal Crossing thanks to the release date for Doom Eternal and Animal Crossing: New Horizons being on the same day as well as the surge of fanart such as depicting Doom Guy teaching Isabelle how to use a firearm. This even extends to the modding community where Isabelle becomes an AI Partner by assisting Doom Guy by either supplying health, armor, and ammo as well as helping Doom Guy kill enemies.
    • With Hazbin Hotel, of all things. The most likely explanation is that both involving dealing with a glut of corrupt demons, albeit through comically different methods. Either way, there's a lot of fanart that shows Doomguy and Charlie getting along.
    • While it once had a minor Fandom Rivalry with Halo, it turned into this once DOOM (2016) came out, as said reboot had a lot in common with the series (both are FPS featuring green space marines fighting inhuman monsters) while still retaining its own identity. This only grew in 2020 when Microsoft acquired Bethesda, making both first-party Xbox IPs.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Doom wouldn't be the only first-person computer game series to come out of The '90s that had interdimensional demonic beings and various other supernatural aspects in it. Ironically enough, the 2016 reboot was published by Bethesda Softworks, the creators of that other series, and both developers belong to the same company: ZeniMax Media. For extra hilarity, both the original and the 2016 reboot would end up getting published to Nintendo systems.
    • Edge magazine's infamous "If only you could talk to the demons" review of the first Doom came out only a month after Shin Megami Tensei II, the fourth game in a series where you can, as the reviewer wished, talk to the demons and form alliances.
    • Sandy Petersen, who worked as a developer on Doom and Doom II, is also the creator of Call of Cthulhu. Not only did someone later make a Cthulhu Mythos-themed mod (Strange Aeons, for the original Doom), but said mod features Dimensional Shamblers (they are referred in one of the "Quit" message of vanilla Doom).
    • At one point, Doom was installed on more computers than Microsoft Windows, the game was heavily promoted by Microsoft, Bill gates himself appeared inside the game to promote Windows 95 and DirectX and there were even rumors of a buy-out. In September 2020, Microsoft actually acquired Bethesda and by extension, Doom.
    • One of the Compet-n speedrun categories added was the Solonet category (playing coop-mode alone, effectively). When Bethesda made an Updated Re Release of Doom in 2019, this mode was added as "Ultra-Violence+" but with "fast monsters" enabled like in Nightmare! mode. Imagine the difficulty fighting through a hoard of monsters meant to be fought by a team of players but they're hyper-aggressive like on Nightmare! mode.
  • Memetic Badass: The Doomguy. While he's already regarded as a legendary soldier by longtime fans due to his exploits against Hell, his over-the-top portrayal as The Dreaded in the 2016 game caused his reputation to skyrocket to Chuck Norris levels of infamy.
    "Doomguy once threw a grenade and killed 80 demons. Then it exploded."
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "PROTIP: To defeat the Cyberdemon, shoot at it until it dies."
    • The Revenant has become entangled with other skeleton-related memes that circulate the Internet, such as the Agitated Skeleton, the (DOOT) Trumpet Skeleton, and the Spooky Scary Skeletons song.
    • The Godmode cheat code IDDQD has become a major piece of modern gaming culture and is regularly referenced in games, jokes, and is crossbred with other related memes such as the Konami Code. The "Get all weapons, ammo, and keys" cheat code IDKFA is very nearly as popular.
    • The BFG 9000 is such a memorable weapon that it has an entire article about its influence on gaming culture on Know Your Meme. It is also the Trope Namer.
    • The iconic "status bar face" - a protagonist's concerned face displayed on the bottom that makes amusing grimaces depending on circumstances (getting hit by projectile, picking up a weapon, etc); over the years, it became memetic in Doom fandom and a common source of photoshop memes and shout-outs, as well as being referenced in some of the Id Software's own games.
    • The 16-page comic book released to advertise DOOM 1 on PC (DOOM Volume 1 - Knee Deep in the Dead) includes many a line that has since become memetic. DOOM 2016 even has its first spoken phrase include one of the more infamous ones.
    "They are rage; brutal without mercy. But you? You will be worse! Rip and Tear until it is done!"
    • "But can it run Doom?"note 
    • "HERE COMES FLAME BOI" for the Arch-Vile, originated from a humorous Doom mod that turns every sound effect into voiced text to speech, it made it all the way to the Doom Eternal gameplay reveal, where most of the live comments said the phrase upon the appearance of the Arch-Vile.
    • "Unf!"Explanation 
    • "A Bethesda.net account is required to play this title. Please connect to the internet to continue." Explanation 
    • Pogodemon Explanation 
    • "Mother of God, its all toilet sounds!"explanation 
  • Rated M for Money: Alongside with Mortal Kombat, Doom helped codify and originate the mentality that controversy helps games sell.
  • So Bad, It's Good: The comic and the movie.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Excitement for the 2019 re-releases of the first 3 Doom games were tempered by the fact that the games required you to log in to Bethesda.net for the first two games, even to play in single player mode. It didn't take long for the Internet to greet this with both frustration and derision. Bethesda later clarified that it was meant to unlock special content for Doom Eternal by linking with the Slayer's Club, but the mess was already made and the (supposed to be optional) Slayer's Club connectivity is mentioned nowhere in the game itself.
    • The controversy was also not helped by the fact that, at the same time as the ports launched, the Xbox 360 versions of the port were suddenly pulled from the Xbox servers, leading to people accusing Bethesda of deliberately pulling their purchased copies to force them to buy the new (and at the time inferior) ports. Bethesda quickly apologized, claimed it was an accident, and fixed it. The combination of everything surrounding the port and the utter disaster that was Fallout 76 being fresh in people's minds led to people assuming that Bethesda was lying. However, it likely was an accident, and possibly one that Bethesda was Misblamed for, at that. What likely happened was that Bethesda wanted to delist the old versions of the port from the Microsoft store - a fairly common practice when a new re-release of a game comes out, so as to prevent buyer confusion - and the Xbox 360 store, which can be finicky with delistings, fucked up and removed the game from people's purchases.
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    The Original Games 
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • The Spider Mastermind has always been infamous for this. Sandy Petersen admited it was a mistake to have it as the final boss in the original Doom. The main reason is if you have the BFG9000 you can just BFG rush it and win every time; sure it'll rack up damage very fast at point-blank range with its Super Chaingun but it won't instant kill you like the Cyberdemon's rockets will, while its huge body will easily soak up all the BFG tracers and die in a guaranteed two hits. It's even possible to get a One-Hit Kill at near point blank range, as the BFG blast plus all the tracers can deal out over 3000 damage, though this requires getting quite lucky in the original Doom, but in source ports that change how the RNG works it's a lot more common. Even without the BFG it's simple to beat, as you can either stand far away and unload onto it with the Plasma Rifle, where the Mastermind's surprisingly high pain chance will stun lock it enough for you to kill it before it kills you, or as long as you have a piece of cover you can simply pop out, hit it, and then get back behind the cover, repeating until it dies without you ever getting hurt, as the Mastermind has quite a bit of startup to its attack. With how huge and unwieldy the Mastermind is it can even get stuck sometimes, where it's then completely helpless. And having more than one at a time can't make a challenging fight, when since they have a hitscan attack Masterminds will still infight with each other, allowing you to get them to destroy each other. The only way for the Mastermind to be a challenging fight is to have it an open area with no cover and without giving the player a BFG or Plasma Rifle, where it then becomes a blatantly unfair fight as the player can't dodge its hitscan attack, so mappers can't use it in that capacity either.
    • The Cyberdemon can be this in its original Tower Of Babel fight for those that can circle strafe well. Once you get past his giant roar and KATHUNK-KATHUNK-KATHUNK footsteps, he's less of a boss and more of a circle-strafing damage sponge since, unlike the Bruisers, there's only one of him and he hangs out in a much more open arena. His rockets are definitely faster than the fireballs you've been dodging up to this point, but after a while you will find yourself filing them under Painfully Slow Projectiles all the same. Since his rockets hit so hard and have the splash damage effect that can get you hit by their explosions even when you dodge, and he is a lot more mobile than the Mastermind, custom map designers can intentionally design their maps, sometimes cleverly and sometimes not so much, to cut down this issue. Particularly cramped areas with no room to circle strafe and close quarters are scary to fight the Cyberdemon in, as it becomes a lot harder to avoid the rockets and even harder to avoid the splash damage, while you have little room for error as even a Doom Guy with 200% health and armor will die to 2-3 direct rocket hits.
  • Awesome Boss: The original fight with the Cyberdemon. It's got to be about fifty feet tall, with a rocket launcher for an arm and loads of bionics, in a stage where it is often the only enemy, for which you have ammunition and weapons practically thrown at you, and explodes when killed because the ammunition inside it cooks off and detonates, reducing it to a pair of stubs where its legs were.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The finale for the Game Boy Advance edition of Doom shows the ending picture from Ultimate Doom's fourth episode, with the marine carrying the severed head of his unfortunate pet bunny, but it doesn't show the cutscene from episode three that gives the picture its context, leaving new players wondering why the hell Doomguy is just holding some rabbit's head.
  • Breather Level: Map four of Thy Flesh Consumed, "Unruly Evil" will come across as this. While resources aren't plentiful, the enemy count is low with no real dangerous placements nor difficult level sections, and the level on a whole is rather easy. Unruly Evil comes after those two levels and another fairly difficult level.
  • Common Knowledge: There's a common misconception about how the berserk power up works: basically it's a black healing kit which raises your health to 100 (unless it's already higher) as well as massively increases the damage of your punch attack. The confusion comes in with how long it lasts: when you pick it up, the screen turns red for about 20 seconds before fading back to normal. Since every other power-up only lasts for a set amount of time, many people are lead to believe the Berserk Pack's effects only last as long as the screen is red; in fact, you still get powered-up punches until you die or exit the level.
  • Catharsis Factor: Nothing's more satisfying than blowing a zombie's brains out with a shotgun or using a chainsaw to violently dismember a demon. Brutal Doom makes this even more satisfying with Mortal Kombat-esque finishing moves and Ludicrous Gibs flying across the screen, and then profanely taunting your enemies for good measure.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • Dwango5, according to Doomworld. Seventeen DWANGO compilations for a total of over 300 maps, and only the first and, more rarely, seventh maps of Dwango5 saw any play, the latter mostly limited to the time when ZDaemon was the most popular multiplayer source port.
    • Brutal Doom has been hit extremely hard with this, due to the majority of players never trying anything else and loading everything they play with Brutal Doom (and then being turned off when it inevitably doesn't work). Or worse, being completely unaware of any other mods or their accomplishments. It's been common enough that the gamer whose first question is "Is it compatible with Brutal Doom", and then slates a mod if it isn't, has actually become a stock stereotype in the Doom modding community.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Ironically, the Arachnotrons don't quite reach Demonic Spider status, but they certainly straddle the line. They're too easily stunlocked to be a top-tier threat, but if you let them start shooting their plasma rifles can really stack up the damage. In Doom 64, they get a buff, where they fire two plasma shots at once at an even faster rate, allowing them to rack up damage at a crazy high rate, though they also get an even higher pain chance to make them even more easily stunlocked.
    • For ZDoom-users, the Realm667 Bestiary page has many of their own brutal enemies to the table. There's too many to list.
    • A more recent megawad, Valiant, has its fair share of horrible enemies replacing some of the existing Doom II enemies. Super imps and super demons are more or less Goddamned Bats instead.
      • Pyro Knights retain the 500 hitpoints of the bog-standard Hell Knights, but they have two attacks which they can use randomly. One of them where they shoot a stream of four fast and powerful projectiles, and one where they shoot two of those and four super imp fireballs. And these guys start showing up in the second episode onward.
      • Cybruisers also have 500 hitpoints, but they shoot rockets and are immune to splash damage.
      • Arachnrobs are flying arachnotrons without their walking apparatus and retain the stream-shooting tendencies of their on-land bretheren. They start appearing in the fourth map of episode 1. They also have a chance of spawning once an arachnotron goes down. And their plasma's still just as strong. Have fun.
      • Suicide bombers, the zombies in black clothing holding a stick of explosive, are just as durable as imps, and make a beeline straight for you before exploding on your face for heavy damage. And they retain the kamikaze screaming from Serious Sam too. Joy.
      • Super Mancubi, or Daedabi, are the Classic Doom equivalent of Doom 3's mancubi, having nearly as much health as barons of hell. (900, in this case) and they shoot two volleys of six projectiles at a time rather quickly, making dodging difficult and getting in melee range suicidal.
  • Difficulty Spike: Episode 4 of Ultimate Doom is significantly harder than all three prior episodes. Additionally the first two levels of Episode 4 are the most brutal levels in the game due to the extreme scarcity of health and ammo, so the difficulty spike is especially shocking upon starting it.
  • Disappointing Last Level:
    • Megawads that end on an Icon of Sin level (which is the vast majority of them, and includes TNT and Plutonia). Even when Icon of Sin levels can be highly creative and vary greatly, such players will just no clip to attack the boss brain directly or just quit out and consider the megawad beaten. The fact that so many megawads end with an IoS level is another factor in making the Icon of Sin so disliked among a significant portion of the playerbase.
    • In the original Doom, Dis is generally seen as one, being just a small visually-unimpressive one-room arena that just houses the Spider Mastermind and a few other monsters, while the Spider Mastermind is infamous for being seen as a significant stepdown after the Cyberdemon in the previous episode, to the point that even the developers remarked it was a mistake having the Mastermind after the Cyberdemon.
    • Ultimate Doom's final level, Unto the Cruel, is also generally considered one; while unlike Dis it has an actual level leading up to the boss fight, the fact it's against the Spider Mastermind again, in an arena where it's even easier to fight, left a sour taste in many players' mouths. Unto the Cruel is also a significantly easier level than much of what the player contended with in Episode 4.
      • Some go even farther and argue "Thy Flesh Consumed" is a Disappointing Last Chapter, due to the very heavy Difficulty Spike and not always for the right reasons. For instance, many levels start you in rooms cram-packed with enemies, something that was never done even on the hardest maps of the first three chapters, and a sudden much greater emphasis is put on platforming in a game that doesn't have a jump button. Unlike the previous levels, the enemies are teleported into the stage from off-screen too, instead of having them locked in rooms that open after certain tasks are accomplished, further giving them an amatuerish feel. It also features absolutely nothing new from the first three chapters, with even the boss being recycled as mentioned above. It does get its defenders from people who enjoy the far greater challenge though.
    • In the Jaguar, 32X, 3DO, and GBA ports of the original Doom, with the Cyberdemon and Spider Mastermind removed, a new final level was needed, so the Fortress of Mystery was moved from a secret level to the final level, completely unchanged. Now Fortress of Mystery is generally considered the absolute worst level in the original/Ultimate Doom and a complete letdown of a secret level, so needless to say, this applies to these ports.
    • The PlayStation/Saturn ports of Doom have a unique final level not in any other versions of Doom, Redemption Denied. It's an arena level that puts you up against a bunch of Barons initially, but with them grouped up and a large space to easily circle strafe them in while you lob rockets with impunity, they're of little threat. After you kill them all, two closets open up with a Spider Mastermind each, which sounds like it could be really challenging...until you remember the Mastermind uses a hitscan attack and thus they can (and will easily) infight with each other, leaving you with just a single near-death Mastermind to fight at the end.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • The Cyberdemon left a big impression on everyone after their first time encountering him, being so large and intimidating while making a very loud "KATHUNK" for every step he made stalking the player to terrify them, and in their first time through players generally found him really difficult, as their inability to strafe effectively (especially limited by the poor controller options back then) got them absolutely murdered by his rockets that killed in 1-3 hits while the Cyberdemon took seemingly forever to kill. To veteran Doom players with strafing down his original battle in an open area is now a joke of a boss fight and in general the Cyberdemon alone does not suffice for a remotely decent boss fight nowadays, but his initial impression was so strong that he is still one of the most famous video game bosses of all time, and people generally agree that the Cyberdemon would have made a much better final boss than the Spider Mastermind, with even the developers admitting having the Mastermind afterward was a mistake.
    • The Cacodemon is the second most recognizable Doom monster after the Cyberdemon and arguably its most popular, with it being a sort of mascot for the series. Fans particularly find its Ugly Cute design endearing.
    • Daisy the bunny appears only at the end of the third and fourth episodes of the first Doom (as a Tragic Keepsake for Doomguy in the latter), yet she gathered a considerable fanbase. Some fan WADs have her as a living entity.
    • Arch-viles are also very liked among the fanbase for their unique mechanics of attacking the player and reviving the fallen demons.
    • With the proliferation of skeleton memes on the internet, the Revenant got newfound popularity for being pretty much just a basic skeleton with rocket launchers attached that punches you out in a comical manner. Being such a threatening enemy that shoots rockets with ridiculously good homing capabilities has also made it particularly infamous among Doom players. When it finally merged with the skeleton trumpet meme it managed to even become an Ascended Meme.
  • Game-Breaker: Several.
    • The BFG in multi-player, due to the aforementioned ability to fire off a shot in one room, run over to another player, and then hit-scan frag them without them even knowing. They could even kill you first, and still get nailed by the hit-scan! It isn't a pushover in single player either. The high damage and extreme blast radius of its attack could clear an entire room of baddies. Custom level makers may note this and balance levels with hoards of monsters to encourage skillful BFG use.
    • In a more retro tone, the now-ubiquitous mouse and keyboard combo turns the original games' Nightmare! difficulty playable even by a relatively unskilled player, while Ultra-Violence becomes a walk in the park, and it's not exclusive to source ports.note  The monsters were never coded to deal with a player as agile as they are with this combination, even when auto-aim is disabled while playing them through a source port, and are little more than glorified zombies that can fire projectiles, especially when it comes to open areas. The Cyberdemon is a particularly egregious victim due to the ease of circlestrafing. Most custom maps take note of this, and scale the difficulty accordingly.
    • In the ZDoom source ports, if one ports the Sapphire Wand from Hexen into Doom, it completely demolishes the Spider Mastermind since the Sapphire Wand's projectiles rip through enemies, which ends up doing more damage to foes with extremely wide hitboxes such as the Spider Mastermind. It is, however, less effective against the Cyberdemon since it has a thinner hitbox than the Spider Mastermind. In the Massive Multiplayer Crossover Game Mod Samsara, the Sapphire Wand, as used by Parias, was nerfed so that it does not pierce through tougher monsters such as the aforementioned bosses.
  • Genius Bonus:
    • The final level in Episode 3 of the first game is named Dis, after the capital city of Hell in The Divine Comedy.
    • The episode title, as well as the level titles (save for the secret level), of Episode 4 are all taken from The Bible.
  • Genre Turning Point: Doom wasn't the first FPS game, but it was the game that really set the genre on fire. Soon after Doom was released to massive acclaim due to its great gameplay, frightening atmosphere, and revolutionary multiplayer, countless video game developers started developing their own FPS games. Because this was before the term FPS existed, computer gaming magazines referred to these games as "Doom clones."
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • The Lost Souls, plus some enemies from the ZDoom Realm 667 beastiary.
    • The Former Human Commandos/Heavy Weapon Dudes are a huge pain, especially when they are well-placed like in the Mission-Pack Sequel "The Plutonia Experiment". Each bullet only causes between 3-15 damage pointsnote , but this monster fires just as fast as the player can (not good), and won't stop until its either dead, it is hurt by any source of damage, or you're out of its line of sight. If forced out into the open, a platoon of chain gunners can drain your health at an alarming rate.
  • Good Bad Bugs: The id Tech engine Doom runs upon has some amusing 'quirks':
    • Custom level makers discovered that you could spawn 'extra' copies of the player into their levels, that could be used for all sorts of interactive things. Naturally, level designers quickly exploited this to create "voodoo doll" effects that allowed them to create remote kill triggers for instant death traps.
    • Due to the way the game handles textures, it is possible to get a Hall of Mirrors effect under certain circumstances. This effect is actually deliberately utilized in some fanmade mods.
    • In early versions of the game, because of how the game assigns an 'owner' for sources of damage and the monster infighting code, a monster that injures itself by accidentally detonating a barrel with its own ranged attack while trying to hit its original target will end up in a frenzy, killing itself with its own melee attack if it has one or just shooting blindly in all directions if it's a purely ranged attacker. This phenomenon is known as "barrel suicide", and while later versions of the original game fixed it, like several other glitches, some source ports reimplement it because it's hilariously dumb.
    • The rather simplistic physics system for the game means that you can move noticeably faster by running forward and strafing in a direction at the same time.
    • You can clip through gates and gaps by simply walking up against them and using vertical mouse movement to push yourself through them. While it takes a few seconds and may require a few attempts, it's rarely slower than taking the intended path.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: One of the quit messages is "If I were your boss, I'd deathmatch ya in a minute!" A few short years later, the workaholic John Carmack, convinced people weren't working as hard as he was, moved his desk into the hallway of the id Software offices specifically to make sure nobody was wasting company time.
  • Misaimed Fandom: In one of the most infamous cases of this trope, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the perpetrators of the Columbine massacre, were avid fans of the game and even created custom maps for it. Doom was one of many different reasons cited as to what motivated the pair to shoot up their school. The reason this is Misaimed Fandom is because the Doomguy refuses to shoot unarmed civilians, and straight up assaulted the officer who ordered him to do so in the backstory.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: The "Power-up Get!" gong sound in the first two games.
    • The first time you charge up and blast the BFG, that electrical crackle and whoosh of its discharge will satisfy you most immensely as that horde of demons just melts from the blast wave.
    • The sound of a shotgun cocking each time you pick up a weapon (even if it isn't a shotgun).
    • The death rattles of the Baron of Hell, Cyberdemon, and Spider Mastermind.
    • The double-barreled shotgun. Any game.
    • The WHAAAARRGARBL of an expiring Arch-Vile is quite awesome too.
    • That nice pulpy sound of something or someone being gibbed (so long as it isn't yourself).
    • The first time you rev up that chainsaw. You know that your best friend has arrived.
    • Samuel Hayden's voice in the 2016 game.
    • You reach the end of a long and brutal level, and press the switch. *ka-thunk!* DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN!
    • The dying snort of a Pinky Demon is oddly satisfying, especially if you punched it out.
  • Narm Charm: The deep voice declaring your victory at the end of the PS1 version is clearly artificially deepened and is delivered in a lovably Evil Is Hammy Troll tone, but coupled with the triumphantly sinister fanfare it plays over...it all just works so well for a balls-off-the-wall action game like Doom. It can also be a breath of fresh air after being treated to ominous ambience for most of the game.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Tons of it. Doom specializes in this trope even in spite of being relatively lighthearted Black Comedy.
    • The Icon of Sin is a gigantic demonic head embedded in a wall, rods and wires implanted in his skull. The center of his forehead is pulled open to reveal a burning portal, dropping one spawn cube after another. The rather literal crown jewel of the piece is the internal entity and weak point - the odd sight of John Romero's head on a pike.
      • The Icon of Sin's greeting message sounds even creepier in the custom megawad Alien Vendetta.
    • In source ports with the aforementioned "Ouch Face", it's pretty funny the first time you see the Doomguy's expression when he takes high damage. As his health drops lower and lower, though, and the "Ouch Face" is triggered, you get to see the Doomguy's facial injuries in all its glory, including lacerations, with blood still dripping from them.
  • Paranoia Fuel: In one of the closing scenes, by the point when you've gotten used to all the jump-scares that the game throws at you... there's a level where NOTHING comes out.
    • In E2M5, there's a marble wall with an alien face that damages you, just for standing in front of it. That texture shows up a lot in other levels, and each time you see it, you'll wonder if it's going to damage you, too. In reality, it's actually a damaging floor in disguise, but still...
  • Polished Port:
    • The original Xbox version of The Ultimate Doom and Doom II included in Doom 3: Limited Collector's Edition and Resurrection of Evil (the latter also includes the Master Levels of Doom II) are near-faithful ports of the PC version. Unlike the other console ports, nothing was sacrificed during the transition, they run on a decent frame-rate, and includes a new secret level for each game. There are some game-breaking bugs however (e.g. potential crashes, being trapped in certain areas of a map or stuck in objects), and due how cheat codes were handled, players may accidentally activate a cheat while holding the sprint button. The HD version on Xbox LIVE Arcade fixes many of issues of the original Xbox version while giving these games a higher native resolution, uses the Gravis Ultrasound music, added online multi-player, and in Doom II's case, features an all-new "No Rest for the Living" episode. Unfortunately the Wolfenstein 3D levels were censored, and the red medical crosses were removed. These ports were also included as part of Doom 3: BFG Edition and the PlayStation 3-exclusive Doom Classic Complete compilation; the latter also includes Final Doom and Master Levels of Doom II.
    • The PlayStation version combined both Doom and Doom II into one, featured new lighting effects, and changed the rockin' soundtrack for some dark and ambient music that make it feel like a horror game. And while there are some things missing here and there a la the Jaguar version (mainly for performance reasons), such as the lack of the Arch-Vile and Icon of Sin, the port makes up for it by adding in new visual changes that are really cool and really add to the atmosphere, like the sky in the Hell maps being an animated wall of flame. It also featured Doom II monsters in the original Doom when played on Ultra-Violence.
    • While extremely poorly received at launch, the 2019 suite of portsnote  eventually became this thanks to a set of patches. For starters, it's the first official version of the game to run at 60 FPS — every other version prior, including the DOS original, ran at 35 FPS. In addition, the resolution is doubled from 320x200 to 640x400, implemented quick-saving and quick-loading, cheats are available (unlike the XBLA/PS3 versions), a weapon carousel was added to make weapon switching much easier on controller, and an "Add-Ons" section was added that allowed for players to download a set of curated community WADs for free — launching with No Rest for the Living, both halves of Final Doom, and SIGIL. In addition, the PC and Android versions support the ability to import custom WADs. Another patch would go even further to implement 16:9 widescreen presentation with the option for the original 4:3 presentation, gyro motion controller support, revamped deathmatch multiplayer, a new Ultra Violence+ difficulty, and DeHackEd support for mods among other improvements. The only major drawback is that the multiplayer is split-screen only, unlike the XBLA/PS3 versions.
  • Porting Disaster: Doom has been ported to all sorts of systems, some of which couldn't really handle a game of its size and complexity all that well. This often resulted in extremely pixellated graphics, shortened and sometimes removed levels, missing weapons, fewer types of enemies and removed frames of animation for them. The last one led to "crab-walking" enemies that faced the player constantly, meaning it was impossible to sneak up on them and very difficult to trick them into damaging one another.
    • The SNES and Sega 32X versions are considered the worst of these: The SNES version gets props for being made in the first place, and sported a few pros such as an awesome soundtrack, full enemy roster, the least amount of cut levels, all power-ups, the least simplified maps, a proto-Sniper Rifle (the shotgun still fired multiple pellets but they had no spread whatsoever), and a spiffy red cartridge, but also had the graphical problems mentioned above in addition to no circle-strafing. The 32X version, however, despite appearing on an allegedly more advanced system, was even worse: terrible musicnote , and losing more levels than any other port (only the first two episodes are ported, and it only has both of their secret levels on a technicality, as the second episode's secret level outright replaces "Tower of Babel"), and both the Cyberdemon and the Spider Mastermind monsters. The remaining levels were also haphazardly gutted, sometimes making it impossible to get a 100% score since items and enemies had been left in removed areas of the maps. The BFG is technically programmed into the game, but is impossible to get because every location it would have appeared in has been cut and the developers didn't add any pick-ups for it anywhere else.
    • The Sega Saturn version of the game, despite being on a more advanced system than the 32X, is an absolute mess. It suffers from horrible frame-rate issues and jerky and unresponsive controls with a questionable control scheme that makes it almost unplayable. This was due to Executive Meddling from John Carmack, who absolutely refused to let the Saturn version use hardware rendering since, while the Saturn's specs would have allowed the game to run at 60 FPS, it resulted in texture warping, which was a deal-breaker as far as he was concerned; the quick-fix to this was to hastily reprogram the 32X port's renderer, with disastrous results. The American (but not the European and Japanese) version also axes the multiplayer. And some of the sound effects are lower quality than the other versions.
    • The 3DO Interactive Multiplayer version comes dangerously close to being the very worst, thanks to being headed by someone who had no idea how difficult it was to port games between systems (he gave a single programmer ten weeks to make the port with nothing more than jpeg images of some assets and a copy of Ultimate Doom). In addition to cutting the same levels and monsters as the Jaguar and GBA versions, it also has serious frame-rate issues. You can either shrink the screen down (making it virtually impossible to see anything without bunching up to the TV), or you could make the window bigger (which caused the frame rate to drop into single digits at points). The only thing saving it is the awesomely remixed soundtrack, which is itself brought down by the fact that so many levels were cut that a lot of tracks go unused.
    • The Atari Jaguar version is pretty decent for a console port (Romero, Carmack, and id Software developed the Jaguar version themselves, and many of the console ports are based on this version), but it contains no in-game music because the sheer computing load on the console's co-processor precluded it from playing the music.
    • The Game Boy Advance versions of Doom and Doom II manage to subvert this. Despite having a lower framerate, low-res visuals, altered levels, bowdlerization of the blood/gore, and being released on a handheld console, they both manage to be remarkably well-done ports considering the GBA's limitations and impressive additions to the system's library of first-person shooters.
    • While many leagues better than the aforementioned ports from the '90s, the 2019 ports of Doom and Doom II for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and mobile Android systems were, on launch, inexplicably inferior to the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and even original Xbox versions. For one, they required a mandatory login with a Bethesda account to even be played, which tended to cause problems when using the respective console's sleep mode (which require one to reboot the game to fix). Lacking any kind of online features at launch, with even the multiplayer being split-screen only, people were baffled at the requirement — turns out, it existed solely to activate an Old Save Bonus in the then-upcoming Doom Eternal, a feature which was probably not worth the hassle. In addition to this, the game was improperly scaled to a 16:10 aspect ratio (as opposed to increasing the field of view or a similar solution), resulting in a stretched, warped picture. The ports also emulated shadows incorrectly, leading to some areas (such as the dark room in E1M3) appearing much brighter than intended. To top it all off, the sounds appeared to be recorded from the MIDI files and played back incorrectly (as opposed to simply emulating them), leading to slowed-down music and sound effects.note  Fortunately, Nerve Software eventually patched out almost all of the problems with the port — removing the mandatory login in one update, fixing the lighting and repairing the sounds and music in another, and finally fixing the aspect ratio and adding a whole lot more — ultimately putting these versions into the opposite trope.
  • The Scrappy:
    • The Spider Mastermind is rather unpopular with Doom fans, with it being mocked for its boss fights being complete jokes and for its rather silly design that isn't intimidating like the Cyberdemon and Barons nor Ugly Cute like the Cacodemon and the second game's Arachnotrons. Among custom map makers it's also by far the least-used stock enemy in WADs, not counting the Icon Of Sin/Boss Brain, as with it being a huge Damage Sponge hitscan attacker that will get stuck often, it's pretty much impossible to make it into a challenging boss fight without making it outright unfair for the player, and with its qualities it can't really be used well as a normal enemy or Elite Mook, as it can be either easily ignored, just get BFG blasted, or will really slow the gameplay down. It's not an uncommon view among Doom mappers and players that there's "no good way to use the Mastermind", and otherwise it's generally agreed the Mastermind is the hardest Doom enemy to use properly.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The Pistol, after the chain gun is picked up. You'd expect the Chaingun to be less accurate due to being a faster-firing minigun, but repeatedly tapping the fire button lets you fire accurate double shots for sniping, using the pistol's ammo. This is one reason why weapon mods may try to replace the pistol with a viable starting weapon (such as Brutal Doom's assault rifle), or enhance it (like Project Brutality adding both a Guns Akimbo option, as well as a Suppressor to make it a stealth weapon).
    • The Chainsaw is iconic, but as a weapon it's pretty damn bad. First being a melee weapon, running in to saw an enemy to death leaves you way more vulnerable than just keeping your distance and shooting them, and if you're trying to stunlock an enemy to death the chaingun has the same rate of fire and pretty much the same DPS as the chainsaw but doesn't require you to get in an enemy's face to hit them. Then you can't really use the chainsaw on anything bigger than Cacodemon; due to buggy hit detection in vanilla Doom the chainsaw fails to properly latch onto wide enemies like Arachnotrons, while Revenants' and Mancubi's pain chance are low enough that you can't reliably stunlock them with the chainsaw without them hitting through, then you have no chance to stunlock Hell Knights, Barons, and Archviles with their especially low pain chances, and trying to chainsaw a Cyberdemon and Mastermind is flat-out suicidal. The only real practical use of the chainsaw is to save you some ammo against Pinkies and maybe the occasional solitary Caco, but as an ammo saver the chainsaw is outclassed by the Berserk Fist, which once you learn how to safely weave in and time your punches with your weaves, you can use it much more safely against those bigger enemies that the chainsaw can't safely stunlock, and kill enemies faster than the Chainsaw can too.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: The first game was credited with popularizing the entire FPS genre, creating the A Space Marine Is You formula, garnering attention for its shocking violence, and introducing game modding. Naturally, some would draw unfavorable comparisons by modern standards. Many younger shooter fans would consider its gameplay to be simplistic and its story to be lazily shoehorned compared to likes of Halo and BioShock. Likewise, while Doom garnered much infamy during the 90s for its violence, modern graphics can depict far more realistic and disturbing acts of violence.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: Compet-N has several categories for these, with others rising from the command line parameters for different source ports:
    • UV Speed
    • UV Max - 100% kills & secrets
    • NM Speed
    • NM100S - Nightmare, 100% secrets
    • UV -fast - 100% kills & secrets with faster and more aggressive monsters
    • UV -respawn - 100%+ kills & secrets with respawning enemies, can be combined with the -fast parameter to simulate Nightmare mode without the double ammo bonus)
    • UV Tyson - 100% kills and secrets using only the fist, berserk fist, chainsaw, and pistol
    • UV Pacifist - Speed run without attacking any enemies directly (with your weapons) or indirectly (by blowing up barrels or activating crushers). Infighting is still permitted, though.
    • UV Reality - Complete a level without taking any damage (since getting shot in real life will kill you) or using the plasma rifle or the BFG (since those weapons don't exist in real life)
    • UV Solo-Net - Solo play with co-op monster sets, featuring extra enemies and even extra boss enemies (Masterminds and Cyberdemons) that weren't there even on the hardest difficulties in normal solo play.
  • So Bad, It's Good:
    • The (in)famous FIREBLU texture which is essentially an animated red-fire over an ultramarine-like blue wall in a vaguely web-like pattern. It's such an out of place texture yet appears surprisingly frequently in some levels, particularly maps designed by Sandy Petersen. The vividness clashes so badly with overall quality of most textures that the texture has memetic status as having a charm of its own; you can find merchandise with the texture printed on it even!
    • Even though "E3M8: Dis" may be seen as a letdown for the final level of the episode, it can be amusing that the only forces that the Spider Mastermind could muster were two Cacodemons and a Baron of Hell. Players playing through the entire episode are also likely to have the BFG and pulling off a One-Hit Kill on the boss can feel so comical. Even without a BFG like starting the level with a pistol start, the Plasma Gun leaves her in a Cycle of Hurting and barely a threat.
    • Due to poor usage of the system's audio chips, the 32x port (see Porting Disaster)'s soundtrack, in the words of The Angry Video Game Nerd, "sounds like shit", both figuratively and literally, arguably the worst possible version of the game's music. But regardless, it led to many people mocking the tracks as a Taco Bell orchestra, one fellow even going the extra mile and creating...this.note 
    • And for some people, the four novels based on the original game. The demons were changed to aliens and the Doomguy was forced to have a female Marine tagging along with him, then her plus a Mormon soldier and a teenager on Earth. That's ignoring how the third and fourth books really went off on a tangent about faith and the soul.
  • So Cool, It's Awesome: The premise of the original game has you play as a Space Marine being sent to Mars to kill demons, with nothing but a Hyperspace Arsenal. The second game takes this to even higher levels, where it has you saving the world!
  • Special Effect Failure: The Windows port, Doom95 (which incorporates Doom, Doom II, Ultimate Doom and Final Doom) makes full use of Windows' facilities, including using hardware acceleration (where available) to implement the "partial invisibility" effect. Unfortunately, on some graphics cards this didn't work properly, and Spectres (and players using the Partial Invisibility power-up) are even more conspicuous than other creatures. Modern computers don't always make it work properly either. Lampshaded in the Doom95 manual: "Due to all of this new hardware tech, the previously-nearly-invisible Spectres are now in the realm of sorta-invisible. To make up for the difference, please close your eyes when you encounter them."
  • Speedrun: These games developed one of the earliest online speedrunning fanbases.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: Technically, to Aliens (since it was originally meant to be based on the film) with a good amount of the Evil Dead trilogy thrown in.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: The intro of "At Doom's Gate" sounds awfully similar to the intro riff in Maria Magdalena, of all songs.
    • Of course, the most obvious song it sounds like is Painkiller, to the point you have to wonder how they never got sued.
    • Compare the opening riff to the one from Ronnie James Dio's "Shut up and Shout" from '83. Notice anything?
  • Tear Jerker:
  • That One Level:
    • "E2M6: Halls of the Damned" is a drag the first time playing it without a strategy guide. The goal is to obtain all three keys to open the exit near the start, but two of the keys are buried deep in the halls. The major threat is a maze region with a Lovecraftian layout, and some nasty monster ambushes. The night-vision goggles placed through out the level help a lot here. There is also a nasty Kaizo Trap deep within the level.
    • "E3M5: Unholy Cathedral", mostly because even the most efficient path through the level still requires you to go through almost every room, slowly slogging your way through several Pinkies and Cacos. Not helping matters is trying to find that efficient path, since it requires figuring out which of the several teleporters in the central courtyard takes you where you need to go.
    • "E3M7: Limbo" is not heavily populated, but is made difficult by a teleport puzzle that must be solved by crossing mandatory "hurt-floors" with a finite supply of hazard suit power-ups. The first time in this level will probably be very confusing, with the player wondering how the hell they raise the bridge to the exit door. Much of this level is figuring out where the numerous teleport pads lead.
    • In Episode Four of Ultimate Doom, "E4M1: Hell Beneath" and "E4M2: Perfect Hatred" are infamous for their difficulty:
      • Hell Beneath is a short level with not that high of an enemy count, but it's the first level of the episode (so you must Pistol start it) and has a severe lack of resources (there's only 9 health bonuses for health (a total of 109% health you'll have for the level), a suit of green armor with 12 armor bonuses (a total of 112% armor for the level), and not enough ammo to kill all the Hell Barons unless you can get them grouped together to spread out enough damage with your 12 rockets).
      • Perfect Hatred, while not lacking in resources like the previous level, is usually considered the most difficult level in Ultimate Doom. It's a compact level where you must constantly jump over lava pits while being assaulted from all around you with no cover, with powerful enemies placed in the most inconvenient of places (there are 12 Barons in the level, all fought in either tight spaces or on little ground to maneuver on). The exploitation of two design oversights (grabbing the BFG through the wall it's behind to obtain it significantly earlier, and skipping a large portion of the level by exploiting a jump to access the last area without the blue key) are pretty much required for many normal players to beat the level on Ultra-Violence difficulty, and few can beat the level on Nightmare without utilising those exploits.
    • E4M6: Against Thee Wickedly also contends with the aforementioned two levels for most difficult level in Ultimate Doom. The main feature of the level is a teleporter that the player must use to access different parts of the level. However entering the teleporter from different directions teleports the player to different areas, and the teleporter is located in a large lava pool, while the level in general forces the player to run through lava at frequent points, meaning the player will regularly be taking unavoidable damage trying to figure the level out. The level is additionally large and complex while the teleporter is unintuitive and takes a while to figure out, leading to a ton of unavoidable damage for those who don't know the right path and an effective time limit on figuring the level out. On top of that, resources and radsuits are very limited and spread out, while the opposition is nearly as strong as in the rest of E4 (including a mandatory Cyberdemon fight at the end on a small ledge, though this can be mitigated with a secret BFG and invulnerability that be used to easily defeat it).
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Being a PC exclusive was a massive boon to it in the visuals department. Back in those days, fully-3D games were expected to look like the original Star Fox, with visible polygons numbering in the dozens at best and flat colors over everything. For its day, Doom was basically Crysis.
  • Win Back the Crowd: The 2019 Unity ports of the first two Doom games by Nerve Software were initially reviled for not only being shipped with a plethora of problems that drew unfavorable comparisons to previous console ports of the past, but also implementing an always-online DRM that forces players to sign up for a Bethesda.net account to even play the games. Since then they took the criticism of the ports to heart and eventually removed the game's DRM and rectified the port's issues. Rather than leaving the ports at that, however, the developers continued adding new features and updates to the classic Doom games, effectively turning them from one of the worst ports of Doom to one of the best.

    The Comic Book 
  • Awesome Ego: Holy shit, the Doomguy. He's "a man and a half" through and through.

    The First Film 
  • Anti-Climax Boss: The Hell Knight is established early in the film to be the biggest and baddest creature that Grimm's team encounter on Mars, and single-handedly goes on an unopposed rampage through the facilities on both Mars and Earth. Yet when John faces it half-way through the FPS sequence, it gets unceremoniously blown away in a matter of seconds, and we're instead left with the newly-transformed Pinky and Ax-Crazy Sarge to provide the ending conflict for both the FPS sequence and movie, respectively.
  • Awesome Music: While the film itself was controversial with the fandom, to say the least, the track "First-Person Shooter" has enjoyed praise from even the film's staunchest critics, for being a kickass metal track that fits Doom like a glove. It's even become a popular choice for fanmade WAD soundtracks.
  • Critical Research Failure: Sam claims that "ten percent of the human genome is still unmapped." Mapping of the human genome was finished in 2003.
    • The premise of the creatures in the movie actually being former humans transformed by an outside force makes it seem that the writers either knew or cared very little about the game's premise. While the Doom games did feature enemies that fit that sort of criteria, they were still only a small and relatively insignificant portion compared to the bulk of the game's antagonists, which were interdimensional demons that were brought to Mars by a botched teleporter experiment.
      • Amusingly enough, it becomes a slight Mythology Gag with the reveal in Doom Eternal that that is exactly what Demons are, races drained of their souls to be turned into Argent Energy, which start off as the Zombies but eventually mutate into the demons we all know them as.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Most people want to watch this movie for the first-person shooting scene.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Sarge crosses it when he orders The Kid to kill the uninfected UAC personnel, and then shoots him when he refuses.
  • Narm
    • Sarge's spontaneous Camp attitude when he becomes Ax-Crazy.
    • When Sarge is pulled away by the monsters, he yells: "I am not supposed to die!" which is followed by a very awkward scream as he is dragged away from the heroes. Really, Sarge?
    • The constant awkward references to Hell and demons when the plot writes out any actual relation to either of those things.
  • Older Than They Think: One of the complaints towards the movie was that it focused on The Squad instead of a One-Man Army like in the game. However, the Doom Bible by Tom Hall reveals that the original Doom was also supposed to focus on different members of a squad of Marines before they were all replaced in the final product by Doomguy.
  • Periphery Demographic: Outside of its original audience of fans of the game and more typical action movie viewers, the film also became a cult classic in certain fandom circles because of John and Sam's relationship having something of an incesty vibe.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: Sam and John are twins, but tend to come across more as estranged lovers rather than brother and sister.
  • Signature Scene: The first-person sequence, which is generally regarded as the highlight of the film even by its many detractors.
  • So Okay, It's Average: It's not necessarily an awful movie and watchable enough by video-game movie standards, but the loose relation to the source material in terms of plot, setting, and characters leaves it feeling like a big-budget version of a Sci-Fi Channel original that could have easily skated by without using the Doom license at all. There's a good reason the first-person sequence is widely considered the best part of the film.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: An experiment conducted by an amoral corp backfires and causes horrible mutations, then a team of elite badass soldiers are sent to clean the mess and suffer great casualties... Despite being an official adaptation of Doom, the plot is much close to a Resident Evil in space.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!: The film plays out more like a Resident Evil movie with a space setting, likely because the filmmakers were trying to cash in on the success of the latter's then-recent film series.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Not only were the resources to make this movie wasted on a plot that had nothing to do with the actual game, but even the movie completely fails to take advantage of its Mars setting or give a proper explanation as to why a Martian retrovirus would change some people into superhumans but others into monsters based on how "good" or "evil" they are. And even though teleporters are established and used prominently in the movie, they aren't even what bring the creatures to Mars.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously: The film is most charitably considered a mediocre Cliché Storm video game adaptation movie, but one thing reviewers all noticed was how good Dwayne Johnson is as the leading man. Despite a howlingly dumb script where the central twist is him becoming a crazy zombie with bad makeup stuck on his face, he injects a lot of humanity into it, showing cracks in the mask while still being likeable, and making the descent into madness convincing. This was early enough in Johnson's career that he was still being credited as "The Rock", so was probably the role that showed studios how strong an actor he actually was.
  • Video Game Movies Suck: Despite a solid budget, big-name draw and being violent enough for an R rating, the assessment is that it's either So Bad, It's Good for how it craps badass all over the place, start to finish, or a complete fail for having next to nothing to do with any of the Doom storylines. Its actors are certainly giving it all they've got, and it has that rockin' FPS sequence and music.
    • Roger Ebert's review for the movie provides the quote for this trope's page.

    The Novels 
  • Broken Base: Are the novels good for what they are, taking an Excuse Plot and moving it in a neat new direction that will forever keep it distinct in the franchise, or are they a dumpster fire of too much creative freedom completely warping the entire point of Doom into yet another '90s sci-fi novel with "demons" on the cover?
  • Fanon Discontinuity: When fans talk about this series, they'll usually only recommend the first book, maybe even the second. Mostly because while it's apparent that at least one of the authors personally played the original Doom, everything beyond that took such a massive swerve from anything in the games and loose canon that the books became more of a punchline than anything taken seriously.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: During the L.A mission, Arlene's weapon of choice is the 'AB-10 Machine Pistol'. The AB-10 is actually an alternative name for the TEC-9 Pistol, made famous by gang culture (hence the probable inclusion of it during the LA mission) but also made infamous for its use in the Columbine High School massacre. The Doom games were blamed as a scapegoat for the shooting, since the perpurtrators were fans, and one of them even made custom levels for the games.
  • Older Than They Think: Giving the Doomguy a distinct name, identity and personality happened long before the movie or the like with this series. Flynn Taggart became a surprisingly consistent go-to name for modders writing plotlines and characters.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: The third book already started getting weird with the revelation of the Freds, but the fourth goes straight to bizarre territory as it juggles existentialism alongside a plot that dives headfirst into a double Gainax Ending territory without much reason behind anything.

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