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  • Actor Shipping: Henry Cavill, Gal Gadot and Ben Affleck have all received copious shipping from the fanbase, more so than the characters they portray. Gal Gadot accidentally fueled the flames herself. In a cast interview, she said that she and Amy Adams had become close during the production of Batman V Superman, even having a family sleepover with their children. Due to her still developing grasp of English, Gadot said she had slept with Adams, raising a few eyebrows from the other actors.
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    • Following criticism over the overly-dark tone of the first two films, the creators involved with the setting have clarified that subsequent works in the setting will be more hopeful and funnier. The marketing went out of its way to assure fans that Suicide Squad would have humor even if its protagonists are amoral villains.
    • For those who weren't impressed by Wonder Woman's suit in Batman v Superman, her solo movie features a much more vibrant color-scheme, reflecting her once idealistic attitude.
    • The efforts to move away from Zack Snyder's original somber vision in Man of Steel and Batman v Superman, as manifested most clearly in the theatrical cut of Justice League, is seen as this by some viewers while it has had the opposite effect for others.
    • Some of the main issues of the franchise were the production shenanigans caused by knee-jerk executive reactions following the critical meltdown of Batman v Superman and the lack of communication that led to its bad image and the proliferation of negative or downright ludicrous rumors. After the 2018 reshuffle, directors like James Wan and David F. Sandberg have taken a more proactive engagement with fans to clarify concerns and assuage them. And there hasn't been any report of troubled production since Justice League.
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  • Base-Breaking Character: Superman. In both Man of Steel and Batman v Superman, he's more morose and somber rather than his usual depiction as an all-loving idealistic hero. Many fans, especially those of the Christopher Reeve Superman films, dislike this Superman's personality, feeling that it betrays the character's appeal as a symbol of hope. Conversely, some fans are more welcoming since it feels appropriate for an inexperienced protagonist faced with difficult decisions in a harsh world, and it has roots in some comics.
  • Broken Base:
    • Man of Steel, Batman v Superman and Justice League are extremely polarizing due to, in a word, tone. Ever since Man of Steel, DC Universe fans have been divided over the Darker and Edgier approach to the source material. While some have rejected the films outright as too off base, others are willing to deal with it, often just to see their stuff on screen at the end of the day. Still others have embraced the approach because of the contrast with the Marvel Cinematic Universe in particular, and Zack Snyder has a fanbase on his own. Then there are fans who only care about having good movies regardless of the tone they use, pointing out that gritty, serious superhero movies like The Dark Knight Trilogy and Logan work because they use a dark tone to tell interesting stories with relatable characters.
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    • The DC fans who like or at least tolerate the films are then divided over having Justice League and future films be Lighter and Softer. Some feel being "more fun" would only invite wider positive reception. Others feel that Warner Bros. should stick to their guns and that the DCEU's tone makes it stand out from the MCU and other superhero films, and without it they fear superhero films becoming too "safe" and "samey". The studio-imposed tonal shift of Suicide Squad and Justice League, along with the hiring of James Gunn of Guardians of the Galaxy fame for the Suicide Squad sequel, has only accentuated the dividenote .
    • While many people were looking forward to see so many new characters introduced in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, others think it was another sign of DC rushing things just to compete with Marvel, without giving each character a much needed introduction movie first. The same sentiments are true for Justice League. The counterargument to this is that "the MCU way" isn't and shouldn't be the only way to handle cinematic superheroes. The X-Men series didn't start with solo introduction movies before going to team stories, and even the MCU has team members like Black Widow, Falcon, Vision and others never had their own movie despite being Avengers members (add to that Black Panther and Spider-Man were introduced in ensemble movies as well). Related to the characters' introductions, much-needed scenes detailing the backstories of Aquaman, Flash and Cyborg were simply axed from the theatrical cut of Justice League, which didn't help matters.
    • The hiring of James Gunn to helm the Suicide Squad sequel has won over a number of fans who had previously been unenthusiastic about the prospect of another Suicide Squad movie after the mixed results of the first one. On the other hand, some DCEU fans have expressed concerns about his history of making problematic tweets (never mind the fact that Gunn apologized for such actions repeatedly). Then again, some Snyder fans are looking forward to Gunn's involvement since they did collaborate on Dawn of the Dead (2004).
  • The Chris Carter Effect: The franchise had many plot threads that weren't properly resolved largely due to Executive Meddling made in response to a lack of audience interest. The Sequel Hook set up in Batman v Superman (the Knightmare sequence, the Darkseid nods, Flash's warnings) mostly became aborted arcs and most of Justice League retconned parts of Batman v Superman.
  • "Common Knowledge": Warner Bros. attempting to achieve True Art Is Angsty by making the DCEU as somber as possible, when by all accounts they just gave the reins to Zack Snyder and David S. Goyer and let them do their thing to kickstart it. After Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice went for even Darker and Edgier than Man of Steel, the amount of negative critical and audience reception prompted the studio to rather drastically steer away from this approach for Justice League once Snyder left for personal reasons (and he received plenty of executive notes even before that). Wonder Woman meanwhile was never intended to go that route, and neither were Aquaman and SHAZAM!. While two of the early movies did end up victims of extreme Executive Meddling to enforce tonal changes (to underwhelming results), the DCEU is intended as a sandbox giving more creative leeway to the directors than, for instance, Marvel Studios does. Directors that come after Snyder are not obligated to stick with the tone of Man of Steel and Batman v Superman — James Wan chose to make Aquaman back in 2015, and he made it clear he was going to have it emulate adventure movies of old, thus being Lighter and Softer than the Snyder movies by design from the get-go.
  • Complete Monster: General Erich Ludendorff & Steppenwolf. See those pages for details.
  • Creator Worship:
    • Fans of Zack Snyder's other movies generally offer the same level of adoration to him here. Said fans also tend to praise the projects in the setting that he's only producing, such as Wonder Woman. Likewise, even some of his most ardent critics have begrudgingly praised his several of his casting choices like Ben Affleck as Batman, Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman and Jason Momoa as Aquaman.
    • Conversely, Patty Jenkins, James Wan and David F. Sandberg are widely adored by fans for making the protagonists likable and embracing the whimsical pop sensibilities of the source material. Patty Jenkins is praised for proving the viability of female-directed tentpole movies. Likewise, James Wan is respected for successfully taking Aquaman out of his Joke Character reputation and David F. Sandberg was praised for perfectly blending Shazam's Golden Age cheese with modern sensibilities.
  • Critical Backlash: Man of Steel, Batman v Superman, Suicide Squad and Justice League have gotten such a negative reception and people who don't like them have been near-obsessive in expressing their dislike at every opportunity and doing so in a very vitriolic manner that it's pretty much inevitable that many viewers will watch the films and come away with a far more positive opinion. This is especially noticeable with Batman v Superman and its extended edition. Even people who didn't like the film are getting sick of the negativity and some fans' refusal to give the film and/or Zack Snyder credit or praise where it's deserved, such as his decision to cast Gal Gadot, which proved instrumental in the success of the Wonder Woman film.
  • Critical Dissonance: Man of Steel, Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, Suicide Squad, Justice League and Aquaman got significantly better ratings by audiences than they did with critics on websites like Rotten Tomatoes. That said Aquaman has received largely positive critical reviews, so it has a milder case of this.
  • Critic-Proof: Critics have not been kind with the first three films and Justice League, giving them mixed to negative reviews. Audiences were undeterred... initially at least:
    • Batman v Superman pulled in an impressive domestic total of $170,100,000 on its opening weekend... only to lead into a massive drop-off in the following weekend due to bad word of mouth. The domestic total landed at a respectable, but not stupendous, $330 million, falling short of studio expectations.
    • Suicide Squad meanwhile pulled in very good numbers for a comic book property that is new to live action films, it remained on top of the box office for three consecutive weeks (and, despite the fact that the critically acclaimed animated film Sausage Party provided some competition at the box office, not even that topped Suicide Squad), and practically equaled the domestic gross of Batman v. Superman despite being, yet again, a piñata for critics.
    • Justice League is the first to fail at this, not even cracking 100 million the first weekend and wrapping up at around $660 million total in the face of mixed to negative reviews, possibly due to audience goodwill being lost due to Batman v Superman (or the reverse, fans of the latter feeling cheated by the brutal, uneven and short-sighted changes brought about by Joss Whedon out of Executive Meddling) and Suicide Squad (even though it was successful at the box office, it still suffered a significant second week drop and audience criticism of the DCEU grew even greater), or negative word of mouth due to the short running time, change of composer for the soundtrack and instances of Special Effect Failure. Due to the massive budget and high expectations, it was the first DCEU film to lose money. The marketing effort was also significantly lacking compared to the massive ones that Man of Steel and Batman v Superman benefited from.
  • Don't Shoot the Message: Both fans and critics have run into this trope as there are undeniably legitimately good arguments to be made both in criticizing the films and defending them as well as in pointing out flaws in how the films have been reviewed and covered but the poor behavior of others on both sides makes any kind of respectful discourse very difficult.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception: Blaming DC Comics for the DCEU's shortcomings when they don't call the shots. Warner Bros. does. (Marvel Comics isn't in charge of the MCU either; Marvel Studios is its own company under Disney. Despite this, "Marvel" and "DC" tend to be talked about like they're monolithic entities.)
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • A quite vicious one with fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, especially since the latter has been the critics' darling for years, while the first three DCEU movies and Justice League (2017) have received a mixed reception at best and been outright panned at worst.
      • Certain comments by DC film creators that seemed to dismiss the MCUnote  didn't help matters.
      • Some DCEU fans themselves ended up goading some cast and crewnote  into making "Fuck Marvel" statements, which of course stoked the fires even more.
      • This got especially heated when Jake Gyllenhaal, who was heavily rumored to be courted as Ben Affleck's replacement as Batman, signed on as Mysterio in the sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming. Quite a few people jeered at DCEU fans over Gyllenhaal supposedly choosing the MCU over the DCEU. On the flip side, some DCEU fans took it as a tentative sign that Ben Affleck (who had kept quiet throughout) would be staying, though this ultimately proved to be incorrect.
    • A rather large one with the TV-based Arrowverse. Some fans of Arrow think the show is so far a better adaptation than Man of Steel, so combining their universes would be detrimental to the show (and to The Flash), while some fans of Man of Steel instead see Arrow as the weaker, detrimental adaptation. The well-received The Flash (2014) was well-received by those who hated Man of Steel for embracing a more balanced, lighthearted tone compared to Man of Steel's more polarizing tone, and some felt that Man of Steel should have had that tone instead. Shortly after The Flash had a well-received debut, Warner Brothers announced the casting of the Flash along with its planned movie line-up. Fans were quick to negatively compare the movie Flash Ezra Miller to the TV Flash Grant Gustin.
      • Another major part of this is that the DCEU is given preference on every single character they want to use, which at times has even forced the Arrowverse to kill off characters like Deadshot and Amanda Waller. With the 'verse set to also have Barry Allen as the Flash, some fans are seriously wondering if they'd go so far as to make the Arrowverse producers kill the main character from one of their shows.
      • Joe Manganiello opened an even bigger can of worms when he off-handedly insulted Manu Bennett's highly popular portrayal of his same character Deathstroke, saying a TV portrayal couldn't possibly be as good as what a movie could do with him, without having even seen it. Many Arrowverse fans had a ball when he suffered Laser-Guided Karma, with the Batman film receiving a page-one rewrite that no longer included Deathstroke, while Bennett returned to the role on Arrow after being gone for a couple of years. On the other hand, WB then entered in talks with The Raid director Gareth Evans for a Deathstroke film.
      • It got worse after Justice League came out when WB informed the Arrowverse producers that Slade Wilson was off limits again.
    • When the trailer for Supergirl came out, many were saying that Supergirl felt much more like a Superman adaptation than Man of Steel (even more so since a new Superman played by Tyler Hoechlin has been introduced in season 2). The show later introduced its own version of Lex Luthor, who quickly garnered far more praise than the version seen in Batman v Superman, causing additional tensions between the fanbases. Additionally, the show was also part of the scheduling conflicts that prevented Lynda Carter from having a cameo in Wonder Woman.
      • In general, the rivalry is not helped by the fact that people will often praise the shows to slam the films while downplaying or ignoring the serious flaws the shows have displayed.
    • On the subject on DC TV shows, there's one with the Titansverse. Some DCEU fans are jealous of how Titans (2018) and Doom Patrol are more critically acclaimed than Snyder's DC movies despite sharing a similarly dark tone (even though tone is not necessarily indicative of overall quality). As for Cyborg, he became a regular supporting character on Doom Patrol while his DCEU counterpart has been largely MIA with no solo movie or further appearances slated for the immediate future. Like the Superman example, Joivan Wade's depiction of Cyborg has been praised by critics and fans for being warmer and livelier than his more morose DCEU counterpart, which has added to the rivalry.
    • As bad as all these fandom rivalries may be, none seem to be as heated as the one between fans of the DCEU Superman films and fans of the Christopher Reeve Superman films. Fans of the Reeve films have been extremely harsh towards Man of Steel and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice for not having a more idealistic portrayal of Superman more in line with the Reeve films, accusing the newer films of betraying the character's appeal and damaging Superman's public image, and arguing that the traditional boy scout Superman not appealing to modern audiences is a bad reason to make him Darker and Edgier (particularly as Captain America is depicted in the MCU as a boy scout-like hero, and he's one of the most beloved characters in the MCU for precisely that reason and is frequently said to be a better Superman than the DCEU version). Fans of the current films have been equally vocal in criticizing the flaws in the Reeve films and their portrayal of Superman, such as how his version was stuck in the past even then, and pointing out how Superman would have to be updated given how forty years has passed since the Reeve films and both the character and the superhero landscape have changed radically since the 1970s as well as that they were given a film more in line with the Reeve Films with Superman Returns and then they complained about it being too much like them and it's unreasonable to expect them to keep Superman's character frozen in time when every other major superhero has been allowed to evolve. That's in addition to pointing out that Superman is still fundamentally the same character and that Reeve fans have been unfairly and disproportionately harsh on him for being superficially different. To put it simply, it's a debate with very strong feelings on all sides.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • Fans of these films tend to overlap and get on well with fans of Fox's X-Men Film Series as they are both underdogs with a darker approach to the genre than the MCU. When some critics insulted X-Men: Apocalypse by comparing it to Batman v Superman, a few fans took it as a compliment. Also, both the DCEU and X-Men film series were supported by the infamous petition to stop Disney from supposedly influencing critics to attack those movies after X-Men: Apocalypse and Batman v Superman received mixed-to-negative reviews while Captain America: Civil War received critical acclaim.
    • In a similar "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" situation, many DCEU fans were/are also supportive of Sony's Marvel films competing with the MCU. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse has been warmly received by DCEU fans despite the film being a box office competitor with Aquaman. Likewise, Sam Raimi's Spider-Man Trilogy is very popular among the DCEU fandom since it too isn't in the MCU and has actors who later appeared in the DCEU like J. K. Simmons, Joe Manganiello, and Willem Dafoe.
    • Of course, there are also DCEU fans who enjoy the MCU as well and get along with its fans, and vice-versa. The Black Panther and Captain Marvel fandom are especially cordial towards the DCEU.
      • Black Panther and Aquaman fans get along since they are the first films in their respective franchises to have both non-white leads and directors, giving the superhero movie genre some much-needed diversity. Some DCEU fans went the extra mile by raising money for impoverished black kids to see Black Panther in theaters.
      • While there was some rivalry going on, Captain Marvel (2019) fans generally do hold a cordial relationship with Wonder Woman and SHAZAM!. For the Wonder Woman, it was their fans uniting against their Girl-Show Ghetto detractors. For the latter, that positive relationship was helped by SHAZAM! director David F. Sandberg and star Zachary Levi denouncing trolls trying to drag Captain Marvel, a sentiment that was repaid for with Captain Marvel fans encouraging others to go see and support SHAZAM!.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • A franchise example; Wonder Woman is the first DC Extended Universe movie to earn an overall positive response from critics, currently sitting at a 93% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Compare this to the divided response to Man of Steel (55% on RT) and the critical thrashing of both Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (28%) and Suicide Squad (25%). Justice League took quite a nosedive compared to Wonder Woman however, with a 41% Tomatometer rating.
    • Aquaman has been well received critically (not to Wonder Woman levels of reception, but well enough), and SHAZAM! extremely so. It seems that taking a more Adaptation Distillation rather than Adaptational Angst Upgrade with their heroes has shown to be better strategy, giving the franchise a brighter future than before. It probably also helps that the former has never had an iconic portrayal in live media and the latter's television series didn't stand the test of time as well as Batman and Wonder Woman did, so neither had to worry about competing with nostalgia.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Ever since the first film in the series, Zack Snyder has has split the fandom with his controversial vision, to the point where many viewers were refusing to see Justice League unless Snyder left the project. When the film was in post production, Snyder stepped down from the film after the death of his daughter.
    • Superman's status as Destructive Savior both in and out of universe (since most if not all of the deaths and collateral damage in Man of Steel and Batman v Superman weren't his fault) is this in light of Wonder Woman (2017), where Diana is pushed so hard that she eventually goes on a rampage and intentionally kills people. It's also implied that Superman's darker portrayal is what helped him cope with the complexities of humanity, while Diana's idealism only made her more emotionally fragile.
    • It was quite common for people unhappy with Zack Snyder's take on Superman to use the now-iconic image of Superman comforting a suicidal teenager in All-Star Superman as a way of criticizing his version, citing it as the kind of characterization that Superman should have had. This would become a lot more uncomfortable in light of Snyder's daughter dying by suicide.
  • He Really Can Act: Despite the franchise's divisive reputation, many people feel that the casting is mostly spot on. Zack Snyder's casting of Henry Cavill as Superman, Ben Affleck as Batman, Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman and Jason Momoa as Aquaman were well-received. Likewise, the casting Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn was very popular with fans clamoring for Robbie to keep reprising her role in future spin-offs.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Casting Jared Leto as the Joker. Leto and Christian Bale once co-starred in American Psycho in which Bale killed Leto's character. This means that a crazy Batman once killed an innocent Joker.
    • In the Rifftrax of the Daredevil film, there are not only the obvious jokes about the similarity to Batman in Ben Affleck's character, but Jared Leto is listed among the bland white actors who Elektra brags about beating up.
    • Prior to her film, it was commonly remarked by Marvel fans that, if Marvel had Wonder Woman, she would have two films already. Not only did Warner Bros. beat Disney to the finish line in making a successful film with a female lead but will be releasing its second female superhero movie and the second Wonder Woman film the year after Marvel's first female led film.
    • Casting Ben Affleck as Batman gained a new layer of irony with the non-DCEU film Joker, revealing that the name of the caped crusader's arch-nemesis is Arthur Fleck.
    • Henry Cavill lost out on two parts to Robert Pattinson. After Ben Affleck stepped down from the role of Batman, he wound up being replaced by Pattinson.
  • Hypocritical Fandom:
    • The Marvel/DC Fandom Rivalry can often lead to things like this cropping up, mostly because with such an opposing reception, the toxicity of both fandoms has more fuel for their fire. Notably, some DCEU fans are pretty quick to play the victim card and act as if the DCEU is being unfairly attacked by Marvel fans, blaming the critical backlash against them on biased and/or paid off critics and favouritism towards Marvel, and in general act as if MCU fans are "being mean" to them. Despite this though, some DCEU fans often go to extreme measures to attack the Marvel films, and will happily praise any time a creator on the DC side says anything negative about Marvel (even if they'd jump down the throat of anyone on Marvel's side who did the same). The tendency of MCU fans to gloat about every victory from Marvel only makes things worse as does the fact that MCU fans who act in such a way aren't called out on it anywhere near as much as DCEU fans, creating an impression of a double standard. Several passive-aggressive reviews over Aquaman added fuel to the fire.
    • Some myopic fans of Zack Snyder have defended his interpretation of Superman on the grounds of "artist's rights", only to subsequently dismiss Wonder Woman and Aquaman for "selling out" just because they are Lighter and Softer than Man of Steel and Batman v Superman. Putting aside the fact that tone isn't indicative of quality, these fans (and many detractors) either fail or refuse to acknowledge that these films were made lighter not because of Executive Meddling but because of creative choices made by the directors not too dissimilar to how Zack Snyder wanted his films to be darknote . On top of everything, although Snyder personally prefers making his movies dark and gritty, he still offers his full support to the directors on these films as Patty Jenkins and James Wan can attest.
    • People who criticize the franchise for not adhering to the Marvel Cinematic Universe formula can come off as short-sighted given how many of the DCEU's creative choices have successfully executed by several successful films. X-Men and The Fellowship of the Ring didn't build up every single protagonist before putting them on a team (rushed); The Dark Knight Trilogy and Logan were dark and edgy in tone (grimdark); and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse killed off the titular character after only two scenes (unearned). The DCEU's shortcomings can't simply be attributed to deviating from the MCU formula and the direction could've worked with the proper execution.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: In regards to the announcement that Barry Allen would be the Flash used in the setting. Fans of the other Flashes, particularly the equally-popular Wally West (who has been Demoted to Extra by the Barry fans Running the Asylum), are annoyed that not only does Barry get to be the Flash in the main comics, the video games, the animated movies (even ones based on stories involving Wally West), the 2014 AND the 90s TV series', while Wally's only uses have been in Young Justice (which was cancelled shortly after killing him off, until a third season was eventually announced) and Justice League (in which he took on a lot of Barry Allen's traits, including his Rogues Gallery and home city), fans are annoyed he couldn't have had the films. Though he appears in the TV series starting in season 2, this Wally is based on his African-American New 52 counterpart so it's likely that the red-headed speedster is gone for good. Though as of 2016's DC Rebirth, classic Wally is back and will coexist with New 52 Wally, retconned to be his cousin.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • Thanks to his boosted popularity from his TV series, the Flash is the most anticipated part of Justice League for many. Notably, the film features similar takes on his father (in jail, framed) and love interest (portrayed as black), which makes the transition easy for TV series fans.
    • For more than a few people, the most appealing selling point of the upcoming solo Batman movie isn't the Batman himself, who has already gotten more than his share of exposure, but to see Deathstroke make his debut on the big screen. Although, given that Matt Reeves decided to re-write the script from scratch after being hired to replace Ben Affleck as the director, it's hard to say at this point if Deathstroke will still be in the movie or not.
    • Lately there have been talks of a Deathstroke solo movie instead, but what gets people truly hyped is that Gareth Evans, director of the Raid movies, pitched it to WB and is in talks to direct.
    • A lot of people are keen to see Nightwing get a solo film and the news of Chris McKay's attachment was also well-received.
    • In general, a lot of characters making their way to the big screen for the first time and many fans, even ones who haven't cared for the films so far, have at least one they're excited to see.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Release the hype engine" Explanation 
    • "I want pictures! Pictures of Batman!!!" Explanation 
    • Director's Cut Extended Universe Explanation 
      • DLCEU Explanation 
    • The extreme members of the DCEU fandom, especially fans of Zack Snyder's movies, have become one of the biggest laughingstocks of the Internet regarding their incredibly toxic behavior towards anyone who didn't praise the DCEU movies as masterpieces, their worship of Snyder as a "visionary" whose DC films are poorly-received because they are too "deep" to be understood by their detractors, their belief that a Darker and Edgier tone automatically equals maturity and quality and a Lighter and Softer tone automatically equals the opposite regardless of context and their willingness to start ridiculous and implausible conspiracy theories about why the DCEU failed to click with critics and audiences rather than simply admitting that the movies aren't flawless and that their flaws are due to the filmmakers and studio executives rather than being made up by the people criticizing them:
      • Saying "Disney is clearly bribing critics to kill non-MCU comic book movies" or variations of this statement any time a film, even one that has nothing to do with WB or the DCEU, receives negative reviews, lamenting that the films' detractors could have been getting well-paid by Disney to trash the DCEU instead of having to do it entirely for free or sarcastically saying that critics praising well-made movies and bashing badly-made ones is clearly indicative of a conspiracy against the DCEU.Explanation 
      • In a variation of the above, whenever someone brings up this conspiracy theory with complete seriousness (usually together with the justification that critics supposedly didn't get how "complex" and "mature" Batman v Superman supposedly is because they are apparently too accustomed to the "kiddie" MCU movies), it has become quite popular to point out the many, many holes in said conspiracy theory as a rebuttal (such as many movies distributed by Disney getting mixed-to-negative critical reviews, like Alice Through the Looking Glass, A Wrinkle in Time (2018) and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, as well as The Dark Knight Trilogy's critical acclaim), and also to point out that making a film violent, ultra-serious and superficially dark does not automatically make it mature and complex (and in fact can make it just the opposite if done without anything of real substance to back it up), with examples like Fantastic Four (2015).
      • In a similar vein, cracking jokes about starting a petition to shut down Rotten Tomatoes every time a badly-reviewed DCEU movie is released, sometimes with the sarcastic justification of Rotten Tomatoes being "biased" against the DCEU or Disney having clearly paid or otherwise influenced Rotten Tomatoes to trash the DCEU movies, or alternatively suggesting that someone start a petition to stop WB from making mediocre DC movies.Explanation 
      • Also, sarcastically saying that Disney is clearly paying WB to screw up the DCEU every time bad news about it come out.
      • "You didn't like {name of DCEU movie} because it's too smart for you / it was made for real adults like us DCEU fans because of how dark and edgy it is / you're a MCU fanboy."Explanation 
      • A variant of the infamous Rick and Morty copypasta "To be fair, you have to have a very high IQ to understand Batman v Superman..." has become popular as a means of mocking the members of the DCEU fanbase who proclaim that the reason that people hated that movie was because they supposedly didn't truly understand how deep it was due to the themes it brought up, despite said people pointing to the film's objective flaws such as shoddy storytelling and characterizations, as well as the overall lackluster filmmaking and also failing to actually explore said themes in any good and meaningful way.
      • Snyder's more extreme fans have been given the derogatory title of Snyderbros. These people are generally seen as an embarrassment to the DCEU fandom with many fans calling out their immature behavior and blaming them for tarnishing the image of DC fans.
  • DCEU 1 Oscar, MCU 0 Explanation 
  • Wonder Woman is carrying the DCEU on her back! Explanation 
  • Ben Affleck's extremely bored and tired "I don't know about that, we'll see what the future holds" when asked if he'll play Bruce again during the Justice League press junket.
  • "Tell that to Zod's snapped neck!" Explanation 
  • Some fans have taken to joking about the seemingly endless series of negative and/ludicrous and/or unproven rumors about the films by wondering what bizarre story will get passed around next and making up their own ridiculous ones.
  • Articles and videos ruminating about why the franchise hasn't been as accepted as the MCU and others about how to "fix" or "save" the DCEU absolutely litter the internet and it's not unusual to come across multiple ones with completely differing perspectives, leaving fans confused as to what exactly detractors are looking for.
  • As with the "What if Michael Bay directed X?" meme, Zack Snyder's Darker and Edgier direction has became a source of mockery for the films' detractors. Similarly, his infamous interview quotes where he stated that Batman could get raped in prison in his movies and that he couldn't take superheroes exchanging dialogue while in their costumes seriously have been brought up and mocked as being indicative of the reason his films failed to click with critics and audiences (namely, that he's more interested in making his films as needlessly dark and edgy as possible than actually telling a well-written story), with quite a few people snarking that the Justice League would have exchanged very little dialogue or that there would have been a scene of Batman getting raped in prison in Snyder's cut of Justice League.
  • "Can [current DC movie] Save the DCEU?" Explanation 
  • Memetic Troll: Batman has been made into "that one guy who loves sleeping with his friend's mom" in some circles due to Ben Affleck and Diane Lane (Martha Kent) playing lovers in Hollywoodland, and Nicole Kidman (Atlanna) playing Batman's Love Interest in Batman Forever (Bats was played by Val Kilmer there).
  • Misblamed:
    • Critics of the DCEU are quick to blame DC Comics instead of Warner Bros. who owns DC. It seems the DC people themselves don't even have that much influence regarding the movies. Geoff Johns is linked to both the DCEU and the Berlanti Productions TV shows (Arrowverse, Supergirl (2015)) as a consultant but his influence is most keenly felt in the latter.
    • Some critics panning Justice League were quick to blame it on Zack Snyder. The theatrically-released film is definitely not how he intended it to be, as it is the result of Executive Meddling and Joss Whedon's input, with a whole lot of Snyder's footage ending up as Deleted Scenes or modified (the color grading most notably).
    • This is also inverted as those critical of the films have a habit of attributing anything in the films that works, such as Gal Gadot's performance as Wonder Woman or Superman's more popular characterization in Justice League, to people other than Zack Snyder. This has led many fans to accuse them of just refusing to give him credit for anything while still blaming him for everything that they dislike.
    • A common complaint by detractors is the decision to introduce multiple characters in team-up movies, as opposed to introducing them in solo movies prior to team-up works like Marvel does. However, if anything, Marvel's practice is actually the exception, not the rule, to creating cinematic franchises with Lots And Lots Of Characters, as evident by The Fast and the Furious consisting only of team-up movies (at least until the Hobbs and Shaw spin-off), and the Harry Potter films having no character-focused spinoffs whatsoever (the same also applied to Star Wars until the release of Solo). Even among superhero movies, the Fox X-Men Film Series also doesn't follow Marvel's model, with Wolverine and Deadpool being introduced in team-up movies prior to getting solo films (the latter was actually a technicality, since X-Men Origins: Wolverine included an In Name Only adaptation of the character). The reason for this complaint likely comes from the fact that the DCEU started out with a Solo movie (Man of Steel) before moving into a team-up movie (Batman V Superman).
    • A vocal minority oppose Matt Reeves' The Batman due to the recasting of Ben Affleck with Robert Pattinson as Batman, with these fans accusing Reeves of personally forcing Affleck out of the DCEU. In actuality, Affleck's departure was driven by his own volition as he expressed less than enthusiastic behavior following the negative critical reception of Batman v Superman and his battle with depression stemming from his divorce. In a subsequent interview on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Affleck confirmed that leaving the role was his decision.
  • My Real Daddy: Although Snyder was responsible for introducing Wonder Woman and Aquaman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Justice League (2017), many feel that it was other directors who were able to do the characters justice. However, considering some of Snyder's films' open-ended nature around certain characters and his statements about opting to not give Flash his second costume so those working on his solo film could present their own vision, it's implied this was always the plan.
    • Patty Jenkins could be considered the real mommy of Wonder Woman. When the character was introduced in Batman v Superman, she shown to be a jaded immortal who turned her back on humanity for over a hundred years. Her solo film retconned her as a Broken Bird who, in spite of her hardships, still had enough idealism not to abandon humanity. The direction Jenkins took with Wonder Woman would lead to her film being the first critically acclaimed entry of the DC Extended Universe and turn the character into more of a household name (again, after the Lynda Carter era) who is now as popular, if not moreso, than the DCEU Batman and Superman.
    • In Justice League, Aquaman was depicted as a gruff, cynical loner and Sour Supporter who only joined the team under pressured by Mera. In his solo movie, James Wan changed Aquaman into a more friendly yet down-to-earth reluctant hero with a compelling personal journey of finding acceptance by the Atlanteans while also having Hidden Depths to complement his macho exterior. These changes made Aquaman more relatable and less of a one-note "surfer dude" as seen in Justice League. Public perception-wise, Wan also successfully reconstructed the character and his mythos enough to win over many who still thought he was a useless superhero.
  • Narm: Has its own page.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • A movie involving the Justice League was planned as early as 2009, but as noted in Follow the Leader on the Trivia page, the project only got off the ground after Avengers's success.
    • Many of the difficulties and criticisms the franchise has faced (Divisive casting, deviations from the source material, and excessively dark approach, difficult productions) were all issues that the Tim Burton Batman films faced. The core difference is that Batman (1989) was an unambiguous success, while the issues that ultimately derailed the franchise with Batman & Robin only began to manifest in the later installments. By contrast, the DCEU had the challenge of starting off with a divisive movie like Man of Steel, which led to certain critical and audience perceptions that the franchise would have to spend the next several years dealing with.
    • Many things people have complained about in relation to Superman, such as Clark being more introverted, struggling with his identity and questioning his purpose, have their roots in the comics. In fact, for all the fans who pit the Reeve and Cavill interpretations of Superman against one another, Superman II actually dealt with Clark divesting himself of his powers in order to live an ordinary life with Lois, as well as the subsequent consequences that came with that decision.
    • Some of the more ardent Snyder fans have criticized the later DC movies for having a more lighthearted and optimistic tone, which they insist is an attempt to simply turn the DCEU into another Marvel clone. Marvel Studios did not invent the idea of injecting humor and levity into superhero movies, as older examples like Sam Raimi's Spider-Man Trilogy and the original Christopher Reeve Superman movies can attest. Even Tim Burton's two Batman films, which were considered Darker and Edgier at the time, had quite a few goofy moments, such as the now legendary scene in Batman where the Joker and his goons vandalize an art gallery while jamming to the music of Prince.
  • Old Guard Versus New Blood:
    • Most of the divisiveness of the films, particularly in relation to their portrayal of Superman, has come from fans split on whether the films should be following the path laid out by previous films such as the Christopher Reeve Superman series and the Keaton and Bale Batman films, or trying something new and taking influence from more recent and divisive sources such as the New 52.
    • Since Snyder's exit from the franchise in 2017, a new variant of this has been taking place within the fandom. The divide now exists between the fans who enjoy the lighter post-Snyder movies like Aquaman and SHAZAM!, and those who prefer the darker, grittier tone of Snyder's films. Some DCEU/Snyder fans criticize the newer DC movies as a blatant attempt to emulate Marvel or pandering to the lowest common denominator. In contrast, fans of the lighter movies think that those movies still have dark moments and criticize the older movies for relying too much on darkness for shock value instead of good storytelling. Further exacerbating this divide is the fact that the non-Snyder films (bar Suicide Squad)note  were better received by critics.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy: The franchise has been hit with this almost from the start due to divisive creative decisions, the infamous toxicity of a vocal portion of the DCEU fandom (most infamously their immature actions such as starting conspiracy theories about Disney paying critics to bash the DCEU movies, starting a petition to shut down Rotten Tomatoes in the wake of Suicide Squad's negative reviews, bullying former DC president Diane Nelson off Twitter after she made a comment that some read as critical of Snyder's movies, and sending death threats to critics for the "crime" of giving the DCEU movies negative reviews), the vitriolic personal attacks directed at fans and people involved in the films, the endless series of negative rumors treated as fact even after being debunked, the intensely heated rivalry with the MCU and it's fans, the often excessively harsh criticism and the tragedy of Autumn Snyder's death, which has caused people on both sides of the debate to start questioning the nature of modern film criticism and its perceived emphasis on casual cruelty towards creators. It's gotten to the point that pretty much any article that discusses the films will bring up the controversy surrounding them thus far.
  • Pandering to the Base: The franchise has been attempting to do this ever since its first entry's mixed-to-negative critical and audience reception:
    • After the backlash against Batman v Superman for being too grim and the extremely positive fan reaction to Suicide Squad's much more fun-looking trailers, WB reshot parts of Suicide Squad to be more like the trailers. Unfortunately, this caused the film to have a distractingly uneven tone and inconsistent editing and be panned in reviews too.
    • After all of the above happened, WB repeatedly and emphatically promised that Justice League would have a more light-hearted tone, humor, and a brighter color palette than Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad. When a personal tragedy forced director Zack Snyder to step down, they hired Joss Whedon, who had directed the much-loved The Avengers (2012), to wrap up production and do reshoots. They also had the film cut down to only 2 hours in length, most likely as a response to complaints about Batman v Superman feeling overly long and bloated. The general reaction to all of this attempted course correction was "Not as bad as BvS, but not great either and the Executive Meddling in it is really obvious."
  • Reviews Are the Gospel: The DCEU movies' scores on sites like Rotten Tomatoes are brought up a hell of a lot in debates about their quality — or on sites like this very wiki, especially in the Fandom Rivalry with the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Superman, of all people, has had a serious and very extreme case of this since Man of Steel. In the films, he's undeniably far more serious, introverted, inexperienced, struggles seriously with not knowing his place in the world and hasn't yet evolved into the character he's known for but he's still fundamentally the same. He is repeatedly shown to be kind, humble, self-sacrificing and overall a decent person who tries to stand up for people the rest of the world won't and it's clear he just wants to help, even if he isn't sure how best to do it. Yet to hear some fans talk about him, you'd think he was the most despicable character ever committed to film and he doesn't do a single heroic or altruistic thing in the course of his two films, with some either ignoring the heroic things he does or downplaying them considerably. Even accounting for different interpretations and subjectivity, it's a bit much. Some people have even gone as far as to call him a sociopath, a fascist or a narcissist with complete seriousness.
  • Scapegoat Creator:
    • Zack Snyder and Zack Snyder alone is often blamed for the direction the first films took. Screenwriters such as David S. Goyer and Chris Terrio are less often mentioned, Christopher Nolan's input on Man of Steel is always outright ignored, the New 52 influences stem from Geoff Johns (against which Snyder precisely chose several non-New 52 comics influences for both Superman and Batman), and so on. This sentiment has only increased following the positive critical reception to films he didn't direct like Wonder Woman and Aquaman, together with some of his more infamous statements, such as one claiming that Batman could get raped in prison in his movies and another saying that he was unable to take superheroes exchanging dialogue while in their costumes seriously.
    • That said, a lot of people hold Goyer responsible as well, due to his largely-poor track record with the films he's written by himself (with the acclaimed Dark Knight Trilogy films being written by him together with Christopher and Jonathan Nolan), as well as his infamous statements antagonizing comic book fans like calling She-Hulk a "giant green porn star" and Virgin-Shaming people who wanted Martian Manhunter in the movies. Due to these statements, many comic book fans were quick to mock Goyer after the negative reviews for Batman v Superman came out (with a few pointing out that the comic book fans he'd insulted made up a sizable portion of the people mocking the film he'd written), and there were many calls to have him removed from future DCEU movies together with Snyder.
    • Joss Whedon has also found himself in the crossfires for Justice League (2017). After Snyder left the film mid-production following his daughter's death, Whedon took over reshoots and post-production. However, the film received a mixed reception with some criticizing how Whedon's lighter, zanier footage didn't match up with Snyder's more somber footage, never mind the fact that the tonal changes were mandated by some Warner Bros execs and Geoff Johns. However, Whedon was responsible for adding in the unnecessary subplot involving a Russian family and several sexist jokes about Wonder Woman, neither of which were in Snyder's original cut, and neither of which were well received.
    • To a lesser degree, Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara has garnered much ire for Executive Meddling and perceived favoritism in the DCEU. Tsujihara gave David Ayer just 6 weeks to write the script for Suicide Squad (2016) and later ordered a re-edit of the film to make it Lighter and Softer after Batman v Superman got major backlash for its overly dark and grim tone, which resulted in the film suffering from tonal issues and getting negative reviews from critics. He also received much backlash for keeping Snyder on Justice League (2017) even after the critical thrashing of Batman v Superman.
  • Smurfette Breakout:
    • Wonder Woman played a supporting role in her first live-action cinematic portrayal Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, but her Origin Story movie is the best reviewed of the DCEU so far, and has performed the best at the domestic box office. Warner Bros. seems to have taken note of this, as the first trailer for Justice League (2017) to screen after Wonder Woman put focus on Diana's heroics and Themyscira. And a sequel has been fast-tracked.
    • Likewise, Harley Quinn became the most popular character in Suicide Squad. This of course has led Warner Bros. to greenlight several spin-offs starring Harley, starting with Birds of Prey.
  • Snark Bait: Has its own page.
  • They Copied It, Now It Sucks: A common criticism of the early DCEU films is that the filmmakers were clearly trying to copy the dark tone of Christopher Nolan's critically and financially successful The Dark Knight Trilogy to the detriment of the films. While Nolan's Batman films are darker and more realistic compared to previous adaptations, they are still praised for using darkness to create engaging stories and characters as opposed to a draw in its own right, while also using lighter moments to provide contrast with the overall dark tone. Furthermore, Batman, a Vigilante Man motivated by the murder of his parents, proved to be well-suited to a darker reimagining. In contrast, Superman is traditionally seen as a more light-hearted figure not well-suited to having a dark reimagining.
    • In addition, The Dark Knight Trilogy was intended to be a completely standalone trilogy of movies (only adapting Batman, his various supporting characters and his less fantastical villains like Ra's Al-Ghul, Bane and the Joker), so imitating its dark and gritty style clashed with the more fantastical elements of the DC Universe that the DCEU adapted or would have to adapt (for instance, magic with the Enchantress and Shazam).
    • On a separate note, many fans were also disappointed how the creative minds also hampered the DCEU world-building in their attempts in trying to copy the realism of Nolan's movies. Most notable examples include the decision to downplay Batman's Science Hero qualities and the questionable production choice of making Gotham and Metropolis look like generic cities that lack the unique art deco architecture of their comic counterparts.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • The franchise has the hurdle of coming after popular different versions of the same characters. It's been shown time is no object, as everyone was comparing Man of Steel to the Christopher Reeve Superman films (with the first one having a significant influence on all superhero movies that came after it). While Cavill has to deal with that, Affleck has to deal with the legacy of The Dark Knight Trilogy with Christian Bale and so on. Many feel Ezra Miller's gonna have a hard time living up to John Wesley Shipp and Grant Gustin as the Flash, especially since his casting was announced a mere two weeks after the 2014 Flash show (which features both Gustin as the Flash and Shipp as the Flash's dad) began airing.
    • Exceptions to this include:
      • Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. The dated campiness of the 1970s show starring Lynda Carter left room for a more serious and up-to-date interpretation. And Carter herself gave her full support to Gal through and through.
      • Whomever they cast as Green Lantern, since the previous attempt to give the character a movie didn't fare so well.
      • Jason Momoa as Aquaman, because he appears to be a departure from Aquaman's joke reputation in popular culture, and no previous actor who played him in live action has left a memorable enough impression.
      • Jared Leto as the Joker, since he is also a respected veteran actor like Mark Hamill, Heath Ledger and Jack Nicholson. The final reaction to Leto's portrayal was decidedly mixed, however, especially since many of his scenes were cut from the film and his looks proved divisive.
      • Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn. While Arleen Sorkin and Tara Strong's performances were extremely popular, this being our first live-action film version of the character was enough to give her space to make it her own. While Suicide Squad has been critically lambasted, she remained the most acclaimed and popular thing about it, and her Smurfette Breakout status alone got Birds of Prey greenlit.
    • It's also getting inevitable (and often unfavorable) comparisons to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, which pioneered the shared superhero film universe (that is, outside of Universal Horror and JapanExplanation ).
    • J. K. Simmons has to follow Gary Oldman as Jim Gordon. His burden might be a bit lighter, because not only does the fandom love the choice, he's also an Oscar-winner.
    • Some critics wondered if Suicide Squad might have been better received had it not been for Deadpool, another comic book movie starring a violent Anti-Hero that came out earlier the same year to much better reception, or the MCU's acclaimed Guardians of the Galaxy, which had been released a couple of years previously.
    • The DC Animated Universe has been positively received by fans of DC Comics and ensures that successive adaptations (both animated and live action), ranging in quality, have a particular standard to meet. The DCEU's beginnings are widely considered to fall significantly short: in particular, Batman v Superman has been compared unfavorably to the "World's Finest" three-parter, and Justice League has also been compared unfavorably to the animated series. It has gotten to the point that many think the DCEU filmmakers should have simply followed the DCAU's overall outline in setting up the DCEU properly.
    • In a similar vein to the DC Animated Universe, the DC Universe Animated Original Movies line is aimed at people who watched the DC Animated Universe as children, and it has been widely praised for maintaining a very high quality throughout most of its entries and faithfully adapting many famous storylines. Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad have been compared unfavorably to the Batman: The Dark Knight Returns two-parter and Batman: Assault on Arkham respectively, due to both animated films being much more faithful to their source material.
    • Many fans have gone as far as to cite this as a major reason for the franchise's divisive reputation compared to the MCU where the vast majority of characters are ones who had never appeared in films prior and/or weren't anywhere near as well known to general audiences and, as such, they didn't have a pre-existing image to live up to or audience beliefs about the characters that may not be accurate to the comics. How much this explains it is up for debate. Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn, Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman and Jason Momoa as Aquaman clearly did not have the pressure of pre-existing live action incarnations to live up to, for instance. The campiness of Lynda Carter's TV show made it impossible to consider her interpretation as "definitive" or "memorable" for modern audiences, and you'd be hard-pressed to find people outside of very dedicated fandoms who can name the actress and actors who respectively played Harley Quinn and Aquaman in live action series without some Google Fu. note 
  • Uncertain Audience: The biggest problem with the franchise on the whole, and Zack Snyder's films in particular. Snyder is a self-proclaimed huge fan of comics (at least comics like Heavy Metal or Watchmen, admitting that mainstream comics never grabbed his attention) and generally claims in interviews that he makes stories "for the fans", but the problem is that the primary medium of superheroes, i.e. comics, has a very tiny audience relative to other mass-media adaptations; comics by their nature vary Depending on the Writer, and the DC characters themselves are so iconic and folkloric, that Snyder at times wavers between their Pop-Cultural Osmosis version and their more rounded comics and cross-media versions:
    • Henry Cavill once attempted to defend Batman v. Superman by claiming that it was a "niche" film and not intended for a mainstream audience. This clashes heavily with the way the film was actually marketed, such as the existence of Batman v. Superman children's toys from Mattel, as well as candy tie-ins and even breakfast cereals. It seemed WB was trying to have its cake and eat it too by going after the more mature and sophisticated adult audience of the Nolan Batman movies, while at the same time trying to win over the four quadrant blockbuster audience of the MCU.
    • Overall the first two movies are too serious and dark to appeal to children, too melodramatic and comic-book-like to appeal to adults, too much Continuity Lockout for those unfamiliar with the comics and other versions of the DC Universe, and too deconstructive and change too many aspects of the characters for those who are familiar with said other versions. Justice League likewise is torn between giving audiences the epic superhero team-up they wanted and Pandering to the Base with a more classic Superman, which has resulted in irritating Batman fans who the film seems to paint as a has-been with little future in the Justice League and alienating those who were on-board with the tone of Man of Steel and Batman v Superman.
  • Unexpected Character:
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • A large portion of the franchise's PR after Batman v Superman has been about convincing people that Wonder Woman and Justice League will be more optimistic and won't make the same mistakes as their predecessors. With Wonder Woman, at least, it seems to have succeeded, given the movie currently sits a 93% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, far higher than any of the previous films. Justice League, on the other hand, didn't fare so well. Despite being the DCEU's big team up film a la Avengers, it became the first film of the DCEU to make less than 100 million on its opening weekend and it wound up a Box Office Bomb.
    • Clearly, Warner Bros has not won over general audiences... if Zack Snyder is directing. The well-received on all fronts Wonder Woman was directed by Patty Jenkins, Aquaman was directed by James Wan, and Suicide Squad, which also fared poorly with critics but significantly better (though still very divisive) with audiences and did surprisingly well at the box office given its reviews (though the marketing also helped), was directed by David Ayer and was a victim of Executive Meddling.
    • In the wake of Justice League, some major executive reshuffling at DC Films occurred, with the resulting new direction emphasizing the freedom of allowing talented creators to actually do their thing in making the movies work well, rather than having executives trying to meddle with the process through reshoots and editing in order to ape the Marvel Cinematic Universe. New lead Walter Hamada will now play the role of a unifying voice rather than a controller, and the talent they've hired for upcoming projects have given many hope for the future. Thus far, Aquaman and Shazam have done so well that sequels have already been greenlit (see below for more info), many look forward to Wonder Woman 1984 and Birds of Prey will be an attempt at a more streamlined story than Suicide Squad. Assuming this level of momentum is maintained, it can be assumed the future of the DC Universe is in safe hands. Rumor has it they also got Steven Spielberg lined up for a Blackhawk film which has naturally gotten many very excited.
    • Aquaman's depature from standard action flicks to something resembling a sci-fi Pirates of the Caribbean saw it enjoying generally positive critical reception and grossing over $1 billion worldwide.
    • Shazam, while a more modest commercial success, enjoyed fantastic reviews, with many critics citing it as evidence of the franchise finally turning a corner. This was helped by producer Peter Safran's statements about the reception to the earlier movies having shown WB that different characters benefit from different tones, and that while the whole Darker and Edgier take may work wonders for characters like Batman and the Joker, that doesn't mean it's automatically a good fit for a property like Shazam or Aquaman.
  • Win the Crowd: Has its own page.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: Casting reception of several major established characters tends to be all over the place with these movies, notably for nearly every member of the Justice League. The sole uncontroversial exceptions were Henry Cavill as Superman and Ray Fisher as Cyborg since they were relative unknowns who were felt to at least look like their characters, so fans adopted a "wait and see" attitude instead.
    • Ben Affleck as Batman was immediately and harshly criticized by people who had less than fond memories of Daredevil and romantic comedies like Gigli, despite that he had been pulling a Career Resurrection with The Town and Argo which he directed. The backlash got so bad it was compared to the one that erstwhile comedy actor Michael Keaton had for the 1989 Batman film. However, following the release of Batman v Superman, Affleck was generally praised as one of the brighter spots in the otherwise divisive movie.
    • Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman also garnered immediate and vicious criticism because of her slim ex-supermodel build as seen in the The Fast and the Furious series, due to a loud segment of fans wanting a more literal Amazonian Beauty. Many of these fans rooted for the likes of Gina Caranonote  or/and Jaimie Alexander (Lady Sif in the MCU) instead, although the latter had a similar build to Gadot's. In any case, similar to Affleck, Gadot was generally praised as one of the better parts of Batman v Superman and she got wider praise in the role with the Wonder Woman film.
    • Jesse Eisenberg as Lex Luthor immediately got a lot of flak since Eisenberg was younger and not as physically imposing as many fans would have preferred Lex to be, as common fancasts were the likes of Bryan Cranston and Mark Strong (Sinestro in Green Lantern and eventually Dr. Sivana in DCEU's own Shazam). The prevailing joke was Snyder got Eisenberg when people wanted Heisenberg (Cranston's acclaimed role in Breaking Bad.) Cranston himself dismissed casting being fancast as Lex just because he had gone bald for Breaking Bad like Lex famously is. When Batman v Superman came out, Lex's characterization and writing were the most criticized aspects of him, not his appearance. Later it came to light that Eisenberg and Snyder had originally discussed playing Jimmy Olsen.
    • Ezra Miller as the Barry Allen incarnation of The Flash was criticized (as was TV's Barry Grant Gustin) for not being blond like comics Barry. In Batman v Superman he also had a moustache and ponytail which was gone for his cameo in Suicide Squad. And similar to Eisenberg as Luthor, Barry's characterization and writing, not his appearance, were the most criticized aspects of him in Justice League where he finally had a sizable role.
    • Jason Momoa as Aquaman is a curious case — like Gadot, Eisenberg and Miller, many have complained that he doesn't resemble the character enough even if he were to go blond. The prevailing joke was that Snyder got Khal Drogo when he should have gotten Jaime Lannister, since the latter as played by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau looks much more like classic Aquaman. Quite a few people also feel that Momoa would have been a better fit for Lobo, due to the dreadlocks he sported on (funnily enough) Stargate Atlantis. However, Momoa's prior roles like on Game of Thrones, Stargate Atlantis and elsewhere have also gained him many supporters who want Aquaman's Joke Character reputation in pop culture to end.
    • It's much the same with Will Smith as Deadshot, who was cast by David Ayer, not Snyder for a change - sure, his ethnicity is different, but it's Will Smith.
    • Superman's French VA: Adrien Antoine. While he is a good actor and is pretty good with his lines, he's also been Batman 's French VA since 2004 (The Dark Knight trilogy excluded).
    • Unsurprisingly, Robert Pattinson being cast as a younger Bruce Wayne got hit with this reaction - he's best known for playing Edward Cullen in the Twilight films, which were known for the rather wooden acting from the actors; however, it's worth noting that Pattinson has taken on a lot of dramatic roles, even though it's been close to seven years since he stopped playing the role, not to mention he's been rather vocal about his dislike of the character he played. Also, there's the fact that it may be the source material that's to blame for his rather wooden acting, considering he's been praised for his performances when he's not playing Edward Cullen (Remember Me, Good Time).
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Similar to their casting, the DCEU's costumes tend to get a lot of flak as soon as they're revealed, often for arguably pettier reasons.
    • Superman not having Underwear of Power, his costume looking "too alien" with more Kryptonian flourishes like cuffs and waist piping, and his costume colors being darker shades. It looked brighter in Batman v Superman however, and even more so in Justice League. His overly swept back hair when in costume has also proven contentious, since it makes it appear as if Superman is balding; made worse by the fact that Henry Cavill showed up to the Justice League premiere, unintentionally sporting a more Superman-esque hairstyle complete with the stray forelock; in a manner that could have been easily incorporated for his look in the movies.
    • Batman's ears being too short and stubby, and his usually gold utility belt being muted. However, the costume was also praised by others for translating his black and grey color scheme into film for the first time since the 1940s black and white serials.
    • Wonder Woman's boots having heels, and her costume colors being so muted they look mostly brown. The latter was rectified for her solo film where it is brand new and much brighter.
    • The Flash's main costume being segmented and held together by wires, and having much of the skinsuit under the armor be black.
    • Cyborg's costume being 95% CGI, drawing comparisons to Green Lantern where only his head wasn't covered in CGI.
    • Aquaman going shirtless is nothing new, but for his Batman v Superman cameo, he showed off plenty of tattoos. In Justice League he wears full armor closer to the comic look for the latter half. In his solo film, he eventually gains a colourful costume ripped straight from his classic comics look.
    • Perhaps most infamously, the Joker being covered in tattoos as well for Suicide Squad, including having "Damaged" inscribed on his forehead. The reveal of his look immediately torpedoed much of the goodwill people were having toward the casting of Jared Leto, replacing it with mockery instead. Rumors and actual reports of his on-set antics only fueled the fire even more, and in the final film his performance was divisive, but even more so due to most of his scenes being cut. Harley Quinn as played by Margot Robbie also had tattoos but these didn't trigger nearly the same amount of vitriol.

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