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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Is Amanda Waller really motivated to Shoot the Dog for the sake of the greater good and protecting ordinary humans from super beings that could potentially annihilate all of humanity? Or is it all just a cover for her personal advancement and benefit?
    • Deadshot is either an anti-hero with some codes and ethics who genuinely loves his daughter, or an amoral sociopath with Delusions of Eloquence who uses his Morality Pet as an anchor to feel better about his bad deeds. It's also in question as to whether he really is better for his daughter than his ex-wife—who is evidently inept, but not a murderer.
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    • It's possible to see the Suicide Squad as more authentically courageous and moral than they were supposed to be seen as. Unlike Batman's vast fortune and Superman's powers, most of the squad are poor, exploited by the state (and subject to torture and beatings in confinement); the powers that they have cursed them with insanity/skin diseases and mutation; they're entirely blameless for the collateral damage of the film caused in fact by Amanda Waller's incompetence and underestimating the Enchantress; and yet, when they are given a chance to walk away after learning the truth, they heroically step up and risk their lives for virtually no reward, and El Diablo shows more guilt about the violence inflicted by his actions than both Batman and Superman — and in the end they get locked up once more and screwed over by Waller..
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    • The Joker and Harley's relationship invites a bit of this. Does this version of the Joker truly care for Harley, or does he only want to get her back because he feels she belongs to him? While their relationship as shown in the movie lacks much of the casual abuse, and Harley vocally consents to many of the more extreme things Joker puts her through, we also primarily only see the relationship through Harley's eyes, and don't forget, Harley Quinn is dresses-up-like-a-clown-and-murders-people insane and notorious for her unhealthy devotion to Joker even when he is outright abusive of her in other continuities. On the other hand, the scene of the Joker lying in a depression among a circle of weapons and other objects lends credence to the idea that he does genuinely care about/misses her, which is not seen through Harley's eyes. Word of God on it is that he really does love her, but hates admitting it.
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    • Related to the above, did the Joker rescue Harley from drowning in the chemical vat out of a genuine fondness for her, or did he just realise that by letting someone so devoted to him die he was screwing himself out of some golden eggs?
    • Deadshot and Harley's relationship. Are they Platonic Life-Partners? Like Brother and Sister? Or something else entirely?
    • Batman arresting Deadshot when Deadshot's daughter was present. He says he doesn't want to do this in front of her, but it's very easy to speculate that Batman chose to capture Deadshot with his daughter there in order to ensure that Deadshot doesn't put up a fight or go down swinging. Considering this incarnation of Batman is much more ruthless and pragmatic than most, it's entirely possible that he was exploiting Floyd's greatest weakness, not begrudgingly taking him in in front of her.
    • When Harley breaks the store window to steal a clutch-purse she sees, Flagg can't believe what he sees. She reminds them that they "are the bad guys. It's what we do." This shows a bit of difference between "bad," such as Harley and Floyd, who have some guidance, albeit twisted (Harley stealing pretty items because she fancies them; Floyd is the professional hit-man but takes out a mob stool pigeon), as opposed to "evil," like the Joker, who tortured Harley just for the fun of it.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Judging from this movie's trailers, the film seems to be lighter in tone to Man of Steel and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, even if it is dark comedy. In particular, the posters regularly utilize an eye-catching neon pink and blue color scheme, possibly as a reaction to criticism of Man of Steel's washed-out color scheme.
    • Ever since the divisive reaction to the Joker's tattooed appearance in the first trailer, every subsequent trailer has been careful to show him with a fully covered torso (wearing a vest, a tuxedo, a purple jacket, etc.), as if to assure fans that his tattoos won't be visible for the entire movie. Moreso, his infamous "Damaged" tattoo isn't displayed too heavily due to a lot of his scenes being shot in dimly-lit settings.
    • Similarly, there were complaints about Harley's redesign being too sexualized or different than her 90s harlequin outfit. There is a scene with Harley in her traditional harlequin outfit with the Joker, and she squees in delight when the suit is returned to her by Waller, even if she ends up wearing her redesigned outfit.
    • Toward the beginning of the film, we see Harley Quinn being saved from drowning by Batman, who actively works to save her life, before arresting her, and later takes Deadshot in alive, and even announces himself (rather than just ambush the villain, as he'd normally do) because Deadshot was out with his daughter and Batman didn't want to traumatize her, which seems to address the complaint about this version of Batman supposedly killing people, and also gives fans a glimpse of a more classical and moral Batman who turns criminals in.
    • This trope has backfired for some viewers. For instance, the demand to be fun, colourful and jokey like Deadpool or Marvel's films (which came mainly from clickbait sites instead of general audience goers) lead to what many consider to be a Guardians of the Galaxy ripoff.
  • Award Snub: Inverted, many people were shocked, and some even outraged, that it managed to win an Academy Award (for makeup and hairstyle) despite its very negative critical reception, particularly as it won over the much better received Star Trek Beyond and managed to land the DC Extended Universe an Oscar before the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Awesome Music: See here.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Jared Leto's Joker. Depending on the review he'll be cited as the best or worst thing about this film. And then there's his major Creator Backlash about how much of his material was cut from the film, so that he refuses to even watch it (which goes all the way around to getting him some popularity from the anti-DCEU crowd).
    • Amanda Waller. Either she's a genuinely compelling Well-Intentioned Extremist, and one of the most interesting parts of the movie, or she's evil to the point of being unrealistic, a Smug Snake who's far less competent than the Magnificent Bastard she's sold as, and more interesting in theory than in practice. Though most people praised Viola Davis' performance, they're rather divided on the way that the character was written. In particular, several viewers have argued that killing her entire staff was a completely unbelievable move for Waller, and a lazy way to establish her unsympathetic qualities.
    • Margot Robbie's portrayal of Harley Quinn. While some praise her performance as a different but faithful take on the character who keeps the defining traits of her original counterpart, others felt that Robbie's performance lacked the childlike insanity of the original, coming off less like a mentally insane young woman and more like a drunk college student.
    • Will Smith’s casting as Deadshot has also divided viewers. Some believe Smith to be one of the film’s saving graces, especially as he provides his trademark wit to deliver several of the film’s Actually Pretty Funny moments. Others hated the casting for this exact same reason, believing Smith’s star power to be too distracting to make Deadshot an engaging character, especially as many of the other characters’ roles were reduced in his favour. Less extreme members of this camp agree that, though Will Smith has proven himself to be a talented actor in the past, his performance as Deadshot in the film was simply retreading his more well-known roles.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: Suicide Squad has Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn wearing short shorts and, uh, what else... ah!, and Cara Delevingne as Enchantress in a Chainmail Bikini.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The Stinger consists of Bruce Wayne meeting Waller and her giving him files on the metahumans he's trying to recruit. Not only does this Justice League tie-in have no impact on this film's plot, but it seems even more confusing and useless when Batman was already shown getting similar metahuman files from Luthor in Dawn Of Justice.
  • Cliché Storm: Many viewers were disappointed that the film followed the typical superhero movie formula without changing anything, and the protagonists being "villains" had little to no impact on their dynamic or characterizations. They behaved more like Anti-Heroes than actual villains. Despite initially selling itself as a "new look" into the DCEU similar to Rogue One in the Star Wars films, the Executive Meddling resulted in it devolving into an even more generic superhero movie than its direct predecessors, to the point where its climax is the "portal in the sky" cliche that was also used in two other movies released in that year alone.
  • Crazy Awesome:
    • Whatever possessed the Joker to arrange dozens of knives, bottles, piano keys and other items in a sigil-like manner, and then lie on the floor laughing like a kook, it makes for a striking image.
    • Invoked by the Joker again when he survives the helicopter crash, disguises himself as a SWAT operative (with his name emblazoned across his uniform) and busts Harley out of prison.
  • Creepy Awesome:
    • The Enchantress, as played by Cara Delevingne. Her super-villain scheme may be conventional, but her withered look and golden eyes are genuinely unnerving (especially at the end) and Delevingne's exaggerated dance-like actions while setting up her portal while also calling out the Squad, who she knows is in the same room as her, are quite effective.
    • Killer Croc is creepy and violent. He's also awesome and steals many of his scenes with his hilarious and incongruous lines and overall goofy attitude.
    • Joker, as per usual is psychotic and creepy as hell, but still very entertaining.
  • Critical Dissonance: Par for the course with the DC films at this point, though it is a lot weaker this time around. Critics hated the movie and by opening it had a 26% critic score on Rotten Tomatoes. Fans, however, were more mixed, with a 61% Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score and a pretty good B+ Cinemascorenote  among the general movie-going public, rating particularly well amongst teenage viewers.
  • Critic-Proof: Despite the critical bashing it received, the film smashed records for an August opening and was able to keep its number 1 spot at the box-office for three weeks in a row. It wrapped up its run around $750 million. For comparison, direct competitors X-Men: Apocalypse and Doctor Strange (all three films from separate studios released within a few months of each other) got significantly stronger reviews (52 and 72 on Metacritic, to Suicide Squad's 39) and similar production budgets, yet only grossed $544 million and $677 million respectively. Suicide Squad also had higher home video sales than either, by more than 2-1 in the case of Doctor Strange and 3-1 for Apocalypse.
  • Ear Worm: "All my friends are heathens, take it slow - Wait for them to ask you who you know...".
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Jim Parrack made an impression on some people as a good henchman/foil to the Joker.
    • Batman received a positive reception for his two cameos the film.
    • Slipknot appeared on screen for less than five minutes and died in his second scene with no characterization within the movie itself. Despite (or more likely because of) this, he's become a Memetic Badass by the fandom (see below).
    • Fans of the original comics often praise Jai Courtney's portrayal of Boomerang as the most accurate portrayal of any of the characters, mostly due to him seemingly being the only member of the Squad who the writers and/or executives were not afraid to show was a total scumbag.
    • Katana was very well-received by fans, and even those who weren't familiar with the character liked her.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Harley Quinn as always. Being played by Margot Robbie definitely contributes more to the sexiness factor.
    • The Enchantress as well, though there's a definite element of Fan Disservice given her creepiness.
    • Even the freakin' Joker of all people is getting this treatment. What really helps is that he is played by Pretty Boy Jared Leto and looks more attractive compared to the Jokers portrayed by Jack Nicholson and Heath Ledger.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • A pretty big one with the Arrowverse, mainly because this movie more than any other takes so many villains and characters off the table for the CW shows, Harley Quinn, Deadshot, Katana, and Amanda Waller have all been either killed off or written out thanks to this movie and fans have not been happy. It also made sure that there was little chance of there ever being any new Suicide Squad episodes. Making matters worse is that The Flash established a multiverse exists — and the Arrowverse later introduced its own version Superman — meaning the TV versions of the characters could have continued.
    • Within the larger MCU vs. DCEU rivalry is one between this film and Guardians of the Galaxy due to the perception that this film "ripped off" elements of Guardians such as the Ragtag Band of Misfits cast and contemporary rock soundtrack.
    • A curious case with the Ghostbusters (2016) reboot has arisen after various critics who had praised the 2016 Ghostbusters compared the two movies, often criticizing Suicide Squad as "sexist." Those on the Suicide Squad side have countered by suggesting that the rivalry is due to Suicide Squad earning more in its opening weekend than the 2016 Ghostbusters did in its entire run.
    • A new rivalry has now sprung up with Deadpool (2016) and Captain America: Civil War after at the 89th Academy Awards this film was nominated for and won an Oscarnote  what ile the much more critically and popularly received Deadpool and Civil War both received no nominations. On a side note, Doctor Strange was nominated for Best Visual Effects, but lost to The Jungle Book.
    • Yet another rivalry has sprung up with fellow Hair and Makeup nominee Star Trek Beyond, whose fans feel that the styling effects of Beyond were far more impressive than Suicide Squad's and much more deserving of the Oscar win. Even more putting off for them was the fact that the Oscar reel of Suicide Squad focuses mostly on the hairstyling done for Harley Quinn and Enchantress, rather than the actual make-up prosthetics used on characters like Killer Croc and El Diablo note .
  • Foe Yay: Batman gets snogged by Harley Quinn while giving her the Kiss of Life. From the disgusted look on Batman's face, the feeling is entirely one-sided.
  • Friendly Fandoms: An oddly specific example between the Quinnshot shippers for this movie and fans of the movie Focus. This is because Will Smith and Margot Robbie were in Focus together, playing love interests, and Quinnshot shippers tend to use images from that movie in their fan works for Harley and Deadshot.
  • He Really Can Act:
    • While his talent as an actor was not in doubt, Will Smith was doing a Race Lift and Playing Against Type as the amoral Deadshot. It turned out he did a good job toning down the charm and ramping up the angry asshole, with just enough heart to make him likable.
    • Jai Courtney had some detractors for being placed as a lead character in a number of lesser-received franchise films, but his turn as Captain Boomerang showed him far more interesting as a character actor.
  • He's Just Hiding!: Since El Diablo's body was never recovered, and he seemed to be some kind of Aztec fire god or demon, it's not entirely out of the question that his abilities saved him from that bomb.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Jai Courtney and the actor playing the Arrow version of Captain Boomerang, Nick Tarabay, are both alumnae of the show Spartacus. Also, the announcement of Courtney's casting happened close to Tarabay's first major appearance on Arrow.
    • The speech about Superman tearing the roof of the White House and kidnapping the president becomes funnier when you realize a similar situation has happened before in Superman II and Kingdom Come.
    • Will Smith is an African American playing a Caucasian Floyd Lawton. In one of the recent issues of Suicide Squad Most Wanted, a marksman named Will Evans is called upon the Suicide Squad as a back up for Deadshot and ends up impersonating him. Said "Will" is also a Afro-American.
    • "Without Me" by Eminem plays during a Lock and Load Montage. In the music video for the song, Eminem is dressed up as Robin, and he is a major comic book fan in real life.
    • Will Smith was in I Am Legend, which famously featured an Easter Egg of a billboard advertising a "Batman vs Superman" movie (the writer Akiva Goldsman had been working on such a movie for years). Smith is now a character in the Batman/Superman universe.
    • Meta: David Ayer getting flak for shouting "Fuck Marvel!". Not only Batman can get away with slagging off rival franchises,note  but Suicide Squad won an Oscar while none of the MCU movies got onenote , and as mentioned below, now Suicide Squad has one of the MCU directors for its sequel.
    • Margot Robbie, who played Harley Quinn, later starred as Tonya Harding in I, Tonya, which featured a re-creation of Harding's figure skating routine at the 1991 National Championships... the music for which was Danny Elfman's Batman (1989) theme.
    • Rooney Mara was among the actresses considered to play Harley Quinn in this film. She would later date Joaquin Phoenix who was cast as The Joker in a non-DCEU film Joker (2019). Some DC fans have even pushed for her to play Harley in that film.
    • When the movie was released in 2016, it was attacked by Marvel fans for ripping off Guardians of the Galaxy. Fast forward to 2018, Warner Bros. announced that the sequel/reboot will be written and directed by none other than the Guardians director himself, James Gunn.
    • Not the first time Viola Davis plays a ruthless government agent.
  • Ho Yay: It seems Deadshot and Rick Flag spent half their screentime getting up in each other's faces. Culminates in Flag running up to hug Floyd after the latter takes the shot that activates the bomb that wipes out Enchantress and her mooks once and for all, while gushing about how amazing the shot was.
  • Idiot Plot: The movie only happens because nearly every character in it has no clue what they're doing. This is somewhat justified for the criminals on the squad, but for the Enchantress, Flagg, and especially Waller, it's pretty glaring:
    • The formation of the squad:
      • The film states that the Suicide Squad needs to be formed because 'who would stop Superman if he turned evil'. This ignores the fact that 1) there are other Superheroes in this world (Wonder Woman, the Flash, etc) that would try to stop him, and 2) only two members of the Suicide Squad (Enchantress & Diablo) have any powers, and the rest of the squad aren't any better than regular soldiers when it comes to dealing with metahumans.
      • Waller justifies creating the team by saying that they have built-in deniability if they get caught using supervillains: they can throw the Squad under the bus and say they escaped and wreaked havoc. That's all fine, except, throw them under the bus for what? The plot of the film features a supernatural event that obviously couldn't be the fault of any member of the Squad. Also, if they get caught by who? The government can't criticise Waller's use of the Squad since she literally works for the government and could only start the team with government approval, and it would be difficult to claim innocence to the American public when the Squad was fighting alongside armed forces (meaning the government made no attempt to recapture them).
    • Enchantress' backstory:
      • The Enchantress is only freed from her prison because June Moon, a trained archaeologist, somehow forgets that it's not a good idea to listen to the creepy whispering voice echoing around the cave, and the very first thing she does upon finding the Enchantress' tomb is break open the bottle containing her spirit (something an archaeologist would consider a priceless artefact), allowing the witch to possess her body - though it's possible that the whispering was actually hypnotising June into breaking it.
      • The only reason that Waller falsely believes that she can control the Enchantress is because the Enchantress inexplicably left her heart in the tomb when she escaped. Why her heart was cut out in the first place is never explained, nor is it explained why she wouldn't simply carry it with her.
    • The demonstration at the Pentagon:
      • None of the people Waller is presenting to finds it the least bit unnerving that Enchantress, Waller's "proof" of how capable the Suicide Squad would be, is barely controlled (Enchantress refuses to back down until Amanda attacks her heart), and that her human host says that she 'can't transform into the Enchantress again' directly in front of them.
      • Waller's dossier on the Enchantress includes an image (and presumably hints to the whereabouts of) Enchantress' brother. Considering how little control she has over Enchantress (above), you'd think she would think twice before putting all this information in front of her. This thoroughly bites her in the ass, as Enchantress soon uses this information to find her brother's Soul Jar and release him - kick starting the plot.
    • Flag and Enchantress
      • Waller actively wanted Rick Flag and Dr. Moone to get involved, even though he's her handler and thus the person who will have to put her down if she slips her leash. Anyone with half a brain would realize that's a task you want to give to someone objective. Amanda makes things worse by threatening Moone's safety in front of Flag - telling him that she'll be placed in a medically induced coma if Enchantress begins to act up. This, of course, comes to bite her in the ass since Flag doesn't report when Enchantress goes missing, out of fear for what will happen to Moone.
      • Although Flag not reporting it is forgivable since he's in love with her, less forgivable is the fact that other than one person watching her, there is zero surveillance on Moon/Enchantress. And Moon doesn't let anyone know that Enchantress took her over, especially since it seems harrowing for her - though this again could be out of fear for what Amanda will do to her.
      • By the way, Enchantress' freeing of her brother only worked because when Rick tried to phone Waller, she was asleep and didn't hear her phone because it was on vibrate, and because Waller had zero security measures protecting the brother's Soul Jar (it was on a shelf in a store room).
    • Enchantress goes rogue
      • When Enchantress makes her duplicity clear, Waller decides to stab the heart. Yay... except she just stabs it repeatedly with a tiny instrument, giving Enchantress enough time to absorb some of her brother's power and survive without the heart. Even if Waller didn't plan for that possibility, given her incredible power, her being off her leash for even a few seconds could cause catastrophic damage. You would think she would have a means of instantly terminating her. You know, like she does for everyone else in the Suicide Squad.
      • It gets worse. the means of instantly terminating her is built into the case, in the form of the explosive charge taking up the other half of the case. The one that has to be disabled with Waller's thumbprint every time the case is opened. Literally all she had to do was open the case and wait for the bomb to go off. Maybe give it a toss through a window to save her own skin.
    • Midway city:
      • Waller is in Midway City. The entire mission is to get her out. It's never explained what she was doing there.
      • After the extraction takes place, Waller gets into a separate helicopter than the Suicide Squad, which means when the helicopter is shot down she has none of the help she'd personally invested in. This leads to her capture and Enchantress using her brain to attack several secret targets and create tempting illusions for the Squad when they show up.
      • The helicopter crew for Waller's extraction from Midway City fire off bright chaff despite not facing a conventional foe, and all that does is draw attention, resulting in the helicopter crashing.
      • When Harley attempts to escape, Waller orders Flag to kill her. He tries activating her implant, but the Joker has already disabled that. The possibility of shooting her, since she is only a few feet away, never seems to occur to him.
    • Misc:
      • Did nobody seriously see Griggs give Harley a phone and loudly proclaim that it's from the Joker right in front of them? Seriously, if anyone pointed that out, then the Joker's interference in the plot would have been minimal at best.
      • At the end of the film, Amanda threatens to kill off the squad if they don't return to prison via their neck bombs. But Harley's neck bomb had been disabled by the Joker, so why didn't she kill Waller so she couldn't blow up the squad. Or failing that, why didn't she run and save her own skin?
  • Internet Backlash: When reviews were released in the 30% range for the film following screening for critics four days before the theatrical release itself, fans of the film started a petition to shut down Rotten Tomatoes, the site that aggregated said reviews. Keep in mind that Rotten Tomatoes is not a review site, but instead collects reviews from available sources and comes up with an average rating, and that the film was not released publicly for another four days. The petition's creator admitted up front that it was nothing more than a symbolic gesture, and took it down after a few days but not before the petition was signed over 15,000 times (albeit with a good percentage of those signatures submitted by people who only wanted to mock the idea in the comments).
    • Now that Rotten Tomatoes has started showing a positive reaction from audiences, fans have now moved onto more precise targets for allegedly trying to be buzzkills over a movie that hadn't yet received a public release.
  • It's Not Supposed to Win Oscars: Warner Bros.' spin, until it actually won an Oscar.note 
  • Jerkass Woobie: Several members of the squad qualify.
    • Harley is established as being mentally unstable even before her chemical immersion. In contrast to most masochistic interpretations of the character, she's shown in visible discomfort when the prison guards strap her to a chair and force-feed her through a nasogastric tube.
    • Deadshot's abrasive, but having lost his beloved daughter to his deadbeat ex-wife while he rots in prison earns him some sympathy.
    • Killer Croc. He may be a murderer, but it's not his fault he looks like a monster and even the unfeeling Waller recognised that it was the alienation that turned him bad.
    • Rick Flag is Drill Sergeant Nasty, but it's understandable as his girlfriend is being held hostage and he's facing the very likelihood that he'll have to kill her. Highlighting this is the fact that when he first met the squad members, he did initially show a sympathetic side.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: A lot of people are interested in seeing how an anti-hero/villain-led comic book movie will turn out, along with what this means for the DCEU. Others just want to see a live-action version of Harley Quinn, or Leto's interpretation of the Joker, or both.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • Harley escapes with Joker in the helicopter. Waller orders Deadshot to shoot Harley in exchange for letting him go free, and Deadshot seemingly complies. Who actually thought he was really going to kill Harley at that moment?
    • Joker seemingly goes down with the helicopter during the third act... and unsurprisingly returns unharmed at the end. Then again this is the Joker we're talking about.
  • Love to Hate: Amanda Waller gets this treatment from most of the fandom. She's a stone-cold badass who scares the hell out of everybody, and is portrayed by Viola Davis, who's been getting near-universal praise for her performance... but she's also an Ungrateful Bitch who thinks she can treat the Squad like trained dogs and murders her staff (who, bear in mind, were completely innocent) to cover her own ass after her plan blows up in her face. Most of the fans agree that Waller's a cool character and admire her in a way, while also agreeing that she's a completely heinous person, with some even expressing disappointment that she gets to live at the end after what she did.
  • Memetic Badass: Slipknot. The promotional material has so heavily implied that he will be a Sacrificial Lamb that the fandom has gone the other way, treating him as everything from the strongest member of the Squad to the secret seventh member of the Justice League. Many have taken the statement that he "can climb anything" to the illogical extreme, saying that, for instance, he could beat Superman by climbing to Krypton and getting kryptonite. Ironically, this isn't even the first time Slipknot has gotten this treatment. In the actual Suicide Squad comics, all Slipknot did was fail to strangle some alien robots and end up on the wrong end of Captain Boomerang's Chronic Backstabbing Disorder. Years later, though, some fans noted he'd first appeared tackling the incredibly powerful Firestorm with nothing but a rope, and declared him to be awesome.
  • Memetic Loser: Jared Leto's Joker, for a variety of reasons ranging from his actor's creepy on-set behavior to a character design that some have mocked as ridiculous and overly "edgy", to his extremely limited screentime to his laugh being unsatisfactory, online the character has been subject to wide derision in contrast to the character's iconic and much-beloved portrayals in The Dark Knight, Batman (1989), Batman: The Animated Series and even Jerome Valeska in Gotham. Some people have even said that the Cesar Romero version was more intimidating.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "So that's it then. We're the patsies. We're some kind of Suicide Squad." The last line in particular gets used a lot, with "Suicide Squad" being replaced with the title of another work for the sake of the Title Drop.
    • "The Fresh Prince of Belle Reve"
    • Looks like Boomerang jumping out of a body bag and punching out the first guy he sees is becoming one too, same with him lifting his eyebrows in amusement.
    • "[X] is Jason Todd!" as a way of mocking the absurdity of the pre-release Epileptic Tree that this movie's Joker would be Jason Todd.
    • Many people who found the on-set stories of Jared Leto's method acting more funny than scary have made up similar stories about the cast and crew being terrified by anything Leto does.
    • "This is Katana. She's got my back. She can cut all of you in half with one sword stroke, just like mowing the lawn. I would advise not getting killed by her. Her sword traps the souls of its victims." Explanation 
    • When Slipknot was first revealed for the movie, due to his relative obscurity and the fact that he shares his name with a very well-known metal band, making references to Slipknot when he was brought up was very commonplace.
    • Suicide Squad has an Oscar, let that sink in/Suicide Squad has more Oscars than X Explanation 
      • Also born out of this is a stereotype of DC fans pedantically insisting the movie's Oscar win be mentioned every single time it's brought up.
      • That's "Academy Award-Winning Suicide Squad" to you!/You mean, "Academy Award-Winning Suicide Squad"?
    • “She was fearless, and crazier than him. She was his queen, and God help anyone who disrespected his queen.” A misquoted line from Waller's introduction of the Joker and Harley Quinn, which was soon used in parody edits of unlikely pairings.
    • "Fuck Marvel!" David Ayer repeated the fans' shouts of "Fuck Marvel!" at the film's premiere and, although he quickly apologized, his quote was still brought up as a sign of the Fandom Rivalry spilling into the actual creators on DC's side. However, some disgruntled Marvel fans have started picking up the quote to criticize the Marvel for firing Guardians director James Gunn and Star Wars author Chuck Wendig. The dismissal of Gunn and Wendig have outraged many for making it seem like Marvel is caving to alt-right trolls who targeted the two creators for their liberal views.
    • DAMAGED Explanation 
    • Gang Weed Explanation 
  • Mis-blamed: Some people who dislike the film accused it of proving the DCEU was fundamentally unsalvageable despite the highly publicized Authors Saving Throws after the reception of Batman v Superman. What this overlooks is that the film was already well into development when that happened and the ability to course correct was quite limited. As it turns out, Wonder Woman was a critical and financial success.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • If murdering Robin - a minor - before the events of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice didn't make Joker enough of a monster already, his treatment of Dr. Harleen Quinzell removes any kind of sympathy to the character.
    • Amanda Waller crosses it when she murders her own staff and group of interns in cold blood when the Squad comes for her, in order to cover up her own screw up with Enchantress. These were absolutely innocent people, who didn't have clearance and who were simply rubbed out for Waller's own career. Deadshot is an amoral sociopath who nonetheless has never killed women and children, and it's impossible not to agree with him when he says that Waller, Flagg and Co. by condoning this action have no moral ground over him and the other Squadmates.
  • Narm: Has its own page.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Joker's tattoos and wardrobe may be absurd, but that's The Joker for you.
    • Many viewers love to playfully point out that many songs from the trailers were also in Wayne's World.
    • Harley's reactions from pouting when lectured by Rick Flagg to expressing excitement at the explosive carnage seem childish and silly in many gritty scenes. Then again, it does make her seem all the funnier and out of touch with the world. On a related note, Margot Robbie's accent might not be consistent, but it's quite endearing.
    • Most fans will admit the Squad becoming True Companions so quickly when they barely know one another is a bit silly, but many of them find it endearing, especially in the case of El Diablo, the Squad's most noble member.
    • The overwhelming number of quips is pretty jarring for anyone accustomed to the somber tones of Man of Steel and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, but since the protagonists are okay with casualties and collateral damage, it makes sense for them to be inappropriately chipper.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • David Ayer repeating the fans' shouts of "Fuck Marvel!" at the film's premiere. The next day he promptly apologized, saying he got caught up in the moment and has nothing but respect for the MCU crew, but it's still being brought up as a sign of the Fandom Rivalry spilling into the actual creators on DC's side.
    • It's very unlikely Jared Leto will be able to live down his panned portrayal of the Joker anytime soon, with people forgetting his prior accomplishments in favor of just hating everything he's in. And while Blade Runner 2049 was a better-praised performance, it seems rather difficult he'll fully Win Back the Crowd (not helped by 2018's The Outsider).
  • Older Than They Think:
    • A common complaint about the movie was that they completely wasted Slipknot as a character, being that he only shows up for three minutes to get himself killed by the nano bombs trying to escape after Captain Boomerang convinces him the bombs were a bluff. However, they may not realize that the scene where Slipknot tries to escape after being convinced by Captain Boomerang had been lifted straight from the comics, in a scene that is nearly identical to the one played out twenty-eight years later. In both cases, Boomerang was just trying to see if the bombs were real. There is one crucial difference, however: Slipknot survived the detonation in the comics.
    • A schlocky fantasy-adventure film from Japan, Kunoichi: Lady Ninja (Kunoichi ninpo-cho: Yagyu gaiden), also had a woman doing the same (campy) ritualistic dance like the Enchantress which casts a massive spell with flashing energy and shaking earthquakes.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Batman only gets about 2 minutes of screen time, but par the course with Batman, every second counts.
    • The Flash gets one line during his ten second cameo and still manages to be one of the most memorable parts of the movie.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Harley Quinn/Deadshot has already gotten a name: Quinnshot.
  • The Scrappy: Many fans and critics feel that Enchantress was the weakest part of the movie, thanks to a combination of poor characterization, generic and vague motivations and some occasionally cliche dialogue about darkness and world domination, along with simply being so powerful that she leaves little room for an interesting conflict. Not to mention that she's horribly out of sync with the rest of the movie; watching her battle the Suicide Squad is a little bit like watching the Dirty Dozen fight Rita Repulsa. Cara Delevigne's overacting doesn't help on this count.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Harley/Joker fans have always had Harley/Ivy fans to fight with, but now they also have Harley/Deadshot shippers.
  • Snark Bait: Here.
  • So Okay, It's Average: Outside of critical reviews (which are almost universally negative), the general consensus from most is that it's not the best comic book movie out there, but it is watchable, has some decent action and does have some enjoyable parts due to the reasonably good acting. However, it was vastly undermined by a clumsy plot, incredibly poor editing, and underdeveloped characters.
  • Special Effect Failure: The bizarre CGI effects used for the Enchantress' empowered form. While her usual form is a creepy-looking practical costume with makeup, her empowered goddess form seems to be almost entirely CGI for some reason, despite being just a simple Chainmail Bikini. At times, it appears to be Cara Delevingne's face awkwardly pasted onto a CGI body and headdress, giving her the appearance of a bobblehead.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
    • The movie is actually a more effective substitute of the comic book The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen than its own film adaptation. It has a bunch of surly antiheroes who cross the lines between heroes and monsters (much like the original comic), led by a girl (Harley Quinn) haunted by her affection for a monster (Quinn-Joker=Mina-Dracula), a straight hero who is secretly mourning and grieving for his loved one (Quatermain=Rick Flagg), a villain who has a strained relationship with his daughter (Captain Nemo=Deadshot), and monsters with soft centers and Redemption Quest (Mr. Hyde=El Diablo and Killer Croc). It even has a Lovable Rogue potential traitor in Captain Boomerang (Invisible Man). All of them are also led by a shady intelligence officer (M and Campion Bond/Amanda Waller).
    • Due to the team becoming True Companions in the third act, an element that never really appeared in the comics, it's probably the closest we'll ever get to a Secret Six movie.
    • Some might even consider it an adaptation of Evil Con Carne due to the group of villains working together.
  • Strangled by the Red String: A platonic example. Before sacrificing himself to save the others from Incubus, El Diablo states that, having already lost his first family, he was not willing to lose the surrogate family he had formed with the other members. While this could have been a heartwarming moment to rival that of even The Iron Giant, this feels somewhat forced and confusing when, prior to this scene, Diablo had barely interacted with any of the other membersnote  and his relationship with Deadshot is shown to be strained. He also apparently doesn't think too highly of Flagg.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Quite a few Deadshot fans feel this way about Will Smith's portrayal, in large part because he's played more or less like a typical action hero type, especially a Will Smith action hero type. His death wish is never touched on, his issues with women only crop up with regards to his ex-wifenote , and his relationship with Zoe and her mother is changed to a more typical 'divorced father seeking custody' dynamic rather than Floyd's more unique dynamic in the comics, where he actively wants to distance himself from Zoe in order to keep her safe. For many, the movie's version is essentially just another heroic hitman character without any of Deadshot's unique personality traits.
    • This trope was inevitable seeing that he's one of, if not the most, iconic villain in history, but the changes made to the Joker are divisive at best and absolutely hated at worst. The character's traditional calculating and sinister personality is replaced by that of a generic gangster wannabe, complete with rapper-style bling and tattoos that most iterations of the character would never have. His usually tragically toxic relationship with Harley is also watered down to a version of the Crazy Jealous Guy trope. Some also consider him to be annoying instead of intimidating.
    • Though not to the same extent as the above, some of Rick Flagg's fans have also been let down by his case of Adaptational Jerkass. Flagg, who is usually the Token Good Teammate, acts considerably more conceited and arrogant towards both the squad members and his superiors, and his usual leadership role is more or less demoted to him being co-leaders (if not being replaced altogether) with Deadshot.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • The movie spends a good chunk of its running time building up the Joker as a dangerously psychotic criminal mastermind with a massive crime syndicate and military-grade hardware at his fingertips, but then makes him more-or-less incidental to the main plot — even though making him the Big Bad could actually have improved the story in many ways. Unlike the Enchantress, the Joker is down-to-Earth enough to fight the Badass Normal Suicide Squad on their own terms, yet he could still have been a very plausible threat to Midway City, and making him a major antagonist could have given Harley a much more developed character arc by making her Conflicting Loyalties — whether as a member of the Squad or as Joker's partner — a much more central part of the film. David Ayer himself admitted that he should've made the Joker the main villain.
    • Fans who were looking forward to Katana were disappointed with her relatively small role. Some sites even compared her treatment to that of Jubilee from X-Men: Apocalypse, another Asian superhero who fans were excited for but turned out to be fairly inconsequential in the grand scheme of things. Although she does get more of a backstory, and is at least involved in the central conflict to some extent.
    • It is never fully explored how or why El Diablo can change into a Aztec fire god/demon, or how he even got his powers in the first place. This would have been very interesting if it had been explained at all, and given his death, probably never will be.
    • Captain Boomerang feels criminally underused outside of his arrest and Plucky Comic Relief scenes, usually involving Robbing the Dead or his pink stuffed unicorn.
    • Some looking forward to seeing Slipknot in action were disappointed. He dies in his second scene, and didn't even get a cool introduction.
    • Rick Flagg is given barely anything to do in the film's second half aside from giving orders to the squad. This is especially jarring as, unlike the other characters, he has a personal connection to Enchantress and his main objective is saving her alter-ego. However, much like Superman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Flagg is Demoted to Extra simply because he is not played by a popular actor.note  As a result, the big moments both Harley and Deadshot have with Enchantress in the finalenote  feel as if Flagg should be the character doing these things, and is only not doing them because Will Smith and Margot Robbie are more well-known than Joel Kinnaman. The fact that this version of Rick Flagg is antagonistic and weak compared to his comic book counterpart and other versions (who are usually portrayed as being one of the most moral government officials and one hell of a soldier who is able to keep up with the best of the squad) does not help the case very much.
    • This video lays out clearly every chance for character development the movie missed due to poor editing.
    • Joker's line about his "toys" and the enigmatic nature of the film's true threat beyond the general destruction of Midway City, lead some people to assume that the Clown Prince of Crime had joined up with Intergang — a criminal syndicate using weapons supplied by Darksied to undermine humanity. This could've been a way to tie-in the event of Suicide Squad into the larger Justice League Myth Arc. Instead, the main bad guys were Enchantress and her brother, Incubus, two character few people have even heard of.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • The entire plot of Mad Love — one of the most popular arcs for Harley Quinn and the reason that she was beloved by the audience — was glossed over within 2 minutes of the film in favor of Joker and Harley's criminal streak and Quinn's capture by Batman, which essentially robs Harley of her descent to madness and obsession with the Joker.
    • The film sold us on a story about a team of ex-supervillains seeking redemption as a crack Special Forces team and becoming True Companions in the process, but there are a few problems with the presentation that made it very hard for that premise to live up to its true potential. The Extremely Short Timespan means that there's very little time to believably build the Suicide Squad up as Fire-Forged Friends, since they still barely know each other by the end of the movie. And because most of the running time is consumed by the Squad's very first mission—where everything that can go wrong does go wrong, and they're forced to save the world from another of Waller's recruits—we get very little time to see them functioning together as the hyper-competent team that they're supposed to be.
    • If the villains hadn't decided to become heroes and save the world, there would certainly be possibilities for interesting writing while offering audiences something relatively different.
      The Nostalgia Critic: Screw this scene man, lets give the audience what they goddam paid for.
    • Batman and the Joker both make appearances, yet aside from a car chase scene they have zero interaction. Given that this Batman's Start of Darkness was triggered in part by the Joker murdering Robin it just leaves a particularly juicy plot thread dangling. With Jared Leto expressing doubt over whether or not he'd appear in any future DC films, it seems like this plot point is going to stay unresolved.
    • The movie features both Suicide Squad regulars Deadshot and Captain Boomerang on the same team, as they often are in comics and other media. Often, they can't stand each other due to being total opposites apart from their Improbable Aiming Skills with their weapons, and only work together out of necessity. Here, they barely interact with each other much, if at all, with Deadshot primarily arguing with Flag and Boomerang being little more than a Plucky Comic Relief, leaving some fans disappointed.
  • Too Cool to Live
    • El Diablo, who not only has fire-based powers, but also can turn into a freaking giant fiery skeleton, makes a Heroic Sacrifice.
    • Slipknot.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously: The film was blasted by critics for its pacing and embarrassing performance by Jared Leto as The Joker. However, they all praised Viola Davis's scary charisma as Amanda Waller (which is enough to make the Intro Dump first 25 minutes compelling), Will Smith's portrayal of Deadshot (who is warm enough to make his hitman character charming), and Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn (who was very funny, had No Stunt Double including for the sequence where she had to run across the ceiling in stiletto heels, and acted well enough that her over-the-top Nightmare Fetishist Mad Hatter character was convincing). The movie's portrayal of Harley even made her into a Breakout Character or an Escapist Character, far more popular than anything else about the movie. Some also complimented Jay Hernandez as El Diablo, who has an actual character arc and provides a subdued performance that conveys how it's a tragic one.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • Like Heath Ledger before him, Jared Leto has his work cut out for him to establish his own version of the Joker without being seen as too derivative of his predecessor. At the least, Leto had an Academy Award to his name before he got the part (for Best Supporting Actor, the same category where Ledger won posthumously for his Joker performance), so his ability to act isn't so much the question as much as the impact he can leave as the character.
    • To a lesser extent, Will Smith as Deadshot, Jai Courtney as Captain Boomerang and Karen Fukuhara as Katana following after Michael Rowe, Nick Tarabay and Rila Fukushima, respectively, in Arrow. The latter had the misfortune of being out of focus for a large portion of the film.
    • Several reviews have wondered if the movie might have had better reception had Deadpool (2016), which similarly deals with a violent Anti-Hero, not been released the same year.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • The Enchantress' visions showing Harley Quinn her fantasy, a normal life with Joker, marriage, kids and everything would not nearly be as unnerving as it is when we see the Joker as a normal man (no green hair, red lips and white skin).
    • On an unintentional note, the awkward effects on the Enchantress' empowered form make her face look detached from her body.
  • Ugly Cute: Many viewers find Enchantress's first "dirty witch" form to be more attractive than her One-Winged Angel "Miss Universe" form.
  • Unexpected Character: The team's inclusion in the DCEU was unexpected for a studio that usually fields A-listers like Batman and Superman. With the exceptions of the Joker, Harley Quinn and Deadshot, most of the cast consists of relatively obscure DC villains.
    • The Enchantress is one of the less well-known members of the Squad, despite a number of brief stints with the team.
    • A lot of people had pinned Karen Fukuhara as Plastique, rather than Katana.
    • This will also be the first time in a live action film a fan-favorite like Joker is merely a secondary antagonist.
    • Joker's Number Two, Johnny Frost, had previously only appeared in Brian Azzarello's Joker one-shot comic.
    • Killer Croc is a fairly well-known Batman villain, but he has never been associated with Task Force X before. Notably, King Shark was originally going to be in the film and IS associated with the team, but was replaced by Croc because he would have had to be full CGI.
    • Slipknot makes his adaptational debut here, having previously been a comics-only character with only a few dozen appearances across 30+ years. When announced, he had a lot people scratching their heads wondering who he was. What wasn't unexpected however, was that he was used as the Sacrificial Lamb to show the nano bombs are real, given his obscurity to the public.
    • The Flash appears early in the movie to apprehend Boomerang and his only appearance so far in the DCEU was a trippy dream sequence in "Dawn of Justice".
    • There is an demonic entity also named Incubus in DC Comics that also was an obscure Suicide Squad enemy. How obscure are we talking about? His number of appearances in total can be counted in one hand and even the most hardcore comic book fans would be forgiven for thinking he was created solely for the movie.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Many will concede that Killer Croc's look alone, achieved through practical effects, makes the film indeed worthy of the Best Hair and Make-up Oscar. It puts the likes of the CGI Lizard from The Amazing Spider-Man to shame.
  • What an Idiot!: The film is strung together by many, many poor decisions by most characters, leading to an Idiot Plot.
  • Win Back the Crowd: After concerns over Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice being too dark and serious, many fans looked forward to the movie's (comparably) lighter, funnier tone. However, general audiences were mostly just as divided over the movie than its predecessor, with some Internet personalities, like The Angry Joe Show and Jeremy Jahns, giving the film very high marks, while others, such as Rooster Teeth and Fun Haus, tore it to shreds, and DC fans either praised it as one of the best superhero films created or another on the list of disappointing films forming the DCEU.
  • Win the Crowd:
    • Fans who were concerned that Warner Bros. would play it safe by churning out movies starring Superman, Batman, and the Justice League were pleasantly surprised to hear that this was the first project that they would release on after Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice hits theaters. Many fans are also happy that they're trying to do something different with their shared universe.
    • The announced cast has also been generally well-received in contrast to the casting of Batman, Wonder Woman, and Lex Luthor, which all proved immediately contentious among fans for various reasons. The casting of Viola Davis as Amanda Waller was particularly praised, even by detractors.
    • The second trailer set to Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody". It managed to turn naysayers into fans and had a great effect on the more casual audience at large.
    • Jai Courtney generally has his fair share of detractors in any movie he's been in, but his performance as Captain Boomerang in the trailer has drawn something of a He Really Can Act response. It helps that he also gets some of the funnier moments, and isn't playing a generic Action Genre Hero Guy for once.
  • The Woobie:
    • June Moone is forced to share her body with an undead witch who can take control of her when she's sleeping.
    • Most of the team (save for Captain Boomerang) qualify as Jerkass Woobies, due to being disenfranchised outcasts forced into a life of crime.
    • Though one may not believe it, Amanda Waller could qualify depending on how her yet to be revealed backstory measures up with that of her comic book incarnation (who worked her way out of extreme poverty despite the murder of her husband and two of her children). When she tells Bruce Wayne that she values leverage over friendship, it almost makes one wonder what happened in her past and if she once might have been a decent person.
    • Rick Flag and Katana are Iron Woobies due to their (sort-of) Dating Catwoman and Crusading Widow trauma, respectively, but they keep soldiering on.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?:
    • Downplayed in one case. While most fans were good with the main cast when they were announced, a few were surprised that Will Smith landed the role of Deadshot due to the Race Lift involved. Furthermore, since initial buzz for the film centered on the actors approached while the characters were yet unknown, some expected he was going to play Black Manta or another black supervillain as opposed to a character who has appeared prominently on Arrow. It should be noted that the role was met without controversy, unlike Michael B. Jordan being cast as the Human Torch, but a bit of surprise from fans. Meanwhile, some are just unsure if he can pull off a villainous role that's so heavily against type.
    • Largely averted with the rest of the cast, who have been more well-received as a whole than other casts hired for DC Extended Universe productions.

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