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aka: The Legend Of Zelda Oracle Of Ages

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"I'm sorry I made you worry...But I saw it. A world filled with sorrow and despair...withering away!"
Princess Zelda
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The seventh and eighth games in The Legend of Zelda series were developed by Capcom and released at the same time on the Game Boy Color in 2001. Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages are the first portable Zelda games since Link's Awakening, and use similar graphics and gameplay styles.

Each Oracle game starts with Link being called to a new land by the Triforce. In Seasons he is called to the land of Holodrum, where he witnesses a dancer called Din get kidnapped by the Black Knight Onox, who then sinks the Temple of Seasons into the earth, throwing the seasons of the world into chaos. In Ages Link is sent to Labrynna, where the singer Nayru is possessed by the Evil Sorceress Veran, who uses her powers to travel back in time and manipulate the queen of Labrynna in that time into building an Evil Tower of Ominousness. Link discovers that Din is the Oracle of Seasons and Nayru the Oracle of Ages, and uncovers hints that their capture and the plans of Onox and Veran are just separate parts of a larger, more sinister plot.

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To aid him in his quest, Link receives a signature item in each game. In Seasons he receives the Rod of Seasons, which cycles the seasons through spring, summer, autumn and winter when swung, changing the landscape drastically and allowing him to travel through the land differently. In Ages he receives the Harp of Ages, which allows him to travel back and forth through time, changing the past to change the future and bringing items from one time period into the other. Other new gameplay features include magic rings Link can wear for various benefits, and the ability to call on one of three animal companions to navigate unfriendly terrain and fight enemies. Each game also has slightly different items for Link to use - in Ages the Power Bracelet upgrades into the Power Glove, while in Seasons Link instead trades in the Roc's Feather for the Roc's Cape.

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The true story of the two games is revealed via a "linked game" — the player finishes one game, they receive a password they can input when they begin a new game in the other game. This password triggers new plot developments and storylines to be introduced, revealing it was more than just one evil plan set in motion and to truly save the day Link must go to the other land to save them there.

Capcom would later assist in Four Swords and The Minish Cap.

Chronologically, the two Oracle games take place in the "Hero is Defeated" timeline after A Link to the Past, and either after or immediately before Link's Awakening.


These games provide examples of:

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    Both Games 
  • Aborted Arc: Ambi's arc begins in Ages, but it only receives closure if Seasons is also played.
  • Absurdly Short Level: The Room of Rites only has a few rooms before you face the boss.
  • Almighty Idiot: Because Twinrova sacrificed herself (since Link had pretty much killed her anyway) instead of Zelda, Ganon Came Back Wrong and is resurrected as only a bloodthirsty killing machine.
  • Animal Gender-Bender: Ricky is a male kangaroo with a pouch.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Regrowing bushes will appear whenever you have to throw bombs or seeds.
  • The Artifact: The two games were originally a trilogy, the third of which would have a theme of color, while a remake of the original NES Legend of Zelda was also planned. This still shows up in some ways:
    • The first dungeons of The Legend of Zelda and Oracle of Seasons have similar entrances, layouts, and bosses. Five other bosses from The Legend of Zelda are also used in Oracle of Seasons, and Holodrum's geography has several similarities to Legend of Zelda's overworld.
    • Ages has many dungeon puzzles themed around color; there's multi-colored blocks that ignite torches in different colors depending on which side is showing, the red/blue blocks and crystal switches from Link to the Past return, and color is generally used as a major indicator of how dungeon elements work. Labyrnna's overworld is much more bright and colorful in the present compared to the past, which is desaturated and has an overall dull red and brown color scheme.
    • The 3DS Virtual Console releases treat the games as if they are played on a Game Boy Color, meaning the Advance Shops are inaccessible and there are two rings that you can't get (unless you bring them over from the original cartridges or cheat the password system into giving them to you, that is). Likewise, the Blue Snake in Vasu's shop is inactive because the 3DS doesn't use link cables.
  • Bag of Spilling: You lose most of your stuff in the transition from one game to the next, being left with only four heart containers and a wooden sword. You can pick up your old rings once you reach town, however.
  • Bare-Fisted Monk: Can be invoked by the player. The Fist and Expert Rings allow Link to punch for damage if there are no items equipped on the A or B slots. You're going to need items to advance, but there have been more than a few playthroughs involving as little "equip time" as possible.
  • Bonus Feature Failure: The Bombchus are only acquired as a bonus after starting a New Game+, are not particularly useful at any point in the game, and can only be restocked by buying them at a ridiculous price from one specific, out-of-the-way shop that the game never even tells you about.
  • Bragging Rights Reward:
    • Some of the rings. One is awarded by using a Hero's Secret. Another two can be bought from stores that are only available by playing the game on a GBA. Another ring is given as a reward for beating Ganon in a linked game. There's also the rings you get for killing 1000 enemies and breaking 100 signs. The first ring you get would even count as one.
    • Played with the bonus-items you get when you're playing a Linked Game. They're Bragging Rights Rewards in the first game you play, but since you're able to get them in the middle of a Linked Game, they can get a lot of usage.
  • Broken Bridge: There is always a rock, pit, river, or very large pit that require the power bracelets, Roc's feather, flippers, and hookshot equivalent that open up new areas.
  • Brutal Bonus Level: A linked game has the Hero's Cave, which needs the treasures up to the 7th dungeon to complete. Prepare yourself for some of the most hair-pullingly frustrating puzzles a 2D Zelda game has ever pitted you against.
  • But Thou Must!: Whenever a character gives you a "secret", if you say no to whether or not you'll accept it, they'll just ask the question again until you say yes.
  • Call-Forward:
    • Zelda's character sprite is Marin's with a crown, because Link mistook Marin for Zelda when he first woke up on Koholint Island.
    • A Linked Game ends with Link sailing off into the sea...
  • Challenge Run: The Cursed Ring, which halves your damage and doubles that of enemies, is there for players seeking an extra challenge.
  • The Computer Is a Lying Bastard: The description for the Quicksand Ring reads that it keeps Link from being affected by quicksand — which you would logically only encounter in the Samasa Desert in Seasons. What it doesn’t tell you is that the game defines “quicksand” as any section of flooring that moves Link when he stands on it, even if said flooring is underwater, making the ring significantly more useful across both games than its description implies.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • Both games feature several NPCs from the N64 games. Ages mainly borrows from Majora's Mask, while Seasons opts for Ocarina of Time instead
    • After killing the Twinrova sisters in Ocarina of Time, they say that they'll come back to haunt Link. They probably don't realize it's a different Link, but nevertheless, in the Linked Game, you see what they meant.
    • Dark forces working to revive the recently defeated Ganon? Now where have I heard that one before?
  • Continuity Snarl: Even ignoring the question of canonical order within the pair, these games have some issues fitting into the official timeline. Hyrule Historia places them in the Downfall branch as interquels between A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening, all featuring the same incarnation of Link. However, Zelda seems to know Link only by reputation in a linked game. To make matters worse, A Link Between Worlds seems to offer up yet more contradictions. In the opening animations for the Oracle games, Link is shown approaching the completed Triforce in Hyrule Castle, yet Ganon somehow came back into possession of the Triforce of Power before A Link Between Worlds started. The latter game also makes no mention of Ganon getting resurrected successfully since his defeat in A Link to the Past; even discounting Twinrova's attempt in a linked game, there still doesn't seem to be a way for Ganon to reclaim his piece while deceased, plus the inconsistencies with Ganon being dead versus sealed away. Not helping is the later Zelda Encyclopedia opting to place the games after Link's Awakening with the Japanese version claiming that it features a different Link from those other games. The "official" word just leaves more questions than answers about the games' placement in the timeline.
  • Demonic Possession: Twice; in both cases it's a good thing you have the mystery seeds (from the second dungeon), the seed shooter (from the third dungeon), and the switch hook (from the fourth dungeon).
  • Demoted to Extra: The Master Sword, usually the series' Sword of Plot Advancement, has no involvement whatsoever in the games' story, merely being the final sword upgrade (that is only ever unlocked through the secret system in a Linked Game, to boot).
  • Depending on the Writer: Sources differ on the placement of the Oracle games in the timeline (with it being either an interquel, an immediate sequel, or a far-distant sequel) and whether this Link is the same one from A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening or a separate character.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • When directing you to the next essence, the Maku Trees will use alternate dialogue if you complete dungeons out of order.
    • In rare instances, you can run into Maple on particularly watery maps. If all of her items sink underwater during the collision, she'll treat you to some alternate dialogue.
    • If you manage to beat Twinrova, but lose to Ganon and go back to him, Twinrova will still be defeated.
  • Disc-One Nuke: In a linked game, exploiting secrets allows Link to upgrade his Sword to the Level 2 Noble Sword just before (in Seasons) or after (in Ages) the fourth dungeon. Taken even further, in Ages, you can also immediately upgrade that sword to Level 3, the Master Sword, because you can finish the Chain of Deals by that point.
  • Distressed Damsel: Din via a Crystal Prison in Seasons, and Nayru via Demonic Possession in Ages. In a linked game, Zelda gets it twice: once by a minion of the Big Bad (the Moblin King in Seasons and Vire in Ages), and again by Twinrova after both Onox and Veran are defeated.
  • Empty Room Psych: The rooms for linked secrets have no one in them up until the Playable Epilogue.
  • Everything's Better with Dinosaurs: A red Dodongo named Dimitri that you can ride to swim through fast currents. He can also eat enemies in one gulp. And you can pick him up and throw him to hurt enemies. Also, he's the hardest friend to get a flute for in Seasons (in Ages, you just buy the flute at the store).
  • Full Health Bonus: The Noble and Master Swords can conjure sword beams at full health as usual for the series, but there are rings that will keep the effect active while Link is missing up to three hearts.
  • Grave Clouds: The cemeteries in both Seasons and Ages are perpetually dark and dreary.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • You can actually determine which animal partner you receive by acquiring the flute in one of two ways (either buying it in a shop, or winning it in a minigame), or not acquiring it at all (at which point you get the third option automatically at a certain point in the plot). There are no hints at all to this; none of the flutes other than the automatic one tell you which animal they go to, and the minigames don't even give you an indication that you can win a flute with them to begin with.
    • The uses for some of the rings can be this, since the limited text space the game designates for the descriptions of each one doesn't allow for them to be explained in complete detail. For example, the description for the Quicksand Ring reads that it allows Link to maintain his footing on quicksand, but doesn't let on that the game's definition of quicksand also encompasses regular conveyor belts and even underwater currents.
    • Two of the Heart Pieces can be obtained from Maple and Gasha Trees.
  • High-Speed Train Reroute: Used in the minecart rooms when Link has to either whack the switch with his sword or hit it from afar with one of his ranged weapons.
  • Hijacked by Ganon: The second example within the series (the first being A Link to the Past), but actually not performed by the Trope Namer. The hijacking is actually done by Koume and Kotake, his surrogate parents from Ocarina of Time. Ganon is the Final Boss, but he's not directly involved with the plot other than the fact that the plot was to revive him.
  • Hope Bringer: Princess Zelda coming to Holodrum or Labrynna to ease the populace's fears of the impending crises. Unfortunately, Twinrova uses her to light the Flames of Despair.
  • Hostage Spirit Link: Each game's respective Big Bad will use the Oracle (Or Ambi later in ages) as a Human Shield. Hitting her deals damage to Link, requiring the use of a specific item to separate the hostage from the villain.
  • Human Sacrifice: Twinrova tries to sacrifice Zelda to light the Flame of Despair in order to raise Ganon from the dead. And when you foil their plan, they perform a self-sacrifice, but it messes up the ritual.
  • Imperfect Ritual: The witch sisters Twinrova are preparing a ritual that will resurrect Ganon by sacrificing Princess Zelda, but Link interrupts the ritual. They are forced to sacrifice themselves in order to finish the ritual, which creates a mindless, raging Ganon that Link is able to defeat.
  • Infinity +1 Sword:
    • Two of them, the Master Sword and the Biggoron Sword. There are also tons of items and bonuses that you can only get by playing a linked game.
    • The Red Ring, awarded in Oracle of Seasons by defeating four golden enemies, doubles your sword damage without any drawbacks.
  • Interface Spoiler: If an item has a "L-1" next to its icon in the menu, you'll pick up an upgraded version of it somewhere later in the game.
  • Interquel: Set in between A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening, according to Hyrule Historia. There was evidence to support this before the book's release, including Link's very specific hairstyle in the four games, as well as the boat Link departs on after this series' Golden Ending looking strikingly similar to the one that gets struck by lightning in Link's Awakening. Additionally, the latter game alluded to Link having many adventures after slaying Ganon before his ship sank, so these games cover two of them. Many characters (and sprites) from these games also appear in Link's Awakening, and that makes perfect sense. The Wind Fish, and Link, are dreaming.
  • It's Up to You: In both games, the Maku Trees are unable to discern the location of the final essence Link is searching for, so they leave it up to him to seek them out on his own.
  • Joke Item: You can find magic rings that transform you into certain enemies or NPCs. However, wearing them prevents you from using any of your items or weapons; their only practicality is that they keep you from being eaten by Like Likes.
  • Jump Physics: Subtly improved from Link's Awakening, as jumping during the top-down portions of the game (i.e. almost all of the game) moves you through Z-levels (as in, actual altitude) instead of faking it by putting you in the "jump" state while artificially moving you through Y-levels. This also explains why attacking in the air doesn't hit enemies on the ground, but instead hits the ones that are in the air (meaning you can hit flaming bats if they're low enough, or the jumping Stalfos mid-jump).
  • Last-Minute Baby Naming: Bipin and Blossom, in both games, have trouble naming their son. So they decide to let you, a complete stranger, pick for them.
  • Like Father, Unlike Son: The son of Bipin the Gasha Seed farmer can grow up to have a completely different job than his father depending on certain player choices. While Bipin's son growing up to be either a warrior or a musician has varying degrees of contrast to his father, growing up to be a complete "slacker" contrasts the most with his hardworking father.
  • Luck-Based Mission: In both games, two Heart Pieces can only be gained from Gasha Nuts and running into Maple.
  • MacGuffin: The Essences of Nature in Seasons and the Essences of Time in Ages, sets of items that are necessary to enter the final dungeons of both games.
  • Magic Fire: The three Flames of Sorrow, Destruction, and Despair are used by the villains in order to revive Ganon.
  • The Man Behind the Man: At first, Onox and Veran would appear to be the villains of Seasons and Ages respectively. But later on, it turns out that both of them were actually working at the command of Koume and Kotake, and their actions actually had a deeper purpose: to light some magical flames as part of a ritual to resurrect Ganon, the primary antagonist of the Zelda series.
  • The Maze: The Room of Rites is a tricky type; in order to reach the True Final Boss Link must navigate a seemingly-repeating corridor. (The hint is in the eye statues. Every time you enter a room, they all shuffle to face three directions; the only direction they're not facing is the correct path.)
  • The Mentor: The Maku Tree in both games. After completing each dungeon, they are able to sense that you've just collected another Essence, and are able to give you a hint about where to go to find the next one.
  • Mook Bouncer:
    • Wallmasters, as in other games in the series. At least this time, they are much easier to dodge than in A Link to the Past.
    • For the first time, Floormasters also count as they emerge from the floor to grab you and drag you back to the beginning of the dungeon.
    • In Oracle of Ages, as you escape Veran's Tower, a Wallmaster will grab you and throw you into the room for the final battle against Veran.
  • Nerf: The jumping distance when using the Roc's Feather is shortened compared to the jumping distance in Link's Awakening. This is however inverted in Seasons, where you later pick up an upgrade that lets you jump much farther.
  • New Game+: Beat a linked series and you get a code that lets you do your next playthrough (ideally by switching the order of the games as there are secrets exclusive to both orders) starting with 4 hearts and all your rings, plus a special ring acknowledging you defeated Ganon. The story does start over, though.
  • Nintendo Hard: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening was already a hard game. These games take the stuff Link's Awakening throws at you and take it Up to Eleven.
  • No-Sell: The three "Holy Rings" grant immunity to three different types of damage. The green one in particular can be used to ignore Onox's Human Shield, but it has to be transferred over from Ages.
  • Nostalgia Level: The various references to the first game often involve similarities between dungeons. In particular, the first dungeon of Seasons has a similar layout to the first dungeon of the original Legend of Zelda and even has the same boss.
  • Old Save Bonus: After you beat one version of the game, you are given a Secret (aka a password). Inputting the Secret into the opposite version during the creation of a new save file will alter some minor plot elements, transfer your Ring collection, unlock a new dungeon and exclusive optional items, and start you off with an extra Heart Container.
  • One Game for the Price of Two: Played with: the games by themselves are completely different (items, dungeons, bosses and so on), but if you want to complete the storyline, you need to play a Linked Game requiring both games. And a linked game is a sort of New Game+. You start off with one more heart container than normal and can access more things than a fresh game.
  • Oxymoronic Being: An item, in this case, with the Ember Seeds, which lets you light things on fire, even though those seeds come from trees.
  • Optional Party Member: The animal friends Link encounters. As a rule, one of them will always become Link's permanent partner. The other two will leave never to return. Getting the animal partner you want to befriend for good in each respective game can be a chore.
  • Permanently Missable Content: Both games contain an "Advance" shop that can only be accessed when playing on a Game Boy Advance. In the Virtual Console release of the games for the 3DS, the shop cannot be accessed and the items inside cannot be obtained. Said items are merely an early supply of Gasha Seeds and a ring that's a Bragging Rights Reward, but players seeking to acquire everything will find themselves a couple rings short simply due to developer oversightnote .
  • Playable Epilogue: A non-linked game has this, allowing you to continue to play in the peaceful world while also allowing the use of passwords brought back from a Linked Game.
  • Post-Kiss Catatonia: Link goes into one of these after receiving a Smooch of Victory from Princess Zelda in the linked ending. The Maku Tree in Ages will tear up upon seeing this, given her crush on Link.
  • Random Drops: Most of the rings are obtained randomly from Gasha Nuts, minigames, or Maple. Also, Maple and a Gasha Nut randomly drop a Heart Piece in both games.
  • Regional Bonus: The European localizations remove the aimless dialogue of the Cukemen from the NTSC versions and replaces it with hints about various secrets within both games. Among these is the ability to restore health by sleeping in certain beds — a feature that is present in all versions of the games but never hinted at otherwise.
  • Resting Recovery: For the first time in the series. Link is able to restore his hearts by sleeping in the beds at Impa's Refuge in Seasons and at Nayru's House in Ages.
  • Second Hour Superpower: The plot items in the games (the Harp of Ages and the Rod of Seasons) can only be obtained between the completion of the first dungeon and trying to find a way to the second dungeon.
  • Sequel Hook: Several:
    • During the Playable Epilogue of whichever game is completed first, its respective oracle will allude to events transpiring in the other game's setting, and also mention that Impa has already gone to deal with them. What's more, in Ages, you're told that Queen Ambi has left on a journey of self-discovery after Veran is defeated, setting the stage for her appearances in a Linked Game of Seasons.
    • At the very end of the linked game, you see that Link is heading off in a boat to sea, which doesn't end well for our hero...
  • Sequential Boss: The True Final Boss battles. First A Dual Tennis Boss with Koume and Kotake, then their Fusion Dance into Twinrova, and finally Ganon himself.
  • Shaped Like Itself: Most of the dungeons in both games have layouts based on their names. This is not entirely clear in the beginning, as it is only obvious after revealing the whole map of each dungeon.
  • Side Quest: A bunch are unlocked after you beat the first game and can only be completed with passwords that you use in the second.
  • Smooch of Victory: Defeating the linked games gets Link a kiss from Princess Zelda.
  • Soap Opera Rapid Aging Syndrome: Bipin and Blossom's son grows from a baby to a child during the course of the first game you play, then into a teenager during a linked game. If you choose the Farmer path, he actually looks older than his dad.
  • Socialization Bonus: Each game has two flavors of this bonus. Firstly, a pair of players of either game can link their systems up to trade magic rings, in a manner that ought to be familiar to anyone who's played Pokémon. Secondly, a collection of cryptic passwords, along with vague hints for their intended recipients, are sometimes spoken by NPCs in each game. Writing down the password and telling it to the respective NPC in the other game will unlock a bonus for that game, and occasionally a very powerful one at that. This system is even utilized at the end of each game, too; typing in the password from after the end credits of one game into a new save file of the other will allow one to play a "linked game", which ties together their storylines and even enables a Golden Ending for both of them. The password system was cleverly designed such that, while a single player with both games will be able to fully experience it, it could also be effectively used for a pair of friends who each have a different version.
  • Swirly Energy Thingy: Appear in both games. In Ages, they are time portals between the eras of Labrynna, while in Seasons, they are portals between Holodrum and Subrosia.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: Enforced; both games have an area where you'll need the help of one of the three animal companions to pass an obstacle. Later in the game when one of the three becomes a permanent ally and the only one who will help Link for the rest of the game, an entire region of the world map will be different depending on which companion you're gonna be getting soon, forcing you to go and find them.
  • Unknown Item Identification: Magical Rings must be appraised by Vasu the jeweler for 20 Rupees before they can be worn.
  • The Three Faces of Eve: The three Oracles (shown in the trope page image) are Din, an outgoing dancer (seductress); Nayru, a gentle singer (wife); and Farore, a helpful intellectual (child). Unfortunately, the game which was supposed to feature Farore was canceled. Incidentally, the Oracles share their names with a trio of goddesses in the series mythology (Din, the goddess of power; Nayru, the goddess of wisdom, and Farore, the goddess of courage).
  • Villain Ball: Twinrova fight Link to the death when he interrupts their resurrection ritual and end up having to sacrifice themselves to bring back Ganon, and an incomplete one at that. Koume and Kotake can only be harmed by each other's magic. Why on Earth would they fight him together? Instead of providing Link with the necessary ammunition to take them both down, there's no apparent reason why one couldn't have remained behind to complete the ritual while the other trapped Link in a Hopeless Boss Fight.
  • Warp Whistle: Gale Seeds are used to send Link to various Mystical Trees that he already found anywhere on the maps.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: The Pols Voices? You don't need bombs if you got a flute or a Harp!
  • Welcome to Corneria: For the most part, averted; characters will usually start to say different things in both games as Link advances in his journey. But it's played jarringly straight with the Subrosians in Seasons, who will keep repeating the same bits of dialogue from the first time you meet them well into the epilogue.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?: Moosh freezes up if you try to glide him over a body of deep water, and refuses to enter Sunken City in Seasons for this reason. Ricky also does so, although he claims it's because it "smells like medicine". Similarly, Dimitri finds the sweltering heat of Symmetry City in Ages too unbearable for him to enter. Dodongos dislike smoke, remember?

    Oracle of Ages 
  • Achilles' Heel: Veran is effectively invincible when performing her Demonic Possession, because the heroes don't want to harm her host. However, hitting her with a mystery seed briefly breaks her possession spell, allowing her to be attacked directly. She tries to cover this by investigating mystery seeds early in the story (presumably to defend herself against them), though ironically this leads Link straight to the tree that produces them.
  • Antepiece: The Ancient Tomb has one that's so subtle, many players probably didn't notice: in the room before the boss, there's an obstacle that can be destroyed with a sword swing, followed by another that actually needs a bomb to clear, then you must hit a distant switch with the Seed Shooter in order to open a door, and finally use the Power Glove to lift a heavy obstacle blocking the exit. Those are the items you need to use for each of the boss' four phases, in that order.
  • Arc Villain: When the game is not linked, Veran is the primary narrative villain and the source of all the setting's woes.
  • Bad Future: Inverted — the present's generally bright and cheery while the past is screwed up. Played straight with Symmetry Village, however. You first go there in the present and find some ruins. You then visit it in the past and learn that it's about to be destroyed by an active volcano, and only by restoring the Tuni Nut can the village be saved. One sidequest later, the volcano is made dormant, and you can now visit an actual village in the present.
  • Beat the Curse Out of Him: Unusually for the Zelda series, this is subverted when you can't attack Veran when she's possessing someone because doing so would supposedly only hurt her host. Defeating Veran when she's possessing Nayru and later, Queen Ambi requires shooting Mystery Seeds at her and to remove Veran's spirit from her body, and then switching places with Veran to attack her before she can repossess her host.
  • Bookends: The main treasure of the first dungeon is the Power Bracelet, and the main treasure of the last dungeon is the Power Glove. Both dungeons are even located in the same areas of the Overworld: one in the present, and one in the past.
  • But Now I Must Go: After he stops Twinrova's plans to revive Ganon from coming to fruition, Link bids farewell to a crowd, departs Labrynna and sets off to the sea on a sailboat by himself.
  • But Thou Must!: If you refuse to give the Gorons the Bomb Flower to save the elder who's crushed under a pile of rocks, the Goron will say that the elder will die without it, and then repeat if you refuse again.
  • Call-Forward: When Link washes up on Crescent Island, the Tokay make off with his things due to him allegedly not having any claim over them. In Link's Awakening, we see that Link has made it a habit to carve his name onto items such as his sword and shield, showing how he's learned from these events.
  • Chekhov's Gun: The sealed-up entrance to the Moonlit Grotto (Level 3) in the past is the entrance to the Sea of No Return, the location of the Level 8 dungeon, the Ancient Tomb.
  • Climax Boss: Veran-possessed Nayru, who is fought shortly after completing the sixth dungeon.
  • Continuity Nod: The time travel mechanics borrow heavily from the Dark World mechanics in A Link to the Past, especially during the part of the game when you only have the first two tunes for the harp — the Tune of Echoes to open time portals that work like the Dark World portals, and the Tune of Currents that serves as a one-way transportation from the past to the future (while opening a temporary portal back in your arrival point), working like the Magic Mirror.
  • Crescent Moon Island: Moonlit Grotto, the game's third dungeon and the location of one of the Essences of Time, is on Crescent Island. The dungeon entrance is located right in the middle, and is inaccessible in the past because the ocean blocks it off from the rest of the island. In the present, however, the lever of water is lower, allowing the dungeon to be reached. Much later in the game, when Link has gained the ability to swim in deep water, he can reach the entrance in the past, and it turns out to be the path leading to the game's final dungeon.
  • Cutting the Knot: There's a room in the Crown Dungeon which has an invisible floor. The intended solution is to use the Cane of Somaria to feel out the path to the chest which contains a key, but if a Moblin happens to spawn near the chest, you can just use the Switch Hook on it to bypass the puzzle completely.
  • Developers' Foresight: In a linked game, you can advance toward Symmetry City without needing to rescue Zelda from the Black Tower. However, Mutoh won't appear near the bridge until you go back and save her.
  • Dig Attack: The miniboss of the Moonlit Grotto is a mole with a drill nose that attacks from underneath (and is invincible while doing so). You make it vulnerable to attack by digging up its Worm Sign with the shovel.
  • The Ditz: The Tokay mean well, but aren't very bright. They've come up with an elaborate bartering system instead of simply using Rupees, some can't count past three, and they regard all Hylians as Tokay without tails and long ears.
  • Dual-World Gameplay: Time portals connect the past and future. A few of them are conveniently opened at the start of the game when Nayru's time powers are used, and the Harp of Ages lets Link open them on his own. Once Link learns more songs, he can travel to the future from the past, and by the end of the game he can jump back and forth anywhere he wants.
  • Endless Daytime: Veran uses Nayru's powers as the Oracle of Ages to create perpetual daytime and manipulates Queen Ambi into making the residents of Lynna Village work on the Black Tower 24/7.
  • Evil Tower of Ominousness: The Black Tower, built by Queen Ambi at Veran's urging, which looms over Labrynna and is built from the press-ganged labor of the country's people.
  • Final Dungeon Preview: Link enters the Black Tower while it's under construction early on to get a shovel. After it's completed, it turns into the final dungeon of the game.
  • Fire-Breathing Diner: This happens to two Tokays after they eat the Ember Seeds that you traded to them for Dimitri.
  • Flipping Helpless: Eyesoar, the boss of the fourth dungeon, is beaten by flipping it with the Switch Hook.
  • Fun with Palindromes: Symmetry City's survival depends on the total equality between the two sides. The name of the artifact that maintains the balance? Tuni Nut!
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Link isn't actually present in the scene where Veran mentions what her weakness is. All he knew is that she "desires" them, according to Ambi, which could mean anything.
  • Global Currency Exception: With all his gear getting stolen, Link has to repeatedly trade three of them (Shovel, Power Bracelet and Roc's Feather) until he can get the Mystical Seeds needed to permanently buy the latter two back.
  • God Save Us from the Queen!: Queen Ambi of Labrynna becomes cruel and merciless while under Veran's influence, at first because Veran is manipulating her through a possessed Nayru, and later on because Ambi is possessed herself. She seeks to complete the Black Tower as a testament to her greatness as queen, and is mentioned to have anyone who badmouths her thrown into her palace dungeons.
  • Grandfather Paradox: Ralph confronts Veran, possessing his ancestor Queen Ambi, revealing his development into being willing to protect his nation at the cost of his own existence. However, Veran easily defeats him.
  • Grimy Water: The southwestern sea, until you complete a quest to cleanse it of the filth.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • There is a ring located behind a bombable wall at Rolling Ridge. Bombable walls normally have cracks present to alert the player to their presence, but there are no cracks at this spot nor is there anything else in the game to indicate its presence (aside from the sound you hear if you happen to bang against it with your sword). In addition, there are two other rings that can only be acquired via mini-games, but in both cases the ring rewards are randomized with more common rings that are not exclusive to the mini-game. Meaning even if the player masters the mini-game they likely won't realize they can win an exclusive ring if they keep winning unless they look it up or get lucky and win them early on.
    • The Hero's Cave has a puzzle room where the player must step on all the blue tiles to turn them red in a continuous, uninterrupted path. However, there will always be one blue tile left. Are you doing something wrong? No, this is by design — you're meant to use the Cane of Somaria to cover up the blue tile with a red block, and that makes the chest appear. There are no hints you're meant to do this, and the solution sounds more like a fan rumor than an actual developer intent.
  • Human Shield: Veran's possession ability is a variant; as she laughingly points out to Ralph in multiple cutscenes, trying to strike her will only hurt her victim.
  • Interspecies Romance: The Maku Tree has romantic thoughts about Link, which is more of an interkingdom romance.
  • Jerkass: Some of the Tokay. Upon finding you passed out, they decide to loot your body of your possessions. Then, seeing you wake up, they decide to run away instead of giving your stuff back or making up an excuse. One of them in particular stands out, as he calls your stuff his, and requires you to get other things in order to get your stuff back, despite Link seeing him take them.
  • Lizard Folk: The Tokay, anthropomorphic lizards from a tropical island and with a penchant for theft.
  • Lost in Translation: The name of the Tuni Nut is translated directly in some languages, ruining the pun.
  • Meanwhile, in the Future…: The story progression can be monitored by the progress of the final dungeon, regardless of what era you're in.
  • Mini Game Zone: Rolling Ridge in both the past and the present, where the Gorons have set up various establishments because of a game craze. Several of them are mandatory for Link to reach the sixth dungeon.
  • Missing Secret: If you play Ages first, there's one square on the map that you'll never be able to explore.
  • Mole Monster: The Moonlit Grotto miniboss, Subterror, is a mole-like creature with a drill for a nose. It chases Link around its room while burrowing in the ground, leaving a small raised trail to mark its position. It cannot be harmed while in this state, so Link must use the shovel to dig it up and expose it to attack.
  • Morton's Fork:
    • Of a benign sort. There's a Goron in the past who asks you for some Ember Seeds and Bombs to help him dig for treasure. If you hand them over and come back later, you'll see he's blown out the wall and revealed two treasure chests. He tells you to pick one, but your choice is actually completely meaningless since their contents are identical anyway. note 
    • A less benign example is the Boss Key in Mermaid's Cave. You're faced with two levers and have to pull them until the chest containing the key appears, with snakes falling each time it doesn't. Logic would dictate that there is one correct lever and one incorrect lever, but the truth is that both levers always do the same thing. If the game doesn't feel like giving you the key yet, they will both drop snakes. If it's decided it wants to let the chest spawn, then both will spawn the chest.
  • Narrative Shapeshifting: Link performs some impressive contortions when telling the Funny Joke to the depressed boy in Lynna City, as he's otherwise as silent as ever.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero:
    • The only reason Veran is able to possess Naryu is because Link opens the barrier separating the two in a But Thou Must! moment.
    • A boulder acts as a roadblock in front of the second dungeon. When Link lifts that boulder, the dungeon collapses, with the Maku Tree revealing said boulder was a support stone that kept it standing. Luckily, you're able to use time travel to access the dungeon in the past.
  • No-Gear Level: When Link's raft capsizes and he washes up on Crescent Island, the Tokay rob him of all his tools and Link has to find them all over the island.
  • Now, Where Was I Going Again?: Aside from both the past and present Maku Trees, a Goron in Rolling Ridge will give you hints on what you need to do next. This one is mainly useful in the sequence you need to do in order to get to the sixth dungeon.
  • Peninsula of Power Leveling: After a certain point in the game, the Black Tower in the past becomes a pseudo-dungeon, allowing you to travel within and battle dozens of enemies without actually entering the interior. This is perfect for grinding with Gasha Trees, when there is plenty of soft soil littered close to the Tower for quick access. (1. outside the Toilet in Lynna Village; 2. South Shore; 3. east of the Restoration Wall; the latter two merely need the Roc's Feather to reach)
  • Permanently Missable Content: If you play Ages first as a non-linked game, there's one square on that game's map (an island in the ocean) that you'll never be able to explore.
  • Plot Tunnel: Link gets shipwrecked on Crescent Island, and cannot leave until after completing the third dungeon, when Dimitri can swim Link back to the mainland.
  • Puzzle Boss: Smog from Ages, who acts as a sort of reverse Asteroids Monster. The puzzle involves placing blocks using the Cane of Somaria to force his assorted parts to combine into a form you can attack.
  • Ripple Effect-Proof Memory: Applied inconsistently. The residents of Lynna City are aware that the Black Tower is getting taller in the present as it gets built in the past, but other instances of changes in history (such as Link saving the life of King Zora) go unnoticed.
  • San Dimas Time: Veran goes back in time to alter things in her favor. Some of the effects are instantaneous, while others, like the construction of the Tower, are incremental based on your progress through the game.
  • Shadow Walker: The boss of the Moonlit Grotto teleports around its arena, appearing directly behind the player in a puddle of shadow, disappearing if you turn to face it. How fortunate that the dungeon's item allows you to bounce seeds off walls!
  • Shell Game: The final puzzle in the Black Tower before facing Veran herself is over a dozen stairways. Only one of them will lead to the final level, and taking the wrong one will take Link to a hallway filled with Lynels. The trick is with one of the four fireballs that surround Link, then dart around the room. The fireball standing right behind him when he entered will lead Link to the correct path.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Ambi's lover, the lost sailor whose disappearance caused her to build the tower and weakened her to Veran's manipulations, is essentially responsible for the entire plot despite being absent from the game. Subverted, however, in that he does indeed appear, but he is stuck with a bout of amnesia due to his condition, which doesn't make his presence obvious.
  • Stealth-Based Mission: In Ambi's Palace, Link must sneak past the guards without being seen; if he's spotted on the palace grounds he will be instantly returned to the entrance, while in the palace proper the guards forgo simply kicking you out and move to attack you directly.
  • Super Drowning Skills: Unlike in Seasons, this continues to be played straight even after getting the flippers, because another item that Link acquire much later in the game is required for swimming in "deep water" such as in the sea.
  • Swap Teleportation: The Switch Hook (and its upgraded version, the Long Hook) use this principle for a Teleport Gun with a Grappling-Hook Pistol aesthetic, allowing Link to fire it at loose objects like enemies or clay pots and instantly swap positions with them.
  • Taken for Granite: Some creatures and people are petrified due to the time distortion.
  • Take Our Word for It: Since Link can't speak, the animation for the Funny Joke is best described as interpretive dance.
  • Time Paradox: A few of the Ontological variety turn up from Link ferrying objects back and forth in time:
    • In the past, Link needs a bomb flower to free the Goron elder from a pile of rubble. There are no bomb flowers in the past, however, so Link heads to the future, gets one of the flowers that the future Gorons are growing, and brings it back in time to use. Inspired by this, the ancient Gorons take up bomb flower cultivation and as a result end up creating the same crop from which Link will take a flower to bring back to the past.
    • During the trading sequence, Link obtains a vase from a hungry Goron guard in the present, who offers to trade his family heirloom in exchange for some rock brisket. Link then trades this vase to the Goron guard in the past, who is looking for an heirloom to pass down to his descendants, placing it back in the family's care until it will one day pass to a hungry guard who would rather have some tasty rock brisket...
  • Time Travel: A central mechanic. Link uses a magical harp to play tunes that send him back and forth through time, allowing him to set up events in the past to change the present to meet his needs.
  • Timey-Wimey Ball: This game happily juggles several balls at once. The game mostly goes with the idea of San Dimas time — as Link proceeds through the game, work on the Black Tower in the past continues, and it grows taller in the present in time with its construction in the past. However, it's not consistent. To list some of the problems that arise:
    • The third dungeon, Moonlit Grotto, is entered in the present, and takes the form of a cave with a face. In the past this same cave is sealed because it is missing an eye. A Tokay near the cave in the present says that long ago a "Tokay with no tail" (what they call Link) opened the cave, something which Link hasn't done yet and will not until the end of the game. At this point Link doesn't even know enough (the Tokay's remark notwithstanding) to know that opening the cave in the past is something he will have to eventually do.
    • There are several Stable Time Loops. For one such instance, the Goron vase Link gets from a Goron in the present is the same vase Link must now go and give to the Goron's ancestor, who says he will pass it down through the family. Even with the same event, the game fails to be consistent. The Gorons of Rolling Ridge in the present give Link a Bomb Flower in thanks for defeating the Great Moblin, after which the Maku Tree tells Link that his name has suddenly appeared in legends as a Goron hero who saved their Elder centuries ago. However, before you defeat the Great Moblin, the Gorons mention that long ago a young boy brought Bomb Flowers to Rolling Ridge and they're now the Goron staple crop.
  • Verbal Tic: The Tokay in the Japanese version have a Pokémon Speak tic of using "toka" at odd moments. This was removed in the English version since Western audiences don't find that quite as endearing.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: There's hand in a toilet asking for paper, and you can throw various things into the toilet and get responses. Which include a bomb.
  • Voodoo Shark: The eighth dungeon is in the past, located in the part of the world that in the present is the Yoll Graveyard. So why can't Link just go to the graveyard, play the Harp of Ages and warp to the dungeon entrance instantly? Because if you attempt to warp in the Graveyard, "a mysterious force" immediately sends Link back to the present. This is in so you don't just skip right to the dungeon entrance as just described and must do the sidequest to get in there another way, but this "mysterious force" raises a lot of questions. There's a couple of hints it's Veran, since the Black Tower is another small spot where you can't time warp, and the point where you would be going for the eighth dungeon is right after the Black Tower is completed and Veran's power intensifies, but even if you try to warp before that point, you get the same message.
  • Waterfront Boss Battle: The boss of the sixth dungeon moves back and forth between the surface and underwater.
  • Where It All Began: The eighth dungeon is located in the same area as the first one, just in the past instead of the present.
  • Womb Level: Jabu-Jabu's Belly has Link dive into the mouth of a giant fish and explore his cavernous innards.
  • Yin-Yang Clash: The Armos Warrior wields a supposedly unbreakable sword and a supposedly unbreakable shield. You can only defeat him by tricking him into hitting the one with the other, breaking both.

    Oracle of Seasons 
  • Absurdly Short Level: Onox's Castle only has a few rooms before you face him.
  • Arc Villain: When the game is not linked, Onox is the primary narrative villain and the source of all the setting's woes.
  • Beneath the Earth: Subrosia, a subterranean world beneath Labrynna filled with seas and rivers of lava.
  • Bizarre Seasons: The seasons are all a jumbled mess because of the Oracle being imprisoned and the Temple of Seasons being sunk below the earth, causing different parts of the land to become affected by different seasonal conditions from each others.
  • Broken Bridge: A literal one gets fixed by parking a ship in the gap.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: The owners of the Subrosian Smithy. Rather than offering to do a job, they will wait for Link to ask, and will only do it if he bluntly demands the job to be done and refuse if he asks politely.
  • Chain of Deals: In both games, the end reward is the next level sword. Yet you can get the sword without even starting the chain, as the end result isn't the sword itself, but rather a hint. Even if it isn't necessary to obtain the sword, it is still highly recommended to complete the chain up until you give the Mushroom to the Witch in Sunken City so that she can then sell magic potions for you.
  • Chekhov's Gun: In Level 3, Poison Moth's Lair, just a few rooms from the entrance is a trampoline that Link can't reach in an apparently wide-open space. Link proceeds to use another trampoline later in the dungeon, but the first trampoline is much more important, because the floor right above that is actually Mothula's room. Should Link fall into the pit during the Boss Battle, he must use the aforementioned trampoline to bounce back.
  • Chimney Entry: Link has to enter the chimney of a woman's house during the winter in order to gain access to the second dungeon. She initially mistakes him for Santa Claus or, in the European version, a chimney sweep.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • Most of the other games in the series that had been released at the games' time are referenced. Subrosia bears more than a passing resemblance to the Dark World of A Link to the Past, and Link's Awakening is also heavily borrowed from (which was fairly easily done, as the Oracle games are built on the same engine as Link's Awakening).
    • There's a windmill where a chiptune version of the Song of Storms plays.
  • Degraded Boss: A cross-game example: The boss of the Face Shrine (the sixth of eight main dungeons) in Link's Awakening makes a return as the mini-boss of the second dungeon and later of Onox's Castle.
  • Demoted to Extra: The Gorons. In Ages, Link requires their help in order to enter two dungeons, but here, they're superfluous to the main story and are only pertinent to a selection of sidequests.
  • Developers' Foresight: It's possible to access the remains of the Temple of Seasons earlier than intended by using Pegasus Seeds and the Roc's Feather in lieu of the Roc's Cape. However, the dungeon accessed from the Temple Remains is blocked off without a certain NPC present, and they won't show up until the time is right to do so. There's also a replenishable source of Pegasus Seeds in the area to ensure that you don't become stuck there.
  • Dual-World Gameplay: A downplayed example. The Rod of Seasons changes the seasons but you remain in the same world. The effects are the same, though: the environment changes to open/close new paths depending on the season, like snow piling up or lakebeds drying up. Subrosia is a more straightforward example, being a subterranean land that holds the Temple of Seasons, a few key items and events, and the eighth dungeon.
  • Early Game Hell: The early-game is a little more difficult in Seasons than Ages. For one, the game throws sturdier enemies at you from the start. Additionally, the Roc's Feather and Zora Flippers are obtained much later than in Ages. To make up for it though, the player does not have to go through as much effort to obtain the seeds as they did in Ages, and it's significantly easier to obtain rupees, especially if one has a guide.
  • Endless Winter: Eyeglass Lake, the Western Coast, and the Temple Remains are placed in a perpetual, unnatural winter after Din is captured; you can later change the seasons yourself with the Rod of Seasons, but they always return to winter after you leave. Goron Mountain naturally experiences eternal winter, but it gets even colder than normal with the seasons in chaos.
  • Fisher King: Onox kidnapping Din and sinking the Temple of Seasons throws all 4 seasons out of control in Holodrum.
  • Fission Mailed: If you talk to the sign shop owner in Subrosia after destroying 100 signs, the startup screen will appear as if the game had been reset. However, you'll return back to the shop after a moment and get a ring commemorating your hatred of signs.
  • Four-Seasons Level: A core game mechanic. By swinging the Rod of Seasons, the seasons change and new paths open. Spring lets flowers bloom, Summer drains water and raises vines, Fall covers holes with leaves and helps mushrooms ripen, and Winter freezes water and trees lose their leaves, allowing Link to pass through.
  • Global Currency Exception: Subrosia uses chunks of ore as currency instead of Rupees.
  • Guide Dang It!: Unless you're following a guide or basing off of past playthrough experience, you are unlikely to know that you can use the Rod of Seasons to bat away the trapped Din being used as a Human Shield when fighting Onox. Or you could just bring along a electricity-negating Green Holy Ring and ignore her completely.
  • Hailfire Peaks: The Sword-and-Shield dungeon. The floor shaped like a shield is ice-themed, while the floor shaped like a sword is fire-themed. This is reflected in the miniboss, Frypolar, who has both a fire and ice form and switches between the two of them when hit with Mystery Seeds.
  • Hero Secret Service: In a Linked game playthrough, the troupe of performers that Din is found with reveal themselves to be Hyrulean knights in disguise, there to escort the oracle safely out of Holodrum.
  • Hollywood Magnetism: The magnet gloves. Almost all objects which you can attract towards you/pull yourself towards are not only magnets, but monopolar magnets (the gloves switch between a north and south magnetic charge so you can push and pull). However, they also affect Iron Mask and Darknut enemies, due to their metal mask and armor.
  • Human Shield: Onox uses the crystallized Din as one. Striking her with the sword will hurt Link; in order to create an opening to hit Onox, he needs to use the Rod of Seasons to knock her away.
  • Interspecies Romance: Link woos and dates the Subrosian pop star Rosa so that he can borrow her Skeleton Key to unlock a few doors.
  • In the Hood: All Subrosians wear hoods that leave nothing of their faces visible except their large, white eyes.
  • It's Always Spring: For most parts of Holodrum, springtime is the default season, seen both in the time before Din is captured by Onox and during the Playable Epilogue after she’s rescued.
  • Lethal Joke Item: The Fool's Ore which two Subrosians give you after they steal your Roc's Feather is, for the most part, a useless piece of junk that does nothing. However, if you dig up a Fire Pokey, you can one shot it with the Fool's Ore (it takes several hits from the sword to do the same thing). Unfortunately, Fire Pokeys are the only enemy you can use it on, since you leave it behind when you get the Roc's Feather back.
  • Lethal Lava Land: Subrosia is a volcanic underground world filled with lava pits and the occasional eruption for you to dodge, but it's really more of a subversion: there are few enemies, and the inhabitants are friendly.
  • Magic Wand: The Rod of Seasons, which is used to cycle between different seasons. It can also be used in a physical capacity to aid in the fight with Onox.
  • Magnetic Weapons: Link's magnetic gloves. In order to defeat the dungeon boss, he has to crush it by directing a giant spiked ball with them.
  • Mass Monster Slaughter Sidequest: An old man encountered in a cave near the Gnarled Root Dungeon tasks Link with killing four unique gold-colored enemies, which only spawn once the quest is issued, for reasons he doesn't bother explaining. Once Link hunts down the enemies, he's rewarded with the Red Ring, a magical item that doubles his damage output.
  • Match In A Bombshack: The Moblin King will hole up in a shack where he has his soldiers work on making a new supply of bombs. Players are able to light the bombs using any fire item and leaving to blow up the building. Doing it too often, though, and Link gets caught and sealed within the exploding building.
  • Moth Menace: As one might expect from a dungeon named "Poison Moth's Lair", its boss is a cyclopean Mothula, gigantic moths that were introduced in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.
  • Mythology Gag: There are a ton of references to the first game, which makes sense, considering that these games began development as remakes of the NES games.
    • The first level has a similar layout to the first level of the original game, and the same bosses are also featured.
    • Dodongo returns to his role as the second boss; Gohma (actually the last level boss to appear in the original, first showing up as the boss of the sixth dungeon) is up fourth; Digdogger is again the fifth boss; Manhandla, the third boss of the original game, guards the sixth dungeon; and a two-headed Gleeok (like the others, a recurring boss in the first game, ranging in head count from two in its initial appearance as the fourth dungeon's boss to four as the eighth dungeon's boss) guards the seventh dungeon.
    • Mothula, boss of the third dungeon, is also a returner, but from A Link to the Past rather than the first game.
    • The miniboss of the Dancing Dragon Dungeon, a shrouded wizard called Agunima, is Agahnim from A Link to the Past in all but name, sharing a similar-sounding appellation in addition to his appearance, fighting style, and spinning animation when defeated.
  • Non-Indicative Name: The Woods of Winter's default seasons include all of them but winter. Only by using the Rod of Seasons can it be brought to the area.
  • Revive Kills Zombie: A variant. The Rod of Seasons carries the blessings of Holodrum's spirits of nature and is used to bring life to the land. As such, the only enemies it's effective on as a weapon are the undead ones — Stalfos, Gibdos, Ghinis, and the two Poe Sisters.
  • Saharan Shipwreck: The Piratians' ship is stuck partly in the Samasa Desert and partly in Subrosia. A quest revolves around getting them unstuck so they can dock elsewhere and fix a Broken Bridge.
  • Save This Person, Save the World: Saving Din is the only way to put the seasons back in order.
  • Sequence Breaking:
    • Since you only need the Flippers from Sunken City to explore Eyeglass Lake, it’s possible to complete the fifth dungeon before the fourth one.
    • It is possible to skip the Subrosian Dance to get the Level 1 Boomerang, by using a bomb to activate the switch in the winter tower. You’ll still obtain its upgrade inside the Ancient Ruins later on, meaning there are no repercussions for playing this way.
    • You can obtain the next level sword without even starting the Chain of Deals, since all the trade sequence gives you is instructions on how to find the sword — that is, to keep heading west through the Lost Woods, each time in a warmer season.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Several to Capcom, who helped make these games.
      • In the fourth dungeon, there is an underground platforming section where you cross a chasm by jumping across blocks that appear and disappear in a preset sequence, a very common obstacle in the Mega Man series.
      • Once you destroy its four heads, Manhandla moves in an infinite-shaped (or sideways 8) loop, just like the Alien Final Boss of Mega Man 2.
      • Onox's Scaled Up form has a marked resemblance to Sigma's final form in the original Mega Man X.
    • The eighth boss is one to Castlevania by being a giant Medusa Head.
  • Snot Bubble: The Maku Tree always has one of these, despite being, well, a tree. Popping it with your sword is the only way to get him to wake up and talk to you.
  • Stealth-Based Mission: The Subrosians are involved in a lot of these. You have to stalk Rosa to find the first portal into Subrosia, and later on the Strange Brothers steal your Roc's Feather and you have to follow them to recover it. You can do this again to get different rewards.
  • Sunken City: the aptly-named "Sunken City" in East Holodrum, in which most of the houses are flooded because the ice caps from the north melted.
  • Taken for Granite: The 8th boss is a giant Medusa head, which fights by throwing spheres that petrify Link on contact.
  • The Thing That Would Not Leave: The pirate captain and his crew take up residence in a random house in Subrosia while their ship is undergoing repair, much to the dismay of its original owner. Humorously, you can torment him a little by popping in for a visit after they've left.
  • Unnaturally Looping Location: Onox's Castle functions this way. There are no barricades to keep you from advancing, but each doorway loops you back to the room you just left until you defeat the enemies inside.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
    • The game lets you throw a pirate's skull around in the desert, and he naturally complains about getting sand in his mouth or water up his nose if you throw him on the ground or in a puddle.
    • You can blow up the Great Moblin's home after he moves into the Sunken City. You gain nothing for doing so, either.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: You can blow up the Moblin King's Sunken City house in Seasons with a bomb or ember seed, but do it three times and he catches you and throws you inside with the bombs, resulting in a Non-Standard Game Over.
  • Visual Pun: Onox uses Din as an actual Human Shield against you.
  • The Walls Are Closing In: Present as a trap in the Ancient Ruins. If Link fails, he will die instantly, regardless of how much life he has.
  • Weather-Control Machine: Onox uses Din's powers to mess up the seasons. Later on, Link gets a rod that can do so whenever he's on a tree stump.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?:
    • The members of the troupe (in a Linked Game, they're actually Hyrule Knights undercover) that accompanies Din disappear from the game after being blown off in Onox's attack. The tambourine girl does reappear during the Playable Epilogue, but she doesn't elaborate on what happened to her in the meantime or where the other members are, if they survived at all.
    • Onox sinking the Temple of Seasons underground also is never undone. Once Din is rescued, the seasons return to normal, and the temple remains in Subrosia during the epilogue with none of the characters caring to comment on it.
  • Worthless Yellow Rocks: Valuable items like Pieces of Heart and Gasha Seeds are sold in junk stores in Subrosia. Another Subrosian is tantalizingly seen throwing such items into lava in order to cause a volcano to erupt. Sadly, they cannot be caught out of the air.

Alternative Title(s): The Legend Of Zelda Oracle Of Seasons, The Legend Of Zelda Oracle Of Ages, Oracle Of Seasons, Oracle Of Ages

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