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  • For those who wanted to know about the main page's image: Ladies and gentlemen, The Duke Nukem Forever Balls of Steel Edition!
  • In Japan Ōkamiden had an edition in Capcom's internet store with a chest looking like those in-game, an adorable Chibiterasu plush, a small soundtrack CD (The full soundtrack had to fill 4 CDs), one story book, and if you pre-ordered it, an Issun charm. And the game of course. The Box is huge enough when rearanged to hold both games in the series, and some other collectibles.
    • Likevice the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Spirit of Justice had an edition in a box looking like a small cupboard, a drama CD, a plush of Bokuto's dog, a bag kinda looking like his, a random 8bit charm, and a Postcard book(although you're most likely to not send any of these away anyway).
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    • Dai Gyakuten Saiban had a metal suitcase lunch box based on Sherlock's ingame one, an art book, an notebook looking like a file folder from those times, 3 plushies, a cardboard frame with some other postcards you most likely aren't gonna send anyway, a drama CD, a pin, a photo of the group in a evenlope that looks like Susato's, and a Sherlock Holmes visit card sticker.
  • The Nintendo 64 had its fair share of games that did this.
    • Choro Q 64 came with an assemblable toy car.
    • Disney's Tarzan came with a Tarzan figurine.
    • Donkey Kong 64 has a "Collector's Edition Yellow Game Pak". You get a yellow cartridge rather than a regular gray cartridge. (This game has no regular edition; every cartridge of Donkey Kong 64 is yellow!)
    • Extreme-G has a "Special Edition" in Germany that came with a music CD.
    • Gauntlet Legends came with a Warrior miniature.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time
      • It has a "Collector's Edition" in America and Australia that came with a Gold Cartridge. Since they were printed before the main run, they have several differences from the later versions, like red blood during the final fight against Ganon, and the original Fire Temple music. Also, a few glitches in this version allowed for Script Breaking, making them preferable for players interested in that.
      • It has a "Limited Edition" in Germany that came with a Strategy Guide and a shirt (possibly unlicensed).
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    • The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask:
      • It has a "Collector’s Edition" in America that came with a cartridge that had a holographic label.
      • It has a "Limited Edition Adventure Set" in Europe limited to 1000 pieces that came with a shirt, a watch, a 2 CD soundtrack, a poster, a sticker and 2 pin badges.
    • The New Superman Aventures has a "Collector's Edition" that came with a tie-in comic book.
    • Rampage 2: Universal Tour
      • It came with a Rampage Baby, one of three possible plush keychains of George, Lizzie, and Ralph.
      • It came with a shirt.
    • World Driver Championship came with a shirt.
  • EA brings us the Dead Space 2 Collectors Edition. It comes with a replica plasma cutter, a special code, the soundtrack and the game (and one other thing). The Replica Plasma Cutter is awesome and actually holdable (and the trigger can be pulled). It's only $80.
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  • The console version of Street Fighter IV has a Collector's Edition that comes with the game, an art book, an OVA and the box itself was a diorama featuring C. Viper and Ryu.
  • Painkiller actually inverts this with their "Special" Edition, a budget pack version featuring only 12 of the original game's 20 or so levels, some missing music files and lack of multiplayer. All for $5. They also play it straight, though, with their "Black" Edition, which contains the usual extras (a poster and some behind-the-scenes featurettes).
  • Halo:
    • Halo 2's Limited Collector's Edition includes a "behind-the-scenes" DVD, a manual written from the Covenant's perspective, and a booklet containing several in-universe conversations, letters and text logs.
    • Halo 3 came in three editions: the normal edition for $60, the limited edition with extra goodies for $70, and the "legendary" edition for $130, complete with a Master Chief helmet.
    • Halo Wars had a limited edition which included, among other things, a prequel graphic novel.
    • Halo: Reach also has limited and legendary editions. Both contain a bunch of in-universe swag (most notably Dr. Halsey's entire journal), and the Legendary Edition also features a statue of the protagonists. To prevent another Halo 3, they're preorder exclusives.
    • Halo 4 has a limited edition which includes in-game perks, a collection of various in-universe documents, and a special extended edition of Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn.
    • Halo 5: Guardians has both a Limited and Limited Collector's Edition. Both include a small in-game perks bundle, a metal model of the titular Guardian, an animated adaptation of Halo: The Fall of Reach, and dossiers on all eight of the player characters, and the Limited Collector's Edition also comes with statues of both Master Chief and Spartan Locke.
  • The Limited Edition for Jade Empire came with an extra character model, a different staff model and a making-of video. It cost the same as the regular edition, however. The PC port also came in a "Special Edition" tin, having roughly the same extras as the Limited Edition, but with an art book.
  • Gears of War. The second game had a Limited Edition that included an art book, an extra DVD with "making of" designs and such, a code to download a golden Lancer for use in multiplayer, and a physical picture that plays an emotional role to the character Dom in the game.
    • Aside from the usual limited edition extras, Gears 2 could also be ordered with a FULL-SIZED PLASTIC LANCER RIFLE. Subverted in that you could buy the rifle separately.
  • While "Ultimate" in Ultimate Spider-Man refers to a comic book series (which the game is a Spinoff of and Canon in the comic book continuity, being plotted by the same writer as a part of the series), there was still a Limited Edition released, with, among other things, a mini-sized Limited Special Collectors Ultimate Edition reprint of the comic introducing Venom.
  • Sony and Microsoft liked this strategy so much that they applied it to their systems themselves: both the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 come in a "basic" version and a more expensive "premium" version.
    • To be perfectly honest, this practice dates back to the very earliest of game consoles: it was called a bundle (games, controllers, carrying cases, robots...). The only difference is that now it covers more important features like hard drives.
    • Microsoft have applied it to Windows as well in the form of Windows Vista "Ultimate", which isn't a game in any normal sense of the word, but certainly fits the description of costing rather more for very few extras, including every feature from every other version, even the Enterprise edition, which is the high-end version for business users and that version is generally only available to businesses. Windows 7 Ultimate contains a similar range of features to what its predecessor had.
  • City of Heroes and City of Villains have one of these every so often; one example is the "Good vs. Evil Edition", which comes with both games, the comic books and Strategy Guides in digital form, exclusive costumes, and the Jump Jet and Pocket D VIP powers for all your characters. For most of these, you can buy the extra game content as a separate thing on the website.
  • Working Designs used to make a living doing this. Lunar 2: Eternal Blue Complete for instance, was not strictly a special edition since there was no Vanilla Edition, but it came with a soundtrack, little character stands, a cloth map of the game's world, and even a wearable replica of the game's endgame MacGuffin. Those who pre-ordered the game also got a Ghaleon punching puppet.
    • Another deluxe game set from Working Designs, Growlanser Generations, came with a keychain, a wearable replica of the two game's jewelry-based weapon system, and a steel men's watch. They never skimped on quality.
  • The Battle for Middle-Earth 2 was released in this way. One of the extras is a palette swap of a regular unit.
  • The Baldur's Gate 2 Collector's Edition was released with an extra, bonus merchant available in game, with a second bonus merchant available to those who pre-ordered from the Interplay store or certain retailers. Files enabling both merchants for all players soon became available on the internet, and were eventually included in a patch.
  • BioShock has a special "Collector's Edition" which includes a special case, a "making of" DVD and a Big Daddy figurine. Interestingly both the decision of having a Collector's Edition in the first place as well as what it contained, was decided by fan feedback.
    • BioShock 2 got this treatment too. With a Vanilla (Game only), "Rapture" (Game with 90-page Art Book, though was only released in Europe, Australia and New Zealand) and Special (Game, 164-page hardcover artbook, Soundtrack CD, Vinyl LP of the first games soundtrack and 3 mini-posters) flavors. The Rapture and Special editions where limited to a single production run too.
  • The special three-disc edition of Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence came with a disc with the game on, a disc with an online game and revised versions of the first two MSX2 games on it, and a standard DVD with all the cutscenes and gameplay segments laced together into a ridiculously long spy movie.
    • All of the Metal Gear Solid games in Japan (not counting the Updated Re-releases) were sold in a standard barebones edition containing only the game itself, and a "Premium Packaged" filled with additional content such as art books and bonus discs.
  • Square loves this. Starting with Final Fantasy VII, every major game (AKA: The Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts series) has had an "International Version", with new content and, in the games with voice acting, the English voices. Now, this wasn't so bad with FF7, it was merely the added content that was in the U.S release. But by Final Fantasy X it was several new bosses, a new version of the Sphere Grid, and improved gameplay all around. However, as bad as the Final Fantasy add-ons are, they're not nearly as bad as the Kingdom Hearts ones, called Final Mix. These games not only add a few new bosses, they also add new abilities and a higher, better difficulty level. As if that's not enough, they then put new cutscenes in the games. Important cutscenes that set up the later games in the series. Oh, and despite being called "International Versions", they weren't released outside of Japan...at least, not until HD remasters started coming out. America and Europe is getting both Kingdom Hearts 1.5 HD ReMIX which contains the Final Mix content for the first Kingdom Hearts, and Final Fantasy X / X-2 HD Remaster, which contains the International content for Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2.
    • Even before then, Germany got a boxset of Secret of Mana with bugfixes that only occurred in other PAL countries.
    • Squaresoft (pre-Enix merger) also released Millennium Collection versions of several of their games. These typically included packins that almost seem inspired by (Nippon Ichi's merchandising company) Rosenqueen, ranging from figurines to t-shirts to postcards to teacups to radios and many other oddities.
    • Final Fantasy XII had a Special Edition in a metal case for Gamestop/EB Games which included a special DVD with extra artwork and a "History of Final Fantasy", among others. Quite amusingly, for a period of time, the special edition went for less than the standard edition in the same store.
      • Not to mention XII had a special edition, only in japan, which included the "Zodiac Job System". Basically, each sign of the zodiac was its own job class, which could be assigned to characters- effectively eliminating the biggest problem with the game, the fact that each character is nearly identical to each other character, and they all have access to all the same skills and stat boosts.
    • Final Fantasy XV: Some people might have thought that the "Day One Edition" INCLUDES BONUS CONTENT WEAPON: MASAMUNE (FFXV) was a time-limited edition. It turns out to be the default boxed version, still available new months after release.
    • Additionally, with Kingdom Hearts II Final Mix+ came with an entirely new game that was a PS2 remake of Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories including improved graphics and several new cards. It was later ported to the US, but this took years of complaining by overseas fans and even then it was never given to anyone but North America, forcing all other countries to still import it. Fans in the US who bought Final Mix+ were also disappointed because they expected that it would never come to the US and didn't feel like buying the exact same game again.
  • Neverwinter Nights 2's Limited Edition scored you the "Blessed of Waukeen" feat, granting a + 1 on all saves and the ability to buy special weapons and armor from certain merchants (the feat's name is a Lampshade: Waukeen is the god of merchants and wealth in the game world). Oh, and a "cloth" map of the Sword Coast, along with a pair of pewter rings, one reading "Lawful Good" the other "Chaotic Evil".
    • Then there was the Gold Edition, which bundled the Limited Edition (sans Feelies, but including "Blessed of Waukeen" and the special shops) with Mask of the Betrayer. After Storm of Zehir came out, they added it to the Gold box and created the Platinum Edition; it is this version that is available on Steam.
  • Blizzard has expansion packs for all their games (except possibly Warcraft, the first one) and is fond of releasing them in "Battle Chests", bundles which include the original game, the expansion, (usually) a strategy guide, and (in the case of their RTS games) teching charts. Some the later ones even include the entire series; one Diablo Battle Chest included Diablo, Diablo II, Lord of Destruction, the strategy guide...
    • World of Warcraft and its expansions have the collector editions. They include artbooks, mousepads, sound tracks, trading cards and ingame collector pets.
    • The $100 Collector's Edition for StarCraft II comes with the game, a behind-the-scenes-and-cinematic DVD, a 100-page hardcover artbook, a comic book, a soundtrack CD, guest passes for Starcraft II and Worldof Warcraft, a WoW feelie in the form of a creature, a dogtag-shaped USB/keychain that contains the original game and the expansion, and a Hardcover Collector's Edition Strategy Guide too that comes with a MP map clipboard. Needless to say, Blizzard's Collector's Editions tend to be quite generous.
  • The Tom Clancy franchise games (Rainbow Six, Ghost Recon and Splinter Cell) have been all released in collector's editions. They contain the original games and their expansions, clothing (a hat, shirt and belt), a messenger bag, and an "exclusive" extra (SC mousepad, RS book, GR making-of DVD), housed in a metal case.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask was released in a "Limited Edition Adventure Set" that contained the game, the soundtrack, a special watch, a t-shirt, two pins mimicking badges from the game, wallpaper and a certificate of authenticity. The set itself only had a print run of 1000 units!
    • There is also the Zelda: Collector's edition, which had the two NES Zeldas and the N64 Zeldas. There were three ways to get it: buy a GameCube which it came with, register a GameCube you already have along with two games, or subscribe to Nintendo Power, the last of which also got you the Player's Guide.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is like this now. The original Gold cartridge is the cool one to have, since the gray cart and any other versions (Master Quest, Collector's Edition, Virtual Console) have the removals of the Fire Temple Chanting and the moon and star emblem.
    • Although content was not removed from them, the original releases of the first two Zelda games in the U.S. are similarly treated as such, as Nintendo used gold plastic for the cartridge in those releases, as opposed to the grey plastic that was standard and used in rereleases.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess in the UK had a limited run from Game where they shipped it with a poster. It even said which number of the how many it was.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword had a box version which contains a gold and Hylian-themed Wii Remote Plus, with first releases of both the vanilla and boxed version containing a 25th Anniversary audio CD.
  • When MOTHER 3 was first released, it came in both the standard game-only edition, as well as a Deluxe Box: it contained the game, a limited edition red Game Boy Micro with MOTHER 3-related decals, and a replica of the Franklin Badge. Unfortunately, since this is MOTHER 3 we're talking about, it was exclusive to Japan.
  • The Limited Collectors Edition of Doom 3 on the Xbox came in a metal DVD case with developer interviews, a making-of documentary, concept art and the full versions of Ultimate Doom and Doom II.
  • Fallout 3 has the special edition with a lunchbox and a Vault Tech Bobblehead.
    • Taken to new heights with pre-orders for Fallout: New Vegas. Along with the standard Collectors Edition - which contains poker chips from Fallout: New Vegas casinos, a deck of cards, a graphic novel, and a making-of documentary DVD - Bethesda is offering a total of four different Equipment Packs, each of which contain unique items that are otherwise unavailable in the game world. The catch? Each pack is offered at a different retail outlet, which means if you want them all you'd need to pre-order the same game at four different stores.
      • New Vegas followed the similar-Mass Effect 2 store-exclusive DLCs and these equipment packs are available on XBox Live/PSN for a few dollars (Courier's Stash).
    • Fallout 4 is one-upping all the previous efforts from the series and releasing the PIP Boy Edition, which includes, as one would expect, a PIP Boy. Specifically a game-accurate one to serve as a wrist-mounted case for a cellphone on which to run the free PIP Boy app, which interfaces with the actual game.
    • Fallout Anthology features the "Game of the Year" Edition of Fallout 3 and the Ultimate Edition of Fallout: New Vegas, which include the DLC add-ons for those games, as well as first two games and Tactics, all in a Mini Nuke case. There's also space in the case to add Fallout 4, which came out after the Anthology.
  • SimCity 4 had both the Rush Hour expansion and the original game packaged in the Sim City 4 Deluxe Edition, which was cheaper to get than each one individually. It was re-released a few years later in the SimCity Box, which is also the only way to get the Destinations expansion to SimCity Societies (aside from digital download).
  • The Neverwinter Nights: Diamond release contained the first NWN game, its expansions and three premium modules (think mini-campaigns), all in a single DVD. Prior to that was the Platinum edition, which was the same minus the premium modules, and before that was the Gold edition, which had only the original game and the first expansion.
  • The Sims had a Deluxe Edition of their game that featured one of their top-selling expansion packs along with many extra features that would allow you to create more unique sims and even more stuff to put in your homes.
    • They also have complete collection versions for the first and second games, which include all expansion packs alongside the base game. The former was released normally, but the latter seems to only be available on Origin, and only at random times.
  • The Premium Box of Dengeki Gakuen RPG: Cross of Venus includes limited edition Nendoroids (pint-sized, pseudo-bobbleheaded figurines) of Shana, Kino, Index and Taiga. And they are toradorable. Due to those, it also happens to be the single biggest box for a Nintendo DS game.
  • Gran Turismo 5 is a great impersonation to this trope: there is the Collector's Edition, which includes the game, a GT keychain, a die-cast model of a tuned Nissan GT-R, a book which acts like a mini strategy guide, and a voucher for 5 supercars, which can be a Disc-One Nuke if used right at the beginning of the game.
  • Modern Warfare 2 has the Hardened Edition, which has an art book and a redemption code for a downloadable Xbox 360/Playstation 3 version of the first Call of Duty game, and the Prestige Edition, which retails for 150$ and includes functional Night-Vision Goggles and a head stand along with the above.
    • Treyarch has gone one further. Those who bought the Prestige Edition of Call of Duty: Black Ops got a fully functional RC car with a camera mounted on it, modeled after the RC-XD killstreak reward.
    • Modern Warfare 3 dialed it back, having only a Hardened edition which included bonuses such as a free one-year membership to Call of Duty ELITE and the in-universe "Soap's Journal".
    • The second tier edition returned for Call of Duty: Black Ops II. Called the Care Package Edition, it included a remote-controlled drone and came in packaging resembling, well, the care package in multiplayer.
  • The BlazBlue series has done this with all of its installments of the series (including Extend versions).
    • BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger had its deluxe edition released a month before its regular edition, and came with a DVD (Xbox 360 ver.)/Blu-Ray (PS3 ver.) of tips and a two-disc soundtrack. It also cost the same as a standard new release, taking much of the sting out of the "pay extra for feelies" issue. EU however, had theirs with the same tips disc, but only on DVD, and an artbook.
    • While BlazBlue: Continuum Shift didn't have a Limited Edition in the US, both JP and EU versions had their own LE's. In JP, it came with an artbook, a story script, and a Nendoroid petit of Noel Vermillion. EU had theirs with the artbook, 8 art prints, and a character reference guide.
    • BlazBlue: Continuum Shift EXTEND has a Limited Edition that comes with a 2012 calendar with artworks of the characters on each month, a small artbook with story illustrations and character artworks, and a soundtrack CD featuring some of the music of Continuum Shift.
    • Blaz Blue Chrono Phantasma in both JP and US had an artbook, a mini soundtrack (Song Interlude II), and a Nendoroid petit of Rachel Alucard. The US LE added 2 extra items, a poster with a move list on the side. And a bonus Blu-Ray disc that contains the first episode of the Blaz Blue Alter Memory, a subbed episode of Blue Radio, and some other clips on it.
    • While Blaz Blue Chrono Phantasma Extend didn't have a LE in both US and JP, EU had theirs with an artbook.
    • BlazBlue: Central Fiction however, in all regions included a 100 page artbook (Memorial Book), a mini soundtrack (Song Interlude III), and a Nendorid petit of Noel Vermillion Ver. 2 (in her Chrono Phantasma outfit).
  • Big Fish Games has released several downloadable games as "Collector's Editions". One constant seems to be an integrated strategy guide (which sold several people on the Mystery Case Files: Dire Grove CE all by itself), and there's also usually wallpapers, a soundtrack or concept art, and additional gameplay. The CE's also come out a few weeks earlier than the vanilla version.
  • Later home version releases of beatmania IIDX have been released with multiple editions. There is always the option to buy just the game, but there is usually at least a Special Edition with some extras such as posters, stickers, calendars, etc. and a Complete Set with all the Special Edition extras plus others such as music CDs, DVDs containing music videos and material related to the series, etc. The Complete Set-only extras are often also available for purchase separately, but the Complete Set is usually cheaper than buying the Special Edition plus the additional extras separately.
  • Subverted with DJMAX Trilogy; the only edition of it available comes with soundtrack CDs and postcards with official art on them. However, a blog post by former Pentavision sound producer Forte Escape shows that the game was originally going to play this trope straight with a "Pulsar" edition, and at the same time invert it with a "Lite" edition.
  • Uncharted
    • Among Thieves had the Fortune Hunters Edition, which came in a huge box, had all the Naughty Dog signatures, a replica of the Phurba dagger from the game, an art book, a strategy guide, and some extra skins and golden guns for the multiplayer. The catch? Only two hundred were made, and you could only get them through contests. Good luck buying it normally, someone tried to sell one on eBay for 3000 dollars!
    • Drake's Deception had a Collector's Edition, available to everyone. It came in special packaging that looked like a traveling chest, and contained a steelbook case, wearable replicas of Drake's buckle and ring necklace, and a Drake statue.
  • The Beatles Rock Band initially had a $250 "Limited Edition Premium Bundle," which in addition to the game, had playable replicas of Paul McCartney's Hofner bass and Ringo Starr's Ludwig drums, a microphone with a stand, and eight postcards.
  • Agarest Senki had, for the North American 360 release, the standard version, and the "Really Naughty Limited Edition", which added in the OST, a pillowcase, and (this is likely the 'Really Naughty' part) an oppai mousepad (it's only 'naughty' instead of 'perverted' due to the fact that the character on the pad is wearing clothes).
  • The first two God of War games both had several documentary features; the second had an extra disc devoted to it. Further, whereas most video game covers are thin paper blank on one side, these were slightly thicker and had poster images on the back, so you could slip them out of the case and tack 'em on your wall.
    • God Of War 3, on the other hand, could be one of the crowning examples of this trope for video games. Aside from the barebones release, there was a U.S. "Ultimate Edition" release, which consisted of the game and a glossy art book packaged in a replica of Pandora's Box. Somehow, that release was topped immediately by a very special edition that was only released to journalists in Region 2, which housed the game, art cards, a poster, a behind-the-scenes DVD, a metal Kratos coin and a brochure in a box that looked bloodied and partially destroyed!
  • Star Trek Online's initial release had special in-game items specific to the particular vendor you purchased the game from, in addition to the Digital Deluxe Edition and the Collector's Edition. Then, five months after release, a good chunk of these special items have been made available for purchase by anyone. A fair chunk of the playerbase was... annoyed. It has also fueled speculation that other items — such as the in-game ship that is the reward for recruiting five friends to play the game for two months — may be added to the game's store as well.
    • And as it turns out... the speculation was right. The Galaxy-X from "All Good Things..." was added to the game's store not long after the above entry was added.
  • Epic Mickey, now with bonus "Behind the Scenes" disk, five inch vinyl Mickey figurine, Oswald-themed Wii Remote shell, and Mickey and Oswald Wii skins.
  • Dead Rising 2: Zombrex Edition. Packaged in a classy metal case and includes a 'making of' DVD and a Zombrex syringe pen along wtih the game itself.
    • Even bigger was the High Stakes edition which was exclusive to Capcom's Online store which comes with the game ,a Fortune City map, a deluxe Dead Rising themed Poker set, a redeemable ticket for in game content and one lucky set would include a special golden version of the ticket to redeem for a life size Zombie statue.
  • World in Conflict's Collectors Edition came with, among other things, an authentic piece of the Berlin Wall.
  • Limited edition copies of "Michael Jackson The Experience" for the Wii came with a replica of Michael's trademark sparkly glove.
  • No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle got the Hopper Edition in Japan. It had the game, a DVD with a short called No More Heroes 1.5, a soundtrack, and a fan book. Also, preordering would net you some erotica.
    • The first game came with a roll of NMH toilet paper with a preorder. One instance where No Export for You did not result in many complaints.
  • All Mass Effect games as of the third have had special editions, but special note must go to the second game's Collectors' Edition and Digital Deluxe Edition, which come with special armor and weapons based off the main enemies, an art book, comic, soundtrack, and bonus featurettes. Note the apostrophe.note 
    • The Collectors Edition of the third game comes with a tin case, a hardcover art book, a soundtrack, a comic, an N7 fabric patch and a lithograph of the Normandy. The game itself includes alternate outfits, an exclusive weapons pack, a Robot Dog for your off-mission time, and a secret character with their own mission.
  • Star Wars: The Old Republic: Two different ones: First, The Collector's Edition includes in-game items (plus a pet exclusive to this version), a Statuette of Darth Malgus, and other items, costs $150 (was sold-out, but sales have resumed). Second, the Digital Deluxe Edition costs a more reasonable $80, and has just a couple of in game items.
  • At least the European version of Shadow of the Colossus had an full-art cardboard case and included couple of postcards.
  • Subverted with The Witcher 2. The Premium Edition includes a Making Of DVD, soundtrack CD, a game guide, a map of the game world, two pieces of papercraft and a physical version of an in-game pamphlet and a coin. The catch? That's the base version for your standard 50 bucks, and there's no plans for a Vanilla Edition. The digitally distributed version also has a digital version of all the above minus the coin (and there's no digital vanilla edition yet). Played straight with the Collector's Edition, which throws in a 200 page art book, a set of five dice with a bag, a guide to cheating in dice and card games, a special set of playing cards, another coin, another bit of papercraft, a set of stickers and marble imitation sculpture of Geralt's head on top of the Premium Edition.
    • The Enhanced Edition carries on the tradition of giving you free stuff for the base price: all copies of the game, regardless of whether it's for PC or 360, includes a soundtrack CD, game guide and a world map, on top of a bunch of gameplay improvements (with is a free patch for all non-Enhanced PC copies of the game). The Dark Edition, the limited edition this time round, throws in the making-of DVD, three stickers, an art book, and a medallion of the wolf logo on top of the standard Enhanced Edition contents.
  • The "Love is Over" Deluxe Edition of Catherine comes with your standard art book and soundtrack (the same preorder bonus as the Vanilla Edition), but also includes a t-shirt, a pillowcase, and a pair of boxers, all packaged in a pizza box. They are all story-relevant.
  • The boxart for BIT.TRIP COMPLETE claims that it "includes limited edition soundtrack CD with 18 full songs".
  • Batman: Arkham Asylum had a special edition which came with a "Making of" DVD, special digipak packaging for the game, Crime Alley DLC, and a replica of the game's Batarang.
  • The Collector's Edition of Sonic Generations packaged the game with a fancy slipcase, the Casino Night Pinball DLC, the "20 Years of Sonic Art" book, the "20th Anniversary Sonic Soundtrack", the "History of Sonic: Birth of an Icon" documentary, a commemorative Gold Ring, & a statue with Sonic in both his classic & modern incarnations. This was for the Xbox 360 & Playstation 3 release of the game, limited to 12,000 copies, and only released in Europe & Austrailia.
    • The Special Edition comes with a crystal cube featuring Modern Sonic with the Classic Sonic TV as the indentation, but was only released in Japan.
  • The Collector's Edition of Sonic Mania is the only physical release of the game, and is available for every console Sonic Mania itself is available in (including the Nintendo Switch). It contains a 12-inch Classic Sonic statue standing on a replica Sega Genesis console that plays the classic Sega startup audio of Sonic 1 and a replica Genesis cartridge with a golden ring inside of it, along with a metallic collector's card that includes the download code for the game.
  • The Limited Collector's Edition for Forza Motorsport 4 gives you 5 exclusive cars, the 10 car "Muscle Pack" (normally 560 MS points, or about $7) for free, a metal case, and an art book with some of the cars from the game's Autovista mode. In-game, you get a crown next to your name (you're a "VIP"), and auctions started by VIPs are listed before non-VIP players'. VIP players also get some exclusive events to win rare "Unicorn" cars, which are exclusive performance versions of some carsnote  that cannot be acquired normally. VIP players occasionally receive "gift cars" from the developers, usually Unicorn Cars or existing cars with exclusive vinyl paintjobs - though players are often quick to replicate the paintjob on a separate car to sell on the storefront. Most of the in-game benefits from the collectors editions can be bought a few months after release as Downloadable Content for about $10 through the Xbox store.
  • The X-Superbox, which came out about a year after X3 Terran Conflict. The Superbox contains every single X-Universe game made up until that point (and when Terran Conflict's expansion pack came out a few months after the Superbox came out, Superbox owners got the normally $9.99 expansion pack for free), has a CD full of ship and space station concept art, the X-Encyclopedia which explains some of the technology and the history of the X-Universe, very high-quality versions of the game's soundtrack, and three fan made soundtracks. Free content that anyone can get is also put in the package as well, for convenience - script packages to make your life easier in the game, and PDF versions of fan fiction from the game's forums.
    • X Rebirth has two Collectors Editions - a physical collectors edition which contains a full-color, print version of the X-Encyclopedia, an art book, the two soundtrack volumes, a "Making Of" video, playing cards, a poster, etc. The cheaper Digital Collectors Edition has most of the content of the physical, albeit in digital form, and without the posters and such
  • Resident Evil 6 reportedly has a $1300 Premium Edition, with the main draw being Leon's leather jacket. There's also another that has various other RE games, and yet another that has the usual collection of Feelies.
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U came in two versions; a US$50 version with the game only, and a US$99 version that came packaged with an adapter for Nintendo Gamecube controllers, a favorite in Tournament Play, along with a special Smash-themed controller to go with it.
    • In Europe (at least in the UK) there were two different versions; the above, or a copy of the game with a Mario amiibo.
  • Glider: Special Edition came on a glowing NES cartridge.
  • Borderlands 2 has two deluxe editions above the standard preorder, that include the usual trove of goodies. The cheaper one includes a Marcus bobblehead, and the pricier version also includes a scale replica of the red chests from the first game.
  • Strategy guides aren't immune from this either. Pokémon Black and White has a regular version of its guide and then a hardcover one with a fancier cover with images of the legendary dragons of the games on it.
    • The guide for Pokémon Sun and Moon took this to the level of insanity with it's hardcover collector's edition. It contained 8 concept art lithographs in a protective sleeve, exclusive concept art, a silver rollerball pen etched with the game logos, a bookmark, reusable stickers, a poster map of the region, a 240 page notebook journal, the book itself came with a dust jacket with exclusive artwork, a friggin' thank you card from the developers, the kitchen sink, the ark of the covenant, and the secret of eternal life!
    • Prince of Persia (the Xbox360/PS3 reboot) has a hardcover guide that even came with some (abet smallish) high quality concept art prints tucked away in a envelope on inside of the front cover.
    • And you can add the Zelda series to that, as almost all of the series' recent games, starting with Twilight Princess have had both regular guides and special hardcover ones with very nice gold-embossed covers and Feelies such as cloth maps, lithographs and so on. And Prima Games is also putting together a treasure chest box set with a collectible bookmark, a Certificate of Authenticity signed by Eiji Aonuma, and an exclusive guide for Ocarina of Time 3D exclusive to the set. The MSRP? $180, naturally.
  • Virtual-ON: FORCE for Xbox 360 received a special MEMORIAL BOX 15 limited edition to commemorate the series' 15th Anniversary, and needless to say Sega went all out with this one. This package includes a artbook that also chronicles the series, a 6-CD soundtrack of the entire series spanning from Operation Moongate all the way to MARZ, and two bouncy rubber balls resembling the eyes of Tangram. It was also believed to include a special DLC code that gives you the ability to enhance the breast size of Fei-Yen and Angelan. No, we're not making this up. This premium package however will cost a small fortune, especially since it's an import-only game but it is region-free.
  • Otomedius Excellent has a special edition that comes with a CD soundtrack for the game (despite what it says, it mainly has music from the first game), an artbook featuring various artworks of the characters by Mine Yoshizaki (the series' artist and the creator of Sgt. Frog), and a fairly large double-sided pillow case that features Anoa on one side and many of the girls of St. Gradius from the game on the other.
  • Dead Space 3 has the "Dev Team Edition," pitched as the dev team's love-letter to the fansnote  with 5000 produced. It included a 14oz water bottle in the form of the series' health pack, a 6" tall Red Marker, an art book, a second art book made as a mock electronic datapad showing off various high-profile characters and Necromorphs, several SCAF recruitment posters, a notepad belonging to an important character, and several 'Peng' postcards. The box it comes in is modeled as a SCAF supply container and is labeled with its production number. Hilariously, this box did not include the game, though this was because it was only possible to order from one online vender, so players who had already pre-ordered the game from somewhere else could order the box alone, minus the game's price. Others could have the game included in the form of a standard boxed copy mailed separately.
  • Ni no Kuni's PS3 release had the Wizard's Edition, which came with a physical copy of the spellbook used in-game, a plush of Drippy, the sidekick, a soundtrack CD, and some bonus familiars. A promotion led to some art cards and a special coin being added too.
  • Parodied by the Doom mod titled NUTS2 - 2nd and/or 1st Anniversary Gold Plated Plutonic Aloy Coated Eight volume Nuclear Donkey Edition of Nuts.wad (or, as the subtitle on the title screen says, "basically the same old shit".)
  • Saints Row IV has a whopping four different special editions!
    • The "Commander in Chief Edition", available to everyone who pre-ordered the game, gives you a few in-game items themed to the USA.
    • The "Super Dangerous Wub Wub Edition" includes the bonus items, and also includes a replica dubstep gun, dubstep doomsday button, and a Johnny Gat memorial statue.
    • The "Emperor Zinyak's Game of the Generation Edition" comes with all that, and a light-up rotating display case for the game and a velvet pouch.
    • The most absurd, ridiculous, and exorbitant out of all of them, the Wad Wad edition. It includes the Commander-In-Chief edition of the game, a full-scale replica of the dubstep gun (even larger than the one included in the Wub Wub edition!), a Lamborghini, a Prius (with a year's worth of insurance), a year's Super Car membership, a personal shopper, a day of spy training, a "hostage rescue experience", a capsule wardrobe, first-class flights to Dubai and Washington, DC (with week long stays at the Burj-Al-Arab and the Jefferson Hotel, respectively), and a flight in space from Virgin Galactic. There is exactly one copy of this edition, and it costs one million dollars.
  • Infamous2 had the Hero Edition. It came with a replica sling pack that Cole uses in the game, a Cole statue, a mini-comic by DC Comics, the soundtrack, and a voucher for various in-game perks.
  • Dead Island: Riptide had the Zombie Bait edition that included among other things codes for DLC, cards, a graphic tin case for the game and a statue of a mutilated woman in a bikini. For once many felt the Moral Guardians were right on the money for their disapproval.
  • Subverted again with Shin Megami Tensei IV. All first print copies were limited editions, and nice ones at that, with a soundtrack, deluxe slipcase and a 176-page strategy guide/artbook, making the $50 asking price ($10 more than the usual 3DS game) well worth it for series.
  • Atlus in general are fond of subverting this. Like the above example, many of their games have included bonuses in their first prints: Etrian Odyssey IV and Untold: The Millennium Girl both included soundtrack CDs and small art collections, while Soul Hackers, Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey, and Conception 2 all including soundtrack CDs, among many, many other games of theirs.
  • Every first edition copy of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: All Star Battle come with a notepad designed to look like Hayato Kawajiri under the effects of Heaven's Door and a code to download Yoshikage Kira as a playable character. There's also the Gold Experience Box, which comes with a gold placard of Giorno/Gold Experience, a statue of Jotaro/Star Platinum, and a soundtrack CD that resembles the Star Platinum Stand disc created by Whitesnake.
  • The Grand Wizard Edition of South Park: The Stick of Truth includes not only the Preorder Bonus, but also a six-inch figurine of Eric Cartman in his wizard garb and a drawing of the game world map.
  • Watch_Dogs took this to the extreme with a whopping nine different versions of the game, plus a season pass, infamously requiring a spreadsheet to keep it all straight. Worse yet, there was no super-expensive "Omega" edition that included everything - you needed to buy at least 3 versions to get all the content.
  • Infamous Second Son's Collector's Edition includes Delsin's beanie and pins from his vest, a patch, and in-game missions and outfits.
  • While the Metroid Prime Trilogy set for the Wii was already a limited edition (the normal set comes with an art book), the official Nintendo stores made sure to add even more feelies.
  • Homeworld also falls into this with the HOMEWORLD REMASTERED COLLECTION COLLECTOR'S EDITION. It actually is all of these things, but that doesn't make the title any less unwieldy.
  • The Humble Bundles sometimes have a high-price tier that gives a physical version.
    • Humble Indie Bundle 12 has the "Humble Indie Bundle 12 Entertainment System". It's a box that comes with a special magazine, T-shirt, HIB and Papers, Please themed pins, vinyl record, and floppy disk.
    • Humble InDIE Bundle 13 has the "Humble Indie Bundle 13 Box O' Treats". It comes with a special hoodie, collectible cards based on the bundle's games, a cassette tape with music, and Humble Bundle themed patches.
    • Humble Indie Bundle 14 has the "Humble Indie Bundle 14 Travelin' Pack". It comes with a special T-shirt, patch with symbols representing the bundle's games on it, and a Humble Bundle-themed bandanna.
    • Humble Indie Bundle 15 gives seven figures in the style of Gang Beasts, based on characters in the bundle's games, and a blank one to customize. The next lower tier gives the blank figure.
  • Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call's limited edition comes with a special 3DS pouch, 2 CDs with best of and remixed songs, and physical CollectaCards. First-run copies of the game came with a smaller version that had just the remix CD.
  • Destiny has two special editions. The Limited Edition comes with a steelbook case, Field Guide, postcards, antique star chart, some in-game goodies, and an expansion pass. The Ghost Edition comes with all that, a replica Ghost, and even more physical goodies like stickers and photos.
  • Shin Megami Tensei: Persona:
    • Persona 5 has two different collections for the Japanese and the English versions. The Japanese collector's edition is the "20th Anniversary Edition", intended as a retrospective on the history of the Persona series. It comes with a special soundtrack remixing tunes from previous games and DLC consisting of costumes and Personas based on the parties of previous games. The English one is instead the "Take Your Heart Premium Edition", which includes a more basic soundtrack (titled "Sounds of Rebellion") consisting of just songs from P5, a small plush of mascot Morgana, a bag modeled after the Shujin Academy school bag seen in-game, a steelbook case, and a special box to keep it all in. Both collector's editions also come with a hardback artbook, a big step up from the paperback books from previous games.
    • Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth has the "The Wild Cards Premium Edition". It comes with a special 3DS XL case, art book, soundtrack CD, and physical representations of the tarot cards used in-game.
  • Hatoful Boyfriend has the "Summer of Dove Collector's Edition", which includes the original game, the digital soundtrack, a exclusive comic from the original developer, wallpapers of Oko-san and the St. Pigeonations yearbook.
  • The Spoiler Alert collectors' edition contains a level editor, the original soundtrack, the original Game Jam version of the game, exclusive high-res desktop and concept art, screensavers, deleted graphics and a prequel comic. As a side note, the collectors' edition was released before the standard edition.
  • Soundtrack example: The "Portal 2: Songs to Test By (Collectors Edition)" album contains all songs from both Portal games. (The soundtracks for both games are available for free on Steam, but only for owners of the games, and each game has its separate soundtrack, unlike on this album.)
  • IndieBox is a site that does this for indie games. They always include a physical version of the game, a soundtrack CD, and some stickers, and can include some other extras like pins, patches, cards, and socks. Games that have received the Collector's Edition treatment include Brütal Legend, Luftrausers, Rogue Legacy, Risk of Rain, and Escape Goat 2.
  • The HD re-release of Final Fantasy Type-0 included a collector's edition. It came with a steelbook case, soundtrack CD, art book, manga adaptation, and physical versions of the cards Ace uses.
  • The collector's edition of Kingdom Hearts HD II.5 Remix, the HD re-release of Kingdom Hearts II, came with a steelbook case which contained the game and HD I.5 Remix, hardcover art book, special pin, and plush of the Shadow Heartless.
  • Animal Crossing: amiibo Festival is normally bundled with four amiibo — specifically, the Isabelle figurine and the Goldie, Rosie, and Stitches cards. A limited-time edition of the bundle offers an additional amiibo figurine of Isabelle's twin brother Digby.
  • The Wasteland 2 Director's Cut has, along with an updated Unity engine (meaning updated graphics), several additions inspired by Fallout, the franchise that was inspired by the original Wasteland—namely, quirks, perks and precision strikes. The Digital Deluxe Edition contains Wasteland 2 and the Director's Cut, the original Wasteland, The Bard's Tale, three novellas set in the Wasteland world, the Wasteland 2 soundtrack, and a Concept Art Gallery.
  • Many of Cave's Arcade Games had Updated Rereleases, typically designated "Black Label," whose PCBs were produced in very limited quantities. This tradition may have started with the "Special Version" of Batsugun, the last Shoot 'em Up released by Cave's precursor Toaplan, which might have seen a wider arcade release had Toaplan not gone bankrupt shortly after.
  • No Man's Sky has two special editions.
    • A Limited Edition for the PS4 includes a steelbook case, a comic book, an art book, a PS4 theme, and codes for in-game content.
    • An Explorer's Edition for the PC includes a metal replica of one of the ships, an enamel pin, a backdrop to show off the ship, and more.
  • The special edition of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire included the game packaged in a steelbook case and a figurine of either Primal Groudon or Primal Kyogre, depending on the version bought. Similarly, the special edition of Pokémon Sun and Moon came with a Solgaleo & Lunala-themed New Nintendo 3DS, a steelbook copy of the game, a New 3DS carrying case, and a figurine of the mascot for the version bought.
  • This is parodied with the Very Special Edition of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. And it's actually real.note 
  • The 10 Year Anniversary re-release of Grand Theft Auto III also had a Limited Edition 1:6 scale figurine of Claude from the game, despite that the limited edition figurine not does not come with a copy of the game, likely due to being a (fairly inexpensive) mobile port on compatible iOS and Android devices. The figurine featured changable hand parts, various weapon props from the game (plus some that weren't or not featured in the package), and his prison jumpsuit. Only 1,500 units were produced.
  • Mighty No. 9 had a Signature Edition for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions, that featured a retail copy of the game, which itself featured a voucher for the RAY Expansion and Retro Hero DLCs plus an artbooklet featuring some artwork and renders from the game, and a figurine of Beck with changable faceplates. Only 10,000 units were produced, and each have number written under the display stand.
  • The Nintendo Switch version of Azure Striker Gunvolt had a Limited Edition that was sadly released only in Japan. The Limited Edition includes a physical copy of the game, an audio drama CD that focuses on Joule, Copen, and Quinn, and a DVD copy of the Azure Striker Gunvolt OVA.

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