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Ōkamiden: Chiisaki Taiyou ("Ōkami Chronicles: Tiny Sun") is the sequel to the hit action-adventure game Ōkami.

Nine months after the events of Ōkami, dark clouds, demons, and cursed zones mysteriously return to the land of Nippon. Issun, trying to perform his duties as a Celestial Envoy, is rescued from the returned imps by a puppy named Chibiterasu, whom he takes to see Sakuya. Chibi has some of Amaterasu's powers, being her son, but he is weaker than the protagonist of the last game, since he's still very young. Chibiterasu teams up with various partners, starting with Kuni (son of the original game's Susano and Kushi) to fight the returned evil.

The theme of returning life to the world also returns, but Ōkamiden is definitely more character-driven than Ōkami and its focus on interweaving the many elements of Japanese Mythology.

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The game is on the Nintendo DS. Gameplay is very similar to the original game, with the Celestial Brush adapted to the DS's touchscreen. A new addition is partners, who fight alongside you in battle and can be controlled with the Guidance brush technique.


This game provides examples of:

  • Aerith and Bob: Most of the characters have Japanese names. Then there's Charity, who is never mentioned to be foreign and looks like any other young Japanese woman in the game. And then there's Grimm.
  • All Your Powers Combined: Chibi gains the powers of all of the following Brush Gods:
  • Anachronism Stew: There are near-modern excavation machines in feudal Nippon. And then there's the Moon Tribe and the ancient ruins, which have futuristic Raygun Gothic technology. The latter case is justified since the Moon civilization was already portrayed as more sophisticated in the first game.
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes: Just like in Ōkami, New Game+ nets you various "spells" that change Chibiterasu's appearance, including the Black Sun Chibiterasu form that Akuro takes.
  • Anime Theme Song: Kie Kitano's "Hanataba" used in its commercial.
  • Art Initiates Life:
    • Chibi's Bloom and Vine powers, which revive and create plants.
    • Shikibu's talent, which apparently brings her fictional characters to life. Fortunately, she can erase them when they go wrong.
  • Babies Ever After: This is how the game starts. Several main characters from the previous game have had a kid in the last nine months, including the gods. Even the Imp enemies are the children of the first game's, featuring toy weapons and hanafuda cards over their faces, with the relationship proven when the adult Imps from the first game appear later on.
  • Badass Adorable: Chibiterasu is a loving, goofy puppy, but he manages to take down an even greater evil than the one Amaterasu faced as the Final Boss of the previous game.
  • Bag of Spilling: While Chibiterasu is a separate character from Amaterasu, the player has fewer abilities in this game, explained partially as a lack of experience in Chibi. He has none of the brush techniques she regained in the previous game, only starting with the default Sunrise, and his ink does not regenerate, nor can he pause time to use his brush indefinitely; he's on a time limit. He also cannot equip sub-weapons. Additionally, the Water Lily, Crescent, Veil of Mist, Catwalk, and Blizzard techniques are completely absent from the game, but the game has new powers with Guidance and Magnetism.
  • Balance Between Good and Evil: With the rise of Akuro, the brush gods have reproduced to have children that can counter him.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Nanami and Charity are female examples, while Genji makes a male one.
  • Beat Them at Their Own Game: The final boss can strike out your Celestial Brush techniques until you manage to make the sun re-appear, at which point he will start attempting to use brush techniques of his own... which you can, of course, strike through and interrupt yourself.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Near the end, Manpuku, Kagu and Nanami break the boundaries of time and space to join Chibiterasu and Ishaku in the final battle.
  • Bishōnen: Pretty-boy Waka makes a brief cameo, and new character Genji is an even more effeminate man, with skimpy clothing and a face rendered like other beautiful characters, including Waka.
  • BFS:
    • Kuni's sword is bigger than he is, and it serves as a good successor to Susano's.
    • Tachigami's sword was already a BFS in the original, but it's even more so compared to his offspring; it's even Lampshaded by the difficult time Tachigami's triplets have moving it.
    • Likewise, Chibi's sword Divine Instruments are as long as he is, although they are wielded magically without touching them, so their size isn't a factor for using them.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Sure, you might have once again saved Nippon from eternal darkness, but Kurow doesn't make it.
  • "Blind Idiot" Translation: While the previous game's English translation had a few slips, this one's is much spottier, with multiple grammatical and spelling errors, and is occasionally not consistent with the translations used in the first game. For example, Vengeance Slips became Revenge Slips, Sei-an City is repunctuated to Sei'an City, on one occasion, the Water Dragon is called the Sea Dragon, and Ishaku is spelled Isshaku. These are likely a result of the development switching hands to a different team.
  • Blood Bath: Akuro plans on bathing the vessel he wishes to possess in Orochi's blood, which the player must prevent from happening. Despite traveling back in time twice to both past Orochi battles, Akuro eventually succeeds in reaching his blood.
  • Booze-Based Buff: Sake returns to boost your offensive and defensive capabilities.
  • Boss Rush: Near the end, not unlike the original, you fight the four bosses that carried Yami's essence, followed by Kurow and Akuro.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall:
    • During the Genji chase sequence, one room has him fly all over when you find him before he flies right in front of the screen and blows the player a kiss before he flies off to the next room.
    • At the very end of the credits, Chibi turns and play-bows to the screen. It's adorable, like everything else he does.
  • Bridge Logic: In Hana Valley and the Ice Room, there are trees and pillars conveniently at the right length to bridge gaps when chopped down.
  • Broken Bridge: There are several barriers that require questing or even the completion of dungeons to bypass. Like in the previous game, one of the first obstructions is a boulder in the exit from Kamiki Village.
  • But Thou Must!: Kuni will keep prodding you to give the medicine to the injured crane by the entrance to Agata Forest until you agree.
  • Camera Screw: Since you have no direct control over the camera in combat, it's perfectly possible to end up in situations where you're blindsided by enemies or have a hard time getting what you want on camera to use a brush technique on it.
  • The Cavalry: Three of your five partners come to your rescue just when it's needed most (the other two are excluded for obvious reasons at that point in the game), even violating space and time to do it.
  • Call a Hit Point a "Smeerp": Solar Discs, Ink, and Praise return to serve the function of Hit Points, Magic Points, and Experience Points respectively.
  • Call-Back: Many moments in the game allude to the previous one or outright recreate it, like the boulder blocking Kamiki Village and the outright repetition of the laundry quest for Mrs. Orange.
  • Chain of Deals: Progressing through the Moon Cave this time requires traversing through the floors to fetch items for various demons in sequence to rescue Kurow and reach the top.
  • Changing Clothes Is a Free Action: Kagu switches from her normal clothes to her Miko outfit apparently instantaneously. In front of a giant monster, no less.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Nagi's armor is found in Orochi's treasure hoard in the nine-months-ago Moon Cave and is later worn by Kuni at the climax.
  • Cherry Blossoms: Carrying over from before, cherry blossoms cover the Guardian Saplings and appear when the Bloom power is used.
  • Cloning Blues: Kurow is a doll of Waka brought to life for the express purpose of being a seal for Akuro, to hold him long enough for Chibi to kill them both. Needless to say, he's not happy about it.
  • Colossus Climb: The gigantic robot rabbit Daidarabotchi is being sent to the surface to destroy Nippon, and must be climbed to reach its controls. The actual boss fight takes place against King Fury, who is commanding the machine, but keeping Kurow at the controls is necessary to keep it from bringing its hands up to swat Chibi and Kurow.
  • Constellations: Like before, the Brush Gods lie hidden in constellations and must be brought out, though this is done by tracing the outline here rather than dotting in the missing stars.
  • Continuity Nod: Several, since you're mostly covering the same areas that Amaterasu did in the first game. Memorably, the fashion designer in Sei-an refuses to let you aid him in coming up with designs, since a "lucky" white dog once inspired him to do it on his own.
  • Counterspell: The Final Boss has its own version of the Celestial Brush and often nullifies your brushstrokes by crossing them out with his own. (Fortunately, this rule works both ways.)
  • Cut-and-Paste Environments: Most of the environments in the game are borrowed over from Ōkami, though the limitations of the system mean they have to be chopped up into smaller loaded areas.
  • Cuteness Proximity: Sakuya completely melts when she sees Chibi, mistaking him for Amaterasu before Issun reminds her who she's talking to.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: Almost every single time Chibi attacks something in a cutscene, he doesn't use his weapons or his brush techniques; he just jumps at them and gets swatted aside for his trouble. The only times where he's badass is during gameplay.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: The Vine brush technique has been changed so you must draw a line starting at your character and connecting that to the Konohana Blossom or your partner. In Okami, you had to draw a line starting at the blossom and connecting to your character, which can make switching between the games a little confusing when using Vine.
  • Dark Reprise: Kurow Loses Faith, which has elements of both the Underground Ruins theme and Kurow's Theme.
  • Dem Bones:
    • The Gashadokuro enemies, which come in two flavors: normal, and armored.
    • The Death Beast enemy, which is an all-in-one version of the elemental horse monsters, has a skeletal appearance.
  • Destructible Armor: Armored Dokuro enemies are protected by armor, and must be de-armored by two of their projectiles being knocked back.
  • Deus ex Machina: To summon your partners for the Boss Rush, you have to help Isshaku cut through space-time. Using Power Slash. It's mentioned he did this to help Shiranui get back to their time after they helped Amaterasu kill the twin demons, but only in one line in the narration, and it never comes up again, so it's still quite jarring. Chibi being an actual Deus kind of justifies it though.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • If you try to do something where the game prompts you to use your Celestial Brush while ink-less (bar summoning a brush god), your partner comments on your missing markings.
    • During the Boss Rush, you can use Galestorm to counter tornadoes created by one of the bosses to send them away. The first time you fought them, however, this was not possible because the power was not yet available, but players who try it out for the rematch will be rewarded.
    • There's a ghost named Raiden in Sei-an City. You can only see him if you have Kagu as your partner. If you go up to that spot with any other partner and press A, he'll yell at you and say he only talks to people who can see him.
    • The "Redo" function is there not only in case you miss something or fail a puzzle, but it is also for any situation where you accidentally get yourself stuck in a place while your partner is in an area where you cannot control them because they are hidden behind something you can't wrap your camera around.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: King Fury, who is presented as the greatest threat thus far and is the last boss before Akuro is properly introduced, thus marking the moment the plot picks up steam and the stakes are raised.
  • Discontinuity Nod: In Ōkami, gathering up all 100 Stray Beads nets an artifact that grants invincibility, infinite ink, and 10x damage for your New Game+. In Okamiden, stray beads are nothing more than rather cheap ordinary antiques. When you get scammed into buying one for 10,000 yen, your partner comments on how worthless it is.
  • Doomed by Canon:
    • As soon as time travel gets involved and the game goes back to 100 years in the past, the player knows from the first game that Shiranui is going to die after traveling to the future to help Amaterasu and then back in time to save Nagi. However, what really does him in is protecting Kamiki Village from Akuro's attack in the past.
    • The Goryeo, a.k.a. the Sunken Ship from the first game. You even get to witness the Water Dragon sinking it.
  • The Dragon: Kurow becomes this for Akuro when he finds out about his true mission to die as his vessel and resists this path.
  • Dub Name Change: As with the previous game, there are a few of these. Some, like Kagura becoming 'Kagu', may have been to distinguish her from the similar-sounding Kaguya.
  • End Game Results Screen: Like in the original game, the player gets an overall ranking after the epilogue, with grading criteria including the number of continues used and the total amount of money collected. Getting the top rank in each category unlocks goodies for New Game+.
  • Escort Mission: Sometimes, you have to let your partner off your back and guide them with the Guidance technique. Some of the extended sequences of this can turn into mini Escort Missions.
  • Hair Decorations:
    • Nanami uses her Wet and Dry Jewels as hair decorations after she retrieves them, which ties up her hair in twin buns.
    • Kagu has floral-themed hair decs on and hanging from her bun. After she becomes a Miko, she gains two giant gold bells with trailing Zigzag Paper Tassel. They're even cuter.
  • Evil Knockoff: For the climactic Final Boss battle, Akuro takes the form of a dark version of Chibiterasu — complete with his own Celestial Brush, Divine Instrument, and Kuni as a partner!
  • Exposition Fairy: Issun for the prologue, and whoever your partner is at the moment for the rest of the game. During any point where you don't currently have a partner, all you get when attempting to examine the scenery or a sign is a whimper and a question-mark above Chibiterasu's head.
  • Feed It a Bomb: The Demon Nut enemy can be dispatched by using Bloom to open its mouth when stunned, then planting a Cherry Bomb in it.
  • Fighting from the Inside: When Kuni is being controlled by Akuro as his vessel, Kuni resists the control just as Akuro was about to kill Chibi, and Akuro then comes out of his vessel and fights Chibi himself. Afterward, Kurow volunteers himself as Akuro's vessel and keeps him down for long enough to be destroyed, as his mission was to seal Akuro inside him so he could be killed and take Akuro with him.
  • Finishing Move: If you use the proper brush technique on an enemy during its dying animation (with a possible additional technique during the battle), they'll drop Demon parts, which can be used to upgrade your weapons.
  • Fire, Ice, Lightning: This is the trio of elements that most enemies use now, with Wind not appearing anymore. Elite elemental enemies can use all three, and the Divine Instrument you get for New Game+, the Providence Crystal, can launch attacks of these elements.
  • First Town: Yakushi Village, which can be grown through a sidequest to find more residents.
  • Fixed Camera: You are unable to control the camera in most areas, only having the ability to rotate it in some larger spaces. The camera usually just changes angles depending on what part of the map you are on. It gets a bit bothersome at times.
  • Floating Continent: The Thundercloud. Although it's technically a cloud, it is solid underfoot and has a village of Little Bit Beastly people living on it.
  • Flying Saucer: Issun finds a picture of one in the Ruins. It turns out to be blueprints to build one, and he flies off in it with Chibi in the epilogue, bound for the Celestial Plain.
  • Foreshadowing: Chibi gets various nicknames from his partners over the course of the game. One of them, "Mutt", is less than polite, and it's given by Kuni, who has been selected and influenced by the evil Akuro for the entirety of the game.
    • When you first visit the Thundercloud with Kurow as your partner, you can talk to a girl who lives in one of the houses. When you talk to her, she tells you to scram and seems to be busy. If you later come back with Kurow before going back to the Underground Ruins, you can talk to her again and discover that she was actually writing a song. The song's name? Don't Run from Destiny. Kurow would very much like to do just that, since he was made to die as Akuro's prison.
  • Fur Bikini: The female NPCs living on the Thundercloud wear tiger fur bikinis. The men wear a toga-like garment made from tiger fur. This seems to be an act of reverence toward Gekigami, the tiger god of lightning.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • You can't stand on top of upside-down Konohana flowers... except in cutscenes, it seems.
    • Issun's Masterpieces and History Scrolls can be found in the past in places he never visited. This despite their content relating to the events of the previous game that he was there to witness.
  • Gameplay Grading: Like the original, battles are ranked on time and damage taken, on a scale of "cherry seed" to "cherry blossom", and your score multiplies your winnings. Also like the original, after the credits roll you are given an overall completion grade based on # of deaths, Praise collected, and so on. Your rank determines how many bonuses you get for your New Game+.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar:
    • While the game is marketed for older kids, some of the dialogue comes off as harsher than in Okami, with Kurow using "hella" as an intensifier at one point, for example.
    • The sequence with Genji in the Sage Shrine is pretty surprising for the demographic the game is aimed at. Genji is portrayed as a womanizing menace, and he steals away Nanami and must be chased through the shrine. It's already uncomfortable, but at one point, you find them writhing under the covers of a bed. Fortunately, they emerge clothed and the chase continues, but the implications of the animation in addition to his clear intentions are more overt than one would expect.
  • Giant Mecha: The Daidarabotchi, a giant robot built by the Moon Tribe that gets hijacked by King Fury.
  • Giant Mook: Gashadokuro are so large you only fight their upper halves, with the lower halves presumed to be buried underground. Crosses over with Heavily Armored Mook for the Armored Dokuro.
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly: Praise Points return as a mechanic that power up Chibi when he performs divine acts to help nature and other characters.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress:
    • Chibi and Kurow don't fall immediately after being transported many feet above the ocean, instead waiting for Gravitational Cognizance to set in.
    • This also occurs every time Chibi steps out onto a bridge that can't bear his weight. The bridge falls, Chibi wiggles his feet and looks shocked, and then he falls.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Yami (the Big Bad from the first game). Although Amaterasu defeated him, his evil power remained, although divided into five pieces (Master Anura, Bullhead, Renjishi, King Fury, and Akuro). This game has a tendency to contradict itself, though, as it states in other places that Akuro was the Greater Scope Villain of the first game, having control over Orochi and Yami.
  • Hammerspace: If he has a partner on his back, Chibi's weapons are nowhere to be seen until he attacks. Kagu and Kurow also seem to hide their weapons somewhere when not in use.
  • Hellish Horse: The Fire Beast enemy, who is said to burn with hellfire.
  • Henohenomoheji: Distant NPCs have the henohenomoheji face in their thought bubbles.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • Shiranui, already dying from helping Amaterasu in the future offscreen and saving Nagi in the past, expends the last of his energy deflecting an evil energy sphere from Akuro.
    • Kurow fulfills his designated mission of becoming Akuro's vessel so that he can restrain him and be destroyed, taking Akuro with him.
  • Howl of Sorrow: Chibi, after Kurow's Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Human Popsicle:
    • There's a frozen dragon at one point. And quite naturally, it thaws out just after you grab a certain MacGuffin.
    • Shiranui got himself frozen into one inside the Ice Room himself, and it's up to Chibi to defrost him.
  • Hyperspace Arsenal: Chibi can carry all of his weapons, consumable items, treasures, scrolls, etc. in his inventory, despite not having pockets.
  • I Have No Son!: Susano's reaction to Kuni's declaration that he's going on a Journey to Find Oneself, though it was to ensure Kuni wouldn't have anything holding him back from his journey.
  • Idiosyncratic Difficulty Levels: You can either play on Greenhorn or Old Hand difficulty.
  • The Imperial Regalia: Like his mother, Chibi's weapons are based on the Treasures of Amaterasu.
  • Improbable Weapon User:
    • Chibi can slay demons with mirrors and holy beads. Not by reflecting holy light or anything, just by whacking them senseless. In a New Game+, you can get a pair of crystals that shoot energy... circle... things.
    • Kagu attacks with fans prior to becoming a Miko.
    • Kurow attacks with musical notes from his flute.
  • Incredible Shrinking Man: The Lucky Mallet makes a return, complete with an explanation for why it was on the cargo ship in Ōkami.
  • Inevitable Tournament: On two occasions, you have to fight imps in a competition. First, it's in the Demon Market to win Nanami's freedom, and later, you have to do so in the Moon Cave to win a skeleton key for all the locks.
  • I Have Many Names: Each of Chibi's companions gives him a nickname in the absence of knowing his real one. None of them are flattering.
  • Instrument of Murder: Waka isn't the only Moon Tribe member to have one, it turns out.
    • King Fury, the possessed form of Sugawara, has a lute with an energy sword hidden inside.
    • Kurow's flute has TWO energy blades, one on each end.
  • Invisible Wall: Unlike in Okami, it's impossible to fall off cliffs or jump into deep water. You also can't step into large cursed zones as an invisible wall appears.
  • Irrelevant Sidequest: There are several sidequests that are only there for the purpose of gaining Praise and fleshing out the world more.
  • Jaw Drop: Chibi's reaction to each horrible nickname a partner gives to him.
  • Jumped at the Call: Issun, in contrast to his earlier refusal, with the implication that he misses Amaterasu and his days adventuring. Of course, this time he can't go along because of his previous calling as Ammy's Celestial Envoy.
  • King Incognito: Your first quest is the retrieve a hand mirror for a little girl who later turns out to be Sakuya in disguise. She pretended to be the little girl as a Secret Test of Character.
  • Left Hanging: Not only does the game "not" answer the threads left at the end of Okami, Amaterasu is still fighting on the celestial plain apparently but it adds more questions, most notably about Kuni's birth identity.
  • Leitmotif: Oh yes. Each main character has their own theme tune, and some of the lesser characters do as well - such as Susano.
  • Lighter and Softer: Being about a puppy and having an E10 rating (As opposed to Ōkami's T rating), the game seems like this at first. However, its themes are still mature and serious and it manages to keep tone with Okami pretty well. The game does invert Hotter and Sexier, though, which may be how its rating lowered, including things like Sakuya's costume no longer having a butt window.
  • Load-Bearing Boss: The catfish Bullhead, justified by a Taking You with Me gambit.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading: While the maps are retained from Okami, they have to be chopped up into smaller loaded parts for the DS capabilities, resulting in more loading screens.
  • Magical Defibrillator:
    • Chibi and Kagu find a man passed out in the street. After they unsuccessfully try to find a doctor, the nearby Raiden (who is a lightning ghost) advises them to use his power. They give him a good shock of electricity which miraculously cures the man without leaving a bruise or burn.
  • Matriarchy: With Queen Himiko dead, Sei-an City is overseen by a Miko, who by definition must be female.
  • Minecart Madness: While escaping the Witch Queen after your second visit to the Demon Market, you jump in a cart. Although it's a pushcart rather than a rail cart, the narrow passages and obstacles to dodge (or destroy) make it very much an example in spirit.
  • Monster Compendium: Much like the original game, you have a Creatures scroll that documents enemies faced. It even includes entries for a few characters you don't explicitly battle.
  • Monster Sob Story: When Kagu finds out the story behind Sen and Ryo, she says she almost feels sorry for them.
  • Moon Rabbit: The Moon Tribe's creation, Daidarabotchi, which is a rabbit-headed colossus.
  • Nerf: The Rosary got nerfed like crazy from the first game. In Okami, it was the weakest weapon but had a homing mechanic that allowed for massive combos and made fights go by much quicker. In Okamiden, however, the homing is gone and it kind of just flails all over the place.
  • My Death Is Just the Beginning: It's implied that Yami's death in the previous game led to his essence being reformed into this game's antagonists, with Akuro retaining most of his power and malevolence.
  • New Game+: Your money, maximum HP (and ink pots), and assorted Scrolls carry over to a new game. You can even unlock additional appearances for Chibi and an exclusive weapon.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • Akuro wanted you to defeat four of the bosses you go up against, because they are 4/5ths of his power and he wants it back to himself to fulfill his plans. Nice going, Chibi.
    • A minor example is a small moment on the Goryeo, which is the Sunken Ship before it sank. For a sidequest, a sailor asks you to fix a fish tank. The tank contains two crabs and a shark, implied to be the vessels for the crab demons Jiro and Saburo, who combine into the shark demon Ichiro to fight Amaterasu in Okami. If Chibi didn't fix the tank, its inhabitants probably wouldn't have become a problem in the future.
  • No Body Left Behind: As in the original game, defeated enemies turn into flowers. Presumably the justification is also the same.
  • No Mouth: Like before, the art style rarely includes mouths on characters unless they are meant to be particularly grotesque and monstrous.
  • Non-Standard Game Over: When in the swimming section of the Sage Shrine, if you get sandwiched between a wall and the left side of the screen, this happens.
  • Now, Where Was I Going Again?: Averted, as the Journal keeps track of major things you should remember.
  • Noob Cave: The Cave of Nagi functions as this, featuring many tutorial puzzles and obstacles, mostly teaching the uses of the Guidance mechanic and partners.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: Everyone you send to Yakushi Village pulls this. Even later in the game, when you can teleport between Origin Mirrors, they can still beat you there from halfway across the country.
  • One-Time Dungeon: The Five-Story Pagoda, the Moon Cave, the Underground Ruins, and the Ice Room. Unfortunately, all of these contain unique items that are needed for 100% Completion.
  • Orochi: He plays a surprisingly large role in this game, despite being dead for nine months. Akuro needs his blood to enhance his powers, and travels back to both Orochi battles in his determination to get it.
  • Panacea: The goal of one subplot is to make a perfect medicine in order to cure a terminally ill girl.
  • Panthera Awesome: Gekigami, the brush god of thunder - a huge tiger wielding a bow and lightning bolts. His kids, on the other hand, fall under Cute Kitten.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: As in the first game, placing a painted mask over your face makes the demons believe you're one of them. Then again, imps and the Witch Queen's fairies aren't too bright and see you as one of their own, given that they wear the same masks.
  • Permanently Missable Content: Unfortunately, missable things are all over the place given the number of locations that get sealed off after the first visit. The worst of the bunch are Issun's masterpieces, which unlock various goodies such as the String of Beads, but can be lost until the player is given the option to play a New Game+.
  • Personal Raincloud: A character's reaction to something that leaves them really unhappy, like Chibi's many strange nicknames.
  • Plot Tailored to the Party: Each area of the final dungeon is tailored to the abilities of the partner you have for that area.
  • Point of No Return: After you enter the Moon Cave 100 years in the past, and though you have multiple hours of playing and cutscenes left, you will no longer be able to warp back and forth.
  • Poor Communication Kills: After Otohime helps Chibiterasu in the past, she asks Nanami to tell the Goryeo crew that "there is no Water Dragon protecting the seas". What she actually meant is that the Water Dragon is no longer a benevolent guardian of the ocean, having gone vicious, and is now a serious threat to anyone who roams in the Ryoshima Coast. This leads to the captain of the ship understanding that the monster is just a myth and happily deciding to set sail in the high seas, where the Water Dragon immediately sinks the Goryeo, killing the entire crew while Chibiterasu and Kurow can do nothing but watch with tears in their eyes.
  • Preexisting Encounters: Demon Scrolls wandering around in outdoor locations, and certain areas have ominous kanji emanating from them, which do the same thing. Every time you come into contact with one, you enter a battle, so you can see those fights coming.
  • Punny Name: These are rampant. Many are holdovers from the original, but there's a few more to boot, such as the demon chef Umami.
  • Puzzle Pan: The game's camera will pan across a room to showcase a puzzle.
  • Rasputinian Death: Turns out Shiranui didn't just die because he was poisoned by Orochi or because he was weakened from fighting Lechku and Nechku. It was because he was frozen solid for god knows how long, fought the owls, fought Orochi, and then head-butted a meteor.
  • Raygun Gothic: The Moon Tribe's technology and, to a lesser extent, the ancient ruins.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Kurow and Waka wear pink. Genji not only wears pink, but bares his midriff, has a heart-shaped decoration behind his head, a flower on his shirt, and a heart-shaped fan. Players may be forgiven for thinking he is a she when he first appears.
  • Reality Warper:
    • Chibi can manipulate reality with the Celestial Brush, although he is less powerful at it than Ammy.
    • Akuro after he takes on Chibi's appearance, gaining his own Celestial Brush that can change reality and cancel Chibi's.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Manpuku becomes attached to Chibi because he reminds him of Maru, the dog he had to give up due to his eating habit.
  • Retcon: Several. Not surprising considering the sequel was made by an entirely different set of people than the first.
    • Despite Amaterasu being Shiranui's reincarnation, Chibi is described as Shiranui's grandson. Japanese mythology god biology could be to blame here.
    • Isshaku refers to 100-year-ago Ammy as Shiranui. Shiranui was just the villagers' name for her (as well as Fandom, for clarity), whereas both incarnations are Amaterasu. Mr. Grapefruit even says as much, making it stranger.
    • It wasn't just Susano/Nagi and Ammy who cut off Orochi's heads; Chibi helped out both times, too. Not just that, but Nagi needed Chibi's help to kill Orochi with the Celestial Cleaver move. Susano didn't, though.
    • A major plot point in the first game was to kill the Water Dragon in order to obtain the Dragon Orb - which in turn would allow Otohime to transform (there wasn't time to find a cure for the Water Dragon's madness). Now she is capable of transforming at will, though with Chibi's help. This raises questions as to why she didn't ask Ammy to give her the same treatment instead of telling her to venture inside the dragon for the Orb.
    • The brush gods: There were only thirteen, Ammy included. Her power split into twelve other gods after she died as Shiranui. Okamiden introduces the children of brush gods (and briefly, their parents) who fall outside of those thirteen while never so much as mentioning Hasugami, Yumigami, Kasugami, Kabegami, Itegami and their techniques.
  • Rewarding Vandalism: Smashing pots and cutting down trees can net you items. Since ink doesn't regenerate in this game (not counting the 3-bottle delayed recovery from bottoming out on ink, which is never a good thing in battle), the ink pots you can get from these actions are pretty vital.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: All of the young brush gods, including Chibi, are portrayed as extremely adorable.
  • Rubberband AI: If you get too far ahead of the Witch Queen during the Minecart Madness minigame, she'll just run faster and catch up.
  • Running Gag: Chibi getting a humiliating nickname every time a new partner comes around.
  • Save-Game Limits: Unlike Okami which allowed you to make multiple files, there's only one save file here. Note that there are also some collectibles that are permanently missable, some of which tie into New Game+. N
  • Scenery Porn: Being a sequel to Ōkami, this should be expected. One standout example is the brand new area of Yakushi Village, where the game starts.
  • Sequel Hook: It turns out that the game is a story being told by the adult Kuni. And once again, we're left hanging over the hinted "next story".
  • Shoot the Dog: After Kurow absorbs Akuro, Chibi and Kuni have to kill him to stop Akuro from breaking out.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Doctors Redbeard and Bluebeard have the healing herbs from Resident Evil on their floors, for one.
    • invokedOne of the fishermen in Ryoshima Coast greets Chibi with "Yo, dog." (referring to the popular "Yo dawg" image macro). The Tanuki does the same thing.
    • Examining the one of the sets of herbs in the upstairs of a house in Yakushi Village with Kurow as a partner will cause him to exclaim "Dude, where's my herbs?"
    • In-game, you meet an authoress named Shikibu, who's plagued by her creation, Genji—no doubt a reference to Murasaki Shikibu, who wrote The Tale of Genji.
    • Near the end of the game is this line:
      Kurow: Friends? I don't have any of those. Never have, never will.
  • Sixth Ranger: A telepathic penguin god and a magnetism-controlling whale god are added to the brush god gang.
  • Speaking Simlish: The voice acting, as in the previous game.
  • Spin-Offspring: Kuni is the child of Susano and Kushi although he is adopted, Amaterasu is Chibi's mother, and all the various brush gods apparently now have children.
  • Stable Time Loop:
    • When Chibi first meets her, Nanami asks where he's been and where that blond kid he was with is, as well as calling him Squiddy. Later, Chibi travels nine months back into time accompanied by Kurow, who you've met at that point, and meets Nanami when she helps Chibi find the Knowing Jewel, as well as giving Chibi said nickname. And then there's the whole Orochi, Amaterasu, and Shiranui time loop from the first game...
    • Chibi rescues Shiranui from the Ice Room 100 years in the past, which in turn allows him to show up and save Ammy and, later, Chibi in return. Without this aid, it's highly probable that Ammy would never have been born/reincarnated, and thus neither would Chibi.
  • Sticks to the Back:
    • Chibi's Sword and Mirror Divine Instruments. The Beads float around his neck. The New Game+ weapon sticks to his sides.
    • Kuni's giant sword, just like his father's did.
  • Stationary Boss: Mizuchi, the boss of the Ice Room (being partially encased in ice and all). Akuro's first form is as well, though he has hands that can follow you.
  • Stewed Alive: In the Moon Cave 100 years in the past, Chibiterasu and Manpuku fall into a giant pot of soup. The imp cooking it decides to cook them with the soup, but a hungry Manpuku saves himself and Chibi from being boiled to death by drinking the entire thing.
    • There is another example of this trope not so long afterward; Charity is tricked by Umami into approaching a large pot after refusing to cook for Orochi. Umami then pushes her in, but Chibiterasu saves her with Vine.
  • Super Drowning Skills: Chibi's even worse at it than his mother - he can't even swim at all (except in cutscenes).
  • Super Not-Drowning Skills: The Dry Jewel grants you this, but you only get to use it for one area.
  • Suspiciously Cracked Wall: If you see a glowing, cracked wall, bomb the hell out of it.
  • Swallowed Whole: Kuni, by Bullhead the catfish.
  • Take Your Time: Played straight except during the aforementioned Colossus Climb, which has a five minute timer. Any other time, feel free to run around doing sidequests while the world is in danger. It's not going anywhere. Justified before you finish off King Fury, since Akuro's plans cannot go forward before then. After that, not so much.
  • Thunder Drum: The Thundercloud has large drums which Chibi can use to jump to higher places and some of the inhabitants use drums to create electricity, alongside other instruments. Chibi also gets a pellet drum from there which makes him immune to electricity, though it breaks after you reach the guarded area of the Underground Ruins.
  • Time Travel: You travel to two different times: nine months ago and 100 years ago.
  • Totally Radical: Kurow and several NPCs speak this way.
  • Tron Lines: In the Underground Ruins and on Issun's flying saucer. This seems to be characteristic of Moon Tribe technology.
  • Truly Single Parent: Not spelled out, but we can assume Amaterasu and the other brush gods don't need a partner to produce children. Issun does briefly wonder how Ammy reproduced, starting to ask who her partner was, but he and the player are not answered.
  • Turns Red: Almost all bosses change their behavior at least once as their HP total is worn down.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: No one seems particularly interested by the white wolf puppy ridden by various children, some of whom are pretty unusual in and of themselves. No one really seems to bat much of an eye when things mysteriously fix themselves, burst into fire, or split in half, either.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change:
    • The underwater segment of the Sage Shrine, which plays like a fast-paced underwater 2D platforming level.
    • One part of the game in the Thundercloud is a Rhythm Game. Oh yeah, and it's not optional either.
  • The Un-Reveal: Kurow crushes on a pretty female scholar in Sei-an City, and is promised to learn her name when they go on a date he's been pestering her for. Kurow's path ends in a Heroic Sacrifice and they never go on a date, so the scholar's name is never revealed.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Chibi and Kuni, and to a lesser extent, Nanami and Kagu, to Akuro, who tricks them into destroying the vessels of Yami so he can regain their power, setting his plan in motion.
  • Vendor Trash: Half the things you find in treasure chests only exist to be sold.
  • Victory Pose: After major boss battles, Chibi lets loose with a dramatic howl, accompanied by glowing light and cherry petals. In fact, it's just like his mother's, but cuter.
  • Warp Whistle: Origin Mirrors with an X eventually become warp points, allowing access between Agata Forest and Ryoshima Coast as well as fast travel to the areas within the two halves of the map.
  • Wave-Motion Gun: Akuro's most powerful attack in-battle (which also restores his HP if he successfully uses it).
  • Wham Line: When Chibiterasu confronts Akuro near the end of the game, the demon addresses him by a familiar nickname: "We meet again, Child of the Sun. Or should I say...Mutt?"
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Though Issun does make a comment at the beginning: "You're Ammy's kid? Then who did she...?" before getting sidetracked, the identity of Chibiterasu's father, if any, is a mystery for the ages.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Waka. Some even think he Took a Level in Jerkass. Stopping evil? Awesome. Using Kurow as a doll/sacrifice to trap Akuro, leaving Chibi to kill him? Not so awesome. Though to be honest, the game doesn't make it clear just how involved Waka was in this plan.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: The end of the game shows you a small scene from the life of each of Chibi's living partners, Ayame, and the female scholar.
  • World-Healing Wave: Reviving a Guardian Sapling. Sadly, not done as often as in the first game, but still just as impressive.
  • Yin-Yang Bomb: Akuro's goal is to become invincible by combining his powers of darkness with a "vessel of light". His Monster Compendium entry states, "the light brings death, and the darkness devours light".
  • You Can't Fight Fate: Said almost verbatim by Kurow to Manpuku, although it's clear he's talking about his own destiny, not Manpuku's.
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: Akuro manages to power himself up, despite Chibi and his partners' best efforts.
  • Youkai: You accidentally set a tanuki loose on Yakushi Village. After he rips you off, you have to hunt him down in a sort of hide and seek minigame.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Nanami has blue hair made of water, and Manpuku has red spiked hair that apparently is on fire. Several NPCs, most notably those living on the Thundercloud and Genji, also have unusual hair colors. And the doctor's mustaches.
  • You Shouldn't Know This Already: Justified with the Celestial Brush techniques. Chibi is definitely not the same being as Ammy, so you need to find the correct god and release/rejuvenate it before you can use its technique.

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