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Bravely Second: End Layer is the Eastern RPG sequel to Bravely Default, developed by Silicon Studio and published by Square Enix for Nintendo 3DS.

Two years after the events of Bravely Default, the High Fantasy world of Luxendarc is at last moving towards peace with a treaty signing between the formerly warring factions of the Crystal Orthodoxy and Duchy of Eternia. Unfortunately, this fragile peace is soon destroyed by the newly established Glanz Empire, when its leader, Kaiser Oblivion, kidnaps the Crystal Orthodoxy's Pope, former Warrior of Light Agnès Oblige, and declares war on the rest of the world.

And so it falls to a new party of adventurers to put an end to the Glanz Empire's schemes: Yew Geneolgia, head of Agnès' personal guard; Edea Lee, the leader of the Eternian knights and another of the four Warriors of Light who saved the world two years earlier; Magnolia Arch, a Mysterious Waif hunting for the Eldritch Abomination that destroyed her home; and Tiz Arrior, a third Warrior of Light who fell into a coma soon after the climatic battle of Bravely Default.

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The previous game's composer, Revo from Sound Horizon, did not compose Bravely Second's music due to scheduling conflicts. Instead, Ryo from Supercell composed the soundtrack. However, a good number of tracks from the first game do return.


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This game provides examples of:

     A-C 
  • 100% Completion: The journal entries for monsters make it a little more elaborate. To truly achieve this, you must also keep fighting the same monsters more times to extend their entries, achieving "Complete!"
  • 24-Hour Armor:
    • Danzaburo never seems to take off his big hat despite taking a bath at a hot spring.
    • Edea's mother complains that Braev refuses to take off his armor despite retiring and becoming a seamster. He remarks that he likes the extra weight it gives him.
    • Heinkel now works for the police as an investigator yet still wears full plate armor.
  • Aborted Arc:
    • At the end of Chapter 4, after time has stopped, if you visit Sylvie and the Matriarch Edea will be told that she must lie to the world and make herself out to be a bloodthirsty tyrant. However, at no point in the game does she need to do anything of the sort. Could possibly be a Sequel Hook.
    • Before his final boss battle in House Geneolgia's mausoleum, Denys tells Yew of the corruption of their ancestor, Foundar. After the boss battle, if the player returns to Foundar's grave they'll meet a shadowy figure who warns them of the "Eye of Foundar." After completing the Yokai side quest and learning more about House Geneolgia's history the figure becomes silent and the subject is not touched on again.
  • Accidental Proposal: Yew accidentally does this with Magnolia, whose customs in the moon dictate that a man giving a woman a flower is asking for her hand in marriage. She didn't accept, but was seriously dwelling on it. Things get... awkward when it is cleared up.
  • A.I. Breaker:
    • During the battles with Janne in the Fire Temple and the Skyhold, he uses the Stampede passive ability to counter single-target melee attacks that hit him when he is in aurochs stance. However, the Wall Spellcraft also counts as a counter move, and it takes priority over Stampede, so setting up a Wall on him with a healing or support spell can completely prevent his counterattacks.
    • Wall in general can mess with enemies' A.I. on occasion... even when they're the ones using it. Magic triggered by Wall still counts as casting it, and you have access to Magic Mirror in the third battle with Bella, so if you have that on everyone (or at least your physical attackers), then when she puts up Wall on herself or Cú Chulainn, it actually ends up increasing the damage that they take.
    • Whether it counts as a true A.I. Breaker, an Easy Boss Trick, or merely abusing job skills for fun and profit may be a matter of opinion, but reflection-type Astral Magic makes the fight with Nikolai in the Water Temple almost a complete non-issue. Lightning Mirror on your party reflects all of his magic attacks while also letting your party use healing and support magic, and Magic Mirror on him prevents him from being able to cast healing or support magic on himself. (True, the latter also prevents you from being able to attack him with magic, but that's not much of a problem since his magic defense is sky-high anyway.) It is quite possible for him to kill all of his minions and then himself entirely with reflected magic, particularly if you make him weak to lightning or buff his magic attack.
    • The Bonus Boss can hit very hard with its assortment of abilities, but if the Companion starts the round KOed, it will use Call Comrade to resuscitate it. This counts as healing, of course, so as long as Winter Storm is in effect, the Adventurer is effectively helpless.
  • All Part of the Show: Played with. Florem's new pageant tries to consider both inner and outer beauty, and allows both men and women to compete in separate categories. When Edea interrupts the show when the Empire attacks, and Alternis saves her from Geist, they win on the spot.
  • All Just a Dream: Aimee and Angelo believe the first time they both were defeated by the group was this and they can't stop having those "dreams" every night.
  • All There in the Manual: The Bestiary entries fill up with otherwise unmentioned information about enemies and bosses as you progress. It's often justified as Yew and co. finding documents or extorting information which isn't urgently relevant but still useful and adding them to his diary.
  • And I Must Scream: The journal entry for Amphisbaena reveals it's the exaggerated mutation of two researchers (twins, even) of ten researchers who protected Tiz during his stasis injected with Gigas Lich cells (the monster that used to protect the Earth Crystal but was felled by Magnolia during the raid) that were developed into baena cells. There were two of them originally, but then they were put together and devoured each other, mutating even further and becoming what you saw. The last part of the entry points out how, even after they have been mutated into monsters, they still retain all their painful memories of having been turned into a monster with two heads...and every single time a head is disembodied, only for the cells to painfully regenerate them quickly.
  • Amazing Technicolor Battle Field:
    • Like the first game, the first game's asterisk bearers have a shiny blue asterisk barrier as the backdrop of their battlefield. The new asterisk bearers have an orange themed barrier in comparison with the addition of bubbles floating up as the battle goes on. Along with a new soundtrack to differentiate them from the first game's asterisk bearers.
    • Ba'al battles take place in wildly different environments than the rest of the game.
    • Even more so with the final boss fights with Providence where the party stands in an outer space-esque backdrop.
  • Amnesiac Hero: Minor example. All Three Cavaliers have vague memories of what happened in their latest assignment in Al-Khampis. There isn't quite a good explanation how that even happened. The fact that the demo (which 'details' that assignment) is dubiously canon at best and sheer Continuity Snarl at worst makes it easier to overlook.
  • Animal-Eared Headband: With the return of the performer job, the girls receive yet again bunny ears, as well as in the Brave Bunny and Bonsoir Bunny outfits for Edea and Magnolia respectively. All party members receive cat ears when equipping the Catmancer asterisk, and a fox-eared headband/hood with the Yokai one.
  • Anime Hair: Two years of stasis without anyone trimming his hair gives Tiz Peek-a-Bangs. It's so wild that a child asks his father if everyone in the world has hair like that, only for the father to believe it must be a new fad.
    Magnolia: (in French) It really isn't, you know.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: Fan feedback has generally made the gameplay better:
    • You can choose to Brave a single action all the way to 4 in one screen window to avoid opening 4 windows just to choose the same action 3 more times.
    • Party setups can now be saved as Favorites to avoid making the player tailor their party group through many customization options any time they want to test another job setup out.
    • Trigger conditions for Limit Breaks can now be selected independent of weapon type (Brave, Heal, Items), as opposed to the triggers being tied to weapon types like in the previous game.
    • Quick Jump options are available to avoid losing time traversing an already-traversed dungeon.
    • If you have to fight a boss without any chance to save beforehand and you lose, instead of being tossed a game over screen, the game will go back to the scene previous and fix your party to full health (though you lose all items and special move charges if you use them), telling that you can either change party compositions and try again or return to your last save to grind some more. Examples are the sidequest in Grapp Keep, Nikolai in Water Temple, and Bella and Cu at early chapter 5.
  • Anti-Villain: While Norzen played this straight at first, like its predecessor, players find that the supposedly villainous group turned out to be this. Kaiser Oblivion, also Denys Geneolgia wanted to kidnap Agnès and a time artifact to turn back time so the corruption of Eternia's Crystal orthodoxy never happened, and many of his allies and followers (except for Angelo and Aimee.) were victims before Braev reformed Eternia's orthodoxy seventeen years before Bravely Second. Though some of the asterisk bearer's Anti-Villain side were more prevalent by chapter 5. Bella and Cu Chulainn, for example.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit:
    • Despite how just about every side quest involves two Asterisk holders believing so strongly in their own side that they'll come to blows for opposing them, they'll only ever fight AGAINST you. The one you agree with is perfectly fine with standing there and watching the fight while the one you disagree with will usually have their own mooks joining in.
    • Subverted in the fight against Yōko. Ringabel does help you fight her, but he's not a controllable party member.
  • Armor-Piercing Question: When Agnès asks Magnolia if she's returning to the moon, she and Yew spend the rest of the story depressed about her having to leave.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: Chapter 3, Old Sagitta: "Doctor Altair, famous for his numerous scientific contributions—including the buster ship project, the spatiotemporal compass, and the superconductive rice cooker..."
  • Art Evolution: Unlike the previous game, where most of the characters had a chibi-esque design, this game gives all of the characters more realistic proportions, something that was previously reserved for the Jobmasters. This also applies to returning characters such as Agnès. Case in point, this is Agnès in Bravely Default and this is Agnès in Bravely Second. Regardless, the asterisks all maintain their towering proportions, except for Bella and Minette.
  • Arc Words: "By what strange trick of fate do your paths cross anew?" They become much more meaningful when you realize the narrator is Deneb, who has been watching over the party over the span of both games.
    • "Bravely second, the courage to try again."
    • "Coup de gravy" is said by just about every major character at least once.
  • Artificial Stupidity:
    • Aimee and Angelo’s battle in the second loop will involve them making the party weak to fire, and using fire element on their physical attacks. The party can cast elemental mirror to reflect it back at them…and they won’t bother changing to a different element.
    • Barras can again Invigorate himself to death.
  • Artistic License – Economics: The "Salvaging The Economy" side story involves deciding the current taxation laws on Grandship. Apparently, the government program to take care of orphaned children is so outrageously bloated and incompetently handled that the taxes needed to fund it require a feast at the Drunken Pig to cost millions. If the player supports abolishing this program (with no other apparent changes to economic policy), the economy reverts to normal almost instantaneously; if the player supports keeping it in place, the citizens are able to keep up by making an even more nonsensical amount of money through exports.
  • Atrocious Alias:
    • After Yew assembles the main party for the rest of the story, he dubs them all "Agnès' Avengers", much to their dismay. It later becomes upgraded to the longer "Agnès' Ba'al Busting Avengers", further dismaying them until they sadly become used to it.
    • The absolutely embarrassing name "Rubadub" for the Cool Airship. There were more, worse embarrassing names after that one that they settled for the first one.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: The skillset of the final job, the Yōkai, is composed largely of this, along with Cool, But Inefficient and a couple outright Useless Useful Spells. To break it down:
    • The -ja level elemental magic spells, Firaja, Blizzaja, Thundaja, and Aeroja, are good and powerful...but they cost 99 MP each, so you can't just use them willy-nilly unless you have a party setup that allows for easy MP restoration or casting spells for free.
    • Consume Life and Acid Breath are pretty good, but they do cost 2 BP each and aren't too useful against bosses. There is also Three Blades, which has the same cost, is even less useful against bosses, and generally tends to be outclassed by both Consume Life and Acid Breath (not least because while it can instantly halve a foe's HP, the chance of it doing so is only 50%).
    • Envy is useful, acting as a full-party Dispel along with debuffing both attack and defense stats, but again, it costs 99 MP to use. Sloth has the same cost and, instead of inflicting stat debuffs, inflicts all elemental weaknesses instead...but how often do you need enemies to be weak to more than one element at a time? The Patissier can already inflict elemental weaknesses, and for a lot cheaper. Finally, Pride keeps the same cost and dispel effect but instead buffs the user's attack and defense stats by 25% each...which is frankly underwhelming for this far into the game and that much MP.
    • Avarice absorbs 1 BP from every foe, but since it costs 3 BP to use, it's not repeatable unless you're up against at least four enemies, and of course it doesn't work on bosses.
    • Lust inflicts Charm status on all foes with a 50% trigger chance for each. Obviously, it doesn't work on bosses, and the same effect can be had with a Patissier fitted with the Items for All passive. At least this one only costs 20 MP.
    • Gluttony and Wrath are moves that are really only useful in very specific situations. The former causes all party members to absorb all damage but get K.O.ed if they absorb enough that it would put their HP beyond maximum (which, unless you're using Dark Knights or Phoenix Flight, basically amounts to "great, now I'm taking damage that I can't heal off"), while the latter inflicts Berserk (with a 75% chance) on all enemies. And yes, they do still get the 50% P. Atk. bonus from it.
    • Finally, the only active ability unrelated to the "sin beasts", Disguise, allows you to essentially transform into a copy of another party member and use their job skills. It can be quite useful (for instance, if you have a Fencer in the party, you can activate Bloody Wolf before going to town with -ja spells or what have you), but it costs 1 BP to transform and 1 to transform back, and you can't transform and use the new job skills on the same turn (nor transform back and use your normal job skills on the same turn).
  • Back from the Dead: In Default, a majority of the first world's asterisks were presumed dead but are still living in Second. The reason why is because some of them mention how their lives where saved by "the man in green". That description is only meant to be taken as a hint once you see the Adventurer traveling back in time through a green portal that converts his red getup to a green color. To hide the identity better, none of them thought the man was actually a girl.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Chapter 4 ends with the Kaiser using the compass to spirit himself and Agnes into the past and Anne using the power of the Holy Pillar to make the Moon disappear—causing Luxendarc to be stuck in frozen time. The only solution is to have the courage to try again during a certain battle in the beginning of the game.
  • Badass Boast:
    • Every asterisk holder in the game says a line to introduce themselves as the holders of the asterisks they possess.
    • Played for Laughs in the case of Bella and Kikyo. The first never got to introduce herself formally until the second time around...when Yew and Edea had already taken the asterisk from her, which she grudgingly points out in her second battle when she looks at Yew; the latter because...she's too shy to speak, so an annoyed Edea does it for her.
  • Bag of Spilling:
    • Yew doesn't have any levels or equipment he may have acquired during the prologue demo.
    • Edea and Tiz don't retain any of their levels, equipment or Asterisks from the previous game. Tiz has the excuse of lying dormant for years, but Edea is still a healthy military girl so her levels should be largely intact.
    • Strangely, this is averted with Agnès, who uses Thundaga during the Hopeless Boss Fight with the Kaiser.
    • After selecting New Game+ (the real one) and starting from the Prologue, only Yew's level and stats are retained when fighting Kaiser Oblivion while his job and equipment reverts to what it is at the beginning at the game. You can re-equip his gear after you gain control, and his Job can be changed back shortly after. It's similar for the "earlier" New Game+, except he does keep his Job and equipment for the fight, only to be forced back into the starting Job and equipment if you let the battle end as it did before.
  • Bait-and-Switch: Judging the positioning, it all looks like Lotus's son will die protecting his father at the hands of Geist, until Edea swoops in and kills Geist in the nick of time.
  • Balance Buff: The Bravely Second mechanic gets a subtle one compared to the previous game — SP now builds constantly over time, whether you put your 3DS in Sleep Mode or not.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Many, many cases:
    • Edea, when Yew is attacked by Bella.
      • Bonus points for the game playing her special move theme from the previous game during this scene.
    • Magnolia, when she rescues Tiz from his stasis chamber while the Glanz Empire has seized control of the room.
    • Edea, once more, when she saves Lotus's child from being killed by Geist.
    • The party upon starting New Game+ and intervening with the opening battle.
    • In the final side quest, Ringabel, who continues doing it during the fight against the Yōkai asterisk holder with a whole slew of Special Attacks. Note that he is the only person in the whole game who becomes a true Guest-Star Party Member.
    • Spectacularly done in the final boss, where Yew and every new asterisk holder literally shatter the fourth wall to help the player regain control from Providence itself to fight back.
  • Big Eater:
    • Edea's monstrously big appetite returns with a vengeance.
    • Yoko herself is unable to stop gorging herself on food, especially croissants. Not even after revealing her true form does she stop this quirky side of hers. Her final note to the party is literally a cutscene titled, "So Long And Thanks For All The Croissants".
  • The Big Guy: Nikolai is easily the largest playable character of the cast.
  • Big NO: Yew screams out one when Denys uses the compass to send him and Diamante to the far reaches of time.
  • Book-Ends: Caldisla. It’s the first city visited in Default, which is followed up by a trip to the Norende chasm. In Second, it’s the last...again followed up by a trip to the chasm. It’s even referred to as the “Land of Endings”, in contrast to its title “Land of Beginnings”, from the former.
  • Bonus Boss:
    • There are the 7 Deadly Sins (the Nemesis from the previous game and by extension the same ones from Final Fantasy: The 4 Heroes of Light) to power up the final job.
    • The above relocates all of the elemental dragons guarding the spheres in every monument to enter Vampire Castle to the 3 dimensional dungeons and turning into the Chest Monster kind for the Infinity +1 Sword weapons.
    • After the above is done, you can fight the Adventurer and the Companion in the Dimension's Cauldron (the volcano dungeon in Eisen that used to lead to the Fire Temple)...which THEN leads to a harder boss fight against the Adventurer in his...her Deneb form right immediately.
  • Bonus Dungeon: 3 of them, actually, though only available after finishing the game.
  • Boring, but Practical: The Bishop job. It's essentially a White Mage with no offensive capabilities (i.e., no access to "Holy" or "Aero" spells), but its spells are cheap and restore HP based on percentages, meaning it works well with non-magic jobs.
    • As with the previous game, using a Swordsmaster in combination with someone to redirect aggro (Pirate and Patissier both have abilities to do so) is very effective. The Swordsmaster Level 11 ability, Eye for an Eye counters whenever an enemy attacks an ally. Considering the ability is only unlockable at the end game, and the remaining bosses all have attacks which hit the entire party, there's very little reason to have a Swordsmaster use any other ability, once unlocked.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing:
    • Not quite, but the same principle. In the bestiary, you may notice that you're missing the first "tier" of Imperial soldiers even as you approach the end of the game. You finally encounter them in the last Imperial area, and it turns out that they're the Empire's strongest forces, being either a Boxed Crook, an elite trying to catch the enemy by surprise, or a Super Prototype.
    • By Chapter 4's ending, the bleak world of Luxendarc is stuck frozen in time, with the random encounters everywhere being obscenely overpowered Ba'als wrecking havoc due to the moon having been sent to another world by Anne.
  • Bowdlerise: The Western release has several of these:
    • Aimee's job was both renamed and redesigned from the stereotypical Native American-inspired Tomahawk to the Cowboy-esque Hawkeye in order to avoid negative stereotypes against Native Americans.
    • Revealing outfits for have been altered to be less revealing, and shadows have been added beneath some skirts to prevent Panty Shots.
    • On a more controversial subject, the "bad" endings to the sidequests were modified to include the "good ending" based on Japanese player feedback. In the Japanese version, the first time a side was chosen on either loop, the player would be treated to a cutscene from the characters regretting the choice. Only by choosing the same side twice on one playthrough would the good ending be seen. Japanese players felt this was cheapening their choices, so the localization extended all cutscenes so the player could see the full ending no matter which side they choose.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall:
    • Yew, all alone, somehow senses the player's disapproval at his relief in taking the long way through the woods when the scary bridge used as a shortcut had broken down.
    • This gets more prominent in chapter four and onward.
      • At the end of Chapter 4, as the party is expressing their annoyance at Kaiser Oblivion getting away without them facing him once, Yew stops them, looking thoughtful, then directly addresses the player, knowing one little thing... Wasn't the Hopeless Boss Fight Yew was in at the start of the game against Kaiser Oblivion?
      • The fact New Game+ unlocks straight after that cutscene is another clue.
    • Before the team enters the End-Game Dungeon, during the button-mashing segment, the clouds will open up, and reveal the portal to the Celestial Realm within the great chasm. Once it clears, instead of a portal effect, it instead uses the 3DS camera. Not only using the same type of fourth wall breaking from the previous game, but further cementing the connections between the player's real world, along with the Celestial Realm.
    • In the final battle, Providence addresses you, the actual player, directly, accusing you of being cruel and manipulative in forcing the party to repeatedly fight and die for you. Yew also addresses you later in the fight, saying that you and he share the same will, and that everyone else supports you.
  • Button Mashing: A brief return before the final dungeon as a reference to the prominent mechanic in the first game.
  • Cabin Fever: "The Value of a Life" side story.
  • Call-Back:
    • Once again, Edea having been born and raised in Eternian Central Command gives her access to several passages that the people in charge of know nothing about. In this case, she uses it to sneak into her bedroom, rather than sneak out of it.
    • In Default, Olivia had placed a shield around the Water Crystal. Here, her successor Sylvie does the same. It was also a minor plot point that Agnès could have removed the shield herself and performed the Rite of Awakening, but chose not to. Agnès-possessed-by-Revenant has no such misgivings, and does bypass the shield to drive the crystal wild.
    • Several returning asterisks have references to their holders' actions in Default.
      • Knight Argent Heinkel's team during the Central Command Boss Rush was named "The Iron Wall", and he had an annoying tendency to Protect Ally on all his teammates at the same time. The Knight's new level 11 Chivalry command? Iron Wall, which is Full Cover on all teammates at the same time.
      • Ranger Artemia Venus had been reduced to bloodlust by the time Edea fought her in the first and second worlds. Berserk has been transmuted from the Pirate to the Ranger, and the Ranger's level 11 ability is a bonus to berserk status.
      • Summoner Mephilia Venus was studying under Conjurer Yulyana. The Conjurer asterisk being removed, Invocation has become the Summoner's level 11 ability.
      • In the second and third worlds, Praline a la Mode could be seen singing on Grandship. The song she and Barbarossa are now bickering over - and the name of the Performer's level 11 Singing command? The Grand Ship.
  • Cat Girl: The new Catmancer class comes with cat ears and a tail.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • The Bravely Second Hourglass and system? The latter becomes relevant for advancing to chapter 5 while the former gives an insight of how you first received it early and way back at the prologue of Bravely Default that eventually became the item to bring Tiz back to life courtesy of the Adventurer/Deneb.
    • Additionally, early in the game, Yew will remark directly to the player that his disappointment that the bridge is out isn't due to his fear, this time. It comes off as a throwaway joke, but come the final battle when the True Final Boss has attempted to deliver a Heroic BSoD to the player themselves, Yew's ability to speak to you may come in handy...
  • Chekhov's Gunman:
    • After Agnès is rescued, there is no possible way for anyone to ever make the crystals run wild, right? As long as they don't kidnap Sylvie...
    • A very much important example to the entire franchise would be the Adventurer.
    • The Sword of the Brave, while only used as a plot device blade in order to reveal Yew's past and set up the Yōkai Sub-Story, appears again in the Sequel Hook Stinger and will most likely play major role in the next game.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Yew's companions take turns writing their own comments in Yew's Diary. While the default text is written by Yew, Tiz writes in green, Magnolia writes in blue, Edea writes in orange, and a mysterious man writes in purple.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard: As with Bravely Default, there are a few instances of this.
    • Bella doesn't need to spend an extra BP to use Spellcraft on her spells, unlike the player characters.
    • Alternis Dim retains his massive HP total and move that deals his missing health in damage to one target from the first game, though unlike in Bravely Default, he will use this move from the start rather than only when his HP is low.
  • Continuity Snarl: Most information seems to indicate that Second takes place in Default's first world. However, Mephilia Venus apparently claimed all of Default's summons prior to a Yulyana-advised reversion, of which she only had Girtablulu until the fourth world; Erutus Profiteur and Ominas Crowe makes mention to "the final battle in Eternia" and "those ridiculous teams" from the fifth world; and Lord DeRosso appears to be Killed Off for Real following his Heroic Sacrifice against Ouroboros in the final world.
  • Cool Airship:
    • The Grandship has degraded back to a nation due to having used up all of its orichalcum compound.
    • The one the party obtains is an airship that's also a bathhouse.
  • Contrived Coincidence:
    • Edea, knowing full well by now in the rewritten world of the past that Barbarossa and Praline will listen to her outrageous decision to support one over the other, devises a plan so that the group doesn't have to go all over the place to hear them out again. Only her method to lure Praline out works as intended, but her plan to get Barbarossa to come works by virtue of him conveniently sailing near Florem (he could be found in the western waters of Ancheim), conveniently having his men in Florem, and conveniently listening to her choice while being inside a hidden lab that Fiore used to occupy and alerting the captain at top breakneck speed.
    • In both worlds, while siding against the obsessed Mephilia causes her to turn on you, Kamiizumi makes no appearance in this scenario. On the other hand, if you side with her, he interrupts the conversation and prepares to discipline you at swordpoint despite the absolute lack of foreshadowing to his arrival.
  • Corrupt Church: You thought the Chrystal Orthodoxy was bad in the first game? Turns out they are even worse this time around. The Crystal Guard in particular is shown to have been incredibly corrupt in the recent past and is pretty much the reason for almost every villain in the game joining the Glanz Empire in the first place. House Geneolgia in particular has a history of corruption and oppression, notably the founder as well as Yew's own father, who made his followers murder every member of the Crystal Guard who were against surrendering to the newly-founded Duchy of Eternia, all for his own personal quest for wealth and power. Oh, and the Great Plague, whose victims the Orthodoxy quarantined and left to die, which was one of the reasons Braev founded the Duchy in the first place? Turns out the Plague was spread by the Orthodoxy itself!
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: After giving him time to reflect on his rather absurd theories, Sholmes really starts pulling his weight around at the end of his side story.
  • Cute Mute: Sylvie, the vestling of the Water Temple.
     D-F 
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: When Sonnenblume is active, not only is turn order reversed, meaning the slowest characters move first, it also reverses the order they use their moves. If the player isn't paying attention, this can cause situations like a healer trying to heal someone before reviving them.
  • Dangerous Deserter: When the Crystalguard initially disbanded, the men turned to banditry to use their skills. This inevitably led to helping Yew's father building up an armed force and gaining more power.
  • Darkest Hour: The end of chapter 4. Kaiser successfully goes back in time with Agnès and Anne displaces the moon before the party manages to kill her. With the moon gone, time stops and the world is cast with a perpetually washed-out color, Altair and Agnès become unable to provide the party with guidance, and the party is left with no choice but to appeal to divine intervention to do anything about it. As the final blow, with the Ba'al defense force gone alongside the moon, a swarm of Ba'als completely overrun the overworld, replacing all random encounters outside of dungeons with exceptionally powerful boss fights.
  • Death by Irony: Anne recruits the player at the start of this entire mess because of their pure determination to see a job through to the end. She seems to have forgotten that part of the "job" she gave them to involves removing threats to the world at large. Guess what happens to her and Providence after they reveal themselves as the main threats?
  • Demonic Possession:
    • The Guardian's main gimmick.
    • Agnès by Revenant Grace, the Guardian asterisk's holder, to use her power to make the crystals run wild.
    • Magnolia gets possessed by Revenant in an attempt to kill Edea, who killed his father Geist.
    • Edea gets possessed by Revenant to hand over the Space-Time Compass to Geist.
    • Later on Anne uses Sylvie and the Matriarch to make the crystals run wild in the second loop.
  • Demoted to Satellite Love Interest: Partially. Magnolia still retains her distinct personality, but no longer has a devil-may-care attitude and but she doesn't drive the story in the way the teaser implied, instead being the secondary protagonist. Her romantic subplot with Yew makes up a sizeable aspect of her character as well.
  • Denser and Wackier: While the game still has its dark moments, it's also much sillier than its already fairly lighthearted predecessor, particularly in sidequests. For starters, the new hero has a bizarre obsession with gravy.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • Due to Tiz's Peek-a-Bangs, several job outfits will reflect on this. Everyone but him wears an eyepatch on their right eye when they equip the Pirate job, for example.
    • Any time Altair takes over Tiz's body but you are required to fight a battle right away, the Limit Break quotes and Bravely Second attacks will all reflect on the change.
    • When trying to break sequence, the characters will remark on how they're heading somewhere they're not supposed to be, before forcing the player to head back. The quotes change depending on who is the lead character.
    • Depending on your decisions in the sidequests, you can later see the affected characters in other parts of the world. for example, if you choose to side with DeRosa and allow the oasis to dry up, people from the desert will later be seen in Florem with the Jackal!
  • Disc-One Final Boss: First, there's the encounters with Kaiser Oblivion in Chapter 5, specifically the ones in Gathelatio and Geneolgia Crypts. After that is Diamante, the Ba'al that destroyed Magnolia's home.
  • Disc-One Final Dungeon: The Skyhold during every visit, as well as Geneolgia Crypts.
  • Doomed Hometown: Magnolia's home on the moon, now serving as the reconstruction mini-game replacing Norende from the first game.
  • Double Unlock: The songs in Chompcraft have two unlock conditions. First, the player has to progress far enough in the story to hear the song. Then the player has to make a certain amount of money with one batch to unlock the song. These amounts aren't shown until the player beats the game.
  • Dual Wielding: As well as the forte of the returning Ninja job the Chariot asterisk enables characters to forgo the use of a helmet to equip a weapon on that slot to strike with three weapons at once. Leveling the class further allows you to equip a weapon on your body slot meaning you can wield four weapons at once!. There are also knuckle weapons which are a 2-handed weapon class but obviously go on both hands seperately. Finally, there is a support ability allowing for dual-wielding shields.
  • Easily Forgiven: In the first game, most of the asterisk users were a bunch of violent sadists and maniacs who killed without remorse, attempted to undermine entire countries, repeatedly tried to murder the heroes, and in one instance committed serial date rape. Here, when Tiz and Edea meet with them again the two treat them like they're old friends at best and old annoyances at worst. This is especially jarring because Edea was one of the women Fiore tried to date rape.
  • Elaborate University High: Al-Khampis, which is basically a city built to support the school and reminds you of something akin to Academy City.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Ba'als, full stop. They look like twisted amalgamations of real-world objects and strange creatures that display copious amounts of Unmoving Plaid. They all have deep meanings to them concerning their source of origin...
  • The Empire: The Glanz Empire.
  • Enemy Scan: Upgraded this time around to show HP of enemy types you have previously examined, though it doesn't work on a few enemies that aren't in the Bestiary.
  • Everybody Lives: After using New Game+ to go on in the story, the party spares the members of the Empire rather than killing them as they did the first time around.
  • Everyone Can See It: Yew and Magnolia. Edea, Tiz, Rifa, three bosses, and Altair all tease or encourage them.
  • Evil Weapon: The Sword of the Brave, which offers its power in exchange for taking that which you care for dearest.
  • Evolving Title Screen: The letters S and P, which in the game, Sleep Points are used to charge Bravely Second will appear, forming "Send Player" once you have cleared Chapter 4.
  • Exploiting the Fourth Wall: You, the player, are a tangible force within the game's world. The true antagonists directly acknowledge your involvement with the party. This is taken to the furthest possible extreme in the second game, when you use the New Game+ to derail the villain's plot completely.
  • Exponential Potential: Spellcraft. It works on any spell (save for Catmancies), and it not only enhances the spell's power, but it also lets you do things like attack before any other enemy, change a magic attack into a physical attack, cast the same spell on a group over multiple turns, or even cast the same spell 4 times in a row! The only things keeping it from being a complete Game-Breaker is that it costs more Mana, more BP, and takes up 2 ability slots. It can also be combined with Good Measure, which merges two of the same spell being cast on the same turn with an extra power boost.
  • Expy: Sapp and Piddler are spiritual successors to Biggs and Wedge.
  • Failed a Spot Check:
    • Janne completely missed out Yew using the pendant for communicating with Agnès at the time when Janne had revealed his treason to the Three Cavaliers.
    • Kikyo and Heinkel, despite many searches for the Locked Room Mystery plot, never found out about the secret passage to said room used by the killers. Particularly grating because one of their sweeps was specifically to look for any hidden passages.
  • Fairy Companion: Kaiser Oblivion has one named Anne, who has a passing resemblance to Airy. This is because she's Airy's sister.
  • Fan Boy: Yew has greatly admired the original four warriors of light that saved the world. He even greatly admires Tiz despite Tiz being a country bum (and Edea tossing a negative about him). He also admires Arca Pellar so much he has two copies of his music tracks: one for use and one to stay in mint condition.
  • Fantastic Rank System: Al-Khampis has one based on their position in the school and society. Yew had a ranking of 6-stars (a feat only 26 others in history have managed), indicating he had even more prominence during his days there than 5-star Rich Bastard Pudgius Bismol, who claims his Daddy own's half of the city... which is pretty much the only reason he made his rank. Pudgius himself immediately becomes submissive upon learning this, showing he adheres to the classism.
  • Firing One-Handed: Denied to both the player party and enemies. Firearms are a single, two-handed weapon class, which means that a character cannot fire so much as a pistol with one hand, let alone a BFG. Aimee herself swings her guncleaver one-handed for normal attacks, but fires it two-handed for any Hawkeye specialties.
  • First-Episode Spoiler: Janne and Nikolai being moles for the Glanz Empire. Particularly because they were built up to be protagonists alongside Yew and Magnolia in pre-release material.
  • Floating Continent: Sagitta Village.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: One of the Seven Horrors of Al-Khampis that Yew is afraid of is a black cat named Fluffy that is said to give bad luck to anyone whose path it crosses. In a subversion, it turns out to be Professor Norzen's perfectly normal housecat. Played straight when Minette uses her Catmancy to have him kill Norzen, however.
  • Food Porn: Despite no food ever actually being shown on-screen, most of the tent events and almost all of the Geneolgia Manor events feature the party eating a meal prepared by one of the party members or Alfred respectively, and giving it a lot of vividly descriptive praise.
  • Foreshadowing: Talking to one of the scholars in Al-Khampis after the moon is destroyed has him remark that he detected the Kaiser traveling not to the past, but 200 years in the future. This lets on that someone other than Yew's gang has put a spanner in the Kaiser's works...
    • This bit requires quite a bit of grinding (or lots of friends to send you low-level ones), but fill the Ba'als' bestiary entries and you will notice Purple Pen/Altair getting distraught by the scenes on the background. You later indeed find out the Ba'als and the background are indeed made from his and Vega's memories together.
    • Yew relating the story of how he, during his childhood, accidentally cut his brother's right arm using the Sword of the Brave and then the latter disappeared from his life. An attentive player would easily find out through the voice clips alone that his brother sounds so awfully familiar like Kaiser Oblivion...who then is shown not later on to be staring at his mechanized right arm and vaguely commenting about his past, so players are not so easily shocked to find out the identity later on as intended. How did Yew not notice the rather obvious similarity before, then?
    • Ringabel's reveal during the Yōkai sub-story is made out to be a huge shock, however players who have been paying attention could easily find out that it was not Alternis in Geyser Grotto or in Florem, due to his very not-Alternis-like flirtatious speech and the fact that the Alternis at Grandship, parts of Caldisla, and Yulyana Woods doesn't have Edea's ribbon around his arm.
  • Freudian Excuse: Several examples in the side stories:
    • Holly's determination to keep the old man and his granddaughter from selling their old house by the sea to give Eisen a guaranteed future to prosper as a nation after being ravaged by the war is because she faced a similar situation with her own grandfather having to move both of them to the big city to gain riches easier, which indirectly led to her grandfather never giving her attention. Now what are the chances this will happen to the old man too?
    • Alternis's drive to help the orphaned children of Grandship by keeping the poor laws in place is because he doesn't want them to suffer a cruel childhood like he did in Florem.
  • Full Potential Upgrade: The Yōkai's second skill, Awakening, allows the characters to level up their jobs to 11.
     G-K 
  • Game-Breaking Bug: There are some versions of the game where the Great Chasm at the end of the Norende Ravine won't load. You have to watch a couple scenes here, and traverse this place every time you want to enter or leave Via Celestio, so 'not going here' isn't an option. You can force it to load by putting the 3DS into sleep mode, but it's a pain in the ass to have to do it every time. Thankfully, going out of that particular area or getting into a fight with Anne gives no problem whatsoever.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • The start of chapter five. You are to start a New Game+ to continue on and then you remember it begins with a Hopeless Boss Fight and stays that way until you activate Bravely Second by pressing Start (and you may notice the hourglass number is not displayed when you do this, but they want you to figure it out). Which lets you keep ALL the items, asterisks, and skills you had from the first time around to win against Kaiser Oblivion.
    • When Altair speaks through Tiz prior to a few battles, he has his own set of quotes for using Special Attacks.
    • How did Tiz use the Jedi Mind Trick on those guards? He set the Random Encounter meter to zero.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: The Black Mage/Ranger sidequest has you Locked in a Room with the relevant NPCs. Logically, this should be easily solvable by using a few Teleport Stones, but the only acknowledgement of this fact is that, if you do happen to have some, they arbitrarily don't work until the sidequest is brought to its proper conclusion.
  • Generation Xerox: Sholmes' and Whitson's families all turn out to be the best at what they specialize, except for both of them at least until Sholmes starts coming around and when Whitson grew disgusted with how his family lineage is nothing but glorified assistants to Sholmes' family and decided to become a Phantom Thief.
  • Genre Savvy:
    • After the fifth side story, Tiz surrenders to the idea that Edea will end up fighting the losing choice's supporter for picking the other.
    • During the Seven Deadly Sins side quest, each boss encounter begins with a terrified Magnolia announcing what Sin they're about to fight while the rest of the party recoil in shock. However, as the side quest goes on, the party's reactions become more and more rehearsed. When they fight the final boss in the side quest Magnolia attempts to start the action again only for her friends to politely tell her that they know the routine.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar:
    • This exchange happens in Turtle Dove's Bestiary entry:
    Yew: That Little Gift raises its own BP by 3, huh? I don't know...Seems a bit desperate to me.
    Magnolia: Yes, and what's wrong with it? Why can't a woman give herself a little gift sometime, huh?
  • Gilligan Cut: In the Grandship sidequest, if you side with Alternis (keep the ludicrously high taxes in the name of keeping the Grandship's various social programs and handouts intact,) over Khamer (cut the taxes almost completely and thus end those social safety nets in order to fix the crumbling economy), after Khamer is defeated and chased off, Edea gives Alternis a stern and impassioned speech about how the social programs still need to be kept in line and at least brought down to what the Grandship can actually afford, and that further bloating of the already overburdened social programs is a terrible idea. Alternis sheepishly promises Edea he'll try to be reasonable with the social programs. Cut to the next scene, and the taxes have increased again, to the point that the already ludicrously high prices for everything have quadrupled.
  • Gold Digger: Madam Goldiga.
  • Goldfish Scooping Game: Yew and Magnolia play this together as Altair and Vega did before them.
  • Gone Horribly Right: Cu Chulainn's birth. He is extremely thankful to be a half-man/half-horse being thanks to Bella's magic... but Bella shyly whispers, "my mistake".
  • Good Morning, Crono: Happens to Yew after being utterly creamed by Kaiser Oblivion. Happens yet again when he wakes up in Caldisla in the final chapter, doubling as a direct Call-Back to the prequel.
  • Grand Theft Me: One of the abilities of the guardian class is to possess people.
  • Gratuitous French: Magnolia, as well as the Sagitta people and the inhabitants of the moon.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Anne and Providence are this in regards to the first game, as defeating Airy and Ouroboros played into their hands.
  • Guest-Star Party Member:
    • Janne and Nikolai have shades of this, as game promotions never show them able to change into the asterisks' outfits like Yew does and show up at various points in the game to lend a hand. By the full game, they turned out to be moles. Savy players may also immediately notice they can't gain any experience while in the player's party.
    • Ringabel for Yoko’s asterisk fight. Played with in that whilst he helps out with special moves, he’s not controllable in any form, and Edea will eventually tell him to put a sock in it.
    • Altair in a few instances is in control of Tiz during battles, though it makes no difference gameplay-wise.
  • The Gunslinger: The Hawkeye is a new class that specializes in guns.
  • Guns vs. Swords: Aimee vs Danzaburo, the former having Improbable Aiming Skills and the latter having Implausible Fencing Powers.
  • High Fantasy: The game once again entails a world of adventure, swords, and magic.
  • History Repeats: Used in three different ways:
    • Chapter 5: With the knowledge of how events played out in the first world, the party is able to stay one step ahead of the Glanz Empire's movements and foil their plans at every turn, this despite the fact they had also retained their memories and manage to lose.
    • Edea repeatedly tries to use this to prevent certain events from happening in the side stories. Unfortunately, she can't make a difference in all of these and she must endure having to choose between two polarizing choices as always. At least she manages to abbreviate the events doing considerably the second time around though.
    • On a grand scale that parallels Altair and Vega's relationship, Yew and Magnolia's relationship heavily mirrors theirs and it's even in the same order. First, they meet together in a snowy region and Yew gives Magnolia a flower (Snowcap); second, they share an Umbrella of Togetherness scene using Urchin's umbrellas (Urchin); third, they go to a festival to fish goldfishes (Goldie); fourth, their sneaking out at night at Sagitta Village to research how the village is floating, realizing that they're very good working together (Apparati); fifth, after putting a stop to the Glanz Empire, they all dine together (Redshirt); and finally, the part where they either tie the knot for good (Turtle Dove) or Magnolia leaves on a ship without ever telling her feelings to Yew (Diamante). After Altair heavily suggests them to act on their feelings, they do realize their feelings for each other and Magnolia stays behind to be with Yew. To add to all this, one scene plays in one chapter as well.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight:
    • The first scene in the game is a fight during which the party is completely obliterated and Agnès abducted. Subverted when you have to restart the game with New Game+, since you are able to defeat the boss, using your original party, in order to progress through the story.
    • The random Ba'al encounters at the end of Chapter 4 also qualify, as you're likely nowhere powerful enough to reasonably take them on. Thankfully, you're not meant to and they can be ran from.
  • HP to 1: In the second fight against Anne, she can lower party members' max HP to 1, and it will stay that way for the entire fight. Though it can be reversed if you use the Exorcist's undo HP spell quick enough but the journal entry won't take that into consideration.
  • Identical Stranger: Danzaburo is literally Kaiser Oblivion/Denys Geneolgia wearing a samurai getup, but you can't tell the difference since he is wearing a big hat all the time, even at the hot springs.
  • Idle Game: Two! Norende reconstruction is back (reskinned as Magnolia's hometown), and there's a brand-new Chompcraft minigame.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Yew gets smacked on the arm with a sniper's bullet in Ancheim. Cut to Eisen Bridge where Aimee Matchlock notes that she "was already pushing [her] luck at this range, huh?"
  • Inconsistent Dub: Edea's name is now pronounced "IH-dee-ah", rather than the previous game's "Eh-DEE-ah". Several asterisk abilities have also been renamed:
    Burgle and Buff → Big Bad Burglar
    Epic Group-Cast → Group-Cast Master
    Conservation of Life → Circle of Life
    See You In Hell → Blaze of Glory
  • Infinity +1 Sword: The Yokai asterisk is the final asterisk you can get in the game and has some of the most powerful moves in the game and grants the useful "Awakening" skill. However, that requires you grind the job level to maximum to get all these moves and its most powerful move, "Obliterate," is most useful when your character level has been maxed out. Since you get this near the end of the game and only after doing all the other sidequests, the only real use it will have is to help quickly fill out the Bestiary and be able to breeze through another New Game+.
  • In Medias Res: While the demo provides some backstory, the game proper opens up with a Hopeless Boss Fight against Kaiser Oblivion, leaving questions about what happened beforehand to be answered in as the game goes on. Subverted on New Game+, wherein you have the opportunity to change your destiny by defeating Kaiser Oblivion then and there.
  • Instant Expert: Whitson stealing the asterisks from either Heinkel or Kikyo and effortlessly using their abilities against the group.
  • Interface Screw: The final boss, Providence, will distort the screen, briefly control the party and make them attack one another, and also change the button functions so that it looks as if you're about to delete your save file.
  • Interface Spoiler:
    • Zigzagged. The number of entries in the bestiary for boss fights gives away that you'll fight a particular boss again, mostly. In chapter 2, after fighting Janne in the Fire Temple he falls to his apparent Disney Death. Except you need to fight him three times to finish his entry in the beastiary. It doesn't spoil that you battle him (and the other Empire bosses) again during Chapter 5. Their entries don't get updated with their new boss fights, either.
    • Played straight with Janne and Nikolai. The fact that neither can gain EXP or JP makes it pretty obvious that they are guest party members. The fact they already possess job abilities outside of Freelancer is also a big hint to those that know about how jobs and abilities work in the Bravely world that they are actually Jobmasters and thus most likely must be fought at some point.
  • It Amused Me: Almost all of Yoko's manipulative schemes to bring sadness on her victims and their tragic pasts related to them can be seen as this. However, she is always doing a Secret Test of Character so that her victims may find salvation to stop running away from their inner demons, but it is still ambiguous at best.
  • I "Uh" You, Too: In the Epilogue, Agnès indirectly tells Tiz she wants to get married by saying she wants his last name, and Tiz says it's what he wants too.
  • Keep It Foreign: In most languages of the game, the native tongue of the Moon is Gratuitous French. In the Japanese, Korean and (naturally) French translations, it's Gratuitous English instead.
  • Killed Off for Real: Once again, the death count of important villain characters rise up as you get closer to the Skyhold. Until you reset time from the prologue and the party spares every single villain from dying. The only ones who die are the true villains.
  • Kill Streak: If you wipe out an entire Random Encounter in a single turn, you get the option to chain another battle immediately afterward. The longer the chain, the more your rewards get multiplied when you stop (up to 3x at 10 or more battles).
     L-O 
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: A massive example. Players will notice that a quick look at the world map reveals the Caldis region has completely vanished from existence and it can't be found anywhere else. You eventually learn this is happening because Yoko herself used her powers to make everyone outside Caldisla forget about the region (and vice versa with Caldisla) to keep Anne from ever using the Great Chasm to open a clear path between Luxendarc and the Celestial Realm to transport Ba'als without the moon noticing. Unfortunately, the seal is undone near the final moments of the game, and the Caldis Region shows up on the world map again.
  • Last Episode, New Character: The Adventurer reveals their true name after the final battle.
  • Last of Her Kind: Magnolia Arch is from the world's moon, and the last of her kind after a demon attacks her homeland. Truth be told, she has her Vice President Appleberry up there, along with more survivors. The Sagitta are related to her kind as they are descendants of Moon people who settled on Luxendarc.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler:
    • The game itself is a direct sequel to the previous game, but even the marketing directly spoils that Edea is the heir to the Eternian throne and spoils the True Ending where Tiz is stuck in a coma and Ringabel returned to his home timeline. It also spoiled which of the two endings from Bravely Default was the true and "Canon" path.
    • Likewise, trailers indicate some sort of time shenanigans will be happening, like in the first game.
  • Lawyer-Friendly Cameo: Sholmes and Whitson.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: Quoth Heinkel during the Starkfort murder: "It'll take more than a job change to get me to lay [my armour] aside."
  • Left Hanging: The "calamity" that spurred Altair and others to board a ship and flee from the Celestial Realm is never revealed. It's possible that it was Providence, but one would think such a thing would be brought up after Providence's reveal if that were the case.
  • Lethal Chef: Edea's cooking is stated to be edible, but the problem with it is that she likes to wildly experiment with spices by adding exaggerated amounts of them for an extra kick.
  • Lighter and Softer: While still containing as many mature and disturbing themes as Default, Bravely Second has more enthusiastic party members and dialogue, and relationships and The Power of Love are more in the spotlight. And like the first game, the next loop has the party reconciling with all of the opposing army.
  • Limit Break: Special attacks take this role once more, with a few improvements. For example, you can individually select trigger conditions for special attacks, instead of the triggers being weapon-dependent like in the previous game.
  • Limited Wardrobe: Mahzer Lee complains that Braev doesn't ever change out of his Templar outfit because he's grown very attached to it.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: The asterisk holders of Eternia and people related to them all conveniently do not retain the memories from the first loop unlike everyone else in the main story (Kamiizumi himself only retains the memories of the main story but not his side quest's ones, and unlike everyone else, Rocca Pellar does retain the memories of his sidequest, for some reason), allowing the group to obtain all missing asterisks they ignored over the other in the second loop.
  • Locked Room Mystery: The mystery for "The Murder at Starkfort" Side Quest with Heinkel and Kikyo and their nephew, Sholmes. Madam Goldiga killed her husband, and Whitson helped her until she tried to get him on the crime, forcing him to kill her. Both of them used a secret passage to the room that no one could find.
  • Lost in Translation: The Catmancer class's English name doesn't translate the potential pun (Nekomancer, like Necromancer).
  • Love Hurts: Many couples experience a lot of pain in their relationship.
    • The Ba'als are manifestations of Vega's pain from being left behind by Altair, weaponized by Providence.
    • Edea is secretly burying a lot of sadness from Ringabel's absence.
    • Late in the story, Magnolia and Yew are hurting deeply about her having to return to the Moon.
  • Love Transcends Spacetime: Altair says this. It's also Magnolia's final line to the Player.
  • Luminescent Blush: Plenty of times, for just about everyone in the party and Yoko. And the townswomen who were charmed by Angelo.
  • Lunacy: The moon where Magnolia hails from. It's the place she can help nourish and where the party canfight really messed up bosses just like Norende in the prequel.
  • Magikarp Power: Catmancy. It starts off fairly weak, with some gimmicky, low-damage abilities with an irregular elemental spread, you need consumable items to cast them, and you can only learn some abilities by having confused monsters use them on you. But they don't cost MP, so once you earn enough money and build up your bio-lab you can sling Catmancies with willful abandon and still have have MP left for support magic. And then you unlock Cat Mastery, which has all sorts of powerful abilities...
  • Mechanically Unusual Class: Many of the new classes qualify as this:
    • Wizards can use Spellcraft to change the behavior of any spell they cast (such as turning it into a single-target physical attack, having it trigger at the beginning of the turn, having it trigger automatically after everyone's turns for several rounds, etc). Their normal set of spells are fairly unremarkable but cover every element.
    • Charioteers start with mediocre weapon proficiency, which goes up every time they use a basic attack. In addition, they can throw their weapons and wield up to 4 weapons at a time.
    • Fencers utilize a Stance System, which grants them bonuses that even stack with other buffs.
    • Bishops at first glance are just a variation on the White Mage but their healing spells are directly based on their targets maximum HP, which can be quite exploitable later on. Just make sure not to heal a boss by accident...
    • Catmancers and Yōkai can learn monster abilities, the former by getting hit by said abilities and the latter by defeating Bonus Bosses, though Catmancy uses consumable items instead of MP.
    • Patissiers can create delicious (and debuffing) cakes and pastries by combining items.
    • Exorcists can rewind time for a character, reverting their HP, MP, or BP to a previous turn's value.
    • Guardians can posses people, adding theirs and their target's offensive stats together and their abilities use a special resource called "Soul Power" which builds up with every hit they take.
    • Kaisers use powerful effects that apply to both your and the enemy party, including stopping any type of healing, reversing speed for several turns and having everyone deal critical hits every time.
  • Mental Time Travel: The Bravely Second Hourglass can store memories. When you use it in New Game+, the protagonists and antagonists regain their memories of the previous timeline.
  • Metal Slime: In addition to the Chomper and Guzzler, the game adds 4 new members to the Chomper family. There's the Gobbler, who stays and fights instead of running away; the Chompette, who alternates between enduring attacks and running away; the Silver Chomper, who makes the party run away; and the Gold Chomper, who makes one character leave the battle at a time, resulting in a Non-Standard Game Over if everyone is gone.
  • Mini-Game: Chompcraft, which also doubles as a Sound Test. The cp made in Chompcraft can be exchanged in Chompshire for pg.
  • Mistaken for an Imposter: Trying to go to Ancheim before Professor Norzen creates the sandstorm has the party turned away, on the grounds that "If [the guard] had a pg for every 'Tiz' and 'Edea' that came through here..."
  • The Mole: Turns out that Janne and Nikolai, Yew's partners, are actually working for the Glanz Empire and are Asterisk holders themselves.
  • Moon Rabbit: Magnolia considers bunny ears sacred items referring to the moon rabbits at her home. It is merely a coincidence to see them away from the moon though.
  • Moral Dilemma: Most of the sidequests have you choose between two sides that both have a valid point. However...
    • Moral Dissonance: You can end up being very inconsistent in what you choose because you can only get one of the two Asterisks from the sidequest in each playthrough, meaning there's a good chance you'll end up going against what you want at least once because siding with your heart gives you the job you don't want.
  • Multiple Endings: The side stories have a Bittersweet Ending and a Downer Ending for each choice in Japan. The Western release only has the Bittersweet Ending on each branch; the Downer Endings were removed after intense negative feedback from JP players, who felt they were too depressing and found it tedious to have to play the game four times to see every ending.
  • My Friends... and Zoidberg: One of the quotes in the 4th sidequest says: "Survivors: 9 (and 1 D'gon)"
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast:
    • Kaiser Oblivion. His real name is anything but.
    • The Jobmaster for the Exorcist job is named Geist, the Bloody.
  • The Needs of the Many: Brought up many times.
    • Norzen Horoskoff plans to use a massive sandstorm to bring down Skyhold, but acknowledges that it will likely kill most of Ancheim and Agnès. But allowing Skyhold to continue its acts while inside his sphere of influence is something he can't do.
    • Jackal and DeRosa both want the Watergem, the former to restore the oases around the desert, and the latter to create a clean, renewable energy source. It comes down to gambling the needs of the immediate desert dwellers over a positive future for all of humanity. The player decides which is more important in the end.
    • Erutus points out that by turning the inlet into a port they can solve a majority of the problems that the country, including the economy and labor shortage that the youths face. Holly and the older generation still admire the beauty of nature and have fond memories of it, not wanting to give it up by turning it into a port.
    • Ominas Crowe believes that teaching Femto Flare to Bahamut is the best chance the world has at stopping the Ba'al, which is why he insists on everyone in the party giving their rations to Bahamut when they get Locked in a Room, even if they die as a result. To his credit, he is at least consistent - "everyone" includes Crowe himself, and he has been giving his own rations to Bahamut from the beginning.
    • The Sagitta Tribe have a duty to eliminate the Ba'al, meaning that if the party can't get Agnès from the Skyhold, they will open fire at it regardless.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: Well, Never Trust a Demo, anyways. The Ballad of the Three Cavaliers demo has the player controlling Yew, Janne, Nikolai, and Magnolia with a full compliment of job classes to use... but only Magnolia changes outfits in the process. This seems to indicate that the other three will not be properly playable characters come the full game... but come the full game, Yew is not only fully playable but the central player character. Janne and Nikolai aren't so lucky.
  • Nerf:
    • A few of the more Game Breaking Jobs from the first game don't return, including Spell Fencer, Salve-Maker, Arcanist, Spiritmaster, Vampire, and Conjurer. There are replacements for some of these classes, such as Hawkeye having Warheads as a means of simulating Sword Magic, but they are generally not as overpowered as their original counterparts. Spell Fencer, for instance, had the ability to use Drain Sword which made a Dark Knight's HP Drain by attacking non-existent if you were not attacking a zombie.
    • Hasten World and Slow World and Veil spells have been entirely removed from the Time Mage. The Kaiser job gets weakened replacements for the former.
    • The Red Mage's Revenge ability no longer activates on zero-damage hits. This means, among other things, that Dark Nebula is no longer reliable for free BP.
    • The Merchant job's Big Pharma ability is explicitly capped at 99,999 pg per battle, preventing AFK farming loops. Not that money is exactly hard to come by without it, but that's beside the point...
    • Jobs only have 10 levels this time around. The final job, however, unlocks an 11th level for all jobs with the skill Awakening.
    • The levels of schools of magic has also been cut down to 6, with only two spells per level Awakening and job level 11 usually add a seventh level, which has just one spell
    • Fort-Lune has no weapon or armor shops, unlike Norende in the first game, so you can't get any Disc One Nukes from there.
  • New Game+: Like the first game, you are allowed to choose what you want to carry over. Unlike Bravely Default, this gets subverted as choosing a New Game + is required to advance to the two final chapters of the main plot after chapter 4 and you're forced to take everything from your first go in this case.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: While reuniting Altair and Vega was a nice thing, her soul was the only thing holding back Providence's full power.
  • No Indoor Voice: Cú Chulainn.
  • Note From Ed: What originally starts out as Yew's personal journal becomes later a place where every party member can add their remarks to most enemies.
  • Off-Model: The Adventurer's fighting model still retains the same chibi size from the prequel. It becomes more jarring once she reveals her identity as Deneb in the immediate fight after...and still looks smaller than your team, despite having shown at normal proportions at the end of the game.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: During a tent event, Edea somehow managed to teleport right next to Magnolia after the latter had prepared food for everyone to eat. Mind you, Edea was outside punching a wall...and she appeared on the side of the tent that had no entrance, freaking Yew out.
  • Ominous Floating Castle: The Skyhold.
  • Once More, with Clarity!: The context behind the Ba'als, their Eldritch forms, and their battle backgrounds. By traveling Via Celestio with Altair, you learn how each Ba'al represents a key memory from Altair and Vega's relationship.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: As revealed in the very end on the game, people in Moon only tell their real name to the one they marry. The player doesn't get to hear Magnolia's, though. After all, she isn't marrying the player!
  • Only One Name: Yoko, Altair, Vega, and the true name of the Adventurer, Deneb.
  • Our Angels Are Different: The fairies fit most of the older definitions of angels, being powerful messengers of their gods sent to guide humanity. Pity that their gods are evil.
  • Overrated and Underleveled: Despite Magnolia being a veteran "Ba'al Buster", she joins the party at about the same level as the rest of the cast. She does come with a fairly powerful spear for this point in the game, but there is nothing keeping you from equipping that on another party member.
     P-S 
  • Permanently Missable Content: There are a few items that can only be obtained by stealing them from a specific boss. Miss your chance and you can't get their diary entires without doing a New Game+.
  • Phantom Thief: Whitson becomes one at the end of the Side Quest featuring him and Sholmes.
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate: Strong Strike (powerful attack with 50% chance of missing) from the Monk class makes a return.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Strongly averted, unlike the previous game. The protagonists are much more proactive in asking why the antagonists are opposing them, while the antagonists are more willing to explain their motives.
  • Punny Name: Even more names have been made for important NPCs that are sometimes cringe worthy. Gho Gettar stands out, as does Swetti Tracsute.
  • Rare Candy: The stat-raising Buns dropped from Ba'al encountered via Streetpass or Internet make a comeback. Their counterparts encountered during the story, though, replace them with Elixirs, thus requiring the players put some actual efforts obtaining and weakening Ba'al.
  • Reality Ensues: Firearms are a newly-introduced weapon type. Bows have not been retired, and both have an attack rating influenced by dexterity rather than strength. Consequently, any given purchasable firearm will always be superior to a bow available from the same armoury, unless the one equipping it has better proficiency with bows than firearms (although most bows also come with status effects or other special properties)
  • Red Herring: Throughout the game, every town you enter has a child who will tell you part of the story of Setanta, a warrior who attempted to become a hero to make friends but ended up being a hated killer. Despite being spread out over the first four chapters, the story has no real relevance to the game's plot. Except maybe indirectly, since in Irish mythology, Setanta is Cú Chulainn's real name.
  • Reincarnation Romance: Played with. Yew and Magnolia's relationship has many parallels to that of Altair and Vega. Altair and Vega are distinct and separate from Yew and Magnolia, but how they met, bonded, and fell in love is incredibly similar. And Altair works to prevent them from becoming Star-Crossed Lovers. Additionally, when Altair recounts his memories with Vega in Via Celestio, their silhouettes look very similar to Yew and Magnolia. Magnolia can also dress like Vega with a very expensive costume.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Both Barras and Einheria can't truly remember who Swetti Tracsute and Rhea Veeling are despite being their former underlings respectively. It doesn't help their motives to endorse each respective side are a little petty.
  • Revision: In the previous game, activating all four crystals is bad, because it summons the Holy Pillar in this universe and creates a connected Great Chasm in the next one. In this game, Tiz mentions that this is not the normal function of crystals, and only by overcharging them until they "go wild" will the Holy Pillar be summoned. The real function of crystal vestals, then, is to keep the crystals at a not-previously-mentioned lower level of power which has only beneficial effects.
  • Riddle for the Ages: "The Murder of Lord Gulliver" side quest intentionally leaves a few major questions unanswered, such as what was Whitson's true plan and motives, his connection to Lady Goldiga and his exact involvement in her murder plot, and what Goldiga threatened him with that provoked him to murder her.
  • Rocket-Tag Gameplay: The Kaiser command abilities Noble Eagle and Overlord can enforce this, doubling the offensive stats of everyone in a battle and causing all attacks to critical hit, respectively. Combined with a Fencer's Wolf stance and some Attack-boosting special moves, and suddenly Ba'al v: Urchin's 9999 Guard looks a lot less impressive.
  • Running Gag: Several:
    • Yew's only fear. He has more than one.
    • Yew's obsession with gravy is questioned many times.
    • Any possible pun regarding Ba'al / Ball is used...many times.
    • The returning asterisk bearers always indirectly insulting Edea.
    • Edea's Big Eater moments return with a vengeance.
    • Any non-Moonfarer or non-Sagittan trying and failing to correctly pronounce any spoken French. Occasionally the other way around.
    • Any of The Man With The Purple Pen's Ice-Cream Koan sayings involving vegetables.
  • Samus Is a Girl: The Adventurer who serves as both a save point and a bonus boss in Final Fantasy: the 4 Heroes of Light and the Bravely series turns out to be a woman named Deneb.
  • Sanity Slippage: Geist, the Bloody became Ax-Crazy due to constant usage of Undo. The fact that he left his son to die and had to put him in a suit of armour doesn't help him either.
  • Scenery Porn:
    • The gorgeous towns from Default are all revisitable, and some. Al Khampis, Gathelatio and Yunohana, the new locations, are equally breathtaking.
    • Dungeon maps have taken an impressive leap forward.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: Pudgius Bismol boasts this. The only reason he has 5-stars is because his father is rich, and he flaunts it.
  • Sequel Hook: After the credits, a short scene plays in which one can hear Ringabel speak of some sort of Three Keys and the Sword of the Brave, which was a plot device at the beginning of the game, being one of them. Works even better in Japanese where Bravely Sword sounds similar to Bravely Third.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: The main motive Kaiser Oblivion had aimed to make the Crystals go berserk again. He wanted to go back in time and kill Foundar Geneolgia, the first head of the Geneolgia family so the Crystal Orthodoxy wouldn't be as corrupt. His own followers (minus Angelo and Aimee who defected by Chapter 5 for a much peaceful and happy life) had their reasons too but they shared the same goal as the corrupt main Crystal Orthodoxy at Eternia before the reform by Braev was the reason for all their Dark and Troubled Past issues. Even if it meant that he and Yew would disappear.
  • Seven Deadly Sins: They all return as bonus bosses on the stone monuments after getting the final asterisk.
  • She Is All Grown Up: Tiz's years inside a stasis tube were kind enough to him as he now looks older with longer hair. Edea is old enough to wear more form-fitting outfits.
  • Shipper on Deck: Edea ships Yew and Magnolia hard. She won't allow others to ruin their moments, just as how she drop-kicked Tiz from spoiling the Umbrella of Togetherness scene.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Magnolia also gets another reference in one of her quotes:
  • Sickeningly Sweethearts: Aimee believes Angelo is this with her, but he truly despises her so much but just uses her for his own ends. Or so he would have you think. It's worth mentioning, though, that despite his claims of hating Aimee, Angelo goes well out of his way to confront the party after they kill her, and as soon as he reads her final message to him, he immediately follows her wishes and stops opposing the party. Once the group goes through a time loop, the two of them have no objections and truly become this.
  • A Sinister Clue: Zigzagged with Janne. When he's a playable character, his weapon defaults to his right hand like everyone else, but during cutscenes, he holds his sword in his left hand. He fights left handed full time as an enemy.
  • Sixth Ranger: Magnolia Arch, if we are to count the previous four and Yew.
  • Sidequest Sidestory: There are plenty of stories detailing the previous Jobmasters where Edea helps one of two sides. Unlike the previous game, you can only choose one of the two. Choosing the other will make you be unable to take up the other asterisk you did not pick. Luckily, you are able to obtain the other through a New Game+.
  • Snow Means Love: Yew met Magnolia in the snow and presented her with a flower, like Altair did with Vega.
  • Something Only They Would Say: when confronted in chapter four, Anne addresses the player, reprising her lines from the opening of the first game.
  • Sound Test: Chompcraft serves as a sound test in addition to a mini-game. The songs are unlocked by hearing the song in the story, then making a certain amount of money in a single batch.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: Any song can be played during Chompcraft, although some have to be unlocked first. With sufficient patience, a player can listen to whatever they wish during their simple, mindless craftwork. Like [Battle] Ba'al Battle! Nothing says plush toys like Creepy Children Singing.
  • Speaks Fluent Animal: Minette can speak with cats. Obtaining the Catmancer Asterisk allows you to do the same.
  • Status Ailment:
    • Poison, blind, silence, curse, doom, etc. all return, but then you have some unusual ones:
    • Ghost. It effectively renders you KOed, but with the ability to still default and use magic. The catch? You’re also unable to use any items or summons, which means you are effectively useless if you run out of MP or aren’t a mage. Until you reach Florem and can purchase magic bottles, the only way to cure it is to use the Rubadub. However, since you also become immune to all damage as a ghost and have 0 HP which automatically makes all critical HP abilities trigger, it's a key part of some of the Game-Breaker strategies.
    • Love. An afflicted party member will mimic the party member they’re thinking of, including taking the same damage. If two characters love the same person, the love rivals will instead spend their turns attacking each other.
    • Freeze. Exclusive to the Ba'al vi; Snowcap, this immobilizes the character, and to cure the victim you need to hit them with a fire attack.
  • Stealth Pun: There's a random pig NPC who teleporks you between cities.
  • Stone Wall: The Guardian job is built like this statistically, with S-rank affinity with shields, armor, and helms, and S-rank modifiers to HP and the two defensive stats, but only a B-rank modifier to physical offence and E-rank modifiers to the remaining stats.
  • Stop Being Stereotypical: In the journal entry for Profiteur, Magnolia is appalled and insulted by his fake French accent that she can't bear to listen to him. Fittingly, she speaks real French.
  • Storming the Castle: Yew's initial plan as to how to save Agnès.
  • Sudden Sequel Death Syndrome: Mephilia believes that Sage Yulyana died and went to Heaven after a battle with a powerful Ba'al, telling her about Amaterasu in their final meeting before his fight. The bestiary entries for the dragon bosses hints that he could have possibly survived and left for another world.
  • Super-Powered Robot Meter Maids: According to the bestiary, the Rocket Punching, Optical Camouflage equipped Spartans encountered in Via Celestio are caretaker robots. Not even their designer can explain why they need such power.
  • Sweet and Sour Grapes: While the Eternian officer sidequests all have two sides to an argument and are meant to end with one side forfeiting what the other side proposes, sometimes an outcome combines the best of both worlds.
    • Gho Gettar is torn between refining his summoning research and committing to a back-breaking job. Mephilia wants him to quit the job and study with her, whereas Kamiizumi wants him to stick it out. If you side against Mephilia, he uses what he learned to improve the energy efficiency of the machinery he works with, earning himself a spot in the less physically laborious research and development department.
    • Ominas Crowe wants the food to go to Bahamut so he could master Femto Flare, whereas Artemia wants everyone to have an equal share of the rations. Turns out Ominas held one last fire spell back to burn away some of the debris when things were getting desperate, thus alleviating the burden on the rescue team. At least Artemia isn't sour about the whole thing.
    • Sholmes is stuck deciding between whether to become a police inspector and a private investigator. The trope is inverted — not only does Sholmes have to pick a path and stick to it, but his friend Whitson (who aided Madam Goldiga in her scheme) goes rogue no matter what he chooses.
    • Rocca Pellar is being pestered by Praline, who wants his grandfather Arca's last song for remixing into a pop hit, and Barbarossa, who wants the song to stay as is. In the second world, Barbarossa was only opposed because he never heard Praline sing, but is willing to let her go so long as he helps her with her choreography.
    • Grandship has laws that provide comfort to the poor, the children, and other destitute souls who migrate there for shelter, but those benefits drain the coffers at a phenomenal rate, causing taxes to soar through the roof. Alternis wants to retain the poor laws at all costs, while Khamer wants to abolish the taxes that sustain the poor laws to keep the nation from going bankrupt. Siding with Khamer does cause the poor laws to dissolve, but the businesses use their profits to pick up the slack, providing materials to sustain the destitute and apprenticeships to further the children's education.
     T-Z 
  • Taking You with Me: When the party is not able to defeat Diamante, who keeps regenerating itself, Denys decides to take himself and Diamante to the most distant future with the compass of time and space in order to save the present.
  • Tangled Family Tree: Heinkel and Kikyo are related somehow. Made even more confusing when they're related to Sholmes' family.
  • A Taste of Power: Janne and Nikolai join you for a part of the prologue, and they possess abilities that you won't be able to use until a bit later.
  • Those Two Bad Guys: Sergeant Sapp and Private Piddler. Even if they work for the empire and are responsible for two of the early difficult fights in the game, it’s hard not to find them endearing.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The opening cinematic, released as a trailer, shows Tiz, Edea, Yew, and Magnolia as a party.
  • Trick Boss: The final boss surprisingly enough. When you've defeated the first form, there's nothing to indicate it has a second form other than the first form being slightly easy for a final boss battle, but the instant you try to leave the area, you get drawn into the real final boss battle. Hope you were Genre Savvy enough to heal up before proceeding.
  • Umbrella of Togetherness:
    • Magnolia offers to share her umbrella with Yew, unaware of its implications while Yew blushes madly. When Edea whispers what it means to Magnolia, she grips Yew even tighter.
    • Vega and Altair did this when they introduced themselves to one another.
  • Violence Is the Only Option: When picking a difficult choice between two in each side story, the losing side will always object and fly into a rage against Edea and the group. Diplomacy be damned!
  • What Happened to the Mouse?:
    • Sapp and Piddler are absent come Chapter 4, with no explanation given as to their absence. Made all the more notable when the party travels back in time and they still make no reappearance.
    • Whenever the party defeats an asterisk user, they run away to parts unknown and don't appear again.
  • What the Hell Is That Accent?: In Profiteur's entry, Magnolia complains what kind of French accent he is using, which is justified, given talking in French is something she speaks fluently without sounding too thick or silly.
  • Wham Episode: Par the course for the series by now at some stage, but in particular the party discovering the Sword of the Brave and what Yew did to his brother, finding out Kaiser Oblivion is actually said brother, Denys' attempt to sacrifice himself to stop Anne, and the entirety of Yoko's asterisk quest.
  • Wham Line: Anne the fairy gets an epic one at the end of Chapter IV to reveal that she is Airy's sister from the first game.
    Anne (facing the player): Oh, hello! I see fire in those eyes!
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: The Grace family is probably one of the biggest victims of the Great Plague. About the time Rev started coming down with some other disease, Geist was called away to 'exorcise' a young lady who turned out to be a host of the Plague itself. He sent out a dire warning (unbeknownst to him, it arrived in Braev's hands), but was otherwise silenced as the Plague went out to ravage Luxendarc. By the time Geist came home, Rev was dead, and a sliver of his soul remained, clinging to the hope of seeing Geist one last time. Geist used some of his power to move Rev's soul into an empty suit of armor, but realizing that this was the fullest he could accomplish drove him mad with grief. That, coupled with Revenant's childish mentality (he mistook daddy's insane laughter for that of happiness), eventually led the two to join the Glanz Empire.
  • You All Share My Story: Nearly all of the new asterisk bearers are revealed to be interconnected by the tale of the great plague; Yoko carried it, Gried, the father of Yew and Denys, freed Yoko and thus spread it, Geist was dispatched to exorcise it, Revenant was a victim of it, Minette's mother and Norzen researched a cure for it, and the fallout of its ravages caused Braev's rebellion against the church, which led to Janne, Bella, and Nikolai's sufferings.
  • You Killed My Father: Revenant Grace to Edea in Chapter IV.
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