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Real Life examples for Red Baron.


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  • The aforementioned Manfred von Richthofen, THE Red Baron. Those who actually knew the man would recount how approachable he was to those in the squadron he led, commenting that he was quite friendly and would joke around with his fellow pilots. It says a lot that his sworn enemies gave the man a burial with full military honors, out of sheer respect for his prowess and valor as a fellow Sky Warrior. It is even rumored that tears were shed at the funeral by those who lost friends to his red triplane's gunfire. The fact that Richthofen was only in his early twenties during his career and airplane technology was relatively new and yet he still managed to shoot down 80 freaking planes, it's no surprise why everyone in the war respected the guy. Which also makes his death somewhat ironic — he wasn't killed by an enemy pilot, but by a lucky shot from a machine gunner on the ground (after being chased down there by an enemy pilot; while the circumstances are sketchy, the lethal rounds were confirmed to be infantry-grade, and penetrated at an angle that would have been extremely unlikely unless they were fired from the ground). He managed to make a controlled landing right before he bled out.
    • He also literally Wrote the Book on air combat. Modern fighter pilots still live or die according to how well they learn the lessons he taught.
    • Richthofen had some other nicknames, but they didn't stick as well. He was called "Le Diable Rouge" ("Red Devil") and "Le petit Rouge" ("Little Red") by the French, and the "Red Knight" in by the British.
  • The greatest military man in Brazilian history, the Duke of Caxias, had two: one he shared with The Duke of Wellington: "O Duque de Ferro" ("The Iron Duke") (though unlike Wellington, his was entirely due to prowess in battle), the other was "O Pacificador" ("The Peacemaker"), because of his career crushing rebellions and destroying foreign threats in a way that would cause peace.
  • Another Brazilian was Manuel Luís Osório, the Marquis of Erval, he was nicknamed "O Legendário" ("The Legendary").
  • The Harlem Hellfighters was the first African-American regiment to serve with the American Expeditionary Force during World War I. They were the first unit to cross the Rhine into Germany, and besides the Croix de Guerre from the French army (under which they’d served for six months) for “brave and bitter fighting", they earned the nickname “Hell Fighters” from the Germans, for never losing a man through capture nor a foot of ground to the enemy.
  • Hans-Joachim Marseille was a Luftwaffe fighter pilot and flying ace during World War II. He is noted for his aerial battles during the North African Campaign and his Bohemian lifestyle. He was nicknamed Stern von Afrika (Star of Africa). Also he was really hot.
  • Field Marshal August von Mackensen of the German Army during WWI, who led his soldiers to a very hard-fought and brutal victory over Serbia in 1915 picked up nicknames like he picked up medals. During WWI, he was known as "Hindenburg's Brain" for his contributions to German theory and his actions under Hindenburg (who he later replaced) in smashing the Russian invasion of East Prussia. Due to his wearing of the uniform of the Prussian Death's Head Hussars, he was also called "the Last Hussar".
  • Vo Nguyen Giap, the redoubtable North Vietnamese general who led his soldiers to victory over Japan, France, and then the United States, was called "the Red Napoleon" for his military genius.
  • Generally speaking, one of the main reasons this trope is so particularly prevalent in much East Asian culture and fiction (particularly from Japan and China) is because, historically, successful generals or other heroes in conflicts in Sino-influenced cultures were formally granted such titles by their lords and governments after particular achievements, and often got many more from their soldiers and from the citizenry besides. Guan Yu, for example, had a bunch of them even in life, before he was made into basically a deity. These include "Mei Ran Gong", or "Lord of the Magnificent Beard" and "Changsheng", or "The True Leader".
  • Another German example: Erwin "The Desert Fox" Rommel. Rommel's son Manfred said that he was glad of the compliment because he knew the British had learned to appreciate foxes from hunting them. But he would have liked lion even more than fox.
    • Desert Fox is actually a very appropriate sobriquet, given the nickname of Rommel's British enemies. Rommel's chief adversary in North Africa, the British 7th Armored Division, and later, the entire British 8th Army, came to be called the Desert Rats. The desert fox is a natural predator of the desert rats in the natural world, much the way Rommel's Afrika Korps was to the British 8th Army for much of 1941 and 1942.
  • One of the more famous cases of this rope were he Buffalo Soldiers , the nickname originally given to the all-black 10th Cavalry Regiment , who fought with legendary skill against everything from bandits , the Spanish , and Apache renegades.
  • Vlad Dracula was also known as Vlad Tepes, Tepes meaning "Impaler" cause, well, that is what he did. The Turks were very frightened of him, and mounted his head on the walls of Istanbul, to assure people that he was really dead. Consider the fact this man saw the Turks invading his land, turned to the Turkish prisoners and said 'Well, they aren't doing anything', and created a forest of roughly 30,000 impaled Turkish soldiers.
    • In addition, the name 'Dracula' is derived from dracul, the old Romanian word for dragon. Vlad's father was a knight of the Order of the Dragon, and so Vlad's name means 'son of the dragon'. That's so awesome that if it wasn't true, someone would've had to make it up. Dracul can also mean devil, which also makes it appropriate for anyone who could scare away the Turkish army — and for the demonic imagery Bram Stoker used in his novel several centuries later.
    • His greatest accomplishment, for which the people of modern-day Romania still revere him, was to keep his small, not particularly wealthy or powerful country independent while it was pretty much the front line of a generational war between two powerful civilizations (largely Christian Europe and the largely Muslim Ottoman Empire). Few rulers could have managed that, no matter how clever or how insanely brutal.
    • His ex-janissary compatriot and co-rebel Scanderbeg got the name that means Lord Alexander, third greatest fighter of the Balkans after Alexander the Great and Pyrrhus, by the Turks.
    • Another associate of Vlad Dracula was Janos Hunyadi, a Hungarian military figure known as "The White Knight of Wallachia." Even his son was given the name "Corvinus," making his complete name "Matthias the Raven."
  • Polish king Jan III Sobieski was known as "The Lion of Lechistan" in Ottoman Empire.
  • From the American West was John Johnson, also known as Liver Eatin' Johnson, also known as the Dapiek Absaroka, meaning the Crow-Killer (the Crow as in the Tribe of Indians, not the Corvid).
  • Billy the Kid, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Calamity Jane (double-trope breaker: a female and a "good guy"), or her "partner in crime," lawman "Wild Bill" Hickok, John Henry "Doc" Holliday and entertainer Buffalo Bill.
    • Doc Holliday was actually a doctor; he was a dentist, though he didn't practice much. Wild Bill is something of a subversion; his name wasn't William or any form there of, it was James. His nickname was originally "Duck Bill" Hickok, in reference to his rather large nose.
      • He actually had a fairly successful practice until he was diagnosed with Tuberculosis...in which he became the gambling drunkard gunmen from hell that we know him as. Fun fact: While Doc most definitely had some of the fastest hands in the west, his accuracy wasn't all that good. In fact, one of the few times he was confirmed to have shot someone was an accident. He hit the barkeep instead of the man he was aiming for.
  • Sir Francis Drake was known to his arch-enemies, the Spanish, as simply 'El Draque': the Dragon. Considering that he most famously "singed the King of Spain's beard" with a fire-ship raid on Cadiz in 1587 that fried a significant chunk of the so-called Invincible Armada, which would sail in 1588, this is rather appropriate.
    • In Latin, this was expanded to Franciscus Draco: Francis the Dragon.
    • "Drake" is an archaic English word for "dragon", as in "firedrake".
      • The more mundane meaning, however, of the word "drake" is male duck, from the Old English andraka, duck king. And that would be a bit more colloquial... but less cool.
  • Henryk Dobrzański, first guerilla commander of WWII, was nicknamed "Mad Major" due to his impossible victories.
  • A Finnish example: Simo Häyhä, the sniper or the single greatest killing machine in human history. He achieved over 700 kills in less than 100 days during the Winter War, also known as the "White Death". The cutest thing about the name is that "the white death" also means sugar.
  • Harry Järv, a Finno-Swedish officer during the Winter War, who due to his many successful behind-the-lines missions was given the nickname "Järven" (The Wolverine). Remind you of someone? His name is nearly a pun in itself since "Djärv" (pronounced identically) means "Bold"...
  • The Finnish front of Winter War had a lot of legendary guys known by their nicknames. One of them was the commanding officer of aforementioned Simo Häyhä, captain Aarne Juutilainen, also known as "The Terror Of Morocco". Yes, Morocco. "The Terror" had earlier served with the French Foreign Legion in Morocco for years before returning from the desert to the frosty battles of Winter War. The Terror was a national hero of the Battle of Kollaa, and was able to hold the almost impossibly thin lines with his men (such as The White Death). There's still a Finnish saying "Kollaa kestää" (Kollaa will hold), meaning that you will resist and fight back, no matter what it takes.
  • Another WWII example is Die Nachthexen (the Night Witches), the Soviet all-women 588th Night Bomber Regiment; their old wooden adapted cropdusters were hard to shoot down because they were slower than the stall speed of the German Messerschmitts and Focke-Wulf fighters. This meant that whenever someone managed to get near them, they'd have to slow down to a point where the plane stalls and becomes unable to fly anymore.
  • Lydia Litvyak. A WW2 Soviet fighter pilot with the 586th IAP, later with the 73 Gv IAP. The highest scoring female fighter ace in history with 12 solo victories and 4 shared over 66 combat missions. Her nickname? "The White Lily of Stalingrad", sometimes (mis)translated as "White Rose".
  • USS Samuel B Roberts. Due its extraordinary bravery during the Battle off Samar this tiny ship gained the nickname, The Destroyer Escort That Fought Like a Battleship. This tiny ship with only 2 main turrets managed to fire off over 600 rounds while it dueled with several Japanese heavy cruisers in such close quarters that it's opponents were not able to lower their guns low enough to effectively return fire. The naval equivalent of a knife fight in a phone booth.
  • USS Enterprise (CV-6). Being the most famous of American aircraft carriers in the Pacific War, she actually has several monikers. Some of them include "The Big E", "Lucky E", and most famous of all, "The Grey Ghost". The last of which was due to the fact that every time the Japanese Navy announced they had sunk her, she came back intact.
    • The later nuclear carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Being the most famous American aircraft carrier of the post-World War II era, it, like its namesake, was called "Big E." It was also called (after 1986) the "Mobile Chernobyl" because of its famed eight nuclear reactors (all subsequent American nuclear fleet carriers have had only two).
  • Henri I, duc de Guise, was called le balafré, meaning Scarface.
  • Ivan The Terrible. In Russian, "groznyi" really means something closer to "fearsome" or "formidable". Which is just as awesome.
    • Ironically, he was actually quite beloved by the common people, and was featured in several folk-tales as a Reasonable Tsar of All Russia. He would also prefer to be called "Ivan the Awesome", thank you very much.
      • To make things even more ironic, he was known as "Ivan the Cowardly" in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, because of horrible defeat he received from Polish king Stefan Batory.
      • The nickname almost certainly comes from the fact that he managed to actually conquer all the various parts of Russia (which are no longer under a single government), and the fact that he had a legendarily violent temper, even for the period. (He is known to have beaten his son to death in a fit of rage, and then being desperately remorseful afterwards.)
  • A lot of medieval Vikings had fantastic nicknames: Erik Bloodaxe, Ivar the Boneless, Erik the Priest-hater, Sigurd the Crusader, Sweyn Forkbeard, etc. Though these were made up by English historians who needed an easy way to separate historical vikings from each other. It didn't end with the end of the Viking Age though. During the later middle-ages we still have names like Erik Lisp and Lame, Valdemar the Victorious, Magnus Barefoot...
    • Erik the Red, Harald Bluetooth, Harald Wartooth, Ragnarr Lodbroknote , Erik the Victorious...
    • Æthelred the Unready. Not because he lacked preparation, but because he lacked advisors ('unready' meaning 'not counselled'. Ironic, because his name Æthelred meant "well advised")
      • His son, Edmund Ironside, so named because unlike his father he was a capable military leader.
  • Arthur Wellesley, the The Duke of Wellington, was known as the Iron Duke, One of many 'Iron' titles popular at the time
    • Which, while badass, may be a subversion in context. To quote The Other Wiki: "An opponent of parliamentary reform, he was given the epithet the "Iron Duke" because of the iron shutters he had fixed to his windows to stop the pro-reform mob from breaking them."
      • This did not, however, stop the Royal Navy from naming a battleship Iron Duke after him.
    • Otto von Bismarck was known as the "Iron Chancellor". True, he wasn't a soldier, but he was such a supreme political genius that the moniker was well earned. Bismark also gave a very important speech which convinced the Prussian Reichstag Abgeordnetenhaus (House of Deputies) to make their military stronger, eventually leading to the unification of the German states. It was called the 'Blood and Iron' speech. On 30 September 1862, when he said "The great issues of the day are not decided by speeches and majority decisions - that was the error of 1848 and 1849 - but by iron and blood." However, the massive expansion of the Prussian Army was at that point already going on for two years.
    • Margaret Thatcher gained the title "The Iron Lady" after a strong anti-Communist speech. Red Star (the newspaper of the Reds with Rockets) gave her that name, and it wasn't intended as a compliment. She was not yet PM at this point.
    • Speaking of the Russians, the Soviet Union's first Secret Police organisation was founded by "Iron Felix" Dzerzhinsky, a hardliner who was zealous and ruthless enough to impress even Stalin.
    • Golda Meir, first female Prime Minister of Israel, also got the "Iron Lady" title.
    • Napoleon's Marshal Louis Nicolas Davout, Duke of Auerstaedt and Prince of Eckmuhl, was known as the Iron Marshal.
    • One of the most famous fighting units of the Army of the Potomac was the "Iron Brigade" (originally called the "Black Hat Brigade").
    • The French king Philip "The Fair" the Fourthnote  was also called the "Iron King". His most memorable achievements were: planning and carrying out the arrest of the Knights Templar all across the kingdom in the span one daynote  in what was arguably the most complex police operation of all time, getting his grandfather Louis the Ninth canonized, imposing his rule on his pretty much autonomous vassals, fathering the She-Wolf of France (see below) and getting the fricking pope arrested!note 
  • El Cid Campeador, the national hero of Spain. "El Cid" is the Spanified version of Arabian Al-Sidi, which means "Lord" and Campeador comes from the Latin "campi doctus," "expert in battle." The Lord Master of Battles is so badass it hurts...
    • His equivalent in Al-Andalus was Muhammad Ibn Abi Aamir, who is still known in Spain as Almanzor, from Al-Mansur, "The Victorious One".
  • Caligula was not that emperor's actual name, which was Gaius Julius Caesar Germanicus (with Augustus thrown in there after becoming emperor). The nickname comes from his being raised in an army camp and wearing miniature soldiers' boots. Lots of Romans are known by their cognomina, which were official 'nicknames' of sorts (Caesar, Cicero, Augustus, Germanicus, and so on).
    • Cicero actually means "chick-pea" and the poor guy (not Marcus Tullius Cicero but one of his ancestors) got stuck with it because his nose apparently looked like a chick-pea. Whether this was actually the case, or just slander that was going around in his day, is uncertain.
      • While "Cicero" was indeed an ancestral cognomen, one look at a bust of the famed orator justifies it: his head has that shape.
    • Cognomina might not quite fall under this trope as many were attached to family lines instead of individuals. Cicero, Caesar, Torquatus, and Brutus are examples of such inherited nicknames.
    • Perhaps the best known (at the time anyway) Roman example of this trope was Scipio Africanus. He was born Publius Cornelius Scipio and the Africanus was added after he kicked ungodly amounts of Carthaginian ass in the Second Punic War, including defeating Hannibal (who had already crushed the better part of a dozen Roman armies, usually when badly outnumbered) with more or less even odds at the battle of Zama.
    • Cognomina were more like nicknames that distinguished one branch of a family from another; for example, C. Julius Caesar was Gaius of the Caesar branch of the Julian clan. The Caesar probably came from an ancestor, like Cicero did. Nicknames like "Africanus" were called agnomina, and were given for a person's own deeds or appearance (Like Mucius Scaevola - the last part means "lefty," and he burned his right hand off rather than betray Rome - or Appius Claudius Caecus - Caecus means "blind").
    • However, cognimina could be used in the trope's sense, too. Pompey's father (also a Gnaeus Pompeius) acquired the cognomen "Carnifex" ("butcher") for his rather brutal behavior, and during his early career Pompey himself was known as "Carnifex adulescens", or Kid Butcher, because his battles usually resulted in large numbers of casualties on both sides.
  • Julius Caesar embodies perhaps the inversion of this trope. The German word Kaiser (Emperor) and the Russian word Czar (King) are both derived from his given name.
  • Charles "The Hammer" Martel, grandfather of Charlemagne. To the point where Martel eventually became a word meaning hammer in French. Interestingly, in Dutch the word "martel" means "torture". (The verb, so: "ik martel" translates to "I torture", "hij martelt" to "he tortures", and so on.) The emphasis is off, but it's probably telling that the Dutch generally feel no need to add the hammer part to his name.
    • That is because "Martel" already means "hammer". It is short for "Martellus" (Charles Martel is called "Karl Martell" in German and Carolus Martellus in Latin), a name derived from martellum (a variant of marculus), "little hammer". ("Martellus" in later centuries was also used as a Latinized form of German surnames Hammer and Klopfer ("knocker, thumper")).
    • Other Hammers:
      • Judah Maccabee (makkab = hammer), whose byname was also applied to the dynasty he founded.
      • Edward I "Longshanks" of England, known as the Hammer of the Scots (called that on his grave in Latin: Malleus Scotorum).
      • Tom "The Hammer" DeLay (R-TX), former Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives, named as such for his governing style.
  • Charlemagne himself. The name means 'Charles the Great'. He was actually named after his grandfathernote .
    • In Latin that was "Carolus magnus", and it is a measure of how awe-inspiring that name was that it is thought that the popularity of "Magnus" as a first name in Northern Europe is based on it. While in many Slavic languages the word for "king" is derived from "Carolus" - e. g. in Russian it is krol and in Polish it is król (while "Charles" is "Karol").
    • His father was called Pepin the Short, which is quite a contrast.
  • Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick I Barbarossa, meaning Red Beard. Not a terribly badass nickname, but he's still considered one of Germany's great heroes, and greatly respected even by his enemies of the Italian city-states (indeed, "Barbarossa" is Italian-they gave him his nickname) and their descendants.
  • King Henry V of England (the one Shakespeare wrote a play about) was called 'The Butcher of Agincourt'... though not by the English.
  • Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, is generally referred to as 'Warwick the Kingmaker' for his actions during the Wars of the Roses, in which he raised and deposed monarchs from both competing dynasties before ultimately being killed at the Battle of Barnet.
  • George H. Thomas, one of the lesser known commanders of The American Civil War today, had two nicknames given to him during the Western campaigns. At the route at Chickamauga, Thomas rallied several Union units to allow the rest of the Army to retreat back to Chattanooga. On Snodgrass Hill, his command stood as a rock, earning him the nickname "The Rock of Chickamauga". Later, during the Battle of Nashville, his breaking up of the Confederate Army of Tennessee under John Bell Hood earned him the title "The Sledge of Nashville."
  • Several "Black" nicknames:
    • Edward, Prince of Wales, "the Black Prince".
      • Although he was apparently not known as such to his contemporaries, the first recorded use of "Black Prince" occurring in Grafton's Chronicle (1569), two centuries after his death.
    • The French General Thomas Dumas (the father of Alexandre) was know as the "Black Devil": the irony is, while he gained this name thanks to his black skin and his very authentic badassery (holding a bridge against the Austrian army while being shot six times and emerging alive and victorious), he was perhaps the most honourable general of the French Revolution (refusing to participate in pillage, denouncing the slaughters in Vendée, remaining faithful to the ideals of the Revolution).
    • Eugene James Bullard, the first African-American fighter pilot in the world (though he flew for the French) earned his nickname of 'The Black Swallow of Death' as an infantry soldier in the infamous French Foreign Legion where he won he Croix de Guerre. He later worked as a spy for the allies when France was taken over by the Nazis , and fought in the defense of Orleans.
    • Duke Frederick William of Brunswick, the "Black Duke". He and the free corps he raised in 1809 to fight against Napoleon was dressed in black in memory of his father, duke Charles William Frederick, mortally wounded at Auerstedt in 1806.
    • Famed Spanish guerilla leader Juan Martin Diaz (1775-1823) was better known as el Empecinado, the "pitch-man", because of the black earth of his home. In 1814 a royal decree gave him permission to use Empecinado as his name instead of Diaz.
      • Interestingly enough, nowadays "empecinado" means "really stubborn" in Spain (and it's even got a verb counterpart, "empecinarse", "to dig one's heels").
    • General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing got his nickname from his tenure as commander of the 10th US Cavalry, a unit of African-American soldiers who are more well known as the legendary 'Buffalo Soldiers'.
      • This one was somewhat bowdlerized by newspapers and history books: Pershing's original nickname was "Black-Assed Jack."
      • It wasn't actually Black Jack, it was actually N-Word Privileges Jack.
    • Pyotr Nikolayevich Wrangel, better known as the "Black Baron," was a Russian general from a Baltic German noble family who earned his moniker due to his love for wearing black, Cossack-style uniforms. Unlikely many of his contemporaries, he was among the Royals Who Actually Do Something and earned a well-deserved reputation for military and political acumen during the Russian Civil War.
      • The Bolsheviks feared him so much they ended up using him as a bogeyman in their marching song "White Army, Black Baron."
    • Another example of a menacing nicknamed flying ace is the highest scoring ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, the 'Black Devil', who flew for the German Luftwaffe during World War II and had a staggering 352 victories. Nearly all of these were against Soviet pilots on the Eastern Front, however, so he never gained much notice amongst the Americans and British. He got the name from the black tulip painted on the front of his plane, which he eventually had to remove because all his potential targets tended to run once they saw it.
      • Hartmann was also called the Blonde Knight and Bubi, an affectionate version of 'little boy' in German, by his allies.
    • Not to be outdone, the armored subdivision of the Waffen-SS also has a Black Baron of their own: tank ace Michael Wittman.
    • And of course, the king of pirates himself, Edward "Blackbeard" Teach.
  • From the American Revolutionary War, we have Francis "Swamp Fox" Marion, who is considered one of the fathers of modern guerilla warfare. He was given this name by Col. Banastre Tarleton, who had been ordered to kill him but was never able to because of Marion's use of the South Carolina swamp lanes.
    • Tarleton himself was given the nickname "Bloody Ban" or "The Butcher" after the Waxhaws Massacre. The Patriots thereafter referred to "no quarter" as "Tarleton's quarter".
    • Thomas Sumter, the "Fighting Gamecock"
    • "Gentleman" Johnny Burgoyne
  • From The American Civil War: General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson supposedly gained his nickname from his unflinching resolve in the face of enemy fire (or his refusal to move his men in support of another regiment, depending on which story you believe.)
    • "There stands Jackson like a stone wall" is generally accepted as the quote that caused the name. Although it's unclear whether or not it was actually meant as a compliment. The man who said it, Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee, was in the midst of having his brigade destroyed while Jackson's brigade was standing "like a stone wall." While the conventional interpretation today is that it refers to how Jackson's men were holding off the Yankees, many historians think it was actually meant as a passive-aggressive swipe at Jackson for not supporting and reinforcing Bee's men. Bee died shortly thereafter so nobody knows for sure.
  • Imperial General Matthias Gallas was known as "The army destroyer". Unfortunately, they weren't talking about the armies of his enemies...
  • Many of the bynames that monarchs tends to acquire fit into this. Everything from the standard "the Great" to ones like "plowpenny".
    • Richard the Lionheart, who remains to this day the only King of England to be known by their byname rather than regnal number (Alfred the Great was only King of Wessex).
    • Alfred the Great.
      • His daughter, Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians and de facto Queen of Mercia.
    • Alfred's Welsh contemporary Rhodri Mawr, Mawr meaning 'Great' and Rhodri meaning 'King' (part of it also, puzzlingly, means 'wheel'). This broadly translates as 'Great King'.
    • Hywel Dda, Hywel the Good, who came to prominence just afterwards and whose law code stuck around for approximately five hundred years.
    • The Mughal sultans: The names they are usually remembered under (Babur, Akbar, Aurungzib, Shah Jahan...) weren't their actual names but more like descriptions. Akbarnote  is especially funny as he is in western sources often called "Akbar the Great", which is redundant because Akbar * already* means "The Greater" (the comparative form of the Arabic adjective "kabir" = "great"). Shah Jahannote  means "emperor of the world". Baburnote  means "the tiger".
  • Sanada Yukimura. After an impressive display of valor and one mighty Foe-Tossing Charge, Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu, who was his target, honored him with the title "Japan's Number One Soldier".
    • He's also known as "Demon of the Crimson Lotus" (due to his and his troops' trademark red armor), which is seriously cool. There was even a folk song comparing him to a demon (in a good way).
  • Chinggis (Genghis) Khan is an excellent example, as the name he is best known by is a title taken after he united Mongolia, not his birth name, which was Temujin. The exact meaning of his title is unknown, with numerous translations proposed, from 'Oceanic Ruler', to 'Ruler of All People Who Live in Felt Tents'. The other style of this trope, similar to the Norse and Medieval examples, was (and still is) common in Mongolia, with most people's 'last' names being monikers like 'the Brave', 'the Wrestler', and so on.
  • Khalid ibn al-Walid (Immortal Son of the Newborn), also known as Sayf Allāh al-Maslūl (the Drawn Sword of God), Four-Star Badass extraordinaire. How much more badass can your name and nickname get ?
  • One that's so common it's often overlooked, Mohandas Gandhi is commonly known as Mahatma Gandhi, an honorific meaning "great soul" in Sankrit. Ask about "Mohandas" Gandhi, and most people will just give you a blank stare. (In everyday speech in modern India, he is referred to as Gandhiji, i.e. "honourable Gandhi".)
  • The Air Force of the Israel Defense Force is sometimes affectionately (or not so affectionately) referred to as "The World's Largest Distributor of Mi G Parts."
  • Ask about T. E. Lawrence, and most people have no idea what you mean, but everyone has heard of Lawrence of Arabia.
  • President Andrew "Old Hickory" Jackson, who earned his name during the War of 1812, for standing as "tough as old hickory" wood on the battlefield. Later, when President, Jackson beat off an attempted assassin with a cane. Whether the cane was hickory or not is unknown.
    • Another version of the story says he was called "Old Hickory" because the cane was hickory, and the would-be assassin wasn't the first man to receive a beating with it. (And the assassin only survived because Jackson's own aides pulled him off the man.)
    • The Creek Indians (whom he slaughtered) called him Jacksa Chuya Haryo, "Jackson, Old and Fierce". And this was fifteen years before he became President.
    • Zachary Taylor, President twenty years after Jackson, was also renowned for his military prowess, and was nicknamed "Old Rough and Ready". Ironically, he died not much more than a year into his term.
  • The Iroquois Indians' nickname for George Washington was Town Destroyer. He is otherwise known "The Father of Our Country"note 
  • Carlos Hathcock, legendary American sniper of The Vietnam War, best known for performing a real life example of a Scope Snipe. Known amongst the Viet Cong and N.V.A. as Lông Trắng, "White Feather", due to the white feather he kept in a band on his bush hat.
  • Another Vietnam War example, the entire Australian SASR were known to the Viet Cong as "The Phantoms of The Jungle" due to them using the same guerrilla tactics as the Viet Cong, as well as achieving an average kill ratio of 500 to 1.
  • Russian general Mikhail Skobelev was known as the "White General" (and by the Turks as the "White Pasha"). The Turkmen's would later call him "Bloody Eyes".
  • Timur, founder of the Timurid Empire, possible descendant of Genghis Khan, "Tamerlane" to some, "The Scourge of God" to everyone else.
    • Attila the Hun was known as the Scourge of God nearly a millennium earlier, but in a different part of the world.
      • While "Attila" itself apparently was not his real name but one given to him as a title of honour. It is generally believed to be a diminutive of the Gothic word atta, "father".
  • William the Marshal, a knight who rose out of obscurity to become the right hand man of three Kings of England (four if you count Henry the Young King) and the Regent to a fourth (fifth), being at points the most powerful man in England. He was considered the greatest knight that ever lived and an excellent general, becoming Famed In-Story in Real Life thanks to bards making up songs about him. He was also a genuine badass, fighting in the front lines at the age of 70 at the Battle of Lincoln and, in a less obvious but perhaps more astonishing display of badassery, reissuing Magna Carta. Without him, it might very well have fallen into obscurity.
  • Alfredo Astiz, El Angel Rubio de la Muerte (The Blond Angel of Death). This moniker may or may not have stood as inspiration for Dragunov's (The White Angel of Death).
  • Another English example: King Edward I, 'Hammer of the Scots'. Needless to say, the Scots weren't very fond of him. At 6'2", Edward was extremely tall for his era, earning him another badass nickname, Longshanks.
    • "You, Scot! Hammertime!"
    • Edward's daughter-in-law was no less formidable, eventually tiring of her husband Edward II's laziness, incompetence and habit of lavishing favours on his favourite, Piers Gaveston, a man widely hated by just about everyone besides the King, and masterminding a ruthless and effective coup d'etat which put her son on the throne under the Regency of her and her lover, Roger Mortimer. For this, she earned the nickname 'the She-Wolf of France'. Unfortunately for her, Edward III was quite as capable as his grandfather and not the sort to be anyone's puppet.
  • Sir James Douglas, a.k.a. 'The Black Douglas' who led a contingent that pursued the fleeing English army back across the border and went on to wreak havoc in the North of England with his fast raiding force of mounted infantry
  • A number of Ottoman Sultans had such monikers. For example, Mehmed II is better known as Fatih (The Conqueror) and Suleiman I is known as Kanuni (Lawmaker?) in Turkish and as the Magnificent in English.
  • Ahmad Shah Massoud, the Afghanistan resistance leader against the Soviet Union and later on, the Taliban. Earned the name Lion of Panjshir, which also puns as Lion of Five Lions in Persian.
  • Mustafa Kemal Atatürk: Born Ali Rıza oğlu Mustafa, given the nickname Kemal (perfection) by his math teacher, later given the last name Atatürk (father of the Turkish people) by the Turkish parliament, establishing it as a unique surname that no one else may ever use.
  • George "Blood and Guts" Patton.
    • He brought it on himself, by repeatedly saying that battles were won with "blood and brains", in this case meaning both physical and mental effort.
  • The Devil's Brigade, a joint American/Canadian Special Forces unit in WWII and the subject of a decent, if slightly inaccurate, movie. So named by the Germans — "Des Teufel's Brigade". Not only were they fearsomely capable in combat, but they used to terrify their enemies by doing things such as sneaking through their camp in the middle of the night sticking leaflets on their tents with a picture of a skull and crossbones and the inscription "The worst is yet to come...".
    • The Germans frequently bestowed "devil" nicknames. The United States Marines became "Teufelhunden" ("devil dogs") following the battle of Belleau Wood (1918)note  and the P-38 fighter became "fork-tailed devil" from its twin booms and surprising maneuverability.
  • Another famous example is William the Conqueror, who only achieved that title after he conquered England. Before that, he was just the Duke of Normandy and had a slightly less Badass nickname "William the Bastard" due to his father having never married his mother.
  • Przemysl II Ottokar, King of Bohemia, the "Iron and Golden King"
  • Sir Henry Morgan, one of the most successful pirates and privateers in history, was known as The Sword of England.
  • Sir David Stirling, the original founder of the SAS, was nicknamed "The Phantom Major" by the German forces. So badass was this nickname, that he wasn't even recognized when captured. Due to the terror that this nickname had inspired, he was assumed to be much bigger and scarier than he was, a surprising achievement when you realise that Stirling was already six foot six.
  • Lord Horatio Nelson was called 'Britannia's God of War' by Lord Byron.
    • Japanese Admiral Tōgō Heihachirō, who led his nation to victory that shocked the world in the Russo-Japanese War, came to be known as "The Nelson of the East". Tōgō took this so seriously that he became convinced he was the reincarnation of Lord Nelson.
    • Rounding it out is Admiral Yi Sun-Sin of Korea, who was dubbed "The Martial Lord of Loyalty" for his consistent defense of the nation against the Japanese invasion, despite the Deadly Decadent Court demoting him multiple times out of jealousy.
  • "Mad Jack" Churchill (no relation), famed for such eccentricities as running around the battlefields of World War II with a claymore and longbow, actually using these to kill people, and bringing along his bagpipes. He was crazy, but he was Crazy Awesome.
  • The Spanish explorer who got shipwrecked in Texas, explored much the American southwest and northern Mexico, was Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, whose family name translates into "head of the cow." He was not a minotaur. Back in the 1200s during the Reconquista (711-1492 AD), as the Spanish were trying to drive the Arabs out of Spain, one of de Vaca's ancestors, Martin Alhaja, helped the Spanish army defeat a large force of Arabs by marking a secret mountain trail with a cow's skull. The king was so grateful that he awarded "Cabeza de Vaca" to the family as both a title and name.
  • Before becoming an astronaut, John Glenn was a military pilot and was nicknamed the "MiG Mad Marine" for shooting down three.
  • Alan Shepard, meanwhile, was dubbed the "Icy Commander" for his often bad moods while helping run the NASA office during the years he was grounded with Meniere's disease.
  • General Ulysses S. Grant, after his slew of victories against the South in the American Civil War, wound up with the nickname, "Unconditional Surrender" Grant.note  While attending West Point from 1839 to 1843, he was also nicknamed "Sam", since the initials U.S. also stood for Uncle Sam.
  • During The War of 1812, the employees at the E & S Wilson meat packing plant in Troy, NY (owned by Ebeneezer and Samuel Wilson) had the barrels of packed meat rations stamped E.A. - U.S., with Elbert Anderson as the co-partner in the contract to supply rations. When someone asked a barrel stamper what the letters U.S. stood fornote , one of them jokingly replied "Uncle" Sam, and the nickname stuck, with the joke circulating that all government property belonged to Uncle Sam, and even the employees called themselves "Uncle Sam's Boys". During the Civil War, Thomas Nast caricatured him as tall and lanky with a beard, based on Abraham Lincoln, and the famous Uncle Sam Wants You recruiting poster which originated in World War I is based on a self-caricature of James Montgomery Flagg, which was also inspired by an earlier "Lord Kitchener Wants You" recruitment poster published throughout Great Britain a few years earlier.
  • Byzantine emperor Basil II is more commonly known as Basil the Bulgar-Slayer for being the man to finally conquer the empire's long time foes, the First Bulgarian Empire. While he did crush them, and was capable of ruthlessness, the story of him ordering 15,000 Bulgarian prisoners blinded in lots of 100, with one man in each lot left with one eye to guide the other 99 after the Battle of Kleidon is at best a vast exaggeration and at worst a complete fabrication - though it wouldn't have been entirely out of character, either...
  • Prince Eugene of Savoy was known as "The Great Captain". In his time, captain was practically the same as 'general'... And, as the Turks and the French learned at their expense, he was the best of all. This was a particular embarrassment to the French, as Eugene, due Savoy being allied with France, had originally tried to join the French military, and immigrated to Austria after being turned down on account of being seen as too small and his mother having been exiled.
  • Prince Emanuele Filiberto of Savoy-Aosta, 2nd Duke of Aosta and Italian general during World War I was known as the Undefeated Duke, and his Third Army as the Undefeated Army, because nobody could defeat them. He cheated during the Battle of Caporetto by retreating from his positions, now impossible to defend due the collapse of the Second Army, before being engaged, but got his revenge one year later, when, during the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, the Third Army's cavalry units would transform the Austro-Hungarian ordered retreat in a total rout and trigger the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
  • The kings of Italy of the House of Savoy all had such a nickname:
    • Victor Emmanuel II (the one who reigned when the Kingdom of Sardinia became the Kingdom of Italy)) was known as the "Gentleman King" for not abolishing the constitution when he could have with Austria's support and "Father of the Fatherland" for being the first king of united Italy in over one thousand years;
    • His son Umberto I was known as the "Good King" for a number of liberal reforms in the penal code (including the first abolition of the death penalty) and personally helping the victims of a number of natural disgraces (two volcanic eruptions, a devastating downpour and a cholera outbreak) and "Cannon King" for approving and praising the repression of Milan's famine-motivated riots with artillery (the latter caused two attempts on his life from anarchists, the second of which actually succeeded);
    • His son Victor Emmanuel III was nicknamed "Soldier King" and "Victorious King" for reigning during World War I, and "Little Sabre" for his 'impressive' height of 153 cm (exactly five feet);
    • His son Umberto II, last King of Italy, was nicknamed "May King" for reigning for about one month, most of which was in May 1946.
  • From México (or rather, New Spain and then México), Agustín Cosme Damián de Iturbide y Arámburu, Agustín de Iturbide for short. As a brilliant royalist Dragoon during the war of Independence, in four years of heavy action he never lost a single battle, except for once, when commanded by others, and personally dealt defeat to the insurgent's greatest General, José María Morelos. Iturbide is often referred to as the greatest horseman to ever exist in his home country, and paired with his swordsmanship (he was prone to laughter typical of Flynning during battles) it earned him the nickname of "El Dragón de Hierro", translated: ""The Iron Dragon" (in spanish, "dragón" and "dragoon" are spelt the same). He would go on to create his own plan to liberate México from Spain, and achieved it within 7 months. His fame after that earned a host of other nicknames by the eager press, too long to write here, but just two of those would be "Jupiter's Lightning" and "Neptune's Trident".
  • General George Crook, also known as "Grey Wolf", had a distinguished career fighting against the Shoshone, the Apache, the Sioux and the Cheyenne in the Indian Wars of the 1880's. He ironically later became an activist for the rights of the defeated Native Americans and spent years speaking out against the United States' unfair treatment and failed federal policies. Three guesses who gave him that nickname.
  • Billy Bishop of Canada, the British Empire's great flying ace of World War I, got the nickname of Hell's Handmaiden.
  • Pier Gerlofs Donia was a Frisian pirate and resistance leader against Holland. He had two particularly badass nicknames: "Grutte Pier" (Great Pier), earned for his absolutely massive size and strength (just check out his sword!), and "The Cross of the Dutchmen", which he earned after a naval battle where he sunk 28 Dutch ships in a single day.
  • Hungarian aristocrat and politician István Széchenyi got the nickname "A Legnagyobb Magyar" (The Greatest Hungarian) for his continous efforts to improve Hungary's wealth and innovations throughout his life. He succeeded.
    • Széchenyi's close friend and fellow politician Miklós Wesselényi was widely called "Árvizi Hajós" (Sailor in the Flood) after he personally saved lives using a rowboat when River Danube flooded the city of Pest in 1838.
  • Polish General Jozef Bem who fought in the 1848 Hungarian revolution was widely nicknamed "Bem apó" (Grandpa Bem or Old Man Bem) for his fatherly attitude towards his soldiers and his advanced age.
  • 15th century Austrian military captain John Haugwitz, better known by his nickname Haugwitz the Black.
  • The former 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot were known as "The Die Hards", and the phrase "die hard" actually comes from them. During the Battle of Albuera in The Peninsular War, the 57th saw hard fighting. At one point, their commander, Colonel William Inglis, was badly wounded by grapeshot (think a shell used to turn a cannon into a giant shotgun). He refused to be carried to the rear, laying by his regiment's Colours, and when the fighting got particularly fierce, he could be heard calmly saying "Die hard, 57th, die hard!". Despite massive casualties (422 out of 570 rankers, and 20 out of 30 officers), they managed to hold long enough that they broke the French advance.
  • Richard Samet "Kinky" Friedman has used his stage name for so long that when he ran for governor of Texas, he received permission to officially put "Kinky" on the ballot.
  • Real-life Pirates sometimes acquired badass nicknames. Examples include "Arch Pirate" Henry Every, "Lioness of Brittany" Jeanne de Clisson and "Blackbeard" Edward Teach. It's no surprise that Eiichiro Oda was inspired by this to base some characters from One Piece on said real-life pirates.
  • Albanian national hero Skanderbeg was known by a number of nicknames. Among his countrymen he was "The Dragon of Albania", to the Pope he was "Defender of Christianity" and to the Turks he was "Dread of the Ottomans". "Skanderbeg" itself could qualify since his real name was Gjergj Kastrioti, but after being taken hostage by Sultan Murad II, he named him "Iskander Bey" which meant "Lord Alexander" as in Alexander the Great. The name was slightly altered to Skanderbeg and that is what he is better known.
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    Religion 
  • The most common name for a famous religious figure: "Christ" comes from the Greek word "Christos", meaning "Anointed" - the Greek translation for "Messiah", which meant the same thing.
  • Older Than Feudalism: Along very similar lines to Jesus Christ (and older), "Buddha," loosely translated, means "The Awakened One."
  • Jesus Christ had two disciples called Simon, one was called Simon the Zealot, the other "the Rock", in Greek Petros, which became the popular Christian name "Peter". In French Peter is Pierre, while "rock, stone" is pierre.
  • Jesus also had three disciples called Judah or Judas, one of whom was referred to as Thomas (via Greek Didymos from the Aramaic for "twin") and another, later also known as Jude, as Thaddeus (meaning disputed, could come from a Hebrew word meaning "valiant" or "wise", but could also be a variant of "Theodore"). Both Thomas and Thaddeus became first names in their own right.
  • Jesus had two more disciples, the brothers James and John, sons of Zebedee. Jesus called them the "Sons of Thunder".
  • Among other nicknames, Jesus himself is known as "The Prince of Peace".
  • Giovanni Bernardone was nicknamed Francesco (Latin: Franciscus), "Frenchman", by his father, an Assisi merchant trading with France. Nobody calls St. Francis of Assisi Giovanni anymore.
  • Odin's nicknames and titles are a mix of this trope, The Magnificent, and Names to Run Away from Really Fast. Some notable ones include All-father, Lord of the Undead, Wand-Bearer, Hooded One, and God of Runes.

    Sports 
  • In American Football:
    • Deacon "The Secretary of Defense" Jones.
    • The Atlanta Falcons:
      • Deion "Prime Time" Sanders.
      • Matt "Matty Ice" Ryan.
    • The Pittsburgh Steelers:
      • "The Bus" Jerome Bettis.
      • "The Flyin' Hawaiian" Troy Polamalu (he's originally from California, but of Samoan descent).
      • "Big Ben" Ben Roethlisberger.
      • "Mean" Joe Greene.
      • "Jack Splat/Dracula in Cleats" Jack Lambert, so called because he was missing a few of his front teeth, leaving his canines prominently displayed, and he played with a reasonable amount of blood lust.
    • Gale "The Kansas Comet" Sayers.
    • The Dallas Cowboys:
      • "Captain Comeback/Roger the Dodger" Roger Staubach.
      • Ed "Too Tall" Jones.
      • Thomas "Hollywood" Henderson.
      • The offensive trio of Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith, and Michael Irvin are known as "The Triplets".
    • Reggie White, the "Minister of Defense" (as he was also an ordained minister).
    • The Ismail brothers—Raghib "Rocket" and Qadry "Missile".
    • Several Oakland Raiders players, including, but not limited to:
      • Jack "The Assassin" Tatum.
      • Ken "The Snake" Stabler.
      • Skip "Dr. Death" Thomas.
      • Dave "The Ghost" Casper.
      • Ted "The Mad Stork" Hendricks.
      • "Tecmo" Bo Jackson.
    • The New York Jets:
      • "Broadway Joe" Namath.
      • Darrelle Revis is known as "Revis Island".
      • Antonio "Alcrotraz" Cromartie.
    • "The Sheriff" Peyton Manning.
      • "Easy" Eli Manning.
    • Tom Brady is known as "Tom Terrific", but nowadays, is more commonly known as "TB 12".
    • Clay Matthews, "The Claymaker".
    • The 1985 Chicago Bears were known by their nicknames:
      • "The Punky QB" Jim McMahon.
      • "Sweetness" Walter Payton.
      • "The Colonel/The Sack Man" Richard Dent.
      • William "The Fridge/The Refrigerator" Perry.
      • "Samurai" Mike Singletary.
      • Steve "Mongo" McMichael.
      • Dan "Danimal" Hampton.
    • Joe Montana is known as "Joe Cool" due to his calmness when performing under pressure, especially in the Super Bowl.
    • The Seattle Seahawks have the following:
      • "Dangeruss" Russell Wilson.
      • "Beast Mode" Marshawn Lynch.
      • Kam "Bam-Bam" Chancellor.
    • The Dolphins' wide receiver duo of Mark Clayton and Mark Duper are known as "The Marks Brothers".
    • "L.T." Lawrence Taylor.
    • "The Juice", O.J. Simpson.
    • "Johnny Football" for Texas A&M Heisman Trophy winner and later Cleveland Browns bust Johnny Manziel. Incidentally, he got the nickname in high school.
    • "The Freak" Randy Moss.
    • "The Nigerian Nightmare" Christian Okoye.
    • Brian "Weapon X" Dawkins.
  • In the Canadian Football League, Michael "Pinball" Clemons. He became so well-known by that name that his article at The Other Wiki uses Pinball, not Michael.
  • In Basketball:
    • LeBron James: King James; The Akron Hammer; The L-Train.
    • The Big O, AKA Oscar Robertson.
    • Julius Erving is more commonly known by the moniker "Dr. J."
    • In a subversion, Wilt Chamberlain was called the uncool "The Stilt"; he preferred "The Big Dipper."
    • Magic Johnson. If you just say "Magic", you know exactly who everyone is talking about, and it's not the team in Orlando. Incidentally, his real name is Earvin.
    • Michael Jordan: His Airness; Air Jordan; Black Cat; Money. In NBA message boards, he's just known as the GOAT (Greatest Of All Time).
    • "Larry Legend", Larry Bird, also known as "The Hick from French Lick".
    • Most of the dominant centers of The '90s had one. Hakeem Olajuwon was "The Dream", Pat Ewing "The Beast", David Robinson "The Admiral"note  and Dikembe Mutombo "Mount Mutombo".
      • Shaquille O'Neal was most often referred to simply as "Shaq". Partly because it was easier to say than "Shaquille," and partly because, especially when he was younger, he was built like a brick house, and only slightly easier to push around than one.
    • Stephen Curry: The Golden Boy; The Baby-Faced Assassin; Chef Curry.
    • Kobe Bryant: Black Mumba; The 8th Wonder of the World; Mr. 81; KB-24; KB8; Lord of the Rings; The Dagger; Three Rings; Kob-Me; Kobe Wan Kenobi
    • Kevin Garnett: KG; The Franchise; The Big Ticket; The Kid
    • Paul Pierce: "The Truth", a nickname given to him by Shaq.
    • Vince Carter: Vinsanity; Air Canada; Half-Man, Half-Amazing.
    • David Robinson: The Admiral
    • Some foreign players are nicknamed after their native country, like "The Polish Hammer" Marcin Gortat, "Air Congo" Serge Ibaka, "AK47" Andrei Kirilenko (and yes, he played with the number 47) or "Captain Canada"/"Hair Canada" Steve Nash - the latter being another pun on the original Air Canada, Vince Carter (when he was playing in Toronto).
    • And one of the most famous ones among the younger players is the "Manimal", Kenneth Faried.
    • Spanish player Juan Carlos Navarro is better known as La Bomba Navarro. Not because of his eponymous arched shot, but for his ability to absolutely bomb matches (in a good way) with less than favourable odds. Also, "to be la bomba" means roughly "to be the awesomest".
  • In Ice Hockey:
    • Hardly anyone needs to ask who 'The Great One' is, but for the record, it's the Ambassador of Hockey, Wayne Gretzky.
    • Gordie Howe held every significant NHL career scoring record until Wayne Gretzky came along and rewrote the record book. He played professionally in FIVE decades (40's, 50's, 60's, 70's, and 80's), and was a 23-time NHL All-Star. He was known as "Mr. Hockey."
    • Guy Lafleur, former player for the Montréal Canadiens, was nicknamed "Le Démon Blond" (The Blond Demon), for what should be obvious reasons. He was also frequently called "Le Fleur" (The Flower) in allusion to his own name, but that's not nearly as intimidatingnote .
    • Mario Lemieux got "Le Magnifique", the Magnificent, when he wasn't Super Mario.
      • His Pittsburg Penguins teammate, Jaromir Jagr, was known as "Mario Jr." early in his career. He was generally the team's second-leading scorer when they were together, and it is, coincidentally, an anagram of his first name.
    • Martin Brodeur, goalkeeper of the New Jersey Devils, became "Satan's Wallpaper"
    • Recent rival, New York Rangers Goalie, Henrik Lundqvist, is called "King" Henrik.
    • Dominik Hašek, one of the greatest goalkeepers of all times in and out of NHL, was dubbed The Dominator.
    • Professional fist-thrower, Derek Boogaard was referred to as "The Boogeyman," as he was 6'7'' and caused smaller players to lose sleep. Or go to sleep.
    • Sean Avery is known as "The Pest," when he isn't known as something much more profane with a similar meaning. He's possibly the most antagonistic, fire-starting little prick to ever play sports, and he's not shy about physical confrontations. The home crowd usually loves him, everyone else wants him dead.
    • Maurice "Rocket" Richard.
    • Curtis "Cujo" Joseph.
    • Detroit Red Wings (and also New York Islanders/St. Louis Blues) goalie Chris "Ozzie" "The Wizard of Oz" Osgood.
    • Stu "The Grim Reaper" Grimson. Yes, he was an enforcer. No, you didn't want to fight him.
    • Pat "Little Ball of Hate" Verbeek, who was one of the biggest pests in NHL history until Sean Avery showed up.
    • "Bam-Bam" Cam Neely, one of the first modern "power forwards" in the NHL.
    • Bobby "The Golden Jet" Hull. His son was known as "The Golden Brett" Hull.
  • In Baseball:
    • Babe Ruth of baseball fame probably holds the record for most nicknames like "The Babe," "The Sultan of Swat," "The King of Swing," and "The Great Bambino". He is almost never referred to by his real name, George Herman Ruth, Jr.
    • Willie Mays, the Say Hey Kid.
    • Ted Williams, The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived, was also called The Splendid Splinter, The Kid, and Teddy Ballgame.
    • Orlando "El Duque" Hernández, during his career, was hardly ever referred to by his real name.
    • Joe DiMaggio: "Joltin' Joe" or "The Yankee Clipper". His birth name was Giuseppe.
    • Bob "Rapid Robert" Feller.
    • Jimmie Foxx, "Double X".
    • Lou Gehrig was called "The Iron Horse".
    • David Ortiz, universally known as "Big Papi".
    • Walter Johnson, "The Big Train".
    • Henry "Hammerin' Hank" Aaron.
    • And let us not forget Stan "The Man" Musial.
    • Jackie Robinson: Dark Destroyer; The Colored Comet; Jack-Jack; Jackie the Robber; J-Rob
    • And this is an incredibly small sample of the nicknames in baseball, which are an integral part of the culture like in no other sport; fuller, but by no means complete, lists can be found here and here.
  • In Football/Soccer
    • German footballer Franz Beckenbauer is also known as 'the Kaiser'.
      • "Kaiser" means "Emperor" in German. Thus, other German badasses are also called Kaiser (Michael Schumacher, for example.)
      • Michael Schumacher, during his Ferrari career, was widely knows as the Red Baron, in fact.
      • Though in Germany "Kaiser" is reserved to Beckenbauer. He got his nickname from a radio reporter in a game in which his club Bayern Munich defeated Schalke 04 and his own performance outshone that of Schalke's star player Reinhard Libuda, then known to his fans as "the King" (der König). Libuda, a very good player in his own right, is remembered to this day as "Stan" Libuda (after Sir Stanley Matthews).
    • 'The King' is a common moniker for the widely-accepted greatest player of all time in an English football. team's history. Two of the most famous include King Sir Kenny Dalglish of Liverpool and Denis Law of Manchester United - note that Manchester United also has a King Eric, a.k.a. Eric Cantona.
    • Aside from the Kings, the Manchester fans cheered for "The Welsh Wizard" Ryan Giggs, the "Ginger Ninja" Paul Scholes and the "Baby-Faced Assassin" Ole Gunnar Solskjær, scorer of late and vital goals.
      • And while we're at it, the whole team of United is nicknamed the "Red Devils". Interestingly, the Belgian national team is called Les Diables Rouges in French and De Rode Duivels in Dutch, which mean exactly the same thing.
    • Edson Arantes do Nascimento, a.k.a. "King" Pelé.
    • Ronaldo O Fenômeno, meaning "The Phenomenon".
      • Sometimes referred to nowadays as "Fat Ronaldo", due to the expansion of his girth and the rise of Cristiano Ronaldo, who is often referred to as just "Ronaldo", or even "CR7" (after his initials and shirt number).
    • Diego Maradona is instead known by some as "El Pibe de Oro", which stands for "The Golden Boy". The nickname came from his time at Argentinos Juniors, where he was obviously the biggest prospect in the squad before he left to join Boca Juniors, and then went to cap off his career at Napoli.
    • Liverpool Football Club, referred to as 'the Reds' has a fanbase in the habit of giving awesome nicknames to their players. The classic example is 'King' Kenny Dalglish. Following Dalglish becoming Sir Kenny Dalglish in 2018, the response from Liverpool was: "In Liverpool, we call him King."
      • More recently, Robbie Fowler was known as 'God'.
      • Steven Gerrard has 'Captain Marvel' (No, not that one, not that one, and not that one either), 'Captain Fantastic', 'Stevie G', and 'James Bond' (given to him by team-mate Daniel Sturridge because he could do anything) to pick from.
      • Former striker Fernando Torres is 'El Niño' or 'The Kid' (though he'd picked that one up in Spain).
      • Notably physical (sometimes to the point of Unnecessary Roughness) Slovenian centre-back Martin Skrtel picked up the nickname "The Terminator", largely for his physicality, and partly because he generally looked like he was about to kill someone.
      • Former midfielder, Philippe Coutinho, a short Brazilian player whose skilful play and penchant for spectacular long range goals have earned him the nickname 'the Little Magician'.
      • Young talent Ben Woodburn was, after scoring a spectacular 25 yard goal for Wales at the age of 18, dubbed 'the Prince of Wales'.
      • And the new hero, Mohammed Salah (who plundered 44 goals in 52 club games in his debut season, nabbing the Golden Boot, PFA Player of the Year, PFA Player's Player of the Year, and Football Writer's Association Player of the Year was well), is usually known as 'the King of Egypt'/'the Egyptian King', or simply, 'the Pharaoh'.
      • After forming a lethal Power Trio with Roberto 'Bobby' Firmino and Sadio Mane, known for speed, positional flexibility (the three frequently swap positions to bamboozle defenders), and a ruthlessness in front of goal that racked up 90 goals between them, the three have been nicknamed 'the Red Arrows', after the RAF's legendary aerobatics team.
      • Other nicknamed players include former midfielder Joe 'Welsh Xavi/Welsh Pirlo' Allen. Originally, it was a joke by manager Brendan Rodgers - Xavi and Pirlo are two of the most skilled midfielders of their generation, both World Cup winners and key players for clubs such as Barcelona, AC Milan and Juventus. Allen is a moderately talented and hard working midfielder on his best days. While his determination eventually won over the Liverpool faithful, no one really saw him as being on that level.
      • Some newer players have also got nicknames, including Scottish left-back Andy 'The King of the North' Robertson, and English midfielder Alex 'the Ox' Oxlade-Chamberlain
      • The team itself has been dubbed 'Europe's Comeback Kings' owing to their propensity for mounting comebacks that border on unbelievable. The nickname came after a particularly ridiculous stunt in their Europa League tie against Borussia Dortmund in 2016. Dortmund, one of the most highly rated teams in Europe, were 3-1 up with less than thirty minutes to go. Liverpool, technically outclassed, had to win outright, and did, winning 4-3. This is arguably not as dramatic as another incident, however, the Champions League final of 2005. After going 3-0 down before half-time, instead of scoring three goals in half an hour, they did so in six minutes, and won on penalties. Unsurprisingly, it's known to this day as 'the Miracle of Istanbul'.
      • Then, they arguably topped that in 2018/19 with what is coming to be known as 'the Miracle on the Mersey'/'the Miracle of Anfield': going into the second leg of the semi-final against Barcelona, having lost 3-0 in the first leg, needing to score 3 goals just to take it to extra time, four to win outright, and (thanks to the away goals rule) five if Barcelona managed to score even one (which with Lionel Messi, widely considered to be the greatest player in footballing history, was considered to be almost guaranteed) no one really gave them a chance. And that was before two of their three star strikers were ruled out through injury (forcing them to turn to Divock Origi, a striker who'd scored a total of four goals all season, one of them a few days before, and Xherdan Shaqiri, an attacker who hadn't played since January), and their title rivals won the last match they looked like possibly screwing up, all but confirming the title, the night before. And yet, Liverpool promptly annihilated Barcelona, winning 4-0 - two of those goals being scored by Origi, and in a further twist, the other two being scored by Gini Wijnaldum, only on the pitch in the second half because one of the Barcelona strikers had accidentally-on-purpose injured Liverpool's star left back, forcing a reshuffle.
      • Following their return to Europe's biggest stage, the UEFA Champions League, in 2017/18, and prompt breaking of more or less every goal-scoring record in the book, including a 5-0 demolition away to Portuguese champions, the supposedly rock-solid Porto in the Last 16, a 5-2 thumping of AS Roma (who had just knocked Spanish giants Barcelona) at home in a semi-final with a final aggregate score of 7-6, and in between, a 5-1 aggregate demolition of competition favourites and English champions Manchester City, Liverpool got a new nickname: 'Europe's Entertainers'.
    • Adebayo Akinfenwa, striker for Wycombe Wanderers, is officially the physically strongest player in world football according to the Fifa Soccer franchise (the football equivalent of JohnMaddensNFL), five years running. Fittingly, he's widely referred to as 'the Beast'.
    • On the less than badass note, English footballer Darren Anderton was talented, but also infamous for being injury prone and was thus generally referred to as 'Sick Note'.
    • Legendary English midfielder and captain David Beckham, meanwhile, was referred to as either 'Becks' or 'Golden Balls'. It is up for debate whether this had more to do with his gifts with a football or his modelling career.
    • Everton, Manchester United, and England striker (and captain) Wayne Rooney has been dubbed 'Shrek', for his resemblance to the ogre in question - a model he is not.
    • Brazilian soccer player Givanildo Vieira de Souza got the nickname "Hulk" during his playing days in Japan. He embraced said nickname and wears it on the back of his shirt. He kept it when he moved to Portuguese champions Porto, and when they played Arsenal FC in the Champions League, this led to cheerful chants from the Arsenal faithful of, "He's going green in a minute! He's going green in a minute!"
    • Current Manchester United manager José Mourinho is called "The Special One" after a remark he made during his first spell at Chelsea. After winning a treble for Inter Milan in 2010, and also winning league titles with Real Madrid and in his second Chelsea stint, it can seldom be called undeserved.
      • Jürgen Klopp, appointed Liverpool manager in October 2015, referred to himself as 'The Normal One', something quickly embraced by the fans and the media. The icing on the cake came in the form of their first encounter in the Premier League on Halloween 2015, when The Normal One's Liverpool side thrashed The Special One's Chelsea 3-1 at Stamford Bridge.
    • Ex Real Madrid, current Porto and Spain goalkeeper Iker Casillas is often called "Saint Iker" due to his valuable performances.
    • Possibly more of a subversion, but Switzerland's very short, deceptively muscular and talented winger Xherdan Shaqiri has earned the nickname 'the Magic Dwarf'. He went on to play for Stoke City, a team famous for long ball tactics aimed at enormous strikers and the complete opposite of technical play, before moving to Liverpool, who're more appreciative of his technical talents - and have dubbed him 'the Cube', because he's more or less cube shaped.
    • Argentinian midfield Javier Mascherano is referred as "El León", meaning "The Lion". His fierceness, strength and personality completely justify the sobriquet.
  • In Rugby Union:
    • Brian Lima, Samoan winger/centre, was named The Chiropractor, because his tackles were so violent they could rearrange the bones of his victims.
    • Gareth Edwards, Welsh scrum-half, was The Prince.
    • Edwards' contemporary and teammate, fly-half Barry John, was The King.
    • Serge Betsen, French flanker, was La Faucheuse which translates as The Grim Reaper.
    • Sébastien Chabal, French Number 8 was known for his Badass Beard, long hair and ferocious tackling, being nicknamed l'Homme des Cavernesthe Caveman by French fans.
    • Shane Williams, Welsh winger, was known as 'Shimmering Shane' for his agility and quick feet, which frequently left opposition players on the floor. He was so well regarded that he was called up for the Lions Tour (the Lions squad being a team composed of the best players in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland) at the age of 36 when he'd just gone out to commentate.
    • Jason Robinson, England Winger and Fullback, was known as 'Billy Whizz' after a character from The Beano for his extraordinary turn of pace.
    • South African flanker Schalk the Beast Burger.
    • South African flanker Joe van Niekerk was Big Joe.
    • South African prop Jacobus Petrus du Randt was never known by either of his given names, but rather as Os, Afrikaans for Ox.
    • John Eales, Australian lock, was Nobody, which doesn't sound very threatening, until you know that it is because Nobody's perfect.
    • David Pocock, Australian flanker, acquired the nickname 'the Jackal' at the 2015 World Cup for his talent at snaffling the ball for turnovers.
  • In Formula 1:
    • Alain Prost, who became known as "The Professor" due to his cool and very calculating driving style
    • Kimi "Iceman" Räikkönen
    • Michael "Rainmaster" Schumacher (though the nickname did become something applied to other racing drivers who were good in the wet).
    • Fernando "Magic" Alonso, so named because of his ability to outperform opponents despite having an often inferior car.
  • In NASCAR
    • Ask any fan about "The Intimidator" (Dale Earnhardt), "Little E" (Dale Earnhardt Jr.), "Million Dollar Bill" and "Awesome Bill from Dawsonville" Elliot, "Sliced Bread" (Joey Logano), "Fireball" (Glenn Roberts), "Smoke" (Tony Stewart), "Rowdy" (Kyle Busch), or "The King" (Richard Petty).
  • In Boxing:
    • Muhammad Ali: The Greatest
    • Joe Frazier: Smokin'
    • Mike Tyson: Iron Mike, Kid Dynamite
    • Joe Louis: The Brown Bomber
    • Evander Holyfield: Real Deal, The Warrior
    • Lennox Lewis: The Lion
    • George Foreman: Big
    • Pernell Whitaker: Sweet Pea
    • Ray Robinson, Ray Leonard, Shane Mosley: Sugar
    • Floyd Mayweather, Jr.: Pretty Boy, Money
    • Erik Morales: El Terrible
    • Manny Pacquiao: Pacman, The Mexicutioner, The Destroyer; The Fighting Pride of the Philippines.
    • Harry Greb: The Smoke City Wildcat, the Human Windmill, King of the Alley Fighters, the Human Tornado, the Human perpetual Motion Machine, the Pittsburgh Windmill, and the Wildest Tiger. Why so many nicknames? He was that good.
    • Jack Dempsey: The Manassa Mauler, the Man Killer
    • Carlos Monzon: Escopeta (Spanish for shotgun)
    • Stanley Ketchel: The Michigan Assassin
    • Henry Armstrong: Homicide Hank, Hurricane Hank, Hammerin' Hank
    • Thomas "the Hitman" Hearns, K.O. specialist.
    • "Marvelous" Marvin Hagler (who added the nickname to his legal name during his career).
    • Brazilian pugilist Adilson José Rodrigues, better known as Maguila. Was nicknamed as such for his resemblance with cartoon character Maguilla Gorilla.
    • Julio César Chávez: El Gran Campeón Mexicano (the Great Mexican Champion), and the Caesar of Boxing.
    • Juan Manuel Márquez: Dinamita.
    • Saúl Álvarez: Canelo (Cinnamon, term for red horses, on account of his characteristic red hair).
    • Marcel Cerdan: Le Bombardier Maroccain (the Moroccan Bomber, though he was French), and the Casablanca Cloutier.
  • In Martial Arts:
    • Massively famous Japanese karateka Gogen Yamaguchi was known as "the Cat", most likely because of his grace of movement and his small size. An unfortunately apocryphal story asserts that he acquired this name when he strangled a tiger while locked in a cage with it in a Russian (or sometimes Chinese) POW camp, which just goes to shows how much awe people held for him.
    • Sosai Masutatsu Oyama, founder of Kyokushinkai Karate, "The God Hand". The man who could One-Hit Kill a bull, and achieved it at most three times.
    • Say Cro Cop on an MMA board and everyone will know you're talking about Mirko Filipović.
    • Bruce Lee: "The Great One"
    • Joe Lewis, a black belt in Shorin Ryu Karate, several other disciplines and the man credited with creating American Kickboxing or Full Contact Karate was so popular during his hey day as a Pro Karate fighter that people called him "The Golden Boy". Later on, he acquired "The Jaguar" after a film he starred in and "The Greatest Karate Fighter of all time", as he was voted as such by his peers, including Chuck Norris and Bill Wallace.
    • Bill "Superfoot" Wallace is a Shorin Ryu Black Belt who almost destroyed his right leg doing Judo. Forced to improve his remaining leg when he entered Karate, he developed kicks that were clocked in excess of 60 MPH. He was so skilled with his left leg that he used it like a boxer would use a jab, hence his nickname. He retired from Kickboxing undefeated with 23 fights and 13 K.O's.
    • Don Wilson, called by STAR System Ratings the greatest Kickboxer of all time, was nicknamed "The Dragon". His Kung Fu style, appropriately is Pai Lum, White Dragon Kung Fu.
    • Benny Urquidez, legendary kickboxer, was nicknamed "The Jet" for his spectacular aerial kicks, particularly the jump spinning back kick.
    • "Thunderfoot" Hwang Jang Lee, Tang Soo Do black belt famous for displaying his unsurpassed kicking prowess as the bad guy in several Kung Fu films. During the Vietnam war, he was forced into a fight with a knife-toting ally who didn't believe in Lee's credentials to teach martial arts to the army. Lee kicked him in the head. Unfortunately, the man died, but the incident was ruled as self defense.
    • Dominique Valera, the pioneer of Full Contact Karate in France, is known as "Le King" for his undisputed status as the most legendary Karateka of that country.
  • MMA also lends itself to fighters getting nicknames that give you an idea of how awesome they are.
    • Willie Williams: Bear Killer(which he earned by fighting an actual bear)
    • Fedor Emelianenko, probably the single best fighter in the world, is nicknamed "The Last Russian Emperor."
    • Ken Shamrock: The World's Most Dangerous Man.
    • Wanderlei Silva: The AX Murderer; Mad Dog.
    • Quinton Jackson: Rampage.
    • Andrei Arlovski: The Pitbull.
    • Randy Couture: The Natural; Captain America.
    • Chuck Liddell: The Iceman.
    • Tito Ortiz: The People's Champ; The Huntington Beach Bad Boy.
    • Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira: Minotauro (Minotaur)
    • Antonio Rogerio Nogueira: Minitoro (Little Bull)
    • Brock Lesnar: The Conqueror; The Beast Incarnate
    • Dan Severn: The Beast
    • BJ Penn: The Prodigy.
    • Georges St. Pierre: Rush; GSP.
    • Keith Jardine: The Dean of Mean.
    • Anderson Silva: The Spider; Spider-Man; The Dancing Spider.
    • Jung Chan-Sung: The Korean Zombie.
    • Alistair Overeem: The Reem.
    • Lyoto Machida: The Dragon.
    • Grey Maynard: The Bully
    • Nick Diaz: Diablo
    • Mauricio Rua: Shogun.
    • Cain Velasquez: Cardio Cain.
    • Dan Henderson: Hollywood; Dangerous; Hendo
    • Chael Sonnen: The People's Champ
    • Rashad Evans: Suga.
    • Connor McGregor: Notorious; Mystic Mac.
    • Jon Jones: Bones.
    • Rich Franklin: The Ace.
    • Mirko Cro Cop: Tiger.
    • Vitor Belfort: The Phenom
    • Gina Carano: Conviction; Crush.
    • Ronda Rousey: Rowdy; The Baddest Woman on the Planet; The Arm Collector
    • Cris Venancio: Cyborg.
    • Amanda Nunes: The Lioness.
    • Shayna Baszler: The Queen of Spades.
    • Miesha Tate: Cupcake; Takedown.
    • Holly Holm: The Preacher's Daughter; Hottie.
    • Cat Zingano: Alpha.
    • Page VanZant: 12 Gauge.
    • Bethe Correia: The Pitbull.
    • Rose Namajunas: Thug.
  • In cue sports:
    • A billiards player has one of these. Billiards Congress of America Hall of Fame member Lou Butera was known as "Machine Gun Lou" for his rapid-fire style of play, a moniker earned due to a match in 1973 where he reached a score of 150 in 21 minutes.
    • Add to that snooker players Jamie "Shotgun" Cope, Ronnie "The Rocket" O'Sullivan, Ding "Enter the Dragon" Junhui, John "Wizard of Wishaw" Higgins ...
    • From the halls of Italian billiards, past and present Masters: Angelo "Lord Brummel" Bellocchio, Laurdes "Napoleon" Cavallari, Vitale "Terminator" Nocerino and Daniele "The Gladiator" Montereali.
    • "Hurricane" Higgins, "Whirlwind" White, errrr...."Interesting" Davis?
    • One of the most renowned Filipino billiards players is Efren "bata" Reyes ("bata" being a Filipino term for kid). He got this nickname because there was a person also named Efren that played billiards where he lived during his younger days, the nickname being used to distinguish the two (the other Efren being an adult). His other title is "The Magician" because of being able to make extremely difficult shots.
    • Also Korean-American pool player Jeanette Lee, aka "The Black Widow", from the contrast between her killer instinct at the table and sweet, unassuming nature away from it. She embraces the nickname by regularly wearing all black at the table.
  • In Cricket:
    • Viv Richards was "The Master Blaster".
    • Michael Holding was "Whispering Death".
    • The greatest batsman of all time, Sir Donald George Bradman, was simply "The Don"
    • Shane Warne was "The Sheik of Tweak"
  • In other sports:
  • In golf:
    • Eldrick "Tiger" Woods.
    • Golfer Phil Mickelson is usually just called "Lefty," as he plays left-handed (despite being right-handed in almost everything else). He's also been called "Hefty Lefty" and "Philly Cheesesteak", when he got a bit more pudgy than usual.
    • "Long John" John Daly. He hit the ball a LONG way.
    • "The Golden Bear" Jack Nicklaus. He was a big guy and often wore yellow or gold colored shirts, and was blond. Even though he slimmed down considerably by the late 1960s, the nickname stuck. It's now so closely identified with him that on The Other Wiki, "The Golden Bear" redirects to his page.
    • "The General" Arnold Palmer, in reference to him leading "Arnie's Army" (his MASSIVE galleries) around the golf course.
  • In Professional Gaming (including the Fighting Game Community):
    • Daigo "The Beast" Umehara, after a famous Street Fighter III Third Strike comeback where he successfully parriesnote  an entire super attack after being reduced to so little HP that even blocking an attacknote  would finish him off, and then bringing down his opponent's lifebar down to KO, a moment known by many as "The Beast Unleashed".
    • Professional Starcraft players often get nicknames beyond the screen names they use when competing. Perhaps the best known is SlayerS_Boxer, known as "The Terran Emperor" (real name Lim Yo Hwan). Others include NaDa "The Genius" or Iloveoov "Cheater Terran"note .
    • League of Legends is no different. Probably the best-known example is Faker (real name Lee Sang-hyeok), also known as "The Unkillable Demon King".

    Arts 
  • In Literature:
    • Alexei Tolstoy, the "Red Count" or "Comrade Count." Alexei, a member of the famous Tolstoy clan and thus a count and himself a well-regarded writer mostly of 1920s Soviet science fiction, was an ardent supporter of the Bolsheviks and earned this nickname.
  • Anne McCaffrey has been given the affectionate nickname of Dragonlady of Pern due to her famous Dragonriders of Pern series.
  • Andre Norton was dubbed "Grande Dame of Science Fiction and Fantasy" by her biographers, fans, and peers.
  • In Comic Books:
  • In Voice Acting:
    • Masako Nozawa: The Eternal Boy, because of the many boys she voiced in her career (including most famously, Tetsuro Hoshino, Hiroshi Suzuishi [AKA: "Pidge"], and Son Goku)
    • Veteran Mexican voice actress Diana Santos is called "La Diosa del Doblaje" (The Goddess of Dubbing) due of being not only one of the still-active voice actresses there, but due to the fact, despite being an elderly woman, she still voices little girls, teens or middle-aged women and very rarely women of her own age. For a better example, she is still the official Mexican dub voice of Minnie Mouse from almost basically day one in Mexico since the 70s to this date.
    • Another Mexican voice actor, the late Jorge Arvizu (who was the Mexican voice of Fred Flintstone in the original series and the first voice of Bugs Bunny) was called "El Tata" (literally The Daddy, after a character from a comedy show in the 70s and 80s he used to play).
    • Tabitha St. Germain is frequently referred to as "T-Bone" by her coworkers.

    Other 
  • Businesswoman Leona Helmsley was known as "The Queen of Mean", especially after she was convicted of being a tax cheat. More can be found on The Other Wiki.
  • In some cases, enforced anonymity can end up turning into this trope. Before his death Sergei Korolev — the lead Soviet rocket engineer and spacecraft designer in the Space Race between the United States and the Soviet Union during the 1950s and 1960s — was often referred to only as "Chief Designer", because his name and his pivotal role in the Soviet space program had been held to be a state secret by the Politburo. This made him sound like a sinister figure to the American public, especially during the early days of the Space Race when there was public anxiety about the Soviets being ahead.
  • Many gangsters involved in organized crime usually are known by their monikers, especially (but not limited to) those involved with "La Cosa Nostra." Famous examples include: Al Capone OR "Scarface", Charles "Lucky" Luciano, Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel, John Gotti AKA "The Teflon Don" or "The Dapper Don", Louis "Lepke" Buchalter, Albert "The Mad Hatter" Anastasia or the "Lord High Executioner", Vincent "Chin" Gigante, Jimmy "Whitey" Bulger, Arnold "The Brain" Rothstein or "The Big Bankroll", Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, Carmine Galante AKA "Lilo", Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso, Jimmy "The Gent" Burke, Frank Costello AKA "The Prime Minister", "Crazy" Joe Gallo....you get the idea.
  • Once known as "The King of Kong" (after the documentary film that talked about him), this red baron no longer applies since Billy Mitchell was discovered to have been cheating when he got his famous high score in the original arcade version of Donkey Kong.note 


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