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    Carmine Lupertazzi Sr. 

Carmine Lupertazzi Sr.

Played by: Tony Lip

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tony_lip_244.jpg
"A don doesn't wear shorts."

"Our family's been doin' our Jersey business a long time with the Sopranos in a peaceful and profitable way, and I want to keep it like that."

Longtime don of the Lupertazzi crime family.


  • Affably Evil: Despite being utterly ruthless in his business dealings, Carmine is nonetheless a doting father to his son, Little Carmine, and prefers to resolve tensions with the Sopranos through diplomacy rather than conflict. He is very rarely, if ever, shown to lose his temper with anyone.
  • Amazingly Embarrassing Parents: Asks his middle-aged son Carmine Jr. if he's put his sun block on, in front of Johnny Sack.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: With Johnny Sack in Season 4.
  • Blank Stare: When Johnny Sack repeats Ralph's joke to him.
  • Consummate Professional: Doesn't let petty feuds get in the way of business, to the point where he sanctioned a hit on Johnny Sack when he didn't give him his blessing to put a hit on Ralph, rightly believing that Johnny Sack would do the same.
  • Does Not Understand Sarcasm: When Johnny Sack scoffed his way of sanctioning Ralphie for his joke about Ginny Sack.
    Carmine: (about Ralph) I'll crack him good. I'll ask for 200 grand.
    Johnny Sack: 200 grand for insulting my wife. What's next, Carmine, he gets to FUCK HER FOR A MILLION!?
    Carmine: He wants to fuck her?
    Johnny Sack: I'm making a point, I'm talking about my wife's honor here! My honor!
  • The Don: A classic one; disregards the DiMeo family as a glorified crew.
  • From Bad to Worse: Things start to get out of hand after he dies, with each boss being worse than the former. Carmine is by far the most pragmatic Lupertazzi Don. Johnny Sack balances between pragmatism and ego, while Phil is completely unhinged.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: In Seasons 1-3. After he and his empire are referred to merely as "New York" in the first two seasons, he finally appears in-person during Season 3. Despite being a longtime ally of the DiMeo crime family, Carmine's organization is almost universally viewed by Tony and his associates with wariness and suspicion (not least because the former regularly uses its vastly greater size and resources to coerce the New Jersey mobsters into "sharing" their profits on local business ventures). After the relationship between the two families deteriorates in Season 4, the Lupertazzi crime family ultimately becomes the story's preeminent antagonist and remains so until the end of the series.
  • Happily Married: The two times he's seen in the company of women (once with strippers at Christopher's "getting made" party and once with "the girls from icelandic air" at a hotel party) he ignores the women and talks business to Tony who in contrast to Carmine, can't take his eyes off the women. Then after Carmine dies, Tony has a dream about him where Carmine says he misses his wife, Violet, who was everything to him.
  • Hollywood Heart Attack: Complains of smelling burning hair before dramatically clutching his chest and falling onto the table during a meet with Tony. Somewhat averted in that he lingers on for a few more days in the hospital afterwards before another stroke finishes him off.
  • No Honor Among Thieves: Johnny Sack never realizes that Carmine demonstrated this against him personally: once Sack starts getting unreasonable in his honor feud with Ralphie Cifaretto, Carmine sanctions a hit against Sack.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: According to Johnny Sack, he once refused to sanction a hit on a high-earning "made man" within his Family requested by another mobster whose honor had been violated. However, when the earning capacity of the aforementioned "made man" became diminished, Carmine had him murdered.
  • Properly Paranoid: Knowing that Johnny Sack's would take his refusal to put a hit on Ralphie poorly, Carmine sanctions a hit on Johnny, correctly predicting that Johnny would try the same on him.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: To put it simply, he was the most reasonable and pragmatic boss in the series. He wasn't unaware like Junior, insecure like John, crazy like Phil or as egotistical as Tony. The primary reason for this was that Carmine was first and foremost about making money and maintaining healthy, financial relationships. He was willing to put the squeeze on people and have people killed, but he put earning first.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Scolds Tony for using casual wear.
  • The Stoic: For the most part, he talks mostly in a deadpan and maintains a stony expression. He will sometimes raise his voice in anger though, and smiles at least once (when he talks about his health in the Season 4 finale).
  • Succession Crisis: His death ultimately starts a civil war within the Lupertazzi Crime family due to widespread lack of confidence in his sole heir, "Little" Carmine.

    "Little" Carmine Lupertazzi Jr. 

"Little" Carmine Lupertazzi Jr.

Played by: Ray Abruzzo

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/little_carminevwx20131_6312.jpg
"A pint of blood costs more than a gallon of gold."

Carmine Lupertazzi's son and heir apparent.


  • Affably Evil: Arguably one of the nicest guys in the show.
  • Always Someone Better: Carmine is a wealthy Mafia prince, but he realizes that he's just a small fry compared to Hollywood elite.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: Carmine is seen as a foolish coward for simply giving up in his war with Johnny Sack over leadership of the family. However, his position is sympathetic to the normal viewer, most of whom would presumably rather retire wealthy than risk their lives in a protracted mob war.
  • Delusions of Eloquence: He usually fails miserably when trying to speak with gravitas.
  • Department of Redundancy Department:
    Little Carmine: "The fundamental question is: Will I be as effective as a boss like my dad was? And I will be. Even more so — but until I am, it's gonna be hard to verify that I think I'll be more effective."
  • The Ditz: Whatever respect and success he's earned has been purely through nepotism. He's ultimately a soft, cowardly and not particularly bright Mafiosi who's led a sheltered existence. Tony has a habit of calling him "Brainless the Second."
  • Establishing Character Moment: A sitdown with Tony in which he attempts to display his intellect via a metaphor about the palace of Versailles, only to badly mispronounce every French word he tries to use and completely forget the point he was trying to make. Tony is unimpressed.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: For a given value of "evil", anyway. The man genuinely adores his wife and his father and ultimately opts to leave the criminal life behind after a dream he had in which the now deceased Carmine Sr. cryptically told him to live a happy life with his family rather than try to wear the crown that he did.
  • Happily Married: Prefers to enjoy the good life with his wife rather than wearing The Chains of Commanding.
  • Hidden Depths: His talk with Tony about the dream he had which inspired him not to pursue the boss's chair shows that he might be wiser than he lets on.
  • Ice-Cream Koan: Several, but his character quote arguably takes the cake. Maybe.
  • Inadequate Inheritor: He's basically a preview of what would happen if AJ was allowed to join the mob.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: He's notably the only mobster who has the self-awareness to do this. After taking some harsh losses, he decides he's had enough of the Mafia power play and retires to a civilian life, serving as a neutral mediator in mob conflicts. In doing so, he's one of the very few mobsters to make it out of the show intact.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: He ultimately backs down from his war with Johnny Sack after the full scale of the death and destruction it was causing finally gets to his conscience, a move that is widely mocked by the other mobsters as cowardly and pathetic. By the end of the series he's one of the few named characters still alive and with their personal lives intact, with many of the mobsters who mocked his retirement as cowardly having either suffered humiliating and ignominious ends or left in personal ruin from the fallout of the DiMeo/Lupertazzi mob war.
  • Malaproper: Like most mobsters, he mangles common idioms and vocabulary, but his Delusions of Eloquence due to his unearned success in the mob leads him to these far more often in comparison. Even the other mobsters are visibly dumbfounded whenever it happens.
  • Metaphorgotten: At the premiere of Cleaver, he compares movies to children during his speech and quickly gets lost in the analogy.
  • Nice Guy: Aside from his involvement in a power struggle that he ultimately pulled out of when he couldn't stomach the bloodshed anymore, he comes across in pretty much all his scenes as a decent, civil guy who dislikes violence.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: There are more than a few hints that he is doing this.
    • The story he tells about the French finance minister who outshone his king. Carmine tells it in a very weird way, that makes it seem like there's no point to it, but there's a lesson in it that being too openly ambitious can bite you in the ass. John goes from being a calm pragmatist, to a man who wants to kill his own boss for not letting him kill Ralph over an insult, to the boss and an FBI target. Meanwhile Carmine stays out of the spotlight and ends the story as a happy, wealthy and powerful man.
    • His "botching" of the Phil/Tony sitdown can seem like this. There were already problems between the two men and he was asked to moderate it as a neutral party. First he calms both of them down with reason, then he brings up Billy Leotardo's death like it's no big deal, infurating Phil and making the acrimony between the two men worse than ever before. Phil becomes angrier and more reckless, whereas Tony finds it harder and harder to do business with him. As a result the two go to war, Tony loses his underboss and consigliere, while Phil ends up dead.
    • His page quote. The way he phrases it is quite confusing and weird, but the show makes it clear that killing people leads to further problems that can snowball out of control and ruin countless lives. For instance, many lives could have been spared if Tony Blundetto had never killed Angelo Garepe. On the flipside, many lives were spared because Carmine Sr. wanted to avoid violent conflict and preferred to get things done with restitutions and business settlements. Little Carmine avoided violence and handled sitdowns, he is alive and happy. Phil, Tony and John on the other hand....
  • Only Sane Man: In Season 6, he tries brokering a peace between Tony and Phil because he understands a Mob War will be detrimental to both sides. Unfortunately, Phil doesn't listen.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: He tries to use complicated words and sentences, only to get lost quickly under them.
  • Team Switzerland: Mediates between Tony and Phil, but he bungles it completely when he pointlessly brings up the death of Billy Leotardo.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Completely buries any chance for peace between Phil and Tony when he brings up Billy Leotardo's murder for absolutely no reason.
    Little Carmine: Your brother Billy, whatever happened there...
    Phil: WHATEVER HAPPENED THERE?!
  • Villainous Friendship: With Lorraine Calluzo. He's very angered when Phil Leotardo kills her.
  • The Wrongful Heir to the Throne: Despite being the legitimate heir of Carmine Sr., a sizable faction of the Lupertazzi Family led by Johnny Sack contests his succession, not least because he lacks his father's cunning and ruthless decisiveness. Carmine ultimately decides that he doesn't want to fight for the top spot anyway and relinquishes his claim.

    John "Johnny Sack" Sacramoni 

John "Johnny Sack" Sacramoni

Played by: Vincent Curatola

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sackvwx2013_9765.jpg
" What's this, the fucking U.N. now?!"

" Don't talk crazy!!!....You want to commit suicide? Pills are a lot easier!"

Underboss of the Lupertazzi crime family. His main role in the series is as New York's liaison with the Jersey family; he later moves to N.J. himself. An old friend of Tony Soprano.


  • Alas, Poor Villain: He's given a rare emphatic death, dying after a long illness and surrounded by his anguished family, underscoring that a broken mobster is still a human being. In-universe, even the gangsters who are disappointed in him breaking the Omertà are saddened by his passing and honor his memory.
  • All for Nothing: Johnny spent his life at the tops of the mafia hierarchy and wins a mob war to become boss of New York, yet only a few years later, he's in prison and has almost all of his earnings seized. On top of that, he breaks the Omertà in his trial (and therefore ruining his reputation) for the sake of reducing his sentence only to die long before he could even serve it.
  • Ascended Extra: In the first couple of seasons he appears rarely (usually at gatherings), but becomes a key character from season four onwards.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: He's a New York underboss eager to be Number One, but once he gets there, everything starts to go awry.
  • Berserk Button: Do not ever insult his wife. Ralph only just escapes with his life for doing so due to some quick intervention from other characters and a sudden change of heart from John.
  • Big Bad: In Season 5. Upon learning that Tony Soprano's cousin has joined forces against him with Little Carmine, he and his brutal right-hand man, Phil Leotardo, effectively declare war on the entire Soprano Crime Family.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: With Carmine Lupertazzi in Season 4.
  • Butt-Monkey: His whole arc in Season 6, when he falls from grace and suffers from a declining health.
  • The Chains of Commanding: Soon learns that Tony's warnings about it were true.
  • The Chessmaster: He often chose not to show his feelings but rather acted behind the scenes to take his revenge or undermine people. This would mean he was invisibly pulling strings in certain situations to sabotage people or deals.
  • Chubby Chaser: He doesn't mind at all how his wife is morbidly obese.
  • The Consigliere: To Carmine Sr.
  • Cool Car: As he gets closer to becoming Boss in Season 5, he splashes out on a new Maserati (which later ends up being sold to Christopher Moltisanti after he goes to prison).
  • Deadpan Snarker
  • A Death in the Limelight: The episode "Stage 5" is mostly about his last days on Earth.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: Tries to have Ralph killed for the crime of taking a jab at his wife's weight. Johnny claims that this is perfectly valid and that he wouldn't have needed to ask permission to avenge his wife's honour in the mob's heyday, but mobsters far more senior than Johnny find the entire thing ridiculous and demand that he settle it amicably.
  • The Dragon: To Carmine Lupertazzi, Sr..
  • Dragon Ascendant: A brief stint as The Don after Carmine's death and a mob war.
  • Drunk with Power: He becomes less pragmatic and more ruthless after Carmine Sr. dies. Discussed by the Jersey crew.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: He truly loves his family, and unlike the other mobsters he remains faithful to his wife. He's allowed out of prison to attend his daughter's wedding, although it ends in disaster.
  • Evil Virtues: In spite of being about as conniving, manipulative, cruel, and ruthless as most of his fellow mobsters, John does have a major redeeming feature in his completely geniune and deep love for his wife Ginny. He is notably one of the few faithful husbands in the show, and being willing to defend her honor at cost of everything else.
  • Fatal Flaw: The man is deeply insecure. He buys a mansion in New Jersey, knowing that it will just draw attention from the police. When he becomes the boss he has to constantly show that he is the one with power, even if it creates tensions in his family and problems with Tony. If anybody makes a tasteless remark about his wife, he takes his punishments too far. Ultimately when it comes down to pragmatism or ego, his ego will always win out.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Despite being genuinely devoted to his wife and children, he acts friendly and charming towards others only to the extent that doing so advances his own interests.
  • Good Smoking, Evil Smoking: The man's one of the biggest chain smokers in the whole show. It's probably what causes his eventual terminal lung cancer.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: For Seasons 1-3 as the foremost representative of the massive Lupertazzi Crime Family.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Several ultimately minor issues in the series are blown up by his resentfulness, pride, and rigid sense of honour.
  • Happily Married: Except for a minor, fairly normal domestic argument between him and Ginny, one of the best/rare examples. Unlike almost every other mobster in the series (with the exception of Bobby), he is never shown or even mentioned cheating on his wife.
  • Hidden Depths: A genuinely loving husband and father in spite of being a mob boss.
  • Honor Before Reason: Usually inverted, as he's a very pragmatic businessman, but when he uses the honor angle during the conflict with Ralph over the weight of his wife, Carmine disagrees and Johnny almost pays with his life for it.
  • Ironic Death: He develops terminal lung cancer after he quits smoking.
  • Irrational Hatred:
    • He quickly develops a strong dislike for Christopher over very minor issues, such as offering unwanted advice. John makes it clear that as far as he's concerned, Chris is an upjumped brat who should still be waiting outside in the car; he even floats the idea of Chris being murdered during the Tony B incident.
    • His relentless crusade against Ralph for insulting his wife could also fall into this: even Johnny's own traditionalist, by-the-book don thinks that trying to put a hit on the guy over it is completely insane.
      Carmine Sr.: It's settled, John. So either name a price or get the fuck over it.
  • Like a Son to Me: Little Carmine tells him that Carmine Sr. considered him this as the old man lays dying in his hospital bed. Ironically, both men have already tried in secret to have the other killed.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Around the middle of Season 3, Johnny listens to Ralph Cifaretto complain about Tony Soprano's treatment of him, and how Ralph was passed over for promotion. Johnny acts sympathetic, even acting as mediator between the two, but lies to both parties about what he told the other and his advice ultimately proves useless. Sack does basically the same with Paulie Walnuts towards the end of Season 3, who also gripes about being overlooked by Tony and expresses discontent with his position, and feeds intimate family information to John in the hopes of joining the Lupertazzi family, all of which also leading to nothing when Paulie realizes that Johnny never even mentioned him to Carmine Lupertazzi, and that Carmine doesn't even know who he is. Johnny artfully manipulates both high-ranking members of the Soprano family into feeding him sensitive information, and gets off scot free. All of this after Johnny promises Tony upon moving to New Jersey that he wouldn't "stick his beak in" (interfere in Soprano family business).
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: His appearance, style of dress and eventual fate of dying of cancer in a federal prison in Missouri call to mind Gambino family boss John Gotti.
  • Odd Friendship: In "Stage 5", he befriends fellow inmate and custodian Warren Feldman, a former oncologist and convicted spree murderer.
  • Only Sane Man: Thinks of himself as one and has a legit claim at times but it's clear he's not as above the behavior he looks down as he'd like to believe.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: As underboss. As Boss, not so much.
  • The Resenter: You're in trouble if Johnny sours on you, and this can happen with disturbing ease. A little faux pas from Christopher leaves him walking on eggshells around John from that day on, to say nothing of Johnny's all-consuming vendetta against Ralph for the crime of implying his wife had a fat ass.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: Pleads guilty and admits to the existence of the Mafia to lower his sentence, but dies not long after he shames himself in the eyes of the other mobsters by breaking the Omertà.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Has a taste for expensive Brioni suits and reads GQ Magazine.
  • The Starscream: Puts a hit on Carmine Sr. during the Frelinghuysen Avenue crisis. Inverted earlier when Carmine Sr. wants to get rid of Johnny due to his ruinous feud with Ralph. Both events are outsourced to Tony, but settled down and defused before it's too late.
  • Suddenly Shouting!: Prone to instances of this, such as when he's lobbying to have Ralph Cifaretto killed over the insult to his wife, when he plotted to have Carmine Sr. whacked, and the issues with Tony Blundetto.
  • Surrounded by Idiots: Feels like this from time to time. Having a large pool of minions means that some aren't sharpest knife in the drawer, while others like Phil are simply hard to restrain.
  • Villain Decay: His donship is abruptly thwarted when he's incarcerated and reduced to a life of subsistence.
  • Villainous Friendship: Interstate friendship with Tony.
    • His friendship with Warren Feldman may also count, considering Feldman's backstory.
    • Also, with Joey Peeps, who is, apparently, his younger protege. John is genuinely angry at Little Carmine when Joey is killed by Tony Blundetto, sincerely tries to comfort his mother at the funeral and orders a hit on Angelo Garepe in revenge. Considering that prior to this both sides of the civil war only targeted associates, taking out Garepe, who was family's long-time consigliere and one of the main supporters of Little Carmine, escalated things and only Carmine's surrender prevented further bloodshed. It shows just how much Johnny was pissed off by the murder of Joey Peeps, that after his death, Sacrimoni was determined to take out Carmine's faction.
  • We Used to Be Friends: His relation with Tony during Johnny's rising. Once all is said and done, and John dies of cancer, it is clear Tony still cared about him.

    Phillip "Phil" Leotardo 

Phillip "Phil" Leotardo

Played by: Frank Vincent

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/philleotardovwx2013_2096.jpg
"No more, Butchie... No more of this."

"You want compromise, how's this? Twenty years in the can I wanted manicott', but I compromised: I ate grilled cheese off the radiator instead. I wanted to fuck a woman, but I compromised: I jacked off into a tissue. You see where I'm goin'?"

A hot-headed capo in the Lupertazzi family, released from prison in Season 5.


  • Aesop Amnesia: Shortly after Tony makes an impassioned plea for peace to him following a near-death experience, Phil begins contemplating thoughts of retirement as well as adopting a more pacifist approach to life in general. However, his old ruthless, bloodthirsty personality resurfaces after his protége, Gerry Torciano, is murdered by "Doc" Santoro and he blames this turn of events on his own "weakness."
  • Ascended Extra: After he is mentioned on TV, he mostly shows up in the background at the beginning of Season 5, and then plays only a minor role midway through. It isn't until Billy is killed that he is shot-gunned into being the main antagonist.
  • Asshole Victim: He dies in the series finale by being shot in the head and in the chest by Walden and having his head crushed by his moving van.
  • Ax-Crazy: He is arguably one of the most brutal characters of the entire series. Not to mention that every time he kills, tortures, or intimidates anyone, he has a huge Slasher Smile.
  • Bad Boss: While Tony is no slouch in this department, is hardly A Father to His Men, Phil is even worse than him at it. When Phil declares a Mob War, he immediately goes into hiding, vanishing from everyone including his own soldiers, while sending them out to do his bidding from afar, leaving it all for them to do, risking all their lives for him. Tony on the other hand goes to the mattresses alongside his soldiers, taking the same risks as them, and arming up while proactively looking for ways to hunt down and kill Phil. Also it is this tendency that convinces Butchie to turn against Phil, become The Starscream and end the war with Tony, after a lack of results in killing Tony leads Phil to issue an Implied Death Threat against him for the failure.
  • Berserk Button:
    • The murder of his brother Billy is a constant source of anger for him, even long after that event passes. Its sole mention is an automatic deal-breaker.
      Little Carmine: Your brother Billy, whatever happened there...
      Phil: ''WHATEVER HAPPENED THERE?!'
    • He's also enraged by his cousin-in-law Vito's homosexuality.
  • Big Bad: During the final season. With all the resources of the Lupertazzi Crime Family at his disposal combined with a vicious streak comparable to that of Richie Aprile, he is by far the most dangerous adversary Tony encounters throughout the entire series.
  • Boom, Headshot!: How he dies in the series finale, courtesy of Walden.
  • Brutal Honesty: Combined with Deadpan Snarker for additional injuries.
  • Catchphrase: The guy is ever-vocal about his twenty years in the can.
  • Cigar Chomper: He favors cigars, often in a way that shows his despective indifference towards someone or something.
  • Conflict Killer: Tony had more than a few disagreements with Johnny Sack, but that was nothing compared to when Phil took over.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Was first seen in a photo in the episode "Two Tonys" during the news broadcast about the Class of 2004. He later becomes the Big Bad of Season 6.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: A mix, while Asshole Victim is in play, he's executed in front of his wife and his baby grandchildren, and then gets his head crushed with his own van, offscreen. It's left unsaid if Tony gets a retribution for this gory method/outcome, as a death in front of your family is a big no-no by many members of The Mafia.
  • Decapitated Army: His final strategy in season 6. Ends up happening to him, literally and figuratively.
  • Dirty Coward: For all of Phil's bravado, when it comes time for violence he always only does or threatens it when he has a numerical advantage and/or is against weaker victims who can't fight back for one reason or another. Whenever it comes time to test his actual mettle in a confrontation he tends to reveal his true colors pretty quickly. Such as fleeing from Tony when Tony comes to collect the debt Phil owes him. And most glaringly in the last scene together with Tony before Phil declares the Mob War, Phil doesn't even meet with Tony and Carmine despite inviting them over for a sit down, instead having Butchie turn them away at the door. While the two are leaving Phil childishly shouts down at them and curses them out from the safety of his upstairs window, like a kid hiding up in his tree house, refusing to come out and meet with them to negotiate peace, much to Carmine and Tony's exasperation. He seems to have gone through the effort of inviting them over just to yell at Tony from his house.
  • The Don: Acting Boss after Johnny Sack is arrested, official Boss after Johnny pleads guilty and subsequently dies of cancer.
  • Doting Grandparent: His final scene shows this.
  • The Dragon: During the succession war between Johnny Sack and Carmine Jr., Phil is the head enforcer of the former.
  • Dragon Ascendant: He becomes acting boss after Johnny Sack's imprisonment, then officially assumes the top role after Sack’s death.
  • The Dreaded: Has a reputation in New York and Jersey alike for his ferocity, and even the bosses fear him.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him: Killed off in the finale abruptly and unceremoniously with a shot to the head despite all his build up as the Big Bad.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Eventually rationalizes that he spent twenty years in jail to protect a bunch of people that he despises. Phil thinks that he should be the one commanding respect and not giving it to others who deserve or earn none, like Doc Santoro.
  • Entitled Bastard: Phil is another old-school mobster who thinks that "one gets points for stints in the can" and is always expecting a conferred, special status out of it.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • He views Tony as The Starscream towards his uncle Corrado, and is disgusted by the unceremonious initiation rituals of the Jersey crew and its overall laxitude.
    • Initially, he also rejects whacking Tony because putting a hit out on another Boss is a step too far for him. He later reverses his stance when he orders a war against the Sopranos.
    • He also chides Vito Spatafore for complaining about having to give money to Carmela while Tony was in a coma - Phil is genuinely grateful that his brother Billy took care of his wife and grandchildren while he was in prison.
    • For all his disgust and how fire and brimstone he was over Vito, after having Vito brutally murdered, later the night after the funeral while his wife is asleep he stares up silently at the ceiling, quite awake and troubled seeming, implying he actually regretted doing it on some level.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • He is genuinely grief-stricken and enraged when Tony Blundetto kills his brother, Billy.
    • Similarly, he is later revealed to have a close relationship with his henchman and protégé, Gerry Torciano, as evidenced when he has "Doc" Santoro assassinated in order to avenge the former's death.
    • He also loves his grandchildren dearly, and right before his death, has a cute exchange with them.
  • Evil Counterpart: To Tony Soprano on a scale of Black-and-Grey Morality. In addition to being hot-headed yet decisive as leaders, both characters actively cultivate alpha-male personas for which they are widely respected and/or feared by their associates. Moreover, both view the current generation of wiseguys with disgust while looking back nostalgically on a bygone era when members of La Cosa Nostra strictly observed principles of ''Omertà'' and held those within their ranks to high standards of masculinity.
  • Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor: All of the mob guys make dumb, offensive jokes constantly, but Phil stands out so much that even Tony is put off by him, such as his cold, cruel remark over Vito's son acting up after being the one who had Vito brutally murdered in the first place.
    Phil: I guess the turd doesn't fall far from the faggot's ass!
  • Evil Old Folks: He is old, especially compared to Tony, and is one of the cruelest, most despicable characters in the series.
  • Face–Heel Turn: From his point of view, as "the Leotardo family has been taking shit from everybody the minute they got off the boat from Italy."
  • Fatal Flaw: Despite being one of the most ruthless characters in the series, he considers that his main weakness is being too agreeable in nature and willing to compromise. In reality, it is his obsession with preserving his alpha male persona at all costs that proves to be his downfall.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Sometimes keeps an old-school demeanor and civility above his icy mercilessness.
  • Final Boss: He is the final antagonist of the entire series.
  • Foil: In many ways he is essentially Richie Aprile, if Richie had had the power to fully back up his sociopathy and agendas against Tony.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: Just as the back wheel of a van starts to roll onto Phil's head, we cut to a shot of his grandchildren in the backseat of the vehicle, accompanied by the Sickening "Crunch!" of his skull.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Almost everything - or everyone - can make him suddenly seethe with rage. He's very prone to Suddenly Shouting:
    It's an honor to be joined by men, AND NOT FAGGOT ASS CORN-HOLIN' COCKSUCKERS LIKE MARRIED MY COUSIN. HE SHOULD FUCKIN' DIE!
  • Hate Sink: He was openly sadistic, volatile, brutal and confrontational, utilizes bullying and fear to his victims, sets Vito up to be tortured and killed, ordered his henchmen to kill Bobby and Silvio, and before that, he threatened Blundetto to the cruelest possible death for him. His brutality makes Tony Soprano himself look like a sane boss in comparison. Even the usually stoic FBI agent Harris openly despises him: he cites Leotardo trying to set up a female agent for a rape and beating as proof of his monstrous nature, and why Harris helps the Soprano crew locate him. If it wasn't for his loved ones, he would have arguably been a total Monster.
  • Henpecked Husband: Despite how hot blooded, fun loving and lively he is most of the rest of the time, around his wife Patty he often just seems uncomfortable, uptight and defeated by her, as if he'd rather be back in prison than around her, like a glimpse of how Johnny Boy and Livia Soprano's marriage was.
  • Honorary Uncle: Little Carmine calls him uncle Philly in an attempt to appease him. Suffice to say, it doesn't work.
    Phil: "Uncle Philly my ass!"
  • {{Hypocrite)): For all of his preaching about Cosa Nostra code, he is willing to go after Christopher's mother. Going after a mob guy's family is a huge no-no in that life.
  • Ignored Epiphany: While Phil is recovering in the hospital, Tony comes to visit him and pleads for them to bury the hatchet so they can be around to see their grandchildren. He seems to get through to him, as Phil is moved to tears, but a few episodes later, Phil thinks about the indignities the Leotardos have suffered and decides he can't let them go.
  • In-Series Nickname: "The Shah of Iran". He resents it, like everything else.
  • Irony: Literally comes out of a closet in order to beat Vito to death for being gay.
  • It's Personal: Partially, in the end the death of his brother is just one of many reasons for him.
  • Jerkass: Probably the most unpleasant, cruel and unapologetic guy of the show, which is saying something; unlike other mobsters, he's not restrained by friendship or loyalty ties, and can back his bark with his bite without being put upon by anybody. It comes with the Ruthless Foreign Gangsters baggage.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: As obnoxious as he is, his arguments are usually more often than not rooted in the mafia code of his generation, making him more coherent, rule-abiding and orthodox than his peers. That said, following this outdated code also makes him Lawful Stupid, as he often generates pointless conflict out of it.
  • Kick the Dog: "Comforts" Vito's widow (after murdering him) by telling her that it's for the best that her kids don't "have that kind of role model around."
  • Lack of Empathy: Leotardo personally carries out the murder of his cousin's husband without giving any thought to how this would affect her or her children. This is further shown when he attempts a "pep talk" with her son, choosing to shame him for his behavior as though he has no good reason to act out.
  • Made of Iron: Despite suffering a car accident and later getting shot in Season 5, Phil recovers quickly enough to commit some more murders and beatings in the season. Later, while it forces him to refrain from physical exertion, a major coronary doesn't stop him from running the family in Season 6 Part II. All of this, and he's in his sixties.
  • Men Don't Cry: He loses all respect for Johnny Sack for crying when the feds tear him away from his daughter's wedding. Ironically, Tony brings him to tears later on. He's also willing to tell Nancy Sinatra about her father's telethon moving him to tears within earshot of the other mobsters. Though his disgust for it likely stems from Johnny Sack being the Boss and crying due to the feds instead of for other 'manlier' reasons, seeing this as demonstrating weakness to their enemies, and later his concerns end up being proven right when John betrays Omertà for a more reduced sentence.
  • Moral Myopia: He's butchered more people in horrible ways than you'd care to count. This doesn't give him any perspective when Tony Blundetto kills his brother.
  • Nice to the Waiter: You wouldn't know he's a ruthless mobster from the polite, charming way he tends to interact with civilians. The one time he breaks this, crudely insulting and threatening Christopher's mother in his grief over Billy's death, is played as a major Kick the Dog moment for him.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: He puts Benny into the hospital after beating him with a cane.
  • Noble Demon: Deconstructed. Phil adheres strongly to the old-school laws and codes of La Cosa Nostra, but that doesn't make him any less of a violent thug. His Rage Breaking Point eventually comes from what he sees as everyone else not following the La Cosa Nostra, while he remains obedient. Somewhat marred by the fact that for all his mouth and bravado, he is ultimately a childish Dirty Coward who places his life as higher value than those underneath him.
  • Non-Action Guy: Is forced into this role by the end of Season 6 due to his age and mounting health issues.
  • Old Soldier: Despite pushing seventy, he still carries out hits and can lay out pretty brutal beatings on others. His coronary later on prevents him from engaging in any more action however.
  • Pet the Dog: Downplayed since he is the one responsible for Vito's death but he makes the funeral arrangements in order to spare Marie the stress.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: Views homosexuality as an infamous disgrace and orders Vito Spatafore killed for being gay.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: For a while, he's talked out of his vendetta because it's bad for business. Eventually, he argues for the opposite and evaluates there are too many middle-men.
  • Pretender Diss: Is incensed that Tony's crew have the gall to try and do business with the Five Families as equals when he considers them to be a "fucking pygmy thing" with no respect for the mafia code.
  • Principles Zealot: He is obsessed with the laws and old-school codes of conduct of La Cosa Nostra. As a result he makes stupid decisions that are the absolute opposite of pragmatic.
  • Psychopathic Manchild:
    • Prone to temper tantrums, and also shown to be prone to theatrics to an absurd degree.
      • He literally makes a dramatic exit out of a closet after waiting there an extended period of time when he and his men whack Vito
      • Yells taunts at Tony and Little Carmine from his house when the two attempt to broker a peace with him.
    • Claims that his family name was changed from Leonardo to Leotardo - which royally pisses him off - because the Ellis Island bureaucrats were "stupid and jealous".
  • Redemption Rejection: Took a Level in Kindness after his close encounter with death, but his ruthless ways make a comeback.
  • Remember the New Guy?: One of the several convicts released from jail during the show. He's first mentioned in Season 5 after he finishes his 20 years in the can stint.
  • The Resenter: Pretty much the epitome of the trope in the series.
  • Ruthless Foreign Gangsters: New York mob boss whose conflict with Jersey steers the events towards The Good, the Bad, and the Evil from the point of view of the FBI.
  • Sentimental Drunk: During a celebration of new made men, Gerry Torciano mentions that the wine makes Phil "emotional", which in Phil case, it translates into praising those men via a homophobic tirade against Vito out of the blue.
  • Shadow Archetype: Phil represents the darkest aspects of Tony Soprano's personality cranked Up to Eleven — whereas Tony is a deeply flawed Jerkass, and is particularly repugnant by season 6, he is still somewhat sympathetic, where Phil is unlikable, unpleasant, depraved, and a massive Hate Sink.
  • Sickening "Crunch!": His death, by means of his own van rolling over his head after being gunned down.
  • Silver Fox: Frank Vincent's iconic, good looking hair.
  • The Sociopath: He's up there with the likes of Mustang Sally, Richie, and Ralphie.
  • The Starscream: He kills the head of his family to become Don, and in turn he's betrayed by Butch after his consigliere estimates that the war is pointless and no longer good for the business. Justified with the first example, as Doc Santoro had killed Phil's protege and chosen successor, Gerry Torciano, and was also an example of this trope.
  • Too Dumb to Live: What ultimately does him in, combined with being a Bad Boss. Threatening Butchie, who was running his war for him, as well as foolishly and arrogantly being out and about in public with his wife and grandchildren and no security in the middle of a Mob War.
  • Undignified Death: His wife's minivan rolls over his skull post-mortem, with their infant grandchildren inside, ensuring a closed casket, at a gas station with a number of onlookers. The legendary Lupertazzi hitman will most likely be remembered by candid cellphone pictures of his squashed head on the internet.
  • Unfortunate Names: Openly complains that his legal family name used to be "Leonardo," like the painter. But an Ellis Island bureaucrat goofed it up, and now he's saddled with a name for a ballet outfit.
  • Villain Has a Point: Pops up now and again despite how much of an abrasive, petty, bitter jerkass he is, but especially his rant about giving up twenty years of his life for the likes of Rusty Millio and Doc Santaro, not uttering a peep, with nothing to show for it in the end. He is also entitled to kill Tony B after he murdered his brother and tried to kill him, as unlike Blundetto, Phil is a made man, and the only reason this is not an act of war is that Tony B acted alone. And he ends up being proven entirely right about Johnny Sack potentially betraying Omertà after seeing him cry at his daughter's wedding over the Feds, despite how much of an asshole he is about it.
  • Wham Line:
  • Would Hit a Girl: Brutally slaps Lorraine Calluzzo before subjecting her to a mock execution. He later heads her actual killing. Then, in the course of trying to hunt down Christopher Moltisanti to use him as a sacrificial lamb in retaliation for his brother Billy's murder, Phil savagely and crudely threatens Chris' mother. And in the final episode of the series, FBI special agent Harris cites Leotardo's attempt to have a female agent raped and murdered as his reason for helping Tony find and kill the on-the-run Phil.

    Butch "Butchie" DeConcini 

Butch "Butchie" DeConcini

Played by: Greg Antonacci

Phil's right hand man after Gerry Torciano gets "retired."


  • Blood Knight: Even when Phil is willing to cease hostilities, Butchie continues to antagonize Tony further.
  • The Consigliere: Phil's. Surprisingly, he's more confrontational and bloodthirsty than his boss, at first.
  • Dirty Coward: For all his talk he folds fast under immediate threat of violence.
  • Dragon with an Agenda: Butchie encourages Phil to engage with Tony.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: Backs down from Tony as he assaults Coco, and then later calls for a truce between Jersey and New York.
  • Mistreatment-Induced Betrayal: When the Lupertazzi's attempts to wipe out the Soprano family's leadership in one fell swoop ends up failing, Butchie tries making a vague suggestion to Phil that suing for peace with Jersey might be the pragmatic thing to do. But Phil just responds with contempt for with his lack of zeal in the war, and even makes an Implied Death Threat against him. This convinces Butchie to go behind Phil's back, and a arrange a sit-down with Tony, Paulie, Albie and Little Carmine, where they agree to agree to put an end the hostilities between Jersey and New York, and Butchie even gives Tony his tacit approval to kill Phill.
  • The Napoleon: He is significantly shorter than his peers, yet proves to be cunning, ruthless, and even beats up a guy with help of his friend, Coco.
  • Red Herring: The S6 mid-season finale heavily implies that Butchie will become the largest threat now that Phil seems to be relatively benign. This situation reverses itself two episodes later.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: The Red to Phil's Blue. This gets reversed during the war.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Just before Season 6 Part I ends, Butch simply shows up as one of Phil's right-hand men.
  • The Starscream: Implicitly approves the removal of Phil after the war with Jersey starts to drag on pointless.
    "You do what you have to do."
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     Albert "Albie" Cianflone 

Albert "Albie" Cianflone

Played by: John "Cha Cha" Ciarcia

A trusted associate of Phil Leotardo's since the 1980's. Becomes Phil's consigliere after his ascendancy to acting boss.


  • Co-Dragons: With Butchie, to Phil. Albie overall is the more reasonable of the two.
  • The Consigliere: Shares this position with Butchie, though in practice Albie mostly just ends up going along with whatever Phil wants to do. He briefly protests Phil's plan to wipe out the leadership in Jersey, but falls in line with little effort.
  • Fat Bastard: Downplayed as he's one of the more pleasant and reasonable guys in the Lupertazzi family, but he's quite overweight and is a close supporter of Phil Leotardo.
  • Satellite Character: Only ever shown accompanying other members of the Lupertazzi crew and receives little independent characterization.
  • The Starscream: Eventually goes along with Butchie's plan to sell out Phil to New Jersey to put an end to the war.

    Rusty Millio 

Rusty Millio

Played by: Frankie Valli

A captain in the Lupertazzi family who guides Carmine Jr. during his war with Johnny Sack.


  • Boom, Headshot!: The way he's retired.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Frankie Valli is an acquaintance of Tony's and has to be contacted by Silvio after a casino manager wants a favour returned.
  • Mister Big: Rusty is referred to as the Mayor of Munchkin Land as a joke about his height, yet he briefly held a spot as one of the most influential and powerful figures in the Lupertazzi crime family.
  • The Evil Genius: Nefarious and ambitious, Rusty coolly plots Joey Peeps' murder and Little Carmine's attempted rise to power.
  • Fatal Flaw: Pride; Was fully confident that Little Carmine's side would "steam-roll" right over Johnny Sack's side. This fails, and his earlier plotting is why he is later whacked in Season 6.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Behind Little Carmine, Rusty largely pulled his strings during the Lupertazzi civil war. It's what motivates Johnny Sack to have him whacked.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: The Red to Angelo's blue, being the one who pushes Little Carmine to retaliate over Lorraine.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Rusty doesn't appear until after Lorraine is killed, yet he is a high-ranking Lupertazzi capo that is heavily involved in Little Carmine's side during the civil war within the family.
  • Too Dumb to Live: For a man as high ranking as him in the Mob life and being in it as long as he had been, it was rather stupid of him not being immediately on guard and letting two suspicious looking Italian strangers approach him at his car outside his house asking for directions. Instead lowering his guard and trying to help them out.

    Angelo Garepe 

Angelo Garepe

Played by: Joe Santos

Former consigliere for Carmine Lupertazzi. Released from prison at the beginning of Season 5 as one of the "Class of '04", and seeks to retire.


  • Affably Evil: Hardly even counts as "evil" anymore; even as he's drawn back into the Lupertazzi syndicate, he remains fairly benign, outside of conspiring to have Joey Peeps murdered.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Pleads with Phil just before he is shot.
  • Anti-Villain: The fella just wanted a civilian life after prison, shame Tony Soprano forgot the memo.
  • The Consigliere: To Carmine Lupertazzi, and later to his son, though Little Carmine generally favors Rusty Millio's advice over Angelo's.
  • Doting Grandparent: Angelo is this to his grandson, and speaks fondly of bonding with him after he got out of prison.
  • Evil Parents Want Good Kids: His son Charlie is legit.
  • The Mentor: To Tony Blundetto in prison.
  • Plot-Triggering Death: Angelo's murder leads Tony B to go off the reservation, kicking off the conflict between NY and Jersey.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Blue to Rusty Millio's Red, providing a much-needed voice of caution to Little Carmine's side of the civil war.
  • Retirony: Subverted, in similar fashion to his old friend Tony Blundetto. Angelo is coerced back into the business by Tony Soprano and Rusty Millio, and gets involved in an escalating civil war in New York, which he is eventually a casualty of. Phil Leotardo references this in his final words before killing Angelo.
    Phil: You couldn't fuckin' retire?!
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog: Angelo just wanted to retire after prison, but winds up murdered after trying to mediate the civil war and instead being tempted by Tony into getting directly involved on Little Carmine's side, making him a target for Johnny Sack.
  • The Smart Guy: As befits a consligieri.

    Robert "Billy" Leotardo 

Robert "Billy" Leotardo

Played by: Chris Caldovino

Younger brother of Phil Leotardo.


  • The Apprentice: Phil grooms him into becoming an enforcer and a made man.
  • Cynicism Catalyst: While Billy was alive, Phil was a restrainable soldier, almost amiable by Phil's own standards. After Billy dies, Phil never gets over it and is helplessly embittered, which eventually drives him to stop compromising and to break the status quo.
  • The Dragon: For Phil.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Made sure to provide for his brother's family while Phil was in prison
  • The Generic Guy: Billy was apparently written to have as little personality as humanly possible.
  • In-Series Nickname: Billy
  • Satellite Character: He's an extension of Phil and has virtually zero narrative autonomy.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His death snowballs into the Jersey-New York war and many of the unprecedented events from the final season.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Whips Lorraine with a towel and then shoots her.

    Joey "Peeps" Pepperelli 

Joey "Peeps" Pepperelli

Played by: Joe Maruzzo

Protege of Johnny Sack.


  • Accidental Misnaming: His headstone is carved with his nickname "Peeps", to general dismay, in particular Johnny's.
  • Affably Evil: Aside from beating intimidating Lorraine and murdering Jason, he's a very genial guy.
  • The Apprentice: For Johnny Sack. Phil more directly mentors him as an enforcer, however.
  • Ascended Extra: To an extent. He was first seen in two Season 4 episodes as an aide-de-camp to Johnny Sack and Carmine Lupertazzi. His death in Season 5 is one of the major plot points of the season.
  • Bullying a Dragon: As Phil ridiculously complains about his car seat, Joey catches an aside glance from Tony B, prompting a not-so-subtle aside glance and grin from Joey. Phil spots this, but fortunately lets him off with just a tongue-lashing.
  • Death by Sex: Killed by Tony B. outside a brothel, also resulting in the collateral death of a prostitute he was taking home off the books.
  • Disposable Sex Worker: Though the murder of mob wives is strictly forbidden, and the murder of goomahs is frowned upon, when a prostitute is killed along with Joe, nobody makes a peep.
    Little Paulie: I heard the hooker he was with got it in the chest, must have been silicone everywhere.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: His gravestone is accidentally engraved "Joey Peeps".
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His death at the hands of Tony Blundetto causes a rift between Tony and John that eventually leads to their families warring.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye
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    James "Jimmy" Petrille 

James "Jimmy" Petrille

Played by: Vinny Vella

Johnny Sack's right hand man.


    Faustino "Doc" Santoro 

Faustino "Doc" Santoro

Played by: Daniel Conte

The much-reviled predecessor to Phil Leotardo as head of the Lupertazzi family.


  • 0% Approval Rating: Despite having enough pull to become boss, a good chunk of the Lupertazzi's captains can't stand him. Once he becomes boss, he gets whacked very quickly by Butch and other members of the family by Phil's orders.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Severely offends Phil Leotardo by literally eating the food off his plate, and this after Doc had Gerry whacked.
  • Enemy Eats Your Lunch: Subverted. He requests permission to eat Leotardo's food, which he grants. However, while this normally solidifies one's power over another, it is quickly demonstrated that Santoro has none, as Leotardo quickly dispatches him afterwards.
  • Moe Greene Special: The way he's executed by Phil's men.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Introduced in the second half of Season 6, at which point he is apparently next in line to lead the Lupertazzi crime family.
  • Smug Snake: Passive-aggressively and foolishly lords his self-perceived supremacy over Leotardo.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Not only does he have Phil's chosen successor Gerry Torciano whacked, he later invites Phil to dinner, gloats over his stolen Boss status and eats off Phil's plate. It's just a miracle Phil made it through dinner before giving Doc what he had coming to him.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye

    Gerry "The Hairdo" Torciano 

Gerry "The Hairdo" Torciano

Played by: John Bianco

Phil's second and would-be successor.


  • Affably Evil: Seems to keep Phil's unending rage in check, to a degree. Phil really starts to go downhill after Gerry is killed.
  • Blue Oni: A restraining counterbalance of Phil's red.
  • Characterization Marches On: He's a blond in Season 6A. In Season 6B, he has black hair and a different haircut, very confusing changes that nobody point out, despite Gerry is known as "the hairdo".
  • The Dragon
    • Dragon Ascendant is averted, thanks to Doc Santoro, who has Torciano killed in order to cement his own position.
  • In-Series Nickname: "The Hairdo."
  • Kick the Dog: Participates in the unnecessarily brutal hate crime murder of Vito Spatafore.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: See above example.
  • Rank Up: Has a meteoric career and is made in Season 6A. One of the few additions to "the books" during the whole series.
  • Remember the New Guy?: He's in Phil's inner circle the first time he shows up in the Season 6 premiere.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: He only shows up for a few episodes and scenes in the final season, but his death is one of the factors that leads to Phil Leotardo becoming boss.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: A background young associate who is under Phil's wing only to be killed shortly after, prompting Phil into violent, decisive action. He's Billy Leotardo all over again.
  • The Starscream: Displays hints of disloyalty in his final scene, musing to Silvio that Phil's heart gave out just as he positioned himself to become boss, which Gerry took as an indicator that his mentor doesn't have the balls for the job.
  • Villainous Friendship: One of the very few people with whom Phil ever shares a smile or a genuine moment of levity.

    Dominic "Fat Dom" Gamiello 

Dominic "Fat Dom" Gamiello

Played by: Tony Cucci

A heavy subordinate of Phil Leotardo.


  • Asshole Victim: He's in fact killed for being an asshole, pushing Carlo and Silvio with insulting jokes, inside their own headquarters.
  • Bloody Hilarious: His death is really something to behold.
  • The Brute: Dom participates in the sadistic murder of Vito Spatafore.
  • Bullying a Dragon: See Tempting Fate below.
  • Disposing of a Body: He can't be dispatched butchery-style inside Satriale's anymore because of DNA forensics, so they bury him at a construction site.
  • Fat Bastard: His nickname is "Fat Dom" after all!
  • Jerkass: Outside of being well....fat, this is his only real character trait.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Participates in the murder of Vito, then is murdered himself shortly thereafter for making jokes about his death.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: Is homophobic like the rest of the mob, and he then helps murder Vito over his homosexuality.
  • Speak Ill of the Dead: Makes sarcastic remarks about Vito. This results in Carlo gutting him like the pig he is.
  • Tempting Fate: Making gay jokes about Carlo Gervasi in the Soprano HQ, when only Carlo and Silvio are present? Bad move, Dom.
  • Too Dumb to Live: He's rewarded with a knife to the belly after he repeatedly insults Carlo Gervasi.
  • Uncertain Doom: In-universe. He's referred to as the guy who went to Jersey and never came back. Phil Leotardo is savvy enough to know that Dom has been whacked.
    Phil Leotardo: Well, as coincidence would have it, he was last seen in New Jersey.
    Tony Soprano: So was the Hindenburg, maybe you wanna look into that too?
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Basically a One-Shot Character who dies rather nastily at the hand (or more aptly, the knife) of Carlo, purely to ampt up the conflict between the New York and Jersey mobs.

    Coco 

Coco

Played by: Armen Garo

A subordinate of Phil and restaurant owner.


  • Alcohol-Induced Idiocy: Meadow mentions he reeked of Sambuca when he harassed her.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Literally.
  • Dirty Old Man: Which leads to an epic Curb-Stomp Battle delivered by Tony.
  • Facial Horror: It's probably for the best that the aftermath of his injury wasn't shown.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: All that is shown when Tony stomps his head in are his teeth rattling all over the ground.
  • Incest Subtext: Brings this into play between Tony and Meadow while hitting on her. This is implied to be a huge part of what unsettled Meadow about their encounter - if he had left this out, then he might have even gotten away with it.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: Assists Butchie in beating a dockworker who was bought off by Tony. He then suffers one at the hands (and feet) of Tony later in the episode (for an unrelated reason).
  • Tempting Fate: Seriously, how could he think it was a good idea to hit on Tony Soprano's daughter?
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His curb-stomping is essentially the straw that broke the camel's back, with regards to the brewing Soprano/Lupertazzi conflict.
  • Too Dumb to Live: And you thought Fat Dom was a moron. It's amazing that Coco even DID live after hitting on Meadow.

Other Criminals and Antagonists

    Vin Makazian 

Vin Makazian

Played by: John Heard

A corrupt cop on Tony's payroll.


  • Abusive Parents: His father.
  • Butt-Monkey: He and Hal Soprano could share some tales.
  • Dirty Cop: A corrupt but deeply troubled cop.
  • Driven to Suicide: His main arc which is very well done.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: A very valuable informant who is treated poorly and ungratefully by Tony.
  • Exact Words: Tony orders him not to harm Dr. Melfi while conducting surveillance on her. He complies with that order, but isn't above committing some Police Brutality on her date.
  • Freudian Excuse: Had a turbulent childhood. It's hinted that this was a major part of the motivation behind his suicide.
  • Posthumous Character: Appears in "The Test Dream", occupying the role of Finn DeTrolio's father.
  • Villainous Friendship; Despite the constsnt abuse he is put through Vin feels some loyalty towards Tony. In "Boca" he takes a big risk when he goes to Bada Bing to warn Tony to watch his back. Tony has nothing but contempt for him and abuses him even when Vin tries to help him.
  • Villainous Breakdown: The core of his story arc.

    Barry Haydu 

Barry Haydu

Played by: Tom Mason

A veteran New Jersey policeman.


    Lorraine Calluzzo 

Lorraine Calluzzo

Played by: Patti D'Arbanville

A rare female loan shark and associate of the Lupertazzi crime syndicate.


  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Begs for her life by offering to blow the Leotardo brothers. It turns out to be a mock execution, however. Phil makes fun of the situation and warns her that "Next time there won't be a next time".
  • Bring My Brown Pants: Pisses herself when confronted by the Leotardo brothers.
  • Butt-Monkey
  • Fandisservice: Has a nice body. She is running away naked before the Leotardo brothers kill her.
  • Foreshadowing: Her death visually mirrors Adriana's later that season.
  • Kissing Cousins: Little Carmine's second cousin and one-time lover. Johnny Sack expresses his disgust at their incest as one of many reasons to have Lorraine whacked.
  • Loan Shark: She is known as Lady Shylock.
  • Men Are the Expendable Gender: Averted.
  • Murder Is the Best Solution: According to Johnny Sack, the body count was never high enough with Lorraine. Another of his justifications for having her killed.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Appears in a total of three episodes and maybe four or five scenes before her death, which has major repercussions throughout the season, and ultimately the series.
  • Undignified Death: Ambushed by Billy Leotardo and Joey Peeps while emerging from the shower, at which point Billy tears off her towel, slaps her with it as he chases her across the room, then shoots her dead while she crawls away, naked, on her hands and knees. With classic Sopranos Soundtrack Dissonance to boot.
  • Villainous Friendship: With Little Carmine.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye

    Matush Giamona 

Matush Giamona

Played by: Nick E. Tarabay

A Persian drug dealer who frequents Adriana's club, the Crazy Horse.


  • The Aggressive Drug Dealer
  • Chekhov's Gunman: His efforts to sell drugs in the Crazy Horse are seemingly just a one-episode side plot to further Jackie Jr.'s story arc. However, he reappears two seasons later, now having solid roots for his operation in Crazy Horse, and ends up killing a guy in Adriana's office. This, in turn, leads to Adriana's death when she tries to cover it up.
  • Karma Houdini: Sure, he gets his ass kicked for dealing drugs at one point, but in the larger picture, he is extremely lucky. First he acts as the getaway driver for Jackie Jr. when he and some friends rob Eugene's card game. When shots ring out, Giamona drives off, leaving his buddies behind, and everyone is eventually killed but him. Then a few seasons later, he murders someone in the back of Adriana's club, the FBI targets her thanks to her connection to Christopher and she is eventually killed for being an informant; meanwhile, Matush literally gets away with murder and faces no repercussions from the FBI or Christopher.
    • However, it should be noted that when Adriana recounts the details the incident at the club, the FBI agents become visibly intrigued by Adriana relating Matush's "strong religious beliefs", as well as the fact that he regularly sends money back to Pakistan, and that Matush's brother runs a "prep school" of some type. And towards the end of the episode, even when by all appearances their gambit to use Adriana to make Christopher flip has failed utterly, the agents are still fixated on the Nieves murder by Matush and resolve to take over the investigation from the Long Branch police department, as it may be terrorist related. So with all that, it is not unreasonable to presume that the FBI will eventually nail Giamona, ultimately making this a case of Karma Houdini Warranty. Moths later, Agent Harris brings up Matush in a conversation about possible terrorist activity with Christopher in "Join The Club", revealing his last name "Giamona" for the first time, suggesting that the FBI investigated him at the very least.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: Leaves Jackie Jr., Dino, and Carlo behind at the sound of gunfire.
  • Small Role, Big Impact
  • Took a Level in Badass: In Season 3, he's a small-fry dealer who gets his ass kicked by mobsters for trying to deal outside their club, and later chickens out while acting as a getaway driver. In Season 5, he commits an extremely brutal murder without hesitation.

    Warren Feldman 

Warren Feldman

Played by: Sydney Pollack

A convict and former oncologist who befriends the ailing Johnny Sack late in the series.


  • Almighty Janitor: He's an orderly who spent decades as a doctor, specializing in oncology, and still knows his stuff, able to give advice on the best form of treatment. The main doctor on the ward even has to warn him to stop giving medical advice and undermining his authority.
  • The Atoner: It's not given much focus but his conversation with John implies he's this.
  • Cool Old Guy: He's a pretty charismatic individual and his conversations with Johnny seem to be the closest thing the latter gets to a respite in his dying days.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Having kicked his cocaine habit and spent some time in prison, he appears to be genuinely rehabilitated.
  • Odd Friendship: With Johnny Sack, especially ironic considering Feldman killed his wife and Johnny was so loyal to his wife he was willing to kill for her honor.
  • Once Done, Never Forgotten: Used to be well-regarded in the medical field until he murdered four people, including his wife, in a fit of cocaine-induced rage. For all his charm, that is obviously a permanent stain on his reputation, and the real doctors in the prison hospital are wary of his advice, as well-meaning as it may be.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: He murdered his wife, her lover, her aunt, and the mailman.note 
  • Recovered Addict: Had a nasty cocaine habit back when he was a practicing oncologist.

    "Black" Jack Massarone 

"Black" Jack Massarone

Played by: Robert Desiderio

Owner of Massarone Construction.


  • Bad Liar: Massarone is extremely shifty and anxious in his later appearances with Tony. This serves to indicate his position as a mole for the FBI.
  • The Con: Victim of a semi-classic protection racket; goes to Tony for protection against a picket organized by Tony.
  • Due to the Dead: A golf club cover is stuffed in his mouth when he is retired, in order to deliver a message about rats and snitching.
  • The Mole

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