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He is the key.

Lord Commander: You have no idea, do you? Mooncake is the key. That being can unlock... Final. Space.
Gary: What the mother-loving crap is Final Space?!
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Final Space is an adult animated comedy-drama series airing on TBS that was created by independent film-maker and former Balloon shop member Olan Rogers with veteran TV producer/writer David Sachs acting as the show runner.

The heavily serialized Sci-Fi series follows Gary Goodspeed, a futuristic astronaut with a big personality, as he waits out the last days of his five-year sentence aboard the Prison Ship Galaxy One. He soon runs across an adorable green Planet Destroyer named Mooncake and a Cat Folk bounty hunter, Avocato, and finds himself embroiled in a desperate mission to unlock the mystery of something called "Final Space" and save the universe from total annihilation... while also keeping Mooncake out of the hands of the villainous Lord Commander and his forces.

The show started as a small series of low-budget and roughly made YouTube videos uploaded to Rogers’ channel under the title Gary Space, but went on hiatus three episodes into its planned ten episode run, only to re-emerge six years later as a professionally produced and drama-heavy pilot which quickly went viral and caught the attention of former The Simpsons writer and TV producer Conan O'Brien, who would go on to serve as the executive producer for the show.

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Featuring a star studded cast which includes the likes of David Tennant, Ron Perlman, Gina Torres, Tom Kenny, Steven Yeun, Rogers himself and his friend Coty Galloway, the show premiered its first season on February 26, 2018. In 2019, the show was moved to [adult swim], where its second season premiered on June 24. Afterwards, each episode of the new season will air on TBS a week after their initial Adult Swim airing.

Needs Wiki Magic Love.


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This show provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Abusive Parents: Sheryl Goodspeed is an abhorrent excuse of a mother to Gary. She outright pulls away from him when he's grieving at his own father's funeral, abandons him shortly thereafter and tries to manipulate him on a job in adult years to claim a dimensional key, openly telling him she can't love him after his father died.
  • Aerith and Bob: To name but a few, humans with normal first names and Awesome McCool surnames (Quinn Ergon, Gary Goodspeed), aliens with alien names and human surnames (Tribore Menendez), a catlike creature named "Avocato," and two aliens named Ash Graven and Fox who are the adoptive children of yet a third alien named Clarence Polkowicz. Plus several robot names pronounced as familiar human names (KVN / "Kevin," H.U.E. / "Hugh").
  • Actor Allusion:
    • Tom Kenny voices a character who takes care of a Gary who likes cookies. Sound familiar?
    • Some of the graffiti in the Galaxy One's elevator shaft says "It's a Monday."
  • Abnormal Ammo: While we have the sci-fi staple of laser and disintegrator guns, Gary shoots Superior Stone with a black hole pistol.
  • Agony Beam: One of Avocato's guns torments a guy for a full minute before causing him to explode.
  • Anyone Can Die: Avocato, Earth's entire remaining populace, and the S.A.M.E.S. are gone by the end of Season One.
  • And Show It to You: This is about the only way to kill a KVN.
  • Apocalypse How: Class X. In the Season One Finale, the Lord Commander succeeds in opening the breach to Final Space long enough for one of the Titans to reach out with one hand and grab Earth nearby and pull it in before the breach is closed.
  • Beast Man: Cat Folk called Ventrexians (who like to remind you they're NOT cats) exist and have a role in the show's universe, the most prominent of which are the intergalactic bounty hunter Avocato, and his son, Little Cato.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Gary and Quinn. Quinn frequently denied Gary’s advances early on and punched him a few times. However she grows to care for him and kisses him in episode 10, bringing this trope full circle.
  • Big Bad: The Lord Commander, the leader of a malevolent alien empire.
  • Big Good:
    • The Infinity Guard and its council led by Superior Stone and the Lord Commander.
    • Among the Titans that rule over Final Space, Bolo definitely counts as one. Also doubles as Token Good Teammate.
    • The Arachnitects that built the Titans were created by a benevolent being of infinite light.
  • Bigger Bads: The Titans, who are led by an even worse entity that corrupted them.
  • Big Word Shout: Little Cato lets out a heartwrenching scream of "DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD!" as Avocato runs away to sacrifice himself, preventing a sticky bomb from killing the others.
  • Body Horror:
    • As a consequence of overusing his powers, the Lord Commander's body appears to be literally decaying.
    • At the end of episode 6, we're treated to an indiscreet shot of how Avocato dies from a sticky bomb to the chest, as his corpse slowly drifts out of the Galaxy One to the planet below.
  • Bolivian Army Cliffhanger: Season One ends this way with the fates of Gary, Quinn, Little Cato, and Tribore ambiguous. Season 2 reveals that Gary, Little Cato And Tribore have all survived and Quinn is believed to be still alive because of the fact that Nightfall is still around.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity: In episode 10, several Mookss apprehend the heroes, hold guns to their heads, and then wait and tell them to prepare to die no less than three times...which naturally allows for a rescue (as well as some touching dialogue).
  • Brick Joke: The officer Gary knocked out in the first episode reappears in episode 9, still unconscious in the bathroom after 5 years due to being fed an overdose.
  • Cat Folk: The Ventrexians are a bipedal, anthropomorphic cat people.
  • Central Theme: No one is beyond redemption, and anyone can become a hero if they are willing to give it their all to overcome their personal issues for the people they care about, the universe, and their desire to be good.
  • Cerebus Retcon: The Dewinters, an innocent alien family who were the subject of a brief Black Comedy Burst gag in Season 1, become recurring antagonists in Season 2, believing that Gary killed their wife and mother. And thanks to time travel, they're right note .]]
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Immediately after Avocato dies, the humor in the show gradually dissolves. By the Season 1 finale, almost all of the humor remaining in the show comes solely from KVN.
  • Crapsack World: The whole universe shown to be a dark and brutal setting that includes rampant murders, several corrupt governments, a gladiator pit, a televised death race, a religion where people sacrifice themselves to a snake god, and an evil tyrant selfishly obsessed with becoming a god. Even worse is that there is another dimension filled with demonic god like being trying to break into the material universe.
  • Cyber Cyclops: All KVN units.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • Compared to the show’s character-heavy and drama-driven approach to the original Gary Space miniseries, things got much darker as the concept grew and expanded.
    • Or compare the Lord Commander’s more Laughably Evil portrayal in the pilot, where he drops down celebratory balloons at the thought of defeating Gary, to the person we see in the show who holds an actual child hostage and has no quarrels with brutally murdering people who fail him
  • Doomed Hometown: The team, especially Gary and Quinn, set out to avert this for Earth. Sadly, they fail.
  • Defector from Decadence: At least one of the Titans were the reason for closing Final Space, in retaliation, the others sealed him forever.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Titans are evil cosmic entities trapped in a location outside normal space and the brief glimpse of them shows them to be horrifically alien and unnatural-looking. One of them even bears a striking resemblance to Cthulhu.
  • The Empire: The Lord Commander's forces, including most of the Infinity Guard.
  • Equivalent Exchange: Part of how time travel functions in-universe. In order for someone who died in the past to be saved, someone else must remain in the past. Additionally, the show follows the only timeline in which Gary hasn't died or been lost in the breach, and he's only still around in this one because his universe's Quinn sacrificed herself instead.
  • Everybody Cries: Played for Laughs in chapter 7. It happens after KVN turns on super sad music. Gary tries to hold back his tears until KVN mentions Avocato and Mooncake cries moments later for some reason. It’s ambiguous if Little Cato was crying or not in that scene because he was wearing his father’s helmet and KVN was heard sobbing.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": The Lord Commander.
  • Excrement Statement: Little Cato reclaims the Crimson Light, the ship they won in a race the previous episode, from Clarence, the "Ventrexian way"—that is, peeing all over the ship. This results in an all-out pee battle between the people on the ship (except Nightfall, who just sits and watches), and ends with Ash getting a urinary tract infection.
  • Eyeless Face: The Order of the Twelve lack eyes on their faces and instead have them floating around their heads, and they also exist as an example of The Blank.
  • Family-Unfriendly Death: In episode 6 Avocato takes the brunt of a bomb's explosion on the Galaxy One and gets blown apart. We then see his broken corpse falling through space, guts on full display, as his son and the whole crew watches on.
  • The Federation: The Infinity Guard or so we are initially led to believe.
  • Forgotten First Meeting: Quinn doesn't remember Gary when they meet again in episode 4, and takes the entire episode to remember.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: A couple.
    • The terms of Gary's sentence that HUE pulls up include not only "Time Related Disruptions" but also "Bathroom Related Disruptions".
    • In the background of the Infinity Guard test facility, there is a banner wishing happy birthday to all the July babies.
  • Furry Reminder: Despite what Avocato says, he is still a cat. Episode 2 has two instances of this, one where he lands on a catwalk in the classic "Scared cat" pose (all on all fours with his back arched) and the other where, after Gary slaps him with his dismembered arm, he lets out a meow.
    • In episode 12, Little Cato reclaims their new ship, the Crimson Light, the Ventrexian way—peeing all over the ship.
  • Genuine Human Hide: Or alien hide rather, which Gary wears in episode 2 to blend into the world of Tera Con Prime.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation:
    • During his sentence Gary was provided with KVN specifically to avert this, but after spending five years with an entirely artificial crew he's still crazed and desperate for organic companionship, to the point of reacting to an intruder by tying him up and forcing him to play cards for hours.
    • Little Cato in "The Other Side," hallucinating the presence of the other crew members in order to cope with being totally alone for sixty years.
  • Greater-Scope Paragon: Bolo, aided by Nightfall AKA a Quinn from an Alternate Universe, along with the Arachnitects.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Invictus serves as this for the whole series, as he was the one who corrupted the Titans and is behind Lord Commander's corruption.
  • Hand-or-Object Underwear: In Chapter 7 Gary's prison sentence is up and he is changing out of his prison uniform into his civilian clothes then Nightfall walks in on him nude and Gary uses Mooncake to cover his shame.
  • Hope Spot: In Chapter 6, Little Cato is rescued by his father, the Lord Commander gets Curb-Stomped by Mooncake, the team manages to get rescued in time... then the Lord Commander wakes up, uses his powers to attach a bomb to Little Cato, leading to Avocato's Heroic Sacrifice and kickstarts the show's Cerebus Syndrome.
  • Hot Mom: Sheryl Goodspeed is very attractive for a woman who has a thirty-year-old son.
  • How We Got Here: Every episode of season one begins with a cold open of Gary drifting alone in space with HUE as his only companion and ten minutes of oxygen left. The rest of each episode expands on the events that led to this scenario.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Everyone who's not a main character. Even if they're shooting at people who are standing still and are in the same room.
  • Incredible Shrinking Man: The "butterflies" in episode 5 zap prey and make them shrink to bite-size. Avocato temporarily falls victim to one.
  • Improvised Weapon:
    HUE: Gary, the SAMES have retrofitted the plasma torches, rail guns, and other sundry maintenance equipment into heinous super weapons.
    Gary: YES, HUE! Good Lord, yes!
  • It's All My Fault: Little Cato blames himself for his father's death, since Avocato died trying to rescue him.
  • Jumping on a Grenade: Avocato jumps on a sticky bomb to save his son and the rest of the crew.
  • Killer Rabbit: Mooncake, a round green plushy ball of cuteness, who doubles up as a planet-destroying hyper-weapon, and murders an untold number of creatures in the Colosseum during episode 3.
  • Knight of Cerebus: The Lord Commander. Things tend to get significantly more serious whenever he shows up.
  • Light Is Not Good: Seems to be a subtle motif. The Watchers from "Chapter 3" refer to the Lord Commander's power as "light", the light of the dying star triggers Gary's bad memories and the Galactic Garrison's reason to help Lord Commander tear open a hole to Final Space is because it will flood the universe with light and peace... because, as Quinn points out, the light will kill everyone.
  • Lotus-Eater Machine: Avocato and Gary both experience this in episode 3 with the Lazarus trap.
  • Luke Nounverber: Gary Goodspeed and Quinn Airgone. Amusingly, many of the aliens in the show have much more mundane names, like Clarence and Jack.
  • Made of Explodium: Ships and other hardware are rather fragile in this series.
  • Magnetic Weapons: During the assault on New York, some of the S.A.M.Es use the ship's equipment to make Railguns.
  • Mecha-Mooks: The S.A.M.E.s serve as the crew/prison guards on the Galaxy one.
  • Mood Whiplash:
  • More Than Mind Control: Seems to be how Invictus's possession works. When possessing Gary he attempts to convince him that his friends don't care about him, and he turns Avocato against Gary and Little Cato by playing on his jealousy of the father-son relationship that has developed between them in his absence.
  • Multiple Gunshot Death: Tribore likes inflicting these.
    Gary: Hey guy! I don't know who you are, but I like how you keep shooting people even after they're dead.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast:
    • Stevil. Gary immediately lampshades that someone having "evil" right in there name is a red-flag and refuses to hand Mooncake over to him. Even Avocato admits he has a point.
    • Also Deathcropolis.
    • Despite his small stature (which a prisoner even teases him about in the first episode), the Lord Commander is also one for both his cruel dominance over his lackeys and his powerful telepathic abilities.
  • The Namesake: Final Space is the area where the Titans are sealed away, and where Mooncake was created.
  • Nightmare Face: Gary gives a pretty good one after being possessed by Invictus.
  • Nobody Poops: Averted in a Season 2 episode—after Clarence swallows a dimensional key, he is seen going to the bathroom to pass it.
  • No Eye in Magic: The Lord Commander's powers seem to work this way, given that blood splashed in his eyes temporarily disables him in episode 1.
  • Noodle Incident: According to the Lord Commander in episode 2, this isn't the first time that Avocato has failed to deliver Mooncake. It's possible he's referring to Mooncake's previous owner who was captured in episode 1, though without securing Mooncake itself.
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: At the beginning, it looks like Gary and the rest of the main characters might go through various, quirky mini-adventures through the galaxy despite being pursued by the Lord Commander. Avocato's death in Chapter 6 not only all but completely throws the "quirky" part out the window, it also drives home the fact that the Lord Commander is an actual threat to the heroes and the universe as a whole.
    • In Chapter 10, a Titan drags Earth out of the universe and into Final Space; Quinn, Little Cato and Gary face an Uncertain Doom, with the two former missing and the last one out of oxygen; the Lord Commander is on the brink of death and all his forces have been eradicated along with the Infinity Guard and (presumably) the Infinity Resistance... and Mooncake is still his prisoner.
  • Only Sane Woman: Quinn seems to be the only member of the Infinity Guards with the competence to recognize the threat approaching. Subverted in some ways: the first episode that features her as part of the main conflict shows her punching Gary repeatedly for giving her a series of slightly insulting, but also fairly tame nicknames and breaking one of his fingers with a smile on her face when he tries to flirt with her again. In another way this is averted; certain portions of the Infinity Guard are on the Lord Commander's payroll and are helping him reach Final Space, and she remains in an absurd amount of denial over it despite the abundance of evidence until she actually sees the laser cannon blasting open the breach into Final Space.
  • Overdrawn at the Blood Bank: When Gary's arm is ripped off in episode 2 the wound left behind gushes a literal fountain of blood that lasts for several minutes.
  • Papa Wolf: Avocato, who's main goal is to rescue his son and will do absolutely anything to achieve this goal.
  • Parental Abandonment: Not only did Gary lose his father at a young age and even had a front seat to John's sacrifice on Episode 8 of Season 1, his mother walked out on him not long after the funeral because she felt as though she couldn't love anyone after John's death and that included their son.
  • Plot Coupon: The keys to Bolo's prison that will allow Gary to enter 'Final Space'.
  • Punny Name: Avocato. Geddit? Avocado?
  • Reality Ensues:
  • Reckless Gun Usage: Gary seems to like scratching his face with gun barrels. Mind you, this is Gary we're talking about.
  • Redemption Equals Death: Avocato is killed moments after rescuing the son who paid the price for his own evil deeds and vowing that their future will be better.
  • Reluctant Warrior: We can see in episode 3 that Mooncake seems reluctant and then saddened over his killing spree in the Colosseum, despite his status as a dangerous planet killer.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Avocato’s death caught many viewers off guard because there seemed to be little to no Foreshadowing of it beforehand but if one cared to rewatch chapter 2, it turns out that Avocato’s death was foreshadowed by Clarence but it’s extremely subtle. It comes when Clarence says that he will be helping out Avocato’s for the last time when having to deal with concealing Gary’s identity. Four episodes later, it’s revealed that this was actually the last time. The cold opening for episode 6 also foreshadowed it; when Gary is drifting in space and losing oxygen, he wishes for Avocato to appear and scoop him up, only for HUE to remind Gary that Avocato is not coming with the rest of the episode revealing why. It turns out that Gary was in grief over losing Avocato and still in denial over it due to being close friends with him, so his wish of Avocato saving him was just wishful thinking.
  • Robosexual: Inverted as two of the SAMES robots are aroused when they walk in on Nightfall and Gary, and at one point a captured Quinn successfully seduces KVN into untying her.
  • Running Gag: A very dark one with Gary repeatedly traumatizing the Dewinter family.
  • The Scream: While we don't hear it over the music, it's quite clear that Little Cato is letting one of these out at the end of Episode 6 as Avocato's dead body is drifting into space following his Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: The Titans, who are imprisoned in Final Space.
  • Shout-Out:
    • An energetic blonde dude with a metallic arm... are we talking about Gary, Edward, or Finn?
    • HUE, the Galaxy One's AI, sounds almost exactly like HAL.
    • The looping asteroid sequence in episode 1 resembles a condensed version of the plot of Gravity.
    • When Gary and Avocato are searching for an escape ship in episode 2 we briefly see the space cruiser from Rick and Morty before it flies away.
    • In Episode 2, HUE injecting Gary with a substance that will cause his brain to explode if he doesn't come back from his mission in five hours reminds of Snake Plissken having explosives implanted in his body that will blow up in 24 hours. Though it's all a joke on HUE's part.
    • Chuck's virus in episode 3 references Jurassic Park.
    • Episode 3 has the Lazarus Trap which is visually based on M. C. Escher's "Relativity" (the picture with stairs going in all directions).
    • Episode 4 shows Gary dancing in a clear homage to Footloose.
    • Episode 5's arena sequence and monsters resemble the climax of Attack of the Clones, complete with The Cavalry air-dropping in.
    • In episode 7, Little Cato's den in the air ducts resembles Newt's.
    • One of the Titans revealed in episode 8 bears a distinct resemblance to Cthulhu.
    • One of the alternate Garys shown in episode 8 looks like Neo. Gets better in episode 9, where the storming of an Infinity Guard base is a parody of Neo and Trinity's rescue of Morpheus.
    • Several to Warhammer 40,000 - in episode 5, Avocato loads up with what appear to be Tau pulse rifles. And in 7, there's a chainsword propped up against the wall of his room.
    • Mooncake is pretty similar to Kirby.
    • When Clarence introduces Ash and Fox to Gary, they can be seen doing the Fusion Dance.
    • When Ash joins Fox and Clarence's side in claiming the Crimson Light for themselves, she echoes the first line of Galadriel's dark queen speech.
    • The KVNs have square pupils in their eyes, like Bender and all the robots in Futurama.
    • Before becoming the Lord Commander, Jack wore an eyepiece similar to the scouters from Dragon Ball Z. His design is also similar to those little bald round-headed alien species that Akira Toriyama sometimes uses as extras and comic relief.
  • Single-Target Sexuality: Gary only has his eyes on Quinn, and has had for the past five years. He even turns down Nightfall, a Future Quinn from an alternate timeline, to stay loyal to "his" Quinn, even though he finds Nightfall to be smokin' hot regardless.
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis: Gary has a disproportionately one-sided resentment of KVN, berating the robot even as he rescues him in episode 3. KVN does not share these feelings and continues to rescue and praise Gary at every opportunity.
  • Sliding Scale of Continuity: For a show that is ostensibly a sci-fi animated sitcom, this one is at level 5 full lockout. Each episode has a full impact on the next and each one has a cold opening that takes place in the present with Gary in a hopeless life-threatening predicament and the episodes explain how he got there. the show does recap previous episodes but Gary as the narrator of them, is sometimes unreliable due to his eccentric personality. Word of God states that whatever changes the characters go through are permanent and cannot be reversed, using Gary’s robot arm as an example.
  • The Slow Path: How Gary and Little Cato return to the present in "The Remembered" after going back to the events of Chapter 6, which fortunately occurred only a few months prior.
  • The Smurfette Principle: The only female in the main cast is Quinn, discounting Nightfall, her future self. Everyone else is a male of various species (or a robot voiced by a male actor).
    • In the Infinity Resistance itself, Shannon Thunder is the only female character we get to see.
    • Averted by season 2, which introduces Ash, Clarence's adopted daughter, and AVA.
  • Space Madness: KVN units exist specifically to prevent this. Whether Gary's KVN helped him or made him worse is debatable.
  • Space Whale: The temporal worm in episode 3, which sends anyone it eats into an indeterminable amount of time in the past or future.
  • Spell My Name with a "The": Inverted. The Lord Commander keeps referring to Gary as "the Gary" despite Gary's repeated insistence that it's just Gary.
    Lord Commander: Just The Gary.
  • Spikes of Villainy: All over the Lord Commander's ships.
  • Stable Time Loop: How time travel by temporal worm works, usually. During a brief trip a few years into the past in "The Remembered," we find out that a time-traveling Gary was the one who originally freed Mooncake from the Lord Commander's prison, and that this was why Mooncake attached himself to him in the first place. Additionally, it's implied that Avocato made his Heel–Face Turn at least in part due to having been told by Little Cato that he would one day die at the Lord Commander's hands, and Gary and Clarence were accidentally responsible for the death of Melanie Dewinter and for her corpse ending up in Clarence's hands to begin with.
  • Surprisingly Sudden Death: Avocato is killed by an explosion in the last minute of episode 6, we and the crew get very little time to prepare for this.
  • Take Care of the Kids: Avocato's last words to Gary are "Take care of my boy."
  • Take Up My Sword: After Avocato's death, his son Little Cato decides to take his place on the Galaxy One Crew in order to avenge his death.
  • Too Dumb to Live: The Infinity Guard in general have no sense of self-preservation. Let's see... in episode 4 they try to apprehend the Galaxy One while a supernova bears down on them. In episode 10, they continue to man the spire in New York while the Earth is being ripped apart. And then of course there's throwing in their lot with the Lord Commander...
  • Uncertain Doom: Throughout chapter 10, the majority of the main characters all have their fates currently classified as unknown. Tribore’s ship gets shot and goes out of control but is never seen exploding, Little Cato kills Bhero and confronts the Lord Commander only to get accidentally blown into space by Gary and knocked unconscious and drifting, Quinn detonates the bomb but not before going inside the breach completely. To top that all off Gary runs out of oxygen and seemingly dies and goes to the afterlife to find his father’s spirit and he asks whether Little Cato and Quinn are dead or alive with Gary’s dad not answering that question. The first season ends with a beam of light opening up which indicates that Gary could possibly be saved. Only Mooncake and the Lord Commander are shown to be alive while KVN dies during the battle.
    • Subverted: they all survive, except for Shannon Thunder (maybe) and the Lord Commander.
  • Undignified Death: Sort of a running theme in this show.
    • Gary's father, John Goodspeed, whose spaceship is blown apart in the middle of a heroic mission. Subverted, since he actually died blowing up a bomb to close the rift in Final Space.
    • The Lord Commander also has a habit of making his subjects beg for forgiveness before killing them.
    • Avocato's death in episode 6 is all sorts of undignified and unfair. Right after reconnecting with his son and promising to be there in the future he takes a bomb to the chest and gets sucked out of the spaceship, his broken body on full display as the crew watches on.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: The breach couldn't have been possible if Quinn hadn't drawn on a certain bar napkin. She is understandably horrified to learn this.
  • Walking Disaster Area: The heroes rival Rick and Morty for collateral damage done to any location they visit.
  • Wall of Weapons: Avocato's cabin on the Galaxy One has a fair number of weapons on the walls, and even more behind hidden panels retracted by touching the bonsai.
  • Wham Episode:
    • Episode 6 is a doozie. Not only do we find out that Avocato potentially committed genocide under the Lord Commander, not only do we get to watch actual children being shot by their own parents, but then we have to watch Avo himself get blown to pieces by a bomb right after reconnecting with Little Cato. It's particularly jarring since it seemed like Avocato would be part of the main cast but nope.
    • Episode 8 reveals that The Lord Commander used to be an Infinity Guard member named Jack who was friends with Gary's father for 29 years. It even goes into explaining how he acquired his telepathic powers: Jack was in the proximity of the blast that was caused by the anti-matter bomb that John used to seal the breach. In addition, this episode reveals that there is a good Titan, Bolo, who's assisting Nightfall and the heroes, and that Mooncake is actually comprised of particles from Final Space.
    • Episode 10 is such an episode where the fates of most of the main cast are unknown, if not confirmed dead.
    • "The Remembered": Gary and Little Cato manage to use time travel to bring Avocato Back from the Dead, but he's now suffering from severe memory loss.
  • Wretched Hive:
    • Tera Con Prime, a planet ruled by the Lord Commander and festering with black market dealers, bounty hunters and corrupt police.
    • Yarnum could be classified as this too, considering its main draw is a giant Colosseum where beautiful creatures fight to the death. And also because it’s overseen by the eyes of the universe, who prove themselves loyal to the Lord Commander, and almost as bloodthirsty.
    • One of the two main planets on Zetakron Prime presumably housed one in a prison as well, until the Lord Commander massacred all of the inmates.
  • Year Inside, Hour Outside: The space-time breach in which half the ship is caught in "The Other Side."

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