Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / Supergirl (2015)

Go To

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • There's some debate among fans about exactly how sympathetic we're supposed to be to Winn's "friend zoning," with many finding him bordering on creepy, which would be a problem if we're supposed to want him and Kara together. This is complicated by his being the son of Toyman. It is mostly agreed that after his encounter with his father, he learns not to bottle up his feelings and grows out of it.
    • Some believe Cat was not fooled by Kara's stunt with J'onn and still knows she is Supergirl but plays along because of how uncomfortable Kara was that she caught on. This gained traction after Barry Allen's appearance, where she instantly figured out he was the Flash and tells Kara she always figures out things like that. This is confirmed in the season 2 finale when Cat tells Kara, after she runs off to stop a fire, to "Go get 'em Supergirl".
    • Advertisement:
    • Alex pinged a lot of people's gaydars as early as the pilot. The only male character that was interested in her was Maxwell Lord and she was not interested back because of his antagonism against Kara. Then there were also her past relationships that were hinted at with the implication that they never worked out and there was also her tomboy like sense of style and her personality. Season 2 confirms that she is gay when she develops feelings for Maggie, which leads to her realizing her sexuality and coming out to her family and she eventually enters into a relationship with Maggie.
  • Anvilicious:
    • The show's tagline basically amounts to "See?! Girls can be superheroes too!". Early on the show constantly brings up the importance of female superheroes, repeatedly claiming that everyone is treating Supergirl differently not because she is a super powered alien, but because she is a woman (despite this not being evidenced by the actions of any characters). Most modern superhero shows (such as Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow) already feature strong female characters, with Arrow having more female leads in their main cast than males (though the show is still named for its White Male Lead). Likewise, Jessica Jones (2015), Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and Agent Carter also feature female leads. Thankfully, later episodes toned it down a lot.
    • Advertisement:
    • The entire climax of 'World's Finest', after Supergirl saves a helicopter from Livewire's electricity. Cue the cliché storm of citizens crying out bland phrases such as "Supergirl saved that helicopter!" and "SHE was willing to die for US!". It somehow gets worse when the day is saved by a group of firefighters, one of whom melodramatically offers Kara his hand and states "Supergirl... it was our turn to help you."
    • "Welcome to Earth" has Alex and Maggie visiting an alien bar. Maggie points out that the aliens are no different from minorities and are just hard-working immigrants who have to hide who they are in order to survive. Subtle!
    • "Crossfire" has the actual plot get put on hold so that Kara can have a not-so-subtle argument with a co-worker about gun control.
    • "Changing" has the villain of the week targeting "climate change deniers" who come off more like cardboard cutouts than actual people.
    • Advertisement:
    • The CADMUS plotline in its entirety, really. Illegal aliens being targeted and killed/deported "for the good of humanity". Subtle it is not.
    • In season 3, the brief discussion between Alex, J'onn and My'rynn about the latter two shapeshifters choosing to live in America as black men borders on being too overtly political, but what takes the cake is James Olsen's complete lack of story for a season and the attempt to remedy this towards the end by giving him a monologue on racism that still isn't a storyline, has no significance on any plot, and is basically just political commentary inserted into a TV show to give Mehcad Brooks something to do. Not to mention that no other form of racism is touched on at this anvil-drop except black men, which is especially bad considering the very awkward attempt at pushing Mexican-phobic racism and homophobia together when hastily giving Maggie an exit earlier in the season that didn't do justice to either issue.
    • Season 4 takes the "aliens are immigrants" thing and runs with it. Aliens on Earth are immigrants, usually fleeing crime and persecution and those that oppose them are (mostly white) human supremacists who murder and terrorize aliens for being different, etcetera etcetera etcetera.
    • "Elseworlds" manages to sneak in a not-so-subtle wage gap reference despite it having no real relevance to the plot or advancing Lois' character.
  • Arc Fatigue:
    • The President being an alien. It's revealed in the third episode of Season 2, and gets zero follow-up until near the end of the season... which is just seeing her change to her true form again, which is bizarrely still played like it's a big twist. Granted, this is likely affected by Lynda Carter's schedule. It's finally resolved at the beginning of Season 4, and thankfully pays off in a big way by initiating the season's main storyline.
    • Jeremiah Danvers' whereabouts were an important hook for Season 2, but this was sidelined by all the simultaneous romantic subplots, the overall clunky story development and mostly due to Dean Cain's scheduling conflicts.
    • Lena Luthor's arc of not being like her family has been dragged for so long.
      • It reaches a turning point in Season 5 when Lena is finally driven over the edge and starts covertly acting like her brother.
    • The arc of Kara hiding her identity from Lena is strung out, long after it made no logical sense for Kara not to tell Lena or Lena the genius not to work it out. It became pretty obvious that the only reason the secret was being kept was to eventually give a reason for Lena to go bad. It becomes more egregious when Kara doesn't tell Lena, her best friend and the women she considers a sister, the truth but tells Nia after only knowing her a few months.
    • Waiting for the team to figure out Sam is Reign. There are times when it honestly feels like the writers forgot we already know it's her and are playing it as a real mystery.
    • Season 4 spends a weirdly long time barely acknowledging the big cliffhanger ending of the previous season with another Supergirl appearing in Russia. Her random appearance in a single scene a few episodes in, and then in the first scene back from the winter hiatus, feel like they were hastily thrown together to assure us they hadn’t just dropped it completely.
    • Lena playing Kara while constructing a device to brainwash the world was her main arc in the first part of Season 5. It takes seven episodes before Kara finally finds out that she is being manipulated by Lena. When the show rebooted after Crisis, rather than reboot Lena's character or further the conflict between her and Kara, she retained her memories and started the whole plan again. This leads to Lena basically spending all her screen time in the lab in the second half of the season.
    • It took 17 episodes for season 5 finally reveal what Leviathan's plan in Post-Crisis is (to sabotage the Obsidian Lenses so they can mass genocide on the humans who are trapped with them). It doesn't help that Lex Luthor finds out about this before all the other characters, including Supergirl.
  • Ass Pull:
    • The first time J'onn pulls out his memory wipe ability, it's a devastating last resort that he has no control over, having used it only a few times in his centuries-long life. Just a couple months later he's able to use it with perfect precision, saying simply "I've gotten a lot better at this."
    • Superman being affected by Myriad because he grew up on Earth or Kara not being affected by Myriad because she did not despite the fact Myriad does not affect Kryptonian minds (and that Kara herself spent more than half of her life on Earth).
    • James becoming the Guardian. Both his wanting to be a superhero ever since Superman showed up and his having a black belt are conjured out of thin air once the storyline starts.
    • The crew openly admitted that the second half of Season 3 had to be heavily rewritten after some unspecified behind-the-scenes issues (commonly suspected to be trying to avoid using Andrew Kreisberg's plans for season 3 after his sexual misconduct allegations since he would receive royalties), resulting in some awkward storytelling like Pestilence being killed off just one episode after we meet her after being built up for months, and her death being declared to have definitively stopped the Blight from happening in the future despite Reign having absorbed her powers.
  • Audience-Alienating Premise: Season 5 is currently getting a lot of undeserved fan criticism. However, two of the main season long plots have received a negative reaction from fans and critics and been identified as a reason for declining ratings:
    • Lena's descent into evil has upset fans of Lena who had hoped the show would not take this approach and make her a villain instead of letting her be a positive role model. Seeing a fan favorite suddenly deliberately betraying and hurting her friends (while at the same time trying to forcibly remove the ability for others to do the same) has been hard to watch. Likewise, fans who wanted Lena to go evil, as well as fans who dislike Lena, are annoyed that the show still does not want to make Lena a true villain, opting instead to make her more of a sympathetic Anti-Villain and a Well-Intentioned Extremist, and are upset that the show might redeem her out of nowhere.
    • The Kara and William romance is proving to be unpopular with both fans and critics. As of March 2020, not one regular Supergirl media reviewer approves of the relationship. The lack of chemistry between the two actors, the rushed and sudden attraction between the two, and shoehorning William as part of the "Superfriends" is turning viewers (not just upset Karamel and Supercorp shippers) off and even inspired a boycott of one episode. To date the two episodes where previews made clear they would feature the William and Kara romance have been the two lowest watched in the show's history.
    • For many fans, it appears that the show is deliberately trolling them, as both fans and critics pleaded after a highly praised season 4 not to turn Lena evil or give Kara a love interest (noting that in S4, Kara was much better written without any romantic baggage). The showrunners seem to have ignored both requests.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • After the early episodes got some flack for using Kryptonite in place of red sunlight as something to bring Kara down to human level (when it should instead be killing her), "Truth, Justice, and the American Way" shows that the writers have learned their lesson on that one.
    • After the Martian Manhunter's reveal, the character seemed to unfortunately end up in moments of distress that made it appear as though he'd been subjected to Adaptational Wimp treatment. For some of these moments, the reasoning is justified; such as him not want to go full Martian and reveal himself, or when he's already feeling near suicidal and against the White Martian (A species that was to his kind what a wolf is to a rabbit). Other instances though have him against characters who know full well he's a Martian (such as Astra), and he still struggles against opponents that he expectedly should be more than a match for solo. It becomes particularly egregious when the show makes a mention that J'onn is considered to be more powerful than Superman... by Superman himself. His reputation ends up being repaired somewhat when he's forced to reveal himself to stop a Red Kryptonite-fueled Supergirl in the 16th episode and brings her down in roughly 30 seconds.
    • Throughout the first season, most fans and critics noticed that Winn was much more useful and progressive while working with the DEO and that at CatCo his talent would be wasted. Season Two has him quitting CatCo to work there full-time.
    • The major (if not the only) issue with Tyler Hoechlin's casting as Superman is that he is too young for the character. His debut episode has him explain that adult Kryptonians age slower on Earth thanks to the yellow sun (which is true in the comics canon).
    • There was criticism for the lack of women of color on the show - as all the female leads were white in the first season. The second season adds Maggie Sawyer and M'gann, the former being a Twofer Token Minority as a lesbian too.
    • James becoming the Guardian seems like one for the people who complained about his romance with Kara being dropped, as well as the general complaints about the writers not knowing what to do with him.
    • After it couldn't possibly have been more obvious that Astra's death in Season 1 was entirely due to Laura Benanti leaving for another job, they finally just recast the role of her twin sister in Season 3, opening the possibility that Astra could also come back to fulfill the original plans for her. It also helped that they took the opportunity for yet another Casting Gag of a previous Superman-based actor, in this case former Lois Lane Erica Durance.
    • Alex's romance with Sara Lance in Crisis on Earth-X seems to address the problems many fans had with Supergirl's dubious handling of homosexuality, especially after the Ship Sinking of Sanvers.
    • The writing decisions around the season 3 Big Bad Reign—including her origin story—seem to be tailored to the common complaint of Supergirl having bland, one-dimensional villains (for both its Monster of the Week baddies and its season-long Big Bads, which was not helped by the mishandling of the plot). In a similar fashion, the Villain of the Week for 3x04 received praise for his complexity and depth, and later became a recurring character.
    • The episode "In Search of Lost Time" has Kara (influenced by a mental outbreak) giving Mon-El a wild speech that calls him out on everything fans have complained about for a while: Overtaking Kara's own story, how quickly his romance with Kara moved and acting as if he's Kara mentor. Several reviews praised the show for finally facing up to all the issues of the character.
    • The casting of Elizabeth Tulloch, who was on her late thirties (born on 1980), as Lois Lane after several concerns that a younger actress will be cast on the role especially after the character description released of Lois being in her "early thirties" despite it being very contradictory to the show's timeline (not to mention being yet another example of Hollywood Ageism against actresses that was thankfully averted).
    • Part of the obvious rushed writing process of Season 3's second half was that apparently no one thought to let Superman know that part of Krypton, including his aunt, survived. Season 4 starts with him visiting Argo.
    • The longer the series went on, the less believable it became that Lena could not work out that Kara was Supergirl. By the end of the 4th series, Lena was shown to have worked out Sam was Reign, Alex was DEO, created Green and Black Kryptonite and fly a Legion shuttle in minutes but couldn't see that Supergirl was Kara without glasses. Fans and critics complained about how this undermined Lena's character. In the 4th season finale, Lex revealed Kara's secret to Lena and his words strongly imply that Lena probably did know on an intellectual level but her fear of betrayal led to her subconsciously blocking it out.
    • After two seasons of Brainiac 5's... less than stellar true form, Season 5 finally gives him his iconic green skin, blond hair, and purple costume.
    • The 100th episode "It's A Super Life" has Kara experiencing four timelines where she told Lena her secret...and every one of them ends up even worse than the real timeline. This was the show retroactively rewriting the history of the show to justify the hole they have written themselves (and Kara) into by not telling her best friend her secret.
    • Comic purists weren't thrilled that Mr. Mxyztplk, long shown as a quirky imp, was made into a typical CW-style hunk, complete with dashing accent. In season 5, Mxy (now played by an older, less attractive man), admits that he was putting on a glamour to woo Kara.
  • Awesome Music: Supergirl's theme is easy to associate with Supergirl and makes you connect with the flights and adventures of the character.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Cat Grant has some fans for her Crosses the Line Twice jerkiness, plus Calista Flockhart's well-performed displays of her Hidden Depths, but others turned against her for being gratuitously mean to Kara and her tendency to act as the mouthpiece for the show's sledgehammer feminist messages. Of course, using Cat as the mouthpiece has other implications.
    • James ended up being an even bigger one, as there are some who find him just fine as a character and love interest, while others consider him boring, wishy-washy, and nothing at all like the source material. His transformation to Guardian has been controversial as well, since it was felt as a weak attempt to do something with him, and even then not working due to him being Out of Focus.
    • Lucy since some see her as only being around to stop Kara and James from being together and others just don't like the attitude she has regarding Superman and Supergirl.
    • Fans who preferred the New 52 version of Siobhan Smythe are largely disappointed by the version of the character on the show. It doesn't help that the character is probably the most altered in translation. Comic book Siobhan is Irish, a singer, a Lad-ette, a Nice Girl and Supergirl's best friend. TV Siobhan is none of these things. Meanwhile, those who prefer (or at least are more familiar with) Siobhan McDoughal, the pre-2011 version of Silver Banshee, tend to like the TV Siobhan, despite the changes to the character.
    • Mon-El is either funny, adorable and the only person who can truly understand Kara's situation or he's a generic love interest who has no chemistry with Kara and is never anything but annoying. There is no in-between. The fact that the show all but dropped Kara's season 1 love interest apparently in favor of Mon-El in season 2 did not help his popularity, even among people who did not ship Kara and James. The split gets worse once the two begin to actually get together; some like how much development Mon-El has gone through thanks to Kara's influence and how much more progressive he's become (supporting Kara and showing regret/resentment towards his views), others feel that his ongoing lack of respect for her and apparent disregard of her wants is a sign that he really hasn't changed at all, and then, on top of that, a third group who consider him a likeable guy and think Kara's criticisms of his flaws to be hypocritical and unfair.
    • Snapper Carr, especially after "Exodus". For some, he's a serious Jerkass Has a Point who is completely right in his criticisms of Kara and her reporting due to her frequent attempts to push stories without sources, with some celebrating him firing her when she goes behind his back and leaks the story online, believing he is completely justified to respond in this manner because of what she did. However, others consider him a massive hypocrite as he only seems to put this kind of scrutiny on things Kara wants to report on while being far more lax when it comes to his own stories, especially as he repeatedly talks about bias and 'good reporting'. In particular, while he was eager to publish about the Guardian's supposed killing based on a single piece of flimsy evidence and chewed James out over it, he point-blank refused to publish anything about the stolen alien registry (thus, putting hundreds of alien citizens at risk by not warning them about their compromised identities) unless Kara could provide two named sources (and then, continuing to refuse when Supergirl confirms the story to him herself, still refusing because she wouldn't give him information about the DEO, arguing that 'half truths are just lies'). His later reconciliation with Kara may well raise fans' estimation of him, since it's made clear that he didn't want to fire Kara and regards her as a skilled and brave reporter, just one who needs to learn to follow the rules.
    • Maggie Sawyer has her fans for her relationship with Alex while others think that she is a bland character who nonetheless receives too much screen time and that her role as a Friend on the Force of the D.E.O. is almost always unneeded and even shoehorned.
    • Ruby is either an adorable child that brings lovely moments with Alex and Sam or an irritating kid who grates every time she's onscreen.
    • Kara herself. She frequently comes off as arrogant and self-righteous, particularly when it comes to Kryptonite and her "I never kill" attitude, while everything with her relationship with Mon-El is heavily controversial. It doesn't help that in season 3 she is completely incapable of defeating anyone in a fight she doesn't already have a massive advantage over, not even a normal human who got Worldkiller power literally the minute before Kara fights her. Thus she ends up either having to be saved or talk the villain down, which is pretty big strike against the main protagonist of anything.
    • Lena Luthor has become this in Season 5. For many fans, Lena is absolutely right to hate Kara for lying to her for three seasons about her secret identity, and they try to defend her actions by arguing that she is only willing to do good, even if in the wrong ways. For other fans, Lena is a hypocrite, as by hiding her plans from Kara, she is making exactly the same mistakes that Kara made, and she went to maliciously feign friendship to Andrea and Kara when neither deceived her out of malice. Furthermore, brainwashing Miss Tessmacher, arresting and threatening J'onn's brother, emotionally manipulating Kara and agreeing to make a pact with her evil brother Lex is a great Moral Event Horizon for many fans.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: After a weird bit where Kara decides to keep her prophetic dream about Purity secret from the rest of the team for literally no reason at all, the very next episode casually reveals that she did tell them offscreen. It comes off like the crew very quickly realized what a stupid idea it was, but not quite in time to redo the initial scene.
  • Broken Base:
    • The show's heavy feminist messages and whether they're being overdone and poorly handled or a case of Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped. Even this page got some edit warring over the subject when the show first aired.
    • The show being on a different universe than the "prime" Arrowverse. Some fans feel that this avoids the potential awkwardness of forcing Superman, a well-known and public figure at this point in the show, into a universe that seemingly has never heard of him before. Others feel that it was a waste of potential, seeing that the lore built up by the show can never be a part of the universe built up by the CW. Some of these fans are hoping that a universe "crisis", like the kind DC Comics is known for, can occur that will merge the two universes into one. Earth-38 and Earth-1 would be in a Merged Reality after Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019).
    • Season 2 dumping the Kara/James romance and subsequently setting Kara up with Mon-El. The show is either wisely ditching a relationship that didn't have much chemistry, or sidelining one of its only characters of color in favor of a white guy who's just as big a Base-Breaking Character as James. As alluded to above, the accusation that the writers had Kara dump James just so they could pair her up with a white dude has also added some fuel to the fire.
    • While Maggie's storyline with Alex has been well received, there's a segment of fans who dislike the idea of Maggie being with anyone other than Kate Kane, her former love interest from the comics. There's also a smaller segment of fans who are angry about the show omitting Toby Raynes, Maggie's original girlfriend.
    • The announcement that Floriana Lima would be downgraded from a regular cast member in Season 3, with many fans understandably worried about what this will mean for her and Alex's relationship, especially given the CW's large role in the massive swath of Bury Your Gays across a bunch of TV shows the previous year. Although it was at least made clear that it's entirely Lima's own decision, as she was caught off guard by her upgrade to regular, and wanted time to pursue other jobs. The crew also made sure to put in a shot of the two warmly smiling at each other in the Season 3 trailer. Although neither of them die, the fact that the two have broken up now, albeit amicably, is sure only to intensify the arguments. Others point that dumping Maggie skyrocketed the quality of the series, even if they don't necessarily hate Maggie. A third group is relieved to see the departure of a whitewashed character, independent of shipping preferences or the quality of the show.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: So many people figured out Mon-El was the Prince of Daxam that the crew eventually just gave up and openly put the reveal in the episode's promo.
  • Cargo Ship:
    • Many fans have taken to shipping Kara x pots tickers, or just Kara x food in general.
    • Alex x alcohol, due to how often Alex is seen with some form of alcohol.
    • Alex x guns, due to her fondness for guns and weaponry, to the point that she has a favorite red dot sight system.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Lex's death may be likely to be reversed, but it was still very satisfying to see his plans fall to pieces after he's spent his screen time being incredibly smug and cruel. Lena being the one to kill him is just the icing on the cake.
    • Lockwood is arrested for domestic terrorism and has to watch from the prison TV as his son makes a speech denouncing his beliefs. Baker gets impeached and arrested.
  • Complete Monster: See here.
  • Contested Sequel: There has been controversies on whether Season 2 is an improvement or a worse season than the first one. Some people see it as the worse one due to the excessive focus on Mon-El, the Romantic Plot Tumor, the lessened focus on Kara as a person in favor of the previous two things, and Cat Grant's departure. However, others see Season 2 as an improvement.
  • Crazy Awesome: Mxyzpltk. When challenged by Mon-El, he sends him to the DEO in his underwear. When needing attention, he makes a massive amount of roses. When he needs attention, he comes in with his own Superman outfit. And then, when challenged again, he transports him and Mon-El to a theater to reenact the duel from Hamilton. It takes Kara having an even crazier Batman Gambit to actually beat him.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: In season 4, Manchester Black goes all Knight Templar on the Children of Liberty, a human supremacist terrorist group. When he tries to kill their leader, Agent Liberty, we get this exchange:
    Kara: If you kill him, what does that make you?
    Manchester: The intolerant Left.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • Even before the crossover with The Flash (2014), FlashxSupergirl has gained support. See for yourself.
    • Since Alex came out as gay and Supergirl officially became a part of the Arrowverse, some are shipping Alex with Sara Lance from Legends of Tomorrow and were hoping that they would meet in the "Invasion Crossover Event" and there was originally going to be a Ship Tease moment involving Kara mentioning her sister to Sara, but it was cut out. Come next crossover, though, they finally met and even hooked up for one night.
    • The crossover event also spawned a ship between Rory/Heatwave and Kara when he flirts with her saying "hey Skirt, call me" being called "Skirtwave".
    • Supercanary (Sara Lance x Kara) is also fairly popular. It helps that Sara called Kara hot in the crossover event.
    • Branching out of the Arrowverse, shipping Kara with the DCEU Wonder Woman got quite popular after the latter's solo film revealed their shared love of ice cream. Not to mention this promotion video, which involves Kara wearing Wonder Woman's boots like she just came back from a walk of shame.
    • Back in the Arrowverse, SuperArrow, aka Kara/Oliver. See the YMMV page on the main Arrowverse page for the full story.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Season 4, full stop. Whenever the Children of Liberty suffer any major setback to their plans they immediately bounce right back and get stronger than ever. What started as a fringe terrorist group that targeted and murdered aliens is now a national movement. After finally being arrested, their leader is pardoned four episodes later by the new president and made Director of Alien Affairs. It seems like outside of the main cast any human who isn't part of the Children of Liberty either actively supports them or just doesn't care enough to do anything about them. A viewer might consider that maybe humanity doesn't really deserve Kara's help.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: There are many fans who will downplay if not outright erase all of Lena's villainous acts in season 5. Some even claimed that Lena should've been named the Paragon of Humanity in Crisis on Infinite Earths one week after she tried to brainwash the world.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • When he finally made an appearance in Season 2, the show's take on Superman was quickly embraced by the fandom because, Fandom Rivalry with the DC Extended Universe aside he's an affectionate throwback to the classic Christopher Reeve incarnation without being subservient to it, making him The Paragon yet still a flawed character. Tyler Hoechlin's portrayal of both the Superman and Clark Kent personas is also distinct without being either too derivative or too distant, so one can easily buy into them being considered separate individuals. Many fans and even media outlets are demanding that he get his own spinoff show, DCEU embargo be damned... and in 2019, it was eventually confirmed that a spinoff would indeed be happening.
    • Roulette, due to her being a cunning human villainess played by the likes of Dichen Lachman.
    • Eve Tessmacher, due to her being a reference to the old Supes movies and her being utterly Adorkable.
    • Susan Vasquez, one of the background DEO agents, is also very popular, and is included in a lot of fanfics. Many fans were saddened by her lack of appearances in much of Season 2. Vasquez returns in in episode 11 of season 2, with more screen time.
    • Jess, Lena's secretary, is really well-liked by fans and is included in a significant number of fanfics considering she's only had one scene.
    • Thomas Coville was very well received for being a complex and sympathetic villain with a uniquely fascinating relationship with Kara, and the fans were delighted when he became a recurring character who got an increased role after joining up with Reign.
    • Pam from the DEO's HR department has a lot of fans and has been included in a number of fanfics even though she hasn't even had an onscreen appearance. Fans are fond of speculating about her day and how much paperwork she has to prepare due to the DEO's (especially Alex's) antics. She finally makes an appearance in Season 3, heading after Winn with murder in her eyes after everyone has their darkest id unleashed.
    • Nia Nal got a ton of attention even before Season 4 started thanks to being played by real life hero of the transgender community Nicole Maines.note  Once the show started, her expertly duplicating the original Adorkable Kara performance got even more people on board.
    • Agent Liberty has quickly become one of the show's most popular villains for being a convincingly disturbing and charismatic anti-alien cult leader with a great look. The fact that he actually raises some good points about the role of metahumans in society has been lauded by many as an example of the show's infamous "the aliens are Mexican immigrants" plotline done right. Being played by nerd-favorite voice actor Sam Witwer certainly hasn't hurt his popularity any either.
    • Lex Luthor as played by Jon Cryer. Cryer saw this as his greatest second chance to make up for his part in The Quest For Peacenote  and provided an earnest performance to showcase why Lex is Superman's arch enemy.
  • Evil Is Cool: Despite being a vicious alien-hater, Ben Lockwood/Agent Liberty has been extremely well-received so far for being both chilling and charismatic, thanks in no small part to Sam Witwer's menacing performance. The fact that he's basically just an ordinary university professor going up against superhumans and the DEO with little more than the strength of his rhetoric (and that his arguments have some merit) seals the deal for many people. If they don't, the Cool Mask usually does the trick.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Livewire is seen by many fans as the most attractive villain of the show, though Astra has her fair share of fans, and Indigo, Silver Banshee, and Maxima certainly deserve attention. Maxwell Lord is called sexy by Cat. Kara corrupted by the Red Kryptonite has as many fans, if not more, though she technically isn't a villain. Meanwhile, Roulette really knows how to rock a red dress and show some leg. Fans also found the White Martians disguised as Winn and Alex in "The Martian Chronicles" extremely attractive. Also Lillian Luthor is beautiful but immoral. Queen Rhea is stunning in both her Daxamite queen attire and in the business casual suit she uses to manipulate Lena.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Cat/Kara, referred to as "Supercat".
    • As of season two, fans want Kara and Lena to become a couple after seeing their chemistry with each other. It doesn't hurt that Kara had her in a Bridal Carry in Exodus, and in the next episode, they cuddle and Kara acts a bit like a Stalker with a Crush, while Lena calls her "the best reporter in National City."
    • Winn/Mon-El.
    • Lena and Reign, "ReignCorp", became popular long before season 3 (when Reign is introduced) aired as videos of the actresses interacting showed them to be good friends. It may have aligned with other reasons, too.
    • After their interactions in Elseworlds (2018) and Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019) it has become popular to ship Kara with Kate Kane. The fact that they now live on the same Earth after the Crisis makes it even easier for writers to ship the two.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the DC Extended Universe, mainly due to differences in tone and theme. This came to a head when the show's crossover with The Flash aired a mere three days after the premier of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Many saw the Supergirl episode as the superior crossover due to its Lighter and Softer tone and its lack of forced conflict. Taken even further when the show introduced its own take on Superman in Season 2. Marc Guggenheim explicitly mentioned that the new Superman would be a kinder, gentler and more overtly heroic take on the character, similar to his usual depiction in the comics. It's almost like he was subtly trying to distance the TV Superman from the modern movie version. Tyler Hoechlin even went so far as to say that Superman doesn't have to be brooding or dark to be cool, seemingly taking a shot at the mixed reception to the DCEU version of the character for that exact reason. Things likely turned around with Superman's optimistic and cheerful portrayal in Justice League.
  • Fanon:
    • Due to Melissa Benoist's previous role on Glee, many have presumed that Marley Rose is one of the many alternate Karas in the Multiverse.
    • Similarly, many fans consider Dr. Lexie Grey one of Alex's alternate universe counterparts since she is also played by Chyler Leigh. It doesn't hurt that they share the same first name (Alexandra), and have a surprising amount of parallels. Alex revealing in the third season that she didn't just go to med school but actually became a doctor and worked at a hospital in Seattle certainly made this theory more convincing.
  • Foe Yay: Manchester Black's final words to J'onn before his death? "You're beautiful."
  • Forgot About His Powers:
    • In Crossfire, Lena invites both Kara and Supergirl to her Gala. This leads to Kara having to pull off a number of quick changes between her identities. Why didn't they simply ask J'onn to impersonate Supergirl like he did in Season 1?
    • In season 5, Lena gains the power to incept. She uses it in one episode and it is never mentioned again.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Season 2 has been very polarizing for being Anvilicious, a lot of unconnected plot threads, confusing antagonists and Romantic Plot Tumor. Those problems were present in Season 1, but there was more focus on the big plan and the series was not as preachy.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • The Arrowverse fandom (Arrow and The Flash) has largely welcomed the show's existence, and there's a lot of hope by fans that it can be adopted into their universe the same way Constantine was. It helps that Supergirl is produced by a lot of the same people, and it also helps that the show is apparently less beholden to stay out of the way of the DC Extended Universe, giving those creators a chance to still explore characters taken off the table for those shows like Harley Quinn and Green Lantern. And sure enough, an appearance by the Flash was negotiated during the first season, officially making Supergirl part of the Arrowverse. Later on, she would join him for more adventures, including a four-way crossover where she worked with the Arrow and the Legends.
    • Another one has popped up with Wonder Woman (2017) fandom. Fans like how Diana and Kara are idealistic, cheerful, ice cream-loving superheroines and how their respective actresses are good friends in real life. The genuine friendship between the two works is rather ironic given how Supergirl fans can't get along with DC Extended Universe.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • The joke in the pilot about Cat Grant not wanting to sit next to Bill O'Reilly is harsher after it was revealed that Fox News settled multiple lawsuits from women who claimed O'Reilly sexually harassed them.
    • The allusion to Chloe Sullivan in "Midvale" should have been a nice Mythology Gag, but it came just near the time her actress on Smallville, Allison Mack, was accused of being involved in a sex cult.
    • Blake Jenner's appearance as a potential love interest towards Kara in Season 1 is put in a darker light when Melissa Benoist stated that she suffered domestic abuse from an ex that had restricted her from taking roles with a love interest other than him and that he even threw an iPhone at her and damaged one of her eyes in the process. Benoist did not name the ex in her video, but many had guessed she was speaking about Jenner.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • Many feel that the show starts getting its voice around Episode 6 or 7, focusing more on the overall plot, being a lot less preachy, and settling into a better pace.
    • Season 3 has had a better reception for focusing less on romance, having better defined villains and balancing much better between drama and comedy.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • During the first seven episodes, "Hank" occasionally references how he's lost everyone close to him. The end of that last one reveals he was talking about his entire race, as he's really Martian Manhunter.
    • The following exchange between Alex and Kara in the pilot, after Kara reveals her powers, makes sense in a completely different way once Alex comes out as gay in season 2.
    Alex: You exposed yourself to the world. You're out there now, Kara. Everyone will know about you, and you can't take that back.
    Kara: I don't want to. This is what I was talking about, Alex. I've always felt the need to help people, and tonight I finally got that chance. I didn't travel two thousand light-years just to be an assistant.
    Alex: What if people figure out who you are? What you are?
    • Kara and Adam parting ways in Season 1 becomes this after their real-life actors' divorce a year later. Got much worse in 2019 when Melissa Benoist revealed she'd been in a severely abusive relationship around the time of their marriage.
    • During Barry's first crossover appearance, Winn brings up the idea of an Earth where they're all evil, to which he replies "Been there, it sucked." This referred to Earth-2, where just a few characters had their morality switched, little knowing that a couple years later we'd be introduced to Earth X, where the local versions of the Arrowverse heroes are Nazis.
    • Season 5 had aged poorly before it had even ended. The overarching message of the season was that technology was a negative influence, as innovations like virtual reality and new smartphones was distracting people from socializing in person. How badly did it age? During the airing of the final stretch of the season, a real-life unprecedented global pandemic forced the Earth’s population to stay home (including the shows own cast and crew, who were halfway through filming the final episode), and world governments encouraged everyone to keep their distance from each other and to contact anyone outside their household through online services like Skype or just stay home and play video games/ watch TV for a few weeks to a few months- which undermined the message behind Season 5.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: Kara's text conversations with her cousin get even better now that we can imagine Tyler Hoechlin's Clark on the other end.
  • He Really Can Act:
    • A lot of people were very, very uncertain about Tyler Hoechlin as Superman, mostly because they felt that he was just too young and a little too scrawny to be the elder Kryptonian. The preview scenes for the Season 2 premiere took the wind out of those sails.
    • Also applies to Melissa Benoist herself; her take as Kara while under the Red Kryptonite was very well received.
    • Katie McGrath's performance when she reveals her duplicity to Kara and the reasons for hating her impressed many critics and fans. Likewise, Melissa Benoist's portrayal of an emotionally devastated Kara was also highly praised.
    • Chyler Leigh's performance of Alex's coming-out arc in season 2 was very well received by fans, as well.
    • When Jon Cryer was cast as Lex Luthor, he said he wanted the role as a way to atone for Superman IV. He atoned... BOY did he atone.
  • He's Just Hiding!:
    • The real Hank Henshaw's Disney Villain Death is rather dubious, especially since he becomes a cyborg in the comics - especially when Cadmus has proven it can turn humans into cyborgs at will. One might wonder where it got that tech. He eventually does become ''Cyborg Superman.''
    • In "Fort Rozz," after Livewire's death, many fans believe she escaped through stray sparks of electricity.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • When Melissa Benoist was on Glee, her character, Marley, dressed as a superhero named "Woman Fierce" (a blatant Expy of Wonder Woman), as part of the glee club assignment.
    • When Marvel Comics introduced the blonde Carol Danvers as a supporting character for their Captain Marvel, it unintentionally looked like she was an allusion to Supergirl. Writer Roy Thomas forgot that Supergirl's civilian name was Linda Danvers, else he'd have named her differently. Now since the show uses "Kara Danvers", it looks like an allusion to Carol (who was announced to have a movie in production around the same time) though Supergirl got such names first.
    • SNL's parody trailer of a Black Widow movie became this when the first Supergirl trailer came out, hitting similar beats in their first parts.
    • When Cat Grant asks "Any plans to start a family?" Kara gets annoyed and says "Nobody ever asks my cousin these questions." In Superman: The Movie, the very first question Lois asked was whether he was married. In Lois & Clark, the second question (right after the big "Where are you from?") Lois asked "So, is there a Mrs. Superman?"
    • Kara Squicking after Cat suggested that Supergirl may be Superman's girlfriend becomes funny because her adoptive parents were both played by a former Supergirl and a former Superman.
    • The fact that the shows airs on the same day and time as fellow DC Comics show Gotham does have some fans wondering whether they should consider this decision a meta promotion tool for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice
      • Indeed, on November 29th, 2015, a teaser for the film was aired with Gotham... and not Supergirl.
    • In "Red Faced", a red robot loses its arm. A few weeks later, one of the most famous robots in fiction shows up with a red arm replacing one of his own.
    • In "Human For A Day," James tells Kara she doesn't need superpowers to be a hero. Looks like he took his own advice one season later.
    • The Master Jailer episode has an alien who gets involved in a drug crime, and ends up becoming a professor. Not the usual order though.
    • Cat's "attractive, yet non-threatening, racially diverse cast of a CW show" from "Worlds Finest," with the news that the show's moving to The CW for its second season.
    • During the first season, Stephen Amell was asked if he would like to do a crossover with Supergirl, to which he enthusiastically responded "yes", with the main reason being that he would have an excuse to once again shoot in Los Angeles. Ultimately a crossover between the two shows occurs after all—after production of Supergirl moves to Vancouver!
    • Miley Cyrus criticizing the show's title for using "girl" instead of "woman" is directly similar to Kara's own complaints in the Pilot Episode. Speaking of directly similar, Melissa Benoist sang a Cover Version of Cyrus's Signature Song back when she was on Glee.
    • Tyler Hoechlin's casting as Superman is amusing for anyone who's seen the movie Everybody Wants Some!!. Melissa Benoist's then-husband Blake Jenner stars as the lead - and had guest starred on a Supergirl episode. Hoechlin's character is his captain and introduces himself with "I tend not to like pitchers". Does My Sister Is Off-Limits! extend to cousins too?
      • Plus, his previous role in a comic book adaptation was the extremely grim Road to Perdition. Just try watching that film again and imagine that little kid driving a getaway car will grow up to be Superman.
    • Mr. Mxyzptlk singing "A Whole New World" from Aladdin gets even more amusing when you remember that Gilbert Gottfried (the voice of Iago) also played Mxyzptlk in Superman: The Animated Series.
    • In "Star-Crossed," the team prevents the theft of Vincent Van Gogh's "Starry Night." The day after the episode aired, a set of Van Gogh paintings that had been stolen from a museum in Holland fourteen years earlier were found and returned.
    • The Season 4 premiere has Sam Witwer and Tiya Sircar together for the first time since Star Wars Rebels. Cue the "Darth Maul kills Sabine Wren" jokes from Star Wars fans.
    • You have to wonder if the writers knew what they were doing when they included a dragon named Spike.
    • During the 90s, Chris Rock was chosen to play Jimmy Olsen in the cancelled Superman Lives movie. We end up with a Jimmy Olsen as a black man anyway.
    • Several regarding former Power Rangers actors:
      • Chris Violette played Sky in Power Rangers S.P.D., a team that protects humans and aliens alike in a futuristic Earth where they coexist. Here, he played Domingo, a character who is racist against aliens.
      • Brennan Mejia played the Red Ranger of Power Rangers Dino Charge, where they use batteries as their source of power. Here, he played a drug dealer. It's enough that it brought back the jokes about "Mighty Morphine", but the drug he was selling was also "supercharged" by electricity from "Red Daughter" spreading around the world while she's being defibrillated and it gives superpowers to its consumers.
    • When Phil La Marr joined the show as J'onn's Martian brother in Season 5, people who remember his most famous role could be forgiven for thinking that Marvin the Martian had joined the cast.
    • J'onn complaining about Kara's pants chafing is pretty funny when one remembers that he called Kara's old skirt "surprisingly comfortable" when he shifted into her to fool Cat.
  • Idiot Plot: The entire plot of Season 2's "Homecoming" relies on every single cast member except Mon-El and Winn taking Jeremiah's extremely easy rescue from Cadmus entirely at face value, let him walk around like normal without even attempting to debrief him first, have no medical examination which would detect that he has a robotic arm, buy into his transparent lie after he's caught accessing the DEO's servers without permission, J'onn making no attempt to read Jeremiah's mind until AFTER it's already become apparent he's lying to them, buying his "fusion bomb" story without proof of any kind, and Kara and Alex refusing to believe Jeremiah could have an ulterior motive. Probably worst of all is how Mon-El and Winn very explicitly point this idiocy out just to be blown off.
  • It Was His Sled: "Hank Henshaw" is the Martian Manhunter. Promotional materials don't even bother hiding this anymore.
  • Its The Same Now It Sucks: The Season 2 finale was criticized for repeating elements from the Season 1 finale, namely, an Alien Invasion beginning in National City, an alliance with the evil Lex Luthor-like scientist, a hope speech, a brainwashed Superman and a device with the weakness of the invading aliens.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • Many will have watched 'World's Finest' just to see the Flash cross over.
    • Many will have watched the first two episodes of Season 2 just for Superman's first proper appearance (as his adult self), as he was The Faceless for Season 1.
    • Many Legion Of Superheroes fans came to Season 3 due to the confirmed appearances by Saturn Girl and later Brainiac 5 (that the season aired during a period where the Legion was absent from the comics helps immensely).
  • LGBT Fanbase: The show has amassed a large LGBT following because of Alex's coming out arc, Sanvers (and when that had to end, Dansen), and the copious amounts of Les Yay between Kara and Lena.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • The show has done this twice thus far with J'onn J'onzz: first in the penultimate episode of Season 1 when Indigo stabs him, and again the next season when M'gann's blood begins to mutate him into a White Martian. You just don't do that to a classic superhero like the Martian Manhunter, least of all when he's anything more than a one-off character, so in both cases it was clear it wouldn't take.
    • The trailer for "Rather The Fallen Angel" would clearly like viewers to believe that James is going to set off a bomb planted by the Children of Liberty that will blow up a monument and (somehow) kill a captive Supergirl. We're apparently just supposed to forget that James would never just casually murder someone, especially not Kara, one of his closest friends.
  • Love to Hate:
    • Reign has had a very good reception among the fandom.
    • Both Lex and Lillian Luthor are villains held in high regard by fans.
  • Lying Creator: Prior to and during Season 5, the cast and writers told some outright lies to fans, including;
    • Jessica Queller and Melissa Benoist promising season 5 would involve a fight for Lena's soul. Kara only found out about Lena's turn to the dark side in the 7th episode and only spend the 8th episode trying to save her. Kara and Lena had one scene after this episode and in the 13th episode, Kara ended this plot (which didn't even start) by cutting ties with Lena.
    • Jessica Queller saying that the main plot for the season would almost entirely be about Kara and Lena's relationship. While this was true for the first half of the season, other than the 100th episode, Lena and Kara haven't interacted and Lena spends most episodes alone in her lab.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Manchester Black is driven to a life of crime after his alien fiancée is murdered by the anti-alien Children of Liberty. Manipulating Supergirl to get closer to the group, Manchester interrogates a handful of the Children until discovering that the group's leader is Agent Liberty, aka Ben Lockwood. Paying Lockwood a visit, Manchester reveals Lockwood's secret to his wife, before trying to kill the both of them. Breaking out of jail, Manchester forms the team known as the Elite to combat the Children of Liberty's bigotry. Following the Elite's downfall, Manchester causes a city wide blackout and uses the Staff of K'lar to successfully drive J'onn J'onzz into killing him, using his final words to admire how "beautiful" he is. Throughout his appearance, Manchester proves himself to be combatively capable even without powers, and genuinely charming, all the while being one of the most dangerously competent foes Team Supergirl ever faced.
    • "Alex": Rick Malverne is a former classmate of the Danvers sisters who bored witness to Kara surviving a horrific accident and using her powers to save people. Remembering this, Rick pieces together her past identity once Kara publicly reveals herself as "Supergirl" to National City. Taking the opportunity to free his criminal father from prison, Rick kidnaps Alex and places her in a glass cage, located in a building laced with lead to deter Kara, while slowly filling it with water. Giving Kara and her friends 36 hours to either free his father or watch Alex drown. After being apprehended, Rick remains calm and sees through J'onn's attempt to shape-shift into his father, failing to trick Rick. Even when his plan is foiled when his father reveals the location of his trap, Rick graciously congratulates Alex for surviving his trap and accepts his imprisonment without malice.
  • Memetic Troll: Cat Grant is often used by the show's fans as a symbol (whether through images or by just quoting her) for mocking people.
  • Moe: Many fans find teenage Kara adorable. Adult Kara isn't far behind, either.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • General Lane earns another medal by having Kryptonite injections on hand to torture Astra with. Did he come up with them just for her, or did he have a different target in mind when they were first developed?
    • Maxwell Lord truly cements what a bastard he is in "Bizarro" when it's revealed that he kidnapped not one, but seven girls in an attempt to make a Supergirl clone, inflicting Death of Personality on the seventh and actual death on the first six. To be fair, all of them were brain-dead with zero chance of recovery, but the nonchalance with which he experiments on and disposes of them sends the clear message he is NOT a good person.
    • If Non didn't cross it for you by using Myriad to brainwash all of National City to do his bidding, even commit suicide should he order it, he probably did when he sent a brainwashed Alex in a Kryptonite-powered suit after Kara, fully intending that either or both of them should die in petty revenge for Astra's death.
    • Indigo clearly crossed it a while ago, having tried to exterminate all life on Krypton, but in the present day, not only does she try to pull the same crime on Earth twice, she urges Non to use Myriad to conquer whole other worlds, and even gives him the aforementioned idea to send Alex to kill Kara.
    • The version of Kara that emerges when she is infected with Red Kryptonite crosses it when she goes after and tries to kill Alex.
    • CADMUS (particularly Lillian Luthor and Hank Henshaw) in season 2 has a number of potential crossing points, but they sink to their absolute lowest when they intend to unleash a virus over National City that will exterminate all alien life, with their ultimate goal being the entire world.
    • Roulette was pretty bad in her first appearance, exploiting aliens in an underground fight club. She flew over the horizon in her next appearance, cooperating with alien slavers to abduct and sell humans. She shows zero empathy for her role in this, outright bragging about the diamonds she's being paid with and how she's taken human trafficking to a new level.
    • If Mon-El's mother and Queen of Daxam Rhea trying to kill Kara to force her son to return to Daxam with them first through bounty hunters and then personally wasn't it, then she DEFINITELY crosses it when she murders Lar Gand, her husband and King of Daxam over the fact that he let Mon-El go back to Earth and then swears vengeance on the Earth. She tells Mon-El that he died of heartbreak. Later in the series, she zooms even further past the event horizon when she forces a marriage on Mon-El and Lena by targeting one of Lena's charity hospitals and threatening to destroy it.
    • Morgan Edge crossed it when he poisoned dozens of children across the city just to frame and get back at Lena for buying CatCo.
    • Winn's father Winslow Schott Sr. AKA Toyman crossed it before the series even started. When Winn was a child Toyman responded when Winn's mother Mary tried to leave him and take Winn with her by running her off the road, giving Winn a concussion and then threatening to kill Winn if she ever went anywhere near Winn afterward. The fact that he later coaches his apprentice into following through with the threat even after his death makes it clear it wasn't something said in the heat of the moment. Mary also implies that Toyman had been abusive to her even before he went insane.
    • Ben Lockwood has several potential moments:
      • When he bludgeoned an innocent alien factory worker to death.
      • When he kills Fiona just for being an alien.
      • His plan to sic mind-controlled aliens on children to provoke public xenophobia. Making this even more disgusting, Agent Liberty is a father himself; he knows what it's like to fear for your child's life, and he's actively trying to spread that feeling around to suit his own agenda.
    • Manchester Black abandons the last of his morals when he plans on destroying the National City dam, flooding the city and killing thousands of people, all just to prove a point to J'onn.
    • If Lex Luthor didn't cross it when he turned the Sun red in an attempt to kill Superman (putting who knows how peoples lives at risk), he defiantly crossed it when poisoned the judge, jury, and prosecutor at his trial for turning the Sun red.
  • Narm:
    • The way the characters in the pilot avoid saying "Superman" (besides one instance) despite him being already famous, unlike say the Lois & Clark pilot or Man of Steel where he was a rookie and thus it was more understandable. Is Executive Meddling at work? Luckily, the crew seemed to pick up on how silly people found it, and he's freely called Superman past the pilot.
    • The way the show avoids showing Superman's face when he does show up. In the pilot it was passable for flashbacks, but then he appears in the present day only seen from behind, at a distance, and/or in shadows. And when Clark talks to Kara... it's through online text messages. Even in the first season finale when he flies to National City to help fight Non, he is only seen from a distance before falling under the effects of Myriad. When he's recuperating in the DEO's infirmary, he's unconscious the entire time and we only see his feet. He recovers and leaves offscreen without ever seeing his cousin, only texting her in the epilogue. Again, is it Executive Meddling at work, as not to "detract" from Henry Cavill's tenure? It's odd because Tom Welling and Brandon Routh portrayed Clark at the same time with no problems. Fortunately, this is also being fixed, with Tyler Hoechlin cast to fully portray him in Season Two.
    • When Supergirl offers to help the DEO fight aliens, J'onzz tells her to "go back to getting someone's coffee" instead. He says "I don't like aliens" before this, meaning he doesn't trust her either. But the way it plays out, it's like he stepped right out of Mad Men, telling her to Stay in the Kitchen because she's a woman. The trailer exacerbated it by portraying the comment as sending her into a Heroic BSoD, when actually she's moping over getting her ass kicked in her first fight.
    • Kara's sister lambasting her for saving a crashing airplane because it revealed the existence of her powers, made many people roll their eyes and brought back some unfortunate flashbacks to Pa Kent critiquing Clark for saving a bus of schoolkids in Man of Steel. Especially since Alex herself was on the plane, something that inexplicably goes completely unacknowledged by either of them.
    • The "Supergirl"/"Superwoman" debate that Kara and Cat Grant have. The show treats a rather minor issue with extreme seriousness, with the two sides basically declaring that either the name Supergirl is sexist or the people who don't like it are. It doesn't help that Kara seems completely oblivious to the fact that calling young(ish) adult women "girls" is an English-language colloquialism that few people question. On the other hand, some fans interpreted Kara's problem with "Supergirl" as being that young adult women being called girls when young adult men are not similarly called boys (in this universe, Clark was about Kara's age when he became a superhero, and he's called Superman) is a symptom of young women being undervalued and having their accomplishments minimized, so for those fans the Narm in this scene is really when Cat Grant delivers the final line of her monologue, which was obviously supposed to be a Mic Drop moment, when she'd missed Kara's point entirely.
    • "You've spent more time in the friendzone than the Phantom Zone."
    • If you're not familiar with the comics, this can happen with the reveal that "Henshaw" is really the Martian Manhunter, as all you see is an alien dramatically announcing he has the stunningly ordinary name "John Jones". Young Justice got around this by pronouncing J'onn J'onzz "Juh-ohn Juh-ownz," with a noticeable stop on the apostrophe. Justice League did it by slurring the Js, making it sound like "Zhohn Zhones."
    • Alex trying to get information out of Alura's AI-program. Despite being told 2 times that it doesn't have enough information on the species, she then goes on a lengthy emotional rant about how she needs to save Kara... only for the hologram to repeat that she doesn't have enough information.
    • The twist regarding Master Jailer's identity, which basically goes "He's this character we only met this episode! No, he's actually this other character we only met this episode!"
    • The scene with the citizens rallying behind Supergirl at the end of 'World's Finest'; the whole thing is so melodramatic, badly paced and rushed that it can be near impossible to take seriously.
    • Supergirl's "beacon of hope" speech to break everyone free from Myriad. Never mind that it's fairly certain most of the people under its control likely weren't depressed, it's just way too much schmaltz to accept for some.
    • The anti-Kryptonite shields Winn creates for fighting Metallo only cover a small portion of the chest. Luckily, both Metallos are a good sport and keep shooting directly at that one spot, not even trying to aim anywhere else.
    • James' motivation for becoming the Guardian? Criminals broke his dad's camera!
    • The Wham Line at the end of "Crossfire" is killed a bit by Katie McGrath's incredibly over-dramatic pause, at which you half-expect her to turn to the camera and say "Yeah, that's right."
    • The opening monologue at the start of each episode can be seen as cheesy and cliché.
    • Cadmus' trap for Mon-El at the end of "Changing," which is apparently based on the idea that only an alien would ever stop to help a homeless person.
    • When the Cadmus president slaps Kara to see if she's really burned her powers out, Brenda Strong is terrible at selling the hit, making it quite laughable when the next shot shows that it supposedly made Kara's lip bleed.
    • Henshaw's supposed Badass Boast where he declares himself as Cyborg Superman can come off as this, as there really isn't any in-story reason to name himself after Superman like in the comics. Plus, even in the comics he doesn't refer to himself by the name, insisting on still going by Hank Henshaw. Justified when you realize he's basically saying he's more powerful than Superman, her cousin.
    • Characters throw out pop culture references like there's no tomorrow, but they feel more like the writers going We're Still Relevant, Dammit! than being genuinely funny. Having Indigo talk about how she "wanders the same realm as Candy Crush" feels really forced and cheesy, considering she's a serious villain.
      • The last one is downplayed in Season 2.
    • Snapper Carr's lecture about journalistic responsibility is so self-important and over-the-top it's like he thinks newspaper reports are akin to gods. "One wrong statistic about the stock market and suddenly we're in the Great Depression! One misattributed quote from a candidate and you put a fascist in the White House!"
    • The Season 3 premiere opens with Kara having a dream involving Mon-El and her mother. What should be a very emotional scene ends up just being confusing as Alura has been recast, so as far as the audience can tell Kara is having an emotional embrace with just some random woman, until she talks about the dream more than halfway through the episode.
    • For some reason, Katie McGrath seems to have a much shoddier grip on Lena's American accent in Season 3 compared to Season 2. It doesn't help that the writers keep making her say the word "literally," which she's always struggled with.
    • Oddly enough, the promo for "Not Kansas" seems to go out of its way to give the impression that after discovering the continued existence of Argo, Kara blithely pisses off to go live there, not caring at all that she's leaving her allies to deal with Reign on their own, when the episode's actual story is nothing like that. It doesn't even come off as deliberate Superdickery with the tone of the ad.
    • Having various characters point out that Lena is "a Luthor" can get grating by the middle of Season 3, specifically when it is thrown into dialogue without much need to be, such as with Sam in "Of Two Minds".
    • James and Lena's on-again off-again romance in Season 4, which honestly feels like there's one writer who really wants them together and another who really doesn't, and they're just taking turns getting the couple together and breaking them up when their turn to write an episode comes around until there's no reason to care.
    • The fact that Dreamer has a superhero costume (apparently handed down via generations) despite her power being prophetic dreams. Cue fans wondering if Dreamer is just going to walk around in it not doing anything or if it's meant to be the universe's most needlessly fancy set of pajamas. This is averted in the actual show itself; Nia is shown to be able to fight to some degree even before she suits up and later episodes show her powers have a bit more to them than going to sleep and seeing what will happen, and she is shown to commit to expanding her fighting prowess and abilities once after she officially becomes Dreamer.
    • The first trailer for Season 5 has Kara say the accomplishments of last season don't matter because people are so fixated on their technological devices... something completely unrelated to what happened in Season 4 outside of the anti-alien message boards. It's even worse when you realize her narration is over scenes of people hanging out while looking at their phones, receiving emails on their monitors at work, and what seems to be a young teen slowly riding down a sidewalk on a hoverboard while looking at a video game on another device, which is presented as somehow meaning nobody in the US cares that the president of the United States was arrested for working with Luthor. Yeah, Kara; everything is utterly dystopian now compared to before...
    • Season 5 has Lena declaring: "We don't kill people no matter how much they've hurt us." This would probably carry a little more moral weight if Lena hadn't gunned down Lex in cold blood the season before.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Kal-El having his famous spit-curl as a baby. Which is comic-accurate, mind you.
    • Some of the dialogue that crosses into Narm can have this effect, due to the show generally embracing the cheesiness of older Superman stories.
    • When Kara is attacking Red Tornado with the Solar Flare, it is odd that Red Tornado resists such attack for a long time, but the scene shows very well all the anger Kara has hidden so far. The "Harnessing Anger" music and the flashbacks help to sell the scene.
    • The climax of Worlds Finest is rather cheesy, but it's still a heartwarming moment.
    • Kara's speech about hope in the Season 1 finale. To some, it's the most ridiculous Tastes Like Diabetes claptrap imaginable, but to others Melissa Benoist actually sells every bit of it.
    • Winn's adoration of Superman culminating in a Man Hug. Narmy? Yes. Adorable? Yes.
  • Older Than They Think:
  • One-Scene Wonder: Jindah Kol Rozz has very little screen time, but she knows how to make a creepy impact with it.
  • Rainbow Lens:
    • Kara being an alien is treated this way, to the extent that she and other characters refer to her becoming Supergirl as "coming out" several times. In the pilot, Kara tells Alex that she's always felt the need to help people, and Alex worries about people figuring out "who you are... what you are." In season 2, we also learn about the presence of alien bars that are hidden in remote locations and require a password to get in, reminiscent of forties-era gay bars.
    • In "Livewire", Kara refers to Alex telling her mother that she works for the DEO as "coming out." This turns out to be the first of two Thanksgiving episodes that have Alex coming out to Eliza.
    • Dreamer's status as an alien and transgender woman is baited and switched a few times, and she "comes out" as both at once as a show of solidarity. Plus her powers also tie into her own coming out as a trans girl during her childhood, as they're a Gender-Restricted Ability.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Young Kara is (or was) Violet Beaudelaire.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Watching "Livewire" after the revelations in "Human For A Day", it becomes clear that Hank Henshaw in the flashbacks behaves differently from "Hank Henshaw" in the present.
  • Replacement Scrappy:
    • Non is already a lackluster villain, but his replacement of the more interesting Astra makes him more annoying.
    • William Dey has been poorly received as a replacement of Mon-El as a love interest, and not just by Karamel shippers. His relationship with Kara has problematic start points, while for many fans he lacks the chemistry that Kara and Mon-El had.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • For much of the first season, Winn came under a lot of fans' ire for his unrequited crush on Kara and resulting resentment of her. Having him get over it and moving him to the DEO in the second season, along with upping his Deadpan Snarker quotient and having some fun character moments with James and Mon-El, among others, has done a lot to make him much more of a fan favorite.
    • Many people who hated Mon-El, especially because of the forced relationship with Kara, think of him more highly as of Season 3, since his character has improved significantly. However, as soon there were signs of him and Kara continuing said relationship, the controversy sparked up again.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor:
    • The pairing of James and Lucy was distracting and marginalized Barry Allen's first crossover.
    • A common criticism for Season 2 is that the characters' romantic relationships take a lot of time and focus from the overall plot, even more so than Season 1.
      • The Alex and Maggie ship aka "Sanvers". While the pair is popular, a number of fans and critics have pointed out how the relationship became Alex's primary Story Arc and focus which awkwardly results in her seemingly neglecting the search for her missing father, who is on the Big Bad organization's clutches, in favor of prioritizing the relationship.
      • The Kara/Mon-El ship aka "Karamel" has gotten a lot of backlash for similar reasons. Almost all of Kara's screen time has become dedicated to her relationship with Mon-El, almost neglecting her career as a reporter or her search for Jeremiah. The plot's focus on this relationship, combined with the focus on Alex and Maggie's relationship, has resulted in Kara and Alex not having had a single one-on-one conversation with each other that wasn't about one of their love interests since Alex came out early in season 2, when their close relationship and support for each other was the main pillar of season 1.
      • J'onn and M'gann's pairing isn't any better. There is also a big focus in their sudden attraction. You'd think you'd get a break when M'gann goes to meet other benevolent White Martians, but the focus goes to Winn and Lyra, another forced romance who barely contributes to the story.
    • It didn't get better in Season 3;
      • James and Lena getting together only seemed to distract James from being Guardian and returned him to his Season 1 role as a Satellite Love Interest.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • Mon-El gets this hard from haters who ignore any and all progress he has made and continue to insist that he's nothing more than a frat boy type guy.
    • On the other hand, Imra gets this from a lot of avid KaraMel fans, who try to demonize her despite being a very understanding Nice Girl.
    • President Marsdin is regularly painted as being as bad as the villains of the show because she's an alien who posed as a human, even though she and her policies weren't malicious towards humans like some assumed.
  • Rooting for the Empire: In Season 4, it's pretty easy to root for Manchester Black and the Elite instead of for Supergirl and her friends, given the latter's ineffectiveness against the Children of Liberty.
    • While Lena wasn't a villain in Season 3, during the Kryptonite rift between her and Kara, most viewers and critics actually supported Kara (Kara acted extremely out of character during the arc and contradicted her previous behavior and belief in Lena).
    • Lena when she becomes a villain in Season 5. Her fan favorite status, her actress' popularity, her somewhat valid reasons for hating Kara and an incredibly sympathetic performance from Katie McGrath, even when Lena is doing some horrible things, meant many fans and reviewers hope that she survives the season (it is the last of her contract) and remains on the show.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Non, who has nothing to do with the original character with that name, giving the impression they just fished a random name out of the mythology for cheap recognition points. And then we lose the far more interesting Astra so he can take over as the Big Bad, something even Kara herself complains about.
    • Morgan Edge has been criticized as being a far less interesting villainous rich guy than Maxwell Lord. He's blatantly unsubtle with being evil, and is misogynistic towards Lena. There's very little to make him compelling. Not helped that he only appeared for four episodes, only one of which he was straight-up antagonistic.
    • The Graves siblings. The only thing they really had going for them was being Mythology Gags to the Superman lore. The problem was that they came across as cliché and villainous cartoon characters whenever they appeared onscreen, especially Otis.
    • William Dey has been criticized as yet another poor love interest for Kara. Initially appearing to be a jerk who belittled Kara (which appears to be deliberate trolling of the audience), the revelation that he was Good All Along didn't improve his reputation with the fans. His romance with Kara has been panned due to it coming out of nowhere and it starting after Kara feeling guilty for turning down his constant wooing attempts. The lack of chemistry between Melissa Benoist and Staz Nair hasn't helped. The post-Crisis Cosmic Retcon of William not meeting Kara before makes him look like a character that could be removed harmlessly from the plot. Fans have lamented that by prioritizing him, the series focuses less on established characters like Nia and Kelly. The latter became worse when Nicole Maines confirmed in an interview that the show will not spend time on Nia's career at Cat Co to allow William and Kara to team up and drive the journalism aspects going forward. To give context and ensure fairness, she did state that the show would now focus on her growing as a superhero but the fact that the show is happy to remove stories about a transgender character doing her dream job to give more scenes to push the unpopular William and Kara pairing has not gone down well with fans.
  • Seasonal Rot:
    • Season 2 is criticized for being infected with Romantic Plot Tumors, several Plot Detours, messy plot threads and unclear antagonist(s). And of course, Base-Breaking Character Mon-El. Additionally, after J'onn was set up as the World's Best Warrior, "the most dangerous man on Earth," he was constantly subjected to the Worf Effect, which only got worse in season 3.
    • Season 3 got its first half well received, developing more Kara and Alex, as well as the new and tragic villain Reign. Unfortunately, the behind-the-scenes mess following the dismissal of showrunner Andrew Kreisberg (due to dozens of sexual harassment charges) influenced the second half of the season, which was once again heavily criticized because of an excessive focus on Romantic Plot Tumor and They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character.
    • After a praised fourth season, the series suffered this again with Season 5. This season was heavily criticized, with the main criticisms being about Arc Fatigue involving Lena's plot and the "fight for her soul" (in the words of the showrunner themselves) by Kara and Lex, which lasted the entire season, and also about Romantic Plot Tumor involving Kara and William Dey, who many accused of having no chemistry and stealing precious time from others characters. It didn't help that the coronavirus pandemic prevented the production of the last episode, making the season end without its planned climax.
  • Shipping:
    • One of the popular ships is Kara and Cat, often called "Supercat".
    • The ship between James Olsen and Kara is dubbed "Karolsen".
    • The one between Kara and Mon-EL is dubbed "Karamel".
    • Alex and Maggie are getting shipped as a couple in season 2. They're referred to as "Sanvers".
    • Mon-El and his Prince have gotten a little shipping, too.
    • Season 2 spawned the Kara/Lena ship, dubbed "Supercorp" by fans.
    • Mon-El and Winn is also a pretty popular ship. They're called "Monwinn."
    • Season 3 spawned the Lena/Sam ship, known as "Reigncorp".
    • A fairly popular ship is one between Alex/Sam called "Agent Reign".
    • The ship between James and Lena is named "Guardiancorp" by those who ship it. Most viewers and critics refer to the ship as Lames due to it being extremely unpopular.
    • Alex's relationship with Kelly has been named Dansen.
    • The relationship between Kara and William is called SuperDey.
      • Of those listed above, at present the ships actually featured on screen have been James/Kara, Alex/Maggie, Kara/Mon-El, James/Lena, and Alex/Kelly. The Kara/Lena friendship at present has not been as yet depicted as anything but.
  • Ship Mates: It was very common for Supercorp (Kara and Lena) shippers to also ship AgentReign (Alex and Sam).
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Karamel (the canon ship between Kara and Mon-El) had vicious arguments with shippers of fanon pairing Supercorp (Lena and Kara). Sanvers (Alex and Maggie) fight with Dansen (Alex and Kelly).
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: The anti-alien plot lines of seasons 2 and 4, with their metaphors for immigration, racism, and forced deportation are, in a word, unsubtle. But, especially in a time when these subjects are major hot button issues, their inclusion helps to humanize Kara by having her face relatively mundane problems in addition to fantastic ones.
  • Strangled by the Red String:
    • Love it or hate it, most agree that the build up to Kara and Mon-El's relationship was not handled well. Kara finds out he's a Daxamite and immediately launches into a list of reasons that she dislikes his people, essentially that they are a race of slave-owning, royalist, interstellar frat boys. He then spends the next ten or so episodes proving most if not all of those accusations to be true. He basically annoys and/or frustrates her at every turn. Then Kara has a conversation with her sister, Alex, wherein Alex informs Kara that she's attracted to Mon-El. Kara goes to the bar where he works and finds out that he's stopped drinking for the past week. Then suddenly Kara likes him despite the fact that he continues to exhibit most of the behaviors that she previously couldn't stand about him. The show has yet to make clear what it is about Mon-El that she actually likes. Turns out the production team only put them together because they thought it be interesting if Kara had a love interest she needed to "fix".
    • Lena and James. Lena joined in season 2 and appeared in half of the episodes that season. She and James had zero scenes together. James spend a lot of time saying that she must be evil and is conning Kara. Come season 3, the writers decided to make them a couple for unknown reasons. They shared a few scenes in two episodes and Lena disappeared for 4 episodes. When she returned, all the other characters discussed the great chemistry Lena and James had. They promptly got together that episode. The couple are infamous for their lack of chemistry and any logical reason why they should be together. Over the course of season 3 it didn't help that Kara and James had seemed to have swapped characters, with Kara treating Lena as if she was a Luthor and James defending at all costs. Fans saw the pairing at best as evidence that the writers had no idea what to do with James (so put him with the previous seasons breakout character) or at worst, an attempt to stop fans shipping Lena and Kara as a couple.
    • Kara and William in Season 5. Although most people believed William would be Kara's love interest once he joined the show, the writers have made few attempts to establish any form of romantic interest prior to the second half of the season. Because of this, many fans found it forced when Kara became interested in William out of nowhere.
    • The fact that Kara ends up agreeing to date William simply because she feels guilty about turning him down has annoyed both fans and critics.
    • Fans are also annoyed that William is simply a satellite love interest and seems to have been created to give Kara a love interest for no other reason due to her being single for 3 seasons.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • J'onzz is accused of being a sexist jerk for not thinking that Kara can defeat Vartox. This is despite the fact that Vartox had easily beaten her once before, and was still the superior fighter in their rematch.
    • People like General Lane and CADMUS, while extreme, aren't entirely unreasonable in their views on aliens, as a lot of these aliens have powers that make them extremely dangerous and the two most prominent can do stuff like shrugging off tank shells and shooting laser beams from their eyes. Also Winn dated an alien that exploited the simple fact that her species can't be seen on camera to frame him and several other ex-"boyfriends" for major thefts; forced into doing it or not, the thought of that been a reality is terrifying.
    • Superman may be seriously annoyed the DEO is hoarding Kryptonite, but the events of Season 1 proved that it wasn't a bad idea at all. J'onn brings it up in "The Last Children of Krypton", noting Superman was neutralized by Myriad, and there were few options against power-hungry Kryptonians. Even benevolent Kryptonians may be altered by Red Kryptonite or Silver Kryptonite and be dangerous, so some Green K can put them in check until they return to their normal selves.
    • Snapper Carr attributes James' defense of Guardian in "The Darkest Place" as being a fanboy of superheroes, and that he automatically assumes cape = trustworthy. Of course, James knows the Guardian has a Thou Shalt Not Kill policy because he is Guardian, but Snapper's not wrong in his assessment of James.
    • Inverted in general with Snapper, though. Twice Snapper accosts others of 'bias' in their reporting (James' stance on the Guardian, and Kara's issues with anti-alien technology), arguing that they should be unbiased in their reporting. However, when we see Snapper's reporting, he shows a great deal of bias himself (giving out headlines for the other reporters that focus on negative reactions to aliens and a general anti-alien standpoint), but isn't called on this and shows no sense of irony, making him instead look like a hypocrite trying to silence opinions he disagrees with under the claim of 'non-bias reporting' while pushing his own agenda as the 'non-bias' one. He'd come off as an attempt by the writers to be a strawman for right-wing media figures who criticize liberal media for bias without acknowledging their own, except the show treats him as being a Jerkass Has a Point in these situations.
    • Kara inverts this in "In Search of Lost Time", when at her rant to Mon-El she accuses him of never apologizing for being selfish and a liar, but forgets that Mon-El indeed has; the previous episode he even apologized for having previously hidden that he was the prince of Daxam.
    • Lena finds herself in pretty much the same situation as Superman and the DEO having Kryptonite above when she figures out how to make working Kryptonite in season 3, right down to the Kryptonian supervillains that are trying to take over the world. While Supergirl is against Lena even having the capability from the outset Lena ends up making so many good points viewers are seriously questioning which one of them the writers think the viewer is intended to side with.
    • President Marsdin is treated overall as the Big Good of the show and characterized as an All-Loving Hero. We're meant to feel sorry for her when she's exposed as an alien and her presidency is declared illegitimate... but keep in mind that unless an Author's Saving Throw somehow proves otherwise, Marsdin knowingly and flagrantly violated the U.S. Constitution's prohibition on anyone born outside the U.S. from being President. Note that this prohibition is not discriminatory against aliens, since it applies equally to humans who were born outside the United States.
    • Agent Liberty is a vicious, psychopathic speciesist demagogue, but he's quite right when he points out (as mentioned above) an alien willingly infiltrated and assumed the leadership of the highest office in the country. We're meant to perceive him as delusional and bigoted since the people of Earth have Supergirl and her allies to protect them, but it's rather hard to argue with his implication that, if Supergirl was ever to turn evil, the non-powered citizens would get ground into the dirt. Especially since we had an entire crossover depicting just how bad things would get under the rule of evil superhumans. Not to mention that Supergirl did actually turn evil once and it wasn't pretty. It's fairly reasonable that some people might fear that happening again.
  • Special Effect Failure: There's been some pretty heavy criticism and roasting of the CGI effects, specifically for the Martians. After the show moved to The CW, a new visual effects company came on board and.. well, it's pretty obvious the budget's not as high as it was on CBS. The decision to have Malefic in Martian form for most of his early appearances means that the weaknesses in CGI are more obvious, especially in this clip, where Malefic is overexpressive and very badly lit compared to his environment.
  • Tainted by the Preview: The first trailer divided fans pretty violently, with many declaring that the show looks more like a cheesy Chick Flick than a superhero show. The second one did a better job showing the superhero action but fans are still divided. In fact, when the pilot was leaked six months early there was serious speculation that it may have been done deliberately to give people more to talk about than the trailers, and show that the actual series wasn't as bad as they made it look.
  • Take That, Scrappy!:
    • Influenced by a Hate Plague, Kara tells Mon-El some home truths about their relationship in Season 2, which had a lot of criticism. That said, Mon-El was wrongly accused of never apologizing, when he has, as shown in this video.
    • Again in the 100th episode, Mxy states to Kara that he never knew what she saw in Mon-El.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The reveal of Kara in the super suit. Fans are divided on just about every aspect of it: muted colors like in Man of Steel, Arrow and The Flash (though like the latter two especially and as later seen in trailers, the lighting exaggerated that), having a skirt and her midriff not being exposed unlike the most recent versions, having leggings along with the skirt, the removal of the yellow background in the S shield, etc.. This more or less died down once the outfit was seen in natural lighting, showing that the colors were brighter than thought.
    • Similarly, her season 5 suit is something not everyone considers a winner - the red skirt being replaced by blue pants and everything about it darkening to Zack Snyder levels is seen to make her less visually interesting, and it ain't down to just missing the legs.
    • Jimmy Olsen being described in the casting call as an "alpha male" has raised some eyebrows, because the character is traditionally Adorkable. The trailer shows he has a much more affirmative personality along with a dose of Adaptational Attractiveness, going from a decent-looking guy to a full-blown hunk (the actor used to be a model). The fact that he's black in this version has also upset some people.
    • Kara's heat vision being white-hot blue, rather than the traditional reddish hue. A surprising number of comments have been made in regards to it. (Her Beam-O-War vs. Bizarro sort of proved them right, as it wasn't clear that Bizarro was using cold vision instead of a copycat heat vision.)
    • The perception that instead of getting her own character, Kara is essentially a clone of Superman/Clark Kent ("Superman with boobs"), with her personality, secret identity disguise, day job, supporting cast, and enemies largely adapted from previous versions of Superman.
    • A change within the series that was disliked is that Supergirl in Season 1 was her own character, while on Season 2 she is too absorbed on Mon-El.
    • Changing a blue sun to depower Kryptonians and kill males was badly received, since it was seen as a poor, convenient excuse to keep J'onn out of the battle.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Red Tornado is destroyed just seconds after gaining sentience, never getting any of the Heel–Face Turn from the comics. It's likely an unfortunate case of Real Life Writes the Plot, as creating that makeup job would have been hell on a weekly basis.
    • An even bigger waste as a result of Real Life Writes the Plot is Astra, the apparent Big Bad, who is killed off in episode 13 because her actress had gained a Broadway commitment.
    • Barry Allen was very wasted in the crossover. He barely does anything Kara or Winn couldn't have done, and even gets defeated by a meta when, given his experience with far more dangerous opponents, he should have literally run rings around her.
    • Maxwell Lord was dumped altogether since Season 2 and wasn't that exploited in Season 1.
    • Superman in season one since the main villains were Kryptonians, with some even being related to him; it makes little sense that he wouldn't get involved, especially with his cousin's life on the line.
    • Many fans feel this way about James Olsen's treatment in season 2, when he was demoted from being one of the most important supporting characters to rarely having more than three or four lines in an episode. In a perfect storm of this trope and They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot, his stints as Guardian and as the head of CatCo only came up in a handful of episodes, and time was instead spent on characters and relationships that were less popular and that viewers were less invested in.
    • Zor-El. Despite being Kara's father we only know a handful of facts about him. Even when it turns out Argo City survived he's killed offscreen. His New 52 Cyborg Superman form would have made a good seasonal antagonist for Kara.
    • Speaking of Cyborg Superman, the original version turns up in league with Lillian Luthor. He could've been a great villain, but instead he's so generically evil even his actor is bored by him. Agent Liberty from later on is basically what the true Hank Henshaw should have been.
    • Mercy Graves was introduced in Season 4 as a female villain with a past connection to Lena Luthor, one that had a long history in the comics, only to be unceremoniously killed off a few episodes later.
    • Similarly, Manchester Black was introduced in Season 4 as a morally grey Well-Intentioned Extremist who advocated dealing more harshly with the rising xenophobia in Supergirl's world. In particular, he seemed to have an agenda involving J'onn that was never clarified, as he was killed-off midseason and never mentioned again.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • A pretty common criticism of the pilot was that it felt pretty rushed, with a lot of things glanced over and not really explored. A lot of people have speculated that the producers wanted to do a two-hour pilot but had to cut it down. A speculation that became justified considering that Jeremy Jordan confirmed via Twitter that the flashback scenes involving Kara and Alex in the Manhunter episode were scenes originally shot for the pilot.
    • Cat finding out about Kara's Secret Identity at the end of "Hostile Takeover" could have had a lot of interesting ramifications for the ongoing Story Arc of the show, but Status Quo Is God kicks in in "Blood Bonds" and Cat is convinced to abandon her belief. Subverted when it was revealed that she knew all along that Kara was Supergirl but preferred not to push.
    • Alex keeping Kara Locked Out of the Loop concerning J'onn's true identity. Especially since it was established a couple episodes prior and had at least the potential for dramatic tension and irony, none of which was tapped in the least.
    • It's been argued that "For the Girl Who Has Everything" has a big missed opportunity after the Black Mercy crawls off Kara and doesn't then target J'onn.
    • One that can probably be simply put down to budget concerns: it briefly seems that Kara is going to have to spend the last two episodes of Season 1 having to deal with every supervillain she defeated in the past year (sans the White Martian, whom Non deemed too much trouble to deal with) all at once, but she's able to stop their escape and moves on to other concerns.
    • In "Myriad" it seemed like there would be a Superman/Supergirl team-up but no, Superman's affected by Myriad. When Non has someone close to Kara fight her, you'd think it would be the Myriad-affected Superman but no, it's Alex wearing a suit of Kryptonite. Thankfully the first two episodes of Season 2 have Clark visiting and teaming up with Kara. (We also get Kara having to face a brainwashed Clark.)
    • James Olsen becoming Guardian could have been better if he joined the D.E.O. instead of hiring Winn as his Mission Control. In that way, James could have had a much better development as a hero.
    • Lynda Carter plays the President of United States in the series. Many fans were hoping that it would be implied that the series was canon to Wonder Woman and that the president was secretly Wonder Woman several decades later. She alas is not Diana in disguise and is instead an alien. And going off that last part, her being an alien amounts to pretty much nothing in the grand scheme of the show's story. In fact, it's a popular theory that the show's writers planned to take this reveal somewhere very different, but were then stymied by Lynda Carter's schedule. Thankfully, this is rectified in Season 4 (no, she's not a superhero, but her alien nature does come into play.)
    • Samantha finds out she's actually destined to be a supervillain who destroys worlds, which she wants no part of. What seems like a quite intriguing story of her trying to Screw Destiny is done away with when her personality is simply forcibly overwritten, leaving her with no memory of it when she's not killing people. Pretty much all the fans also suspect that she only exists to die so that Alex can adopt her daughter Ruby. While this ended up not happening, it's still a popular guess for Andrew Kreisberg's original plan before it was changed after his firing.
  • Tough Act to Follow: The show had the guts to make an episode based on Alan Moore's classic Superman story For the Man Who Has Everything, despite Justice League already having done a very highly regarded adaptation of it (enough that it's the only serious adaptation of Moore's work that he likes). Not helping is the necessity to cut out the major roles played by Batman, Robin, and Wonder Woman.
  • Unfortunate Implications:
    • This review of the pilot notes that, for everything it gets right about female empowerment, there are no women of color in the main cast, straying uncomfortably into a white, straight view of feminism.
    • As unpopular as Kara/James was, some fans are still uncomfortable with an interracial romance being ended for barely any onscreen reason in favor of Kara hooking up with another white guy (definitely doesn't help that he's a former slave owner).
    • This article sums up a lot of people's feeling about Mon-El and his romance with Kara - specifically, that her character arc this season is more about making him better so he can date her as a reward.
    • This article goes into very specific details about the implications behind James being so Out of Focus during the second season, especially in light of the fact that Mon-El has gotten so much screen time at the expense of even Kara.
    • This article criticizes the lack of diversity of women the series has and that the attempts to diversify the cast were very poor; either they were background characters who ended up almost, if not totally, forgotten (M'gann, Roulette), or white actresses were cast to play them (Maggie Sawyer being portrayed by a tan Italian actress although Maggie was reimagined as Latina). The article also criticizes that white characters are put to fight against villainous people of color, like Roulette and the Worldkillers. Season five attempts to rectify this (the older sister of the Race Lifted James is now a regular, and while not a superhero, is definitely one of the good guys.)
    • The writing of Kara and William's romance has been harshly criticized due to some problematic clichés used. Aaron Young in CBR stated that the romance starting with them hating each other and William being a jerk to her (even as a facade) is promoting a relationship element that ends up in toxic relationships and that it promotes the idea that toxic men are actually nice if someone looks hard on them. While Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019) retconned him as not meeting Kara before, the relationship still has its problems. William asks Kara out and Kara plainly stating No (to dating) but William continues to pursue her and his attempts are encouraged by Alex, who basically tells Kara to date him. This comes off as a guy who has been rejected but doesn't take no for an answer being rewarded with a relationship with the object of his affections. The fact that this happened in an episode that aired on International Women's Day was pointed out by several reviewers including the Radio Times.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic:
    • Lena Luthor's plan to uplift humanity and give us superpowers is something Kara considers to be a terrible idea. In real life, that's more or less the basis of why human beings create technology, tools, and medicine so that we're less vulnerable. Given how many superheroes exist from accidents like the Flash or Firestorm, it doesn't seem like a bad idea at all.
    • Manchester Black is treated as an irredeemable Terrorist Without A Cause (and is literally stated to be such). However, his victims and targets are A Nazi by Any Other Name nationalists and terrorists who have murdered children. The comparison of "fascists" and "people who kill fascists" as being equally bad has offended a lot of fans, or at least isn't seen with the same level of Black-and-White Morality Kara ascribes to the situation. Even when Manchester Black attacks the White House, it's after the President has been revealed to have targeted refugee ships. That being said, all this does finally go out the window when he attempts to break the National City dam and kill everyone in the city just to torment J'onn.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • When Reactron shows up to attack Kara to get to Superman, Kara insists on not getting Clark's help, wanting to beat him by herself to show the city that she doesn't need Clark's help, and is shown getting upset when Maxwell Lord thanks Superman for saving him when it was Kara who freed him, and gets angry at James for calling Clark for help. While we're supposed to sympathize with Kara, it's hard to ignore the fact she's putting her ego before the safety of others by refusing help stopping a dangerous madman, especially as it's noted that Clark himself could never beat Reactron.
    • Kara's philosophical clashes with the DEO verge on this too. She strictly believes in Thou Shalt Not Kill, but she's working with a government security agency whose very job is to decide whether or not lethal force is necessary to combat paranormal threats. Her insistence on not wanting to kill her terrorist aunt and uncle does far more harm than good. This fades out after Season 1, which may imply Character Development.
    • The otherwise-likeable Superman takes it far too personally that J'onn has Kryptonite. It was not just an affair of trust, it is that not all Kryptonians are benevolent and even the benevolent ones can fall into Not Himself status (as Superman himself has done in literally half his appearances).
    • Kara when he is dismissive of Guardian. She believes herself to be able to define who may or may not be a hero, self-righteously calls him a vigilante, and distrusts him for having a secret identity, not to mention seeming to feel that a Badass Normal is not good enough to fight crime.
    • Ironically, if she knew who Guardian was, she could have made an argument that he's too reliant on his suit, and that even she was forced to go through intense hand-to-hand training before she could start out in the field. But that's one point which is never addressed.
    • President Marsdin is seen as practically a superhero in her own right by the main cast, especially by Kara. However Marsdin's reckless jeopardizing of lives (like Cat Grant's) during the Daxamite invasion leaves her looking a lot less likable as does the utterly unquestioning willingness of the heroes to cover up her identity as a non-human. Talking about that, such a plot twist makes hard not to think of her as an usurper, since presidents should be citizens (US Presidents are actually required to be born in the United States, not just naturalized citizens) to avoid cultural invasions and she must have bypassed the law with false documents to be a president. When she discusses with Kara the fact that she's legally illegitimate, she never seems apologetic at all for the fact that she is blatantly breaking the law which she swore to uphold. It also doesn't help that the show makes a few references to the Donald Trump administration like Maggie's father saying "They're talking about building a wall to keep us out," with the crew apparently not thinking through that it would be Marsdin doing that stuff.
    • Lena's behavior in Season 5 includes turning Eve into a Meat Puppet against her will and plotting to brainwash humanity. Sure, she's clearly portrayed as a Well-Intentioned Extremist, but the audience is generally expected to have much more sympathy towards her than she actually merits. However, the episode "It's a Super Life" has Kara acknowledge that she shouldn't blame herself for Lena's decisions, since it was her who chose to do evil things.
    • Additionally, Lena getting angry at Kara for not revealing her Secret Identity. Kara had no particular reason to tell Lena her identity, and multiple good reasons not to (Lena being used as a hostage or falling victim to mind control/telepathy, amongst others), yet she feels betrayed by Kara taking sensible security precautions.
    • In the show's 100th episode, Kara has a chance to go back in time and save Lena from being evil. After a few bad tries, she decides that it just isn't going to work. Unfortunately, it's a little less understandable given that a certain other hero went through over 14 BILLION potential timelines until he found the one he wanted not so long ago.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Siobhan intends to sell a story to Perry White about Supergirl letting a villain go free. You'd expect that when an affected Kara distracts her she would hide the e-mail from her computer (or at the very least, close the lid). Instead, Siobhan leaves it visible. It's unclear whether she knows Perry White at all, but it's implied that he's just as unwilling as Cat to accept someone who goes behind her employer's back.
    • President Olivia flies to straight to National City to respond to the Daxamite invasion.
      You'd Expect: The President to land somewhere nearby, go to a heavily fortified and secret location, THEN communicate with the Daxamite Queen, or at least arm Air Force One with some sci-fi shields and weaponry to make it a genuine threat.
      Instead: The President flies straight up to the Daxamite mothership with no protection whatsoever except a couple of standard fighters, contacts the Daxamite Queen and threatens her, and to nobody's great surprise Air Force One is effortlessly shot down by the Daxamites, killing everybody on board except for the President herself and Cat Grant who was saved by Supergirl. The only thing that keeps the President out of Too Dumb to Live territory is that she happens to be an alien resilient enough to take a plane being blown up and a several thousand foot fall like it's nothing. Even Kara herself lampshades how stupid this was.
    • Mary, Winn's mother, takes apart one of the Flying Monkey robots that attacked the DEO, finding out who built it in the process.
      You'd Expect: Mary to tell the rest of the DEO what she's found and where to find the one responsible, letting the group catch the villain easily.
      Instead: Mary steals a gun from the DEO storage and heads to the villain's lair, without any backup or even notifying anyone where she is going.
      You'd Also Expect: Mary to shoot the villain during the numerous opportunities she had to do so.
      Instead: Mary just stands there pointing a gun at the villain.
      Result: Naturally, Mary gets captured and used as a hostage to force Winn to come to them, forcing the DEO to rush off to save her at the villain's own lair, with the villain well aware they are coming and thus prepared to face them.
    • In the season 2 finale, Lillian Luthor reveals that she knows she is Supergirl. When Kara asks her why she didn't tell Lena, Lillian tells her that Lena will work it out herself and hate Kara for hiding the truth. Kara ignores this coded warning and spends most of the next two seasons actively hiding her identity from Lena. She even mentions Lillian's warning when discussing Supergirls issues with Lena. When Kara finally does tell Lena, it is far too late, as Lex already told her, and as per Lillian's warning, Lena now hates Kara and wants revenge.
      • Subverted however. Based on the alternate timelines seen in "It's a Super Life" on the idea of Kara telling Lena she's Supergirl, it was actually the right move.
  • What Do You Mean Its Not Political:
    • The episode "Strange Visitor From Another Planet" aired right before the start of the 2016 U.S. Presidential campaign. With this in mind, it's fairly easy to see the parallels between Senator Crane's anti-alien rhetoric and the current real-life debates about Syrian refugees, legal and illegal immigration, and the like.
    • The two-part season finale of 2017 was called "Resist"/"Nevertheless, She Persisted". Both of these phrases were used in that year as definitively anti-Trump, and had the plot of having to go to last resorts to chase out a delusional and ruthless tyrant who wanted to take over the world for petty reasons after pretending to be a friendly face and manipulating the heroes.
  • Win Back The Crowd:
    • As noted above, Claire Holt was the favorite to play Kara - resulting in some feeling disappointed when Melissa Benoist was cast. But after watching the pilot, most of those detractors changed their minds. It's widely agreed by fans and critics that Melissa Benoist's Kara is one of the best things about the show.
    • Berlanti has assured fans that the show's version of Superman will be kinder, gentler and more overtly heroic than his movie counterpart, winning over Superman fans who detest the Darker and Edgier DCEU version of the characters. That said, the show doesn't pull punches, either, for those who were wary that the show would be too Lighter and Softer. The action can get quite vicious and brutal, straining the boundaries of what a broadcast show will allow.
    • Tyler Hoechlin was an unexpected casting choice to play the legendary Man of Steel. But after his performance in the Season 2 premiere, he became a fan favorite.
    • The approach of Reign as a better executed big bad than the unclear ones from the previous seasons has been well received.
    • Jon Cryer's performance as Lex Luthor revived interest for the series because of his unique way of portraying the character and for the effective demonstration of his manipulative skills.
  • The Woobie:
    • Kara. Not only does she have to live with the memory of her dead planet, a fact made more heartbreaking considering that, unlike her cousin, she actually has memories of her time there, there's also the fact that her mission to protect her cousin was a complete failure. The person she was supposed to protect is now not only the most legendary hero of all time, but also someone she's having a hard time measuring up to. She also has to contend with the fact that a family member that Kara grew up with and loved is now not only a megalomaniacal villain itching to take over the world, but also seems to show no bones towards the idea of killing her own niece. And, all the while, she's being scrutinized on her heroics, including getting body-shamed on the radio, and has a large number of very powerful alien and metahuman criminals wanting to kill her to get back at her mom or at Superman himself. She is later forced to send her big love to another world and is understandably heartbroken. When he returns, he is married.
    • J'onn J'onzz, the Martian Manhunter. The Last of His Kind after all the other Green Martians were wiped out by the White Martians, he fled to Earth, only to get unfairly branded as dangerous by the DEO and hunted like an animal. After the man leading the charge against him was killed due to his teammate Jeremiah Danvers realizing the truth and pulling a Heroic Sacrifice, J'onn promised to look after his daughters, which he pulled off by assuming the identity of the man who'd been hunting him, Hank Henshaw, and was forced to act just as bigoted towards aliens to avoid arousing suspicion. When he revealed himself to stop Kara (who was Drunk on the Dark Side at the time), his own agency locked him up.
    • Lena Luthor was adopted by a mother who clearly doesn't love her, and has been forced to live with the fact that her adopted brother is a monster who tried to have her killed. In addition, their actions mean that she is seen as being like them, and Kara is really the only person who trusts her, with Lena even calling her her only friend. In addition, it's shown she spends her Thanksgiving alone in her office. And then she had to kill her old flame, with whom she had just been rekindling a romance.
    • M'gann, and considering her race, Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds. She's a White Martian who despises what she is to the point where she chooses to manifest as a Green Martian instead. She is shocked and warmed to see a Green Martian survived, but can't tell him what she really is. When she's forced to cure him, she knows it'll turn him into a White Martian, something she abhors, but she'll do anything to save his life. When he finds out, he doesn't care or even believe that she's a Token Heroic Orc, and locks her up indefinitely, even though she did nothing wrong. Mercifully, three episodes later, when M'gann is at her most vulnerable (being assaulted by the other White Martians through a psychic attack), J'onn comes to see the kind of person she really is and helps her through a mind meld, forgiving (and making peace with) her for her heritage as well as releasing her from the DEO.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?:
    • Some are saying the guy cast as Winslow Schott would make for a better Jimmy Olsen than the guy actually playing Jimmy Olsen. The pilot does give some justification to the divergence: due to the long gap between Superman and Supergirl's debuts (over a decade), James Olsen is now Older and Wiser.
    • Melissa Benoist got some of this before the show began, mainly because a lot of people wanted an actress like Claire Holt to play Supergirl. This one has largely subsided after the show aired, with many people liking Benoist's performance, even those who don't like the show itself.
    • The casting of Italia Ricci, who is Italian-Canadian and quite clearly Italian in appearance, to play pale, blue eyed, fair haired, Irish Siobhan Smythe. Even though the show changed Siobhan from being Irish (as she is the comics) to just an American of Irish descent, her olive skintone still raised some eyebrows.
    • The casting of Tyler Hoechlin as Superman. Similar to Teddy Sears' casting as "Jay Garrick" in The Flash Season 2, many feel that he is way too young to portray an older and experienced Superman being only a year older than Melissa Benoist, despite the fact that it was established since the Pilot Episode that Clark is already in his mid-twenties when a still thirteen year old Kara landed on Earth. That and he was chosen over fan-favorites such as a Role Reprise from Tom Welling, Matt Bomer, Joe Manganiello and the likes, all of whom are closer in age to what Clark is supposed to be in the show. The age issue is Handwaved in his debut episode, where it's said that adult Kryptonians age slower on Earth due to the yellow sun (which was already established in the comics), and Hoechlin managed to Win the Crowd when they saw him in action.
    • Maggie Sawyer is explicitly stated as being of Mexican descent (second generation) being played by a non-Latina Italian actress. This got worse with a guest appearance from genuinely Hispanic Carlos Bernard as her father.
    • The casting of Jon Cryer as Lex Luthor has raised some eyebrows due to the fact that he's 53, meaning he's 18 years older than the actress playing his sister note  and only five years younger than the actress playing his mother. However, Cryer's performance was acclaimed and the actor was quickly embraced as a great Lex Luthor.
    • Staz Nair as William Dey, Kara's new and rumored to be endgame love interest. What makes the casting bad, is that he and Melissa Benoist share zero chemistry and this should have been apparent as he initially auditioned for James Olsen and lost out to Mehcad Brooks. Mehcad Brooks and Melissa Benoist had very little and awkward romantic chemistry. So, to cast someone as Kara's love interest who initially was not deemed as good as someone else who failed in the role has let to WTF comments on many online forums and Social Media accounts.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • Red Tornado looks like a cheap Halloween costume, rather than professional makeup and costuming. And he looks more brown than red, as if he is made of chocolate. See for yourself. Though that last part turned out to just be the color grading on the photo, as he is quite red in the episode itself.
    • Indigo's costume and make-up came under criticism from fans and even drew comparisons to Mystique. (Mind you, that's a case of Mis-blamed; yes, she does look like someone took Mystique, stuck a Brainiac symbol on her head, and hoped Marvel's lawyers didn't notice... and the comic version has looked exactly like that from day one.)
    • Silver Banshee's costume looks more like an aggressive Halloween cosplayer than supervillain. While there is some justification - since Livewire and Siobhan had to produce a costume quickly, it still looks iffy.
    • The real Hank Henshaw's "Cyborg Superman" getup consists of a cheap-looking metal half mask. Even David Harewood has criticized this.
    • Brainiac 5's costume was poorly received, especially the white wig which was ridiculous. The character had a good reception, but his costume did not. The crew were paying attention and quickly gave him a human hologram filter.

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report