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Lupin is a French mystery/caper thriller series created by George Kay and François Uzan, and directed by Louis Leterrier, Marcela Said, Ludovic Bernard and Hugo Gélin. It began streaming on Netflix on January 8, 2021. It is not related to Lupin III, though the inspiration is the same.

The series stars Omar Sy in the role of Assane Diop, a professional thief whose father Babakar, an immigrant from Senegal, died in his prison cell after being framed for the theft of an expensive diamond necklace that once belonged to Marie Antoinette by his employer, the wealthy and powerful Hubert Pellegrini.

Assane, inspired by his love for Arsène Lupin novels after Babakar gave him one for his 14th birthday, sets out to get revenge on the Pellegrini family and find proof of his father's innocence, using his charisma and mastery of thievery, subterfuge and disguise to expose Hubert's crimes, often with the help of his best friend Benjamin. However, Assane struggles to balance these activities with his familial duties to his ex-wife Claire and their young son Raoul. And now a junior police detective, who is himself a huge fan of the Lupin stories, has begun to connect the dots with regards to Assane's activities.

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In addition to Sy, the series stars Ludivine Sagnier as Claire, Antoine Gouy as Benjamin Ferel, Soufiane Guerrab as Youssef Guédira, Hervé Pierre as Hubert Pellegrini and Clotilde Hesme as Juliette Pellegrini.

A second season was released on June 11, 2021, and a third, scheduled to premiere in 2022, is currently being filmed.


Lupin provides examples of:

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    A to H 
  • The '90s: The flashbacks to Assane's youth with his father, the Pellegrinis, Claire and Benjamin take place in 1995. The cars seen in the streets, the fact that francs (rather than euros) are being used as currency, Benjamin's shaggy hairstyle and Claire's passion for denim are all era-appropriate.
  • Actor Allusion:
    • There are a number of references to Intouchables, the film which first made Omar Sy (as Driss) an international success:
      • Assane's dancing to the Four Tops in his apartment seems to be a nod to Driss dancing to "Boogie Wonderland" by Earth, Wind & Fire.
      • In Intouchables, Driss steals a Fabergé egg from Philippe, his wealthy employer. In Lupin, Assane repeats the feat while scamming a rich older woman.
      • There's also a scene in which Assane states that Hubert Pellegrini is "untouchable."
    • Assane's final disguise as a fireman looks a lot like Omar Sy's Bishop get-up from X-Men: Days of Future Past.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Generally averted for Assane, with the exception of one moment when he's pretty much forced to grovel and pester in order to get an increasingly irate Belkacem to reveal that Raoul wasn't incinerated in Léonard's BMW.
  • Alleged Lookalikes: Lampshaded heavily with Assane and the man whose place he takes in prison; both are of west African origin but don't particularly look alike in any way, and both are aware of this. Even so, none of the prison officials seem to notice the switch.
  • All for Nothing: Assane's decision to appear on The Other Edition. Not only does it fail to take down Hubert, it also leads directly to Fabienne's murder as well as essentially every major problem that Assane faces from there on out.
  • All That Glitters: The necklace that the three Loan Sharks attempt to make off with is a fake made for Assane by Benjamin.
  • Alternate Universe: The series is set in 2020 (as seen on various newspapers and with a mention of Raoul's birthday on December 11, 2020), but there isn't a single visible sign of the COVID-19 Pandemic (restaurants are open while they weren't in France back then, and no one wears a protective mask), which 2020 will be forever associated with. It would probably have been too impractical to include it in the plot, and half of the series was filmed before it broke out.
  • Amicable Exes: Assane and Claire have remained on good terms. Well, until Raoul gets kidnapped. Although by the end of Part 2, they appear to have made up.
  • Anachronic Order: The present timeline is regularly intercut with flashbacks which contextualize the events occurring currently, or represent analogous situations which Assane remembers in order to figure out the best course of action.
  • The Annotated Edition: Assane gives Raoul his old copy of the Arsène Lupin book, which has his own notes scribbled all over it.
  • Apathetic Citizens: While Assane and Claire's backs are turned, Raoul gets abducted by Léonard. From a crowded beach, in broad daylight. And none of the many people standing near him seem to have noticed or cared, aside from Guédira.
  • Aristocrats Are Evil: Played straight with Hubert Pellegrini, but downplayed for his wife and daughter, who respectively come across as being Weak-Willed and a bit snobby but generally well-meaning.
  • Artistic License:
    • Raoul's fourteenth birthday is established to be on December 11th, 2020. However, this fell on a Friday, and December 11th is not typically part of the Christmas holiday as observed by French schools, which means that Raoul would have had to have skipped school in order to take a day trip to Étretat with his parents. No indication is given that he did so.
    • The Wikipedia of the show's universe apparently has some very lax editing standards, given that Assane is able to create entire detailed entries for nonexistent people such as Paul Sernine. Were this Real Life, something like that would have been taken down immediately.
  • Artistic License – Biology: Assane and Claire's conversation on "Raoul's bridge" in the 2006 flashback suggests that they are aware that their unborn child is going to be a boy. However, it's also strongly implied that Claire had discovered that she was pregnant very shortly before revealing it to Assane. A baby's biological sex can only be determined around 20 weeks into a pregnancy (at which point most women have begun "showing").
  • Artistic License – Geography:
    • The series suggests that there are train connections directly from Le Havre to Étretat; these were discontinued years earlier.
    • The various journeys taken between Paris and Normandy seem to take anywhere between 2 and 7 hours, given the changing daylight hours. An actual car ride from the middle of Paris to Étretat would last around three hours.
    • Benjamin's shop is located in Saint-Ouen, a northern suburb of Paris. However, right after he flees the shop when he and Assane are found out, he's suddenly walking around Bercy, a neighborhood in the southeast of the city.
  • Artistic License – History: The Marie Antoinette necklace doesn't look like its historical counterpart (which has disappeared, but copies have survived).
  • Artistic License – Law: Because Hubert's confession to all of his crimes was clearly coerced under duress by Assane, it would almost certainly be considered inadmissible in Real Life.
  • Assassins Are Always Betrayed: Léonard is murdered on Hubert's orders after having screwed up too many times.
  • At the Opera Tonight: A lot of the tenth episode takes place at a fundraising concert thrown by Juliette.
  • Auction: The necklace heist takes place during the object's auction sale. The price starts at €17 million.
  • Avengers Assemble: Assane, Benjamin and Philippe in Chapter 10.
  • The Bad Guys Are Cops: Over the course of the series, we learn that there is an insane level of corruption in the Paris police department, starting straight from the top. However, Laugier, Belkacem and Guédira avert this trope.
  • Balkan Bastard:
    • Bogdan, the thug who threatens Assane in prison, seems to be one of these.
    • The name of the sex trafficker whom Assane accuses Dumont of having accepted bribes from ("Damir Cilic") indicates that he's of ex-Yugoslav ancestry, most likely either Serbian, Croatian or Bosnian.
  • Bathroom Breakout: After being arrested, Assane escapes Belkacem and her gendarmerie associate Hector by claiming that he needs to use a gas station bathroom. When Assane is alone with Hector in the rather nasty-looking stall, he manages to remove his handcuffs and uses them to attach the unfortunate policeman to a pipe. After leaving, he steals a car and drives off. When Belkacem finds out what has happened, she is extremely angry.
  • Batman Gambit:
    • The Marie Antoinette necklace heist has Assane expecting his gang to betray him and turn all the police attention on themselves like thugs of their kind usually do, thereby allowing him to steal the necklace under everyone's noses while throwing the fake one on the ground.
    • Assane understands Juliette's nostalgia for their old fling well enough to know exactly what to do and say to her so that she'll fall further and further into his arms and turn on her father.
  • Bear Hug: Assane gives these to Raoul.
  • Beauty Equals Goodness: Assane, Claire and Juliette are all attractive people, while Benjamin and Guédira are attractive Nerds. Hubert Pellegrini and Commissioner Dumont, meanwhile, are squat and balding.
  • Becoming the Mask: In Assane's words, "I am Lupin."
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Assane and Claire spend a lot of the train ride to Étretat playfully bickering.
  • Betty and Veronica: With Assane as Archie, Claire is the caring and down-to-earth Betty to Juliette's more daring and outgoing Veronica. Due to their respective hair colors, they also qualify as Light Feminine and Dark Feminine. Fittingly, Juliette is drawn to Assane's more roguish side, as opposed to Claire who falls completely for Assane when he describes himself as a "gentleman."
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Hubert Pellegrini, his assassins, and the police all function as antagonists in the series, although (aside from Dumont) the last of these may be more accurately described as Hero Antagonists, since their main desire is to do their job properly by capturing a notorious criminal. And by the end, the three-officer unit of Laugier, Belkacem and Guédira have firmly crossed over into the good camp, as they're the ones who wind up arresting Hubert and Dumont.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • Guédira, when he saves Raoul from getting burned alive by Léonard.
    • Guédira, Belkacem and Laugier when they arrest Dumont while allowing Assane to walk free, for the time being at least.
  • Big Guy, Little Guy: Benjamin and Philippe certainly look like little guys when compared to Assane.
  • Birthday Episode: Chapters 5 and 6 take place on December 11, the birthday of both Raoul and Maurice Leblanc (the creator of the Arsène Lupin character). It's not one of Raoul's better birthdays.
  • A Birthday, Not a Break:
    • Apparently, Babakar died around the time of his son's birthday. After the funeral, Assane finds the present (an Arsène Lupin book) that his father had intended to give to him.
    • Poor Raoul gets kidnapped and nearly killed on his birthday.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The ending to Part 2, which has Assane, having seen off both Hubert and Dumont, finally reuniting with his family but telling them that he needs to leave town for a while to keep them safe.
  • Black-and-Gray Morality: Sure, Hubert Pellegrini is a completely unrepentant Jerkass on every level, but Assane has certainly done questionable things as well...
  • Black and Nerdy: Babakar, Assane and Raoul are all Lupin-loving nerds.
  • Black Is Bigger in Bed: A young Juliette invokes this when seducing 14 year old Assane when he comes at the house of the Pelligrinis... even though the thing she ends up saying is that she heard that Black people "can't swim well."
  • Blackmail: In order to extract a confession from Dumont about his actions regarding Babakar's imprisonment, Assane threatens to tell the beleaguered commissioner's wife about all of his illegal dealings.
  • Black-Tie Infiltration: Assane gets into Juliette's concert dressed in a full tuxedo.
  • Bodybag Trick: Employed by Assane to get out of prison after faking suicide.
  • Book Safe: When he was 14, Assane hollowed out the Bible he was given to hide Arsène Lupin novels in it.
  • Boring Insult: After Assane breaks off his and Juliette's affair in order to commit to his relationship with Claire, Juliette complains that Claire's name is boring, and that this means that her personality must be boring as well. Later on, when she and Assane meet in the present day, Juliette insinuates that Claire's life is dull and unfulfilling.
  • Both Sides Have a Point: Assane has every right to be pissed off at Claire for selling him out to Hubert Pellegrini in order to get Raoul back. However, Claire is also not wrong to tell Raoul that Assane is dangerous and untrustworthy, considering that he lied to both of them constantly and his actions led to Raoul's near-murder.
  • Bottle Episode: A large portion of the third episode takes place in Assane's interrogation room.
  • Brand X:
    • "Deli + Eats" stands in for Uber Eats.
    • Dumont's Siri/Alexa-like virtual assistant is called "Circe."
  • Break the Badass: Assane spends much of Chapter 6 in an anxious rage while hunting down Léonard and Raoul, completely unlike his usual self.
  • Broken Pedestal:
    • Assane, during the period in which he thinks that Babakar was truly responsible for the necklace theft.
    • Juliette experiences this when she finds out that the father she's been close with her entire life is manipulative, murderous and wanted to steal millions of euros from her own foundation.
  • Brutal Brawl: Several, but Assane's fight with Pascal in the final episode stands out in particular.
  • Call-Back: The final scene on "Raoul's bridge" is a reference to the 2006 flashback sequence in which Assane and Claire choose Raoul's name, and incorporates elements from other previous conversations between the two.
  • The Cameo: Mathieu Lamboley, the composer of the series' soundtrack, conducts the orchestra in Chapter 10.
  • The Caper: The theft of the Marie Antoinette's necklace at the Louvre Museum at the start of the series, with Assane mounting his own Caper Crew for that purpose.
  • Casting Gag: This isn't the first time that Ludivine Sagnier and Clotilde Hesme have played women in love with the same man.
  • The Chase: Assane steals a car and pursues Léonard through Normandy in order to recover Raoul.
  • Cheer Up Episode: Benjamin attempts to lift Assane's spirits after Fabienne's death.
  • Chekhov's Exhibit: The moment we see Marie-Antoinette's necklace displayed in its transparent case at the Louvre, it's clear that something is going to happen to it.
  • Chekhov's Gunman:
    • Two prisoners that Assane meets in Episode 2 reappear in Episode 8 disguised as police officers and meeting with Juliette.
    • Philippe Courbet, Hubert's accountant, is an accomplice of Assane and Benjamin.
  • Chevalier vs. Rogue: The teenaged Claire invokes this trope near verbatim when she claims that there are two kinds of men (and claims not to like either category, although she willingly accepts Assane as a companion even after designating him as a "chevalier"). Assane later argues that he falls into a third type, the gentleman.
  • Chilly Reception:
    • Assane gets one in prison.
    • Léonard, Assane and Guédira all experience this in the sleepy Normandy town of Bourneville. It's implied that this is because none of the three are white (Assane and Léonard are Black while Guédira is North African).
  • Clear My Name: Outside of getting revenge against the Pellegrini family, Assane's main drive is to prove that his deceased father was not guilty of stealing Marie-Antoinette's diamond necklace and was framed for it instead. By the end of Part 2, he's also forced to prove that he's not a murderer.
  • Cliffhanger:
    • The ending of the fifth episode has Raoul getting kidnapped, Claire and Assane desperately searching for him, and Assane finally coming face to face with Guédira.
    • Chapter 6's conclusion leads the viewer (and Assane) to believe that Raoul has been killed.
    • Chapter 7 ends with Claire telling Assane to run away before he can be caught by the police.
  • Commonality Connection: Claire sometimes visits Benjamin to ask him how Assane is or what he is doing, and the two are depicted as being good friends.
  • The Con: The series isn't short on them.
  • Consistent Clothing Style:
    • Assane and his trenchcoats, flat caps, Fred Perry jackets and Air Jordans.
    • Benjamin usually wears skinny jeans, button-down shirts and brown overcoats.
    • Léonard is easily distinguished by his habit of wearing a long beige trenchcoat all the time.
  • Convenient Escape Boat: In the last episode, Assane jumps into a speedboat in order to escape the police, and begins cruising up the Seine.
  • Conveniently Timed Attack from Behind: Just when it seems like Dumont is going to capture Assane, Laugier, Belkacem and Guédira arrive and arrest him for corruption.
  • Cool Bike: To help her recapture the adrenaline-fuelled days of her youth, Assane takes Juliette on a motorcycle joyride through Paris.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: One of Assane's capers sees him hide Dumont in City Hall—the place he'd originally kidnapped him from. It's a completely ridiculous idea and it works exactly as Assane expected it to.
  • Crystal-Ball Scheduling: While it's not a direct adaptation of the Arsène Lupin stories, it essentially updates them for the twenty-first century, with Assane recreating many of Lupin's famous heists, and with many of the other characters being inspired by actual Lupin characters. Usually, in-story, this is referenced by someone in the episode reading the corresponding Lupin adventure, and at least in the early episodes the stories were in publishing order.
  • The Cuckoolander Was Right: The other police officers are alternately amused or dismayed by Guédira's attempts to link the crimes they are investigating with the Arsène Lupin stories; however, this makes him the only one who is able to deduce what Assane's plans really are. Eventually, Laugier and Belkacem realize that he was correct about essentially everything and begin to trust his insights more and more.
  • Curtain Call: Chapter 10 sees almost every major character converge on the concert hall where Assane plans to expose Hubert's crimes once and for all. The only two that aren't there (Claire and Raoul) get their own storyline at the end of the episode.
  • Dancing with Myself: While making dinner for himself and J'accuse, Assane dances to "Reach Out (I'll Be There)" by the Four Tops. He doesn't realize that Léonard is being strangled to death by Pascal in the next room.
  • Darker and Edgier: The tone of the series shifts towards the somber with Fabienne's death, and becomes outright dark with Raoul's kidnapping. Once the latter arc is resolved, however, the lightness of the early episodes returns (to an extent at least).
  • Dating Catwoman: Assane and Juliette have this dynamic when they're together, since Juliette is the daughter of Assane's biggest enemy.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Many of the episodes shift the focus onto Assane's relationships with a particular supporting character:
    • Chapter 3 - Dumont
    • Chapter 4 - Fabienne
    • Chapter 5 - Claire
    • Chapter 6 - Guédira
    • Chapter 7 - Raoul
    • Chapter 8 - Juliette
    • Chapter 9 - Benjamin
  • Deal with the Devil:
    • Dumont's descent into villainy began when he accepted Hubert's proposal to frame Babakar for the necklace theft.
    • Claire agrees to turn Assane over to Hubert in exchange for his giving Raoul back to her, although she regrets it and warns Assane before he can get caught.
  • Death Glare: Assane, when he's extracting Hubert's confession.
  • Declaration of Protection: Assane makes one to Claire regarding their child, after she tells him that she is pregnant.
  • Deconstruction: The series gradually becomes one to the Lupin stories, as it shows how Assane's life of crime and habitual lying puts strain on his relationship with his loved ones. By the end of Part 2, Assane gets to experience the full reality of being an internationally famous criminal, including being forced to go on the run for possibly the rest of his life.
  • Delivery Guy Infiltration: In Chapter 10, Benjamin gets into the opera house by posing as a worker unloading computer equipment. Once inside, he changes into a security guard's uniform.
  • Destroy the Security Camera: Part of Assane's plan for the Louvre heist involves the loan sharks disabling all of the security cameras.
  • Did I Mention It's Christmas?: Although a large portion of the series takes place in mid to late December, there is no indication whatsoever that it's Christmas time, aside from a couple of newspaper headlines ("Merry Christmas, Mr. Johnson," in reference to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson).
  • Did Not Die That Way: Babakar didn't commit suicide; rather, he was murdered by Léonard.
  • Didn't Think This Through: One of the three loan sharks in the first episode is tasked with procuring a getaway car; instead of getting a low-key vehicle with plenty of room for all of them fit inside, he arrives with an ostentatious Ferrari, which he barely knows how to drive. Under the stress of being chased by the police, he winds up crashing it in the glass roof of the Louvre Museum's underground section, and all three get arrested in short order.
  • Diegetic Soundtrack Usage: The main themes of the series crop up in the symphony that the orchestra is playing in Chapter 10.
  • Disney Death: Assane tosses Léonard out of a window. From the way he lands, it seems like he should have broken his back, but he manages to get up with little difficulty and lights his BMW on fire, with Raoul locked inside.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me!: After Babakar dies in prison, Anne offers to help Assane in any way she can. Assane, however, wants nothing to do with the Pellegrinis and tells her to go fuck herself.
  • Dreaming of a White Christmas: Averted, as no snow is seen although a lot of the series takes place in December. Significant snowfall in this part of France is rare even in winter. (It's also because many of these scenes were filmed in the summer, due to COVID-related issues.)
  • Dude, Not Funny!: When he and Assane are speeding through Normandy while chasing down Léonard and Raoul, Guédira mentions that he needs to make a call to his (fictional) wife, joking that otherwise she will think that he was kidnapped. He stops talking after Assane gives him a withering look.
  • Dumb Muscle: Kevin, one of the loan sharks who "helps" Assane in Chapter 1.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: Fabienne: "A good journalist never reveals her sources..."
  • Early Personality Signs:
    • Assane is characterized by his ability to think quickly in a crisis and his willingness to attempt daring feats. His fourteen-year-old self demonstrates this by attempting to escape out a window rather than being taken to social services after Babakar's death.
    • Benjamin is always willing to help Assane out, but prefers to do it in a more "behind-the-scenes" fashion. He assists Assane in his theft of a violin...by offering to stand outside and keep watch.
    • In 1995, Claire tries to stop Assane from fighting their bullies on her behalf (but he does it anyway, and she winds up giving him an After Action Patch Up). In the present, although she still cares about Assane, she prefers to keep herself and their son far removed from his criminal life.
  • Easily Impressed: While searching Assane's apartment for evidence following Léonard's murder, Guédira is fascinated by his Arsène Lupin memorabilia. Since many of the items themselves are fairly mundane, Laugier and Belkacem find this amusing.
  • Elegant Classical Musician: A number of them appear during the concert sequence in the final episode.
  • Elevator Action Sequence: Assane knocks out two Hyatt security guards in an elevator while dressed as a waiter.
  • Emergency Refuelling: As Belkacem drives Assane back to Paris, she finds that she is running low on fuel. Her pit stop at a gas station allows Assane to escape captivity.
  • Empathy Doll Shot: Chapter 6 closes with a shot of the top-hatted Arsène Lupin action figure, that Assane had given to Raoul for his birthday earlier that day, lying on the ground. Subverted in that although, at this point, both Assane and the viewer are led to believe that Raoul was killed by Léonard, the next episode reveals that Guédira managed to save him in the nick of time.
  • Enemy Eats Your Lunch: In episode 4, Assane appears suddenly at Dumont's table and announces his presence by biting into his piece of bread and jam. Assane then dips it into his coffee, to deepen the insult.
  • Engineered Public Confession: The final episode sees Assane enter Hubert's box in the concert hall and hold a knife to his throat, threatening him with death unless he confesses to all of his crimes. Unbeknownst to Hubert, Assane records the whole thing and sends it to Guédira, who uses it as evidence to arrest him after the concert is finished.
  • Epic Fail: Assane's theft of the violin ends up being this when he gets caught in the middle of Claire's audition, particularly since Claire gets apprehended as well, destroying any possible future she had as a professional violinist.
  • Evidence Dungeon: A rare example in that it belongs to the protagonist, but Assane's apartment is crammed with Arsène Lupin-related stuff. When the police raid it, they realize that Guédira's theory about the Lupin connection wasn't so far-fetched, after all!
  • Evil-Detecting Dog: Fabienne's dog, J'accuse, is trained to bark whenever he hears the name "Pellegrini."
  • Expy: The crux of the series is that Assane is a modern day Arsène Lupin, as in a Gentleman Thief and Phantom Thief who pulls off high profile heists, but with his own different background. He styles himself after the character In-Universe, having been a fan since his teenage years.
    • Not just Assane, either. Many of the other characters are at least inspired by people encountered by the actual Arsène Lupin.
      • Youssef Guédira is essentially an updated version of Inspector Ganimard, a police officer who makes repeated attempts to catch Lupin. This gets referenced In-Universe, with Assane frequently referring to Guédira as "Ganimard." Somewhat subverted in that Guédira is more clever and insightful than his literary counterpart, who relies more than anything on dogged willpower (like Laugier and Belkacem).
      • Babakar is largely based on Lupin's mother Henriette d'Andrésy (who was also mistreated while working for a wealthy family); however, his death in prison appears to have been taken from the fate of Lupin's father Theophraste.
      • Claire may have been inspired by Clarisse d'Etigues, Lupin's childhood sweetheart who was largely unaware of his criminal activity.
      • Josephine Balsamo, one of the major antagonists in the Lupin books, has her characterization split between Hubert and Juliette Pellegrini.
  • Extremely Short Timespan: Not counting the flashbacks, the fifth, sixth and seventh episodes together take place entirely on December 11th and 12th, 2020. The series as a whole spans mid-October to late December.
  • Fake Charity: Played with. Juliette, like all of her wealthy donors, fully believes that her foundation for disadvantaged children is entirely legitimate. However, Hubert has set things up so that 85% of the donations go to a personal offshore bank account in the Cayman Islands, which essentially renders the entire project a scam. Luckily, Assane and Benjamin manage to reroute the money back to the foundation.
  • Fallen-on-Hard-Times Job: Subverted. At first it appears that Assane's job as a janitor at the Louvre is this, but it's all just an act.
  • Family Business: Hubert appears to be mentoring Juliette to succeed him as the head of the Pellegrini business empire.
  • Father's Quest: Assane rampages across the Normandy countryside in order to retrieve Raoul from the clutches of his enemies.
  • Females Are More Innocent: Anne and Juliette Pellegrini are, respectively, uninvolved in and unaware of Hubert's crimes.
  • Feuding Families: The Diops and the Pellegrinis.
  • Final Battle: The showdown between Assane, Benjamin and Philippe on one side and Hubert and his followers on the other at the concert hall in Chapter 10.
  • First-Episode Twist: When we're first introduced to Assane, he seems to be little more than a down-on-his-luck janitor who struggles to pay alimony to his ex-wife and comes up with a harebrained scheme to rob the Louvre in order to make a quick sum. By the end of the first episode, we learn that none of this is true.
  • Fish out of Water: 14-year-old Assane—an orphaned Black boy from a working-class background—is this when he gets transferred to the College d'Andrésy, experiencing bullying from some of the largely wealthy and white student body. Fortunately, Benjamin comes to his aid.
  • Flashback: How most of the characters' backstories are revealed.
  • Flatline Plotline: To get out of jail, Assane pushes himself near death by overdosing on sleeping pills.
  • Foster Kid: Claire (seemingly for most of her childhood) and Assane (for a little while in 1995).
  • Frameup:
    • Assane's father was accused by Hubert Pellegrini of stealing Marie-Antoinette's necklace in the 1990s. Anne Pellegrini then made him sign a fake confession for the theft, after which he gets sent to prison. The whole ordeal is set up to make it look as if it drove him to commit suicide, but it's later revealed that Hubert's Mook Léonard actually killed him.
    • Assane attempts to frame Léonard for being behind the robbery of the necklace by slipping one of the diamonds into his pocket and then calling the police; however, the cops find out that he bears little physical resemblance to descriptions of the actual thief (which is to say, Assane) and that he has a solid alibi for the time of the theft, so he is released. It's also entirely possible that Dumont called in a favor to get him out.
    • Hubert tries to remove two of his problems at once by having Léonard murdered and framing Assane for it.
  • Frequently-Broken Unbreakable Vow: Shortly after Claire reveals her pregnancy, Assane promises to stop all his "fuck-ups" and commit fully to being a father. And that's exactly what he does.
  • Friendly Enemy: Although Assane and Guédira are operating on opposite sides of the law, the two clearly have a good deal of respect for one another, particularly after Guédira saves Raoul from a fiery death. Guédira, meanwhile, can't help but think that the idea of being the Ganimard in a real-life Lupin story is just so cool.
  • Friendship Moment: Right before they pull off their final caper at the opera house, Benjamin perceives that Assane is anxious. He tries to reassure his friend, telling him that they will be "calm and methodical, as usual," and jokingly reminds Assane that he (Benjamin) is the nervous one of the two. Assane seems legitimately grateful for the support, and manages to regain his confidence.
  • Friend Versus Lover: Although Assane claims that he's happy that Claire is trying to move on from him with a new partner, he's pretty clearly jealous, to the point where Raoul calls him out on it.
    Raoul: Stop pretending like you don't care. It's pissing me off.
  • Fugitive Arc: After he is framed for Léonard's killing, Assane is forced to leave his apartment and go on the run.
  • Gasoline Dousing: Léonard does this to his car, with Raoul still locked in the boot. Fortunately Guédira hears him calling for help and manages to get him out.
  • Gay Paree: Somewhat subverted, in that you get glimpses of the banlieues and prisons of Paris in addition to shots of the Louvre, the Seine, the Eiffel Tower and the Sacré-Coeur.
  • Generation Xerox: Three generations of Diop men are harmed, directly or indirectly, by Hubert.
  • Getaway Driver: Rudy for the Louvre heist, and Benjamin for the opera house showdown (although in both cases, Assane ends up leaving separately).
  • Get into Jail Free: The second episode has Assane switch places in jail with an inmate in order to get closer to the inmate who shared his cell with his father, not needing to cause trouble to get in there.
  • Gasoline Dousing: Léonard does this in episode 6 to burn Raoul, who is trapped in the trunk of his car, alive.
  • The Glomp: After spending a day and a half in agonized worry over Raoul's safety following his disappearance, Claire virtually pounces on him when Assane brings him home.
  • Gotta Have It, Gonna Steal It: Assane's first major Lupin-inspired crime has him stealing a violin from a racist vendor to give to Claire.
  • Gratuitous German: The auctioneer in Chapter 1 does this as one of the guests is a German aristocrat named Herr Kruger.
  • Heist Episode: The first episode focuses on Assane's elaborate plot to steal Marie-Antoinette's necklace.
  • He Knows Too Much: Dumont kicks Guédira off of the necklace case because he is beginning to piece everything together.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Assane and Benjamin have this dynamic.
  • High-Altitude Interrogation: In the first episode, Assane has some debts towards a bunch of Loan Sharks, and the strongest of them holds him over the edge of their several stories tall building for failing to pay them.
  • Hollywood Hacking: Assane is a skilled hacker. He easily gets into the Ministry of the Interior's prison files to search for clues to clear his father's name.
  • Hope Spot: Things appear to be looking up for Assane, Claire and Raoul on the latter's birthday in Étretat, as all three are joking, laughing and having a good time. And then Raoul gets abducted.
  • Hospital Hottie: The nurse at the prison's infirmary is quite attractive (without any sort of fanservice). She wonders if Assane keeps coming back at the infirmary just because he has a crush on her (it's actually just to get closer to the dying inmate).
  • Hostage for MacGuffin: Claire goes to Hubert and tries to trade the diamonds from the necklace for her kidnapped son. Unfortunately for her, Hubert actually wants Assane.
  • How Dad Met Mom: Flashbacks show Assane and Claire's lengthy (and fraught) romantic history, from their first meeting up to Claire becoming pregnant with Raoul.
  • Huge Guy, Tiny Girl: Assane is a full foot taller than Claire. Averted in their teenage years, though, where the two appear to be around the same size. Apparently Assane had a massive growth spurt sometime after 1995.

    I to Z 
  • I Can See You: A non-threatening example — Assane calls Guédira as he's walking out of a cafe. Guédira is startled when he realizes who's calling him, and spits coffee down the front of his shirt. Assane concludes the call as follows:
    Assane: Oh, by the way, try cold water.
    Guédira: Cold water?
    Assane: The coffee stain on your shirt? Try cold water.
  • Identical Stranger: Assane and the other Deli + Eat deliverymen are indistinguishable to the police due to their identical outfits.
  • Idiot Ball:
    • Lorenzo the violin seller may have been a racist Jerkass, but Assane could still have just asked Benjamin to help him rent a violin for Claire rather than going straight in and stealing the most expensive one in the store.
    • Possible the most glaring example—why on earth didn't Assane make copies of Fabienne's tape?
    • Why wasn't Guédira's lead taken more seriously by the police in general? Sure, it was a little...whimsical, but it was the only thing they had, and it made a lot of sense.
    • Had Assane and Claire simply maintained contact with each other while Assane was chasing Leonard down, a lot of the drama in Chapter 7 could have been avoided.
    • In attempt to stop Assane from getting away after his successful carjacking at the gas station, Belkacem fires a gun directly into oncoming traffic. It doesn't exactly take a genius to figure out why that's an awful idea.
    • Why did Pascal and the other officers agree to let Claire have a moment alone with Raoul when Assane brought him back home? Upon seeing Assane, she tells him to flee, and the police are unable to find him when they show up.
    • Claire's new boyfriend Marc apparently failed to comprehend one of the most basic rules of dating a single mother: don't get on her kid's bad side. In one of his few scenes in the show, he manages to offend Raoul by suggesting that he's too old for the Arsène Lupin book he's clearly engrossed in.
  • If It Bleeds, It Leads:
    • The death of Fabienne, a journalist who hasn't worked in twenty-four years, makes headlines in the French papers the day after her body is discovered. One such article, including a photo of "Salvator813" and detailing the pair's fight against Hubert Pellegrini, is spotted by Claire on the train back from Étretat, who immediately recognizes Assane and, upon reading the piece, realizes to her horror that Hubert was involved in Raoul's kidnapping.
    • Assane's supposed murder of Léonard, when combined with the fact that he was the mastermind behind the Louvre heist, instantly makes him the most famous criminal in France, with his exploits being covered near-constantly both on TV and in print media.
  • I'm Not Afraid of You: Claire says this to Hubert when she is trying to make a deal with him to ensure Raoul's safe return to her. Hubert just chuckles, since Claire is quite obviously terrified.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Léonard tries to shoot Guédira and Raoul several times as they flee the abandoned mansion, but never lands a hit. Somewhat justified in that it was dark, Léonard was seriously injured after getting tossed out of a window by Assane, and he was using an unwieldy hunting rifle rather than his usual revolver.
  • Impersonating an Officer: Assane often manages to enter places he isn't supposed to by flashing stolen police badges.
  • Impersonation Gambit: "Philippe Courbet" is really just an emo kid that Assane and Benjamin discovered trying to steal Arsène Lupin books from the library. Despite this, he proves to be very convincing to Hubert.
  • Implausible Deniability: A lot of the claims Assane makes to Claire about what he's doing come across as being this. Having had to endure years of evasions, half-truths, and outright lies from him, she often sees right through it, but is unable to get him to admit to what's really going on.
    Assane: I'm filling out old paperwork.
  • Incredibly Obvious Tail: Possibly as an intimidation tactic, Pascal tails Benjamin by walking directly behind him a few meters away.
  • The Infiltration: Assane's visit to prison, and his smuggling himself into the opera house.
  • Instant Sedation: Gets a good punch of realism during the necklace heist—spraying chloroform on someone's face won't sedate the person instantly, as Assane's crew finds out. Either Assane probably knew this all along and just messed with them, knowing they would betray him, or they were just too dumb to think about using it on a piece of cloth to concentrate as much sedative as possible in the guards' faces.
  • Internal Affairs: By the end of Part 2, the police department is at war with itself when Laugier, Belkacem and Guédira decide to root out the corruption in their own department by arresting Dumont.
  • Involuntary Charity Donation: Zigzagged. Juliette's sponsors believe that they are donating to a legitimate organization; however, unbeknownst to them (and Juliette), 85% of the money is set up to go to Hubert. However, Assane and Benjamin redirect the money to the foundation's bank account.
  • Ironic Juxtaposition: In one of the flashbacks, Assane tells Claire that he will do everything he can to protect their then-unborn child. Minutes later, in the present timeline, Assane's actions indirectly lead to Raoul getting kidnapped by Leonard.
  • It Was a Gift: The Arsène Lupin book given to Assane by his father.
  • I Will Find You: Both Assane and Claire do this separately for Raoul after his kidnapping. Their respective approaches are...pretty different.
    • After a tense car chase, and the tremendous scare of Raoul possibly having been burned alive, Assane gets his son out of Hubert Pellegrini's grasp in his usual confident and creative fashion, even managing to hilariously troll both Hubert and Dumont as he's doing it.
    • Claire, on the other hand, is both worried sick and woefully out of her depth in the world of crime, kidnappings, revenge quests and ransoms...which means exactly what you'd expect. After calling the police produces a disappointingly bureaucratic response, and she finds out that one of the most powerful men in the country is behind Raoul's abduction, she goes to pieces and essentially becomes the personnification of Love Makes You Dumb.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • Belkacem comes across like a jerk for not letting Assane check the trunk of Léonard's car when he believes Raoul has been burned alive. But her apparent belief that he was just faking his devastation isn't unjustified—after all, Assane does have a history of trolling others and using emotional manipulation to get his way, and up to that point the police have no reason to believe that he even has a son.
    • Although Claire hysterically cutting Assane off from Raoul following the kidnapping may seem overly harsh, she's not exactly wrong to say that Assane uses others, that he knows no limits, and that what happened to Raoul was entirely his fault. At the end of the day, after all, she just wants to keep her son out of harm's way. In the final scene of Part 2, Assane even admits that she was right, although by that point Claire appears to be ready to forgive him (again).
  • Just Friends: Assane and Claire's present-day relationship is just platonic. Sort of. Maybe. Not really? ...It's pretty complicated.
  • Knew It All Along: Assane anticipated that Vincent, Kevin and Rudy would betray him during the Louvre heist, and made contingency plans accordingly.
  • Killed Offscreen: We never actually see exactly how Léonard killed Babakar and Fabienne. In fact, the murder of Léonard himself, at the hands of Pascal, is the only death that's shown onscreen.
  • Lampshade Hanging: At one point Claire tells Assane that the Arsène Lupin stories are unrealistic, because he never gets caught. This can be read as the show poking fun at the implausibility of some of Assane's capers.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: In one of the flashbacks to Assane's early con-man life, we see him clean out a old woman of all her valuables... while she brags about her family having been involved in colonialism, gushing right in front of him about how the diamonds he's swindling off of her were stolen from people in Africa. He even gains her trust by playing on her disdain for the poor.
  • Last Request: Étienne Comet, the dying inmate who knew Assane's father in prison, asks Assane to "make his wife smile". To fulfill his request, Assane slips into her house and leaves her one of the diamonds from the necklace.
  • Late to the Tragedy: Assane arrives at Fabienne's apartment just after she is visited by Léonard, and finds her lifeless body hanging from a noose.
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Raoul was an unplanned child, and Claire is shown to have been quite anxious about Assane's reaction when she told him she was pregnant.
  • Let Off by the Detective: At the final showdown at Juliette's concert, Belkacem wants to arrest Assane, but Guédira persuades her to allow him to walk free. Temporarily, anyway.
  • Let's Get Out of Here: Benjamin and Philippe use the frenzy created by Assane's crashing Juliette's concert to make a quick getaway. Benjamin assures Philippe that Assane will catch up with them.
  • Locomotive Level: Assane fights Léonard on a train.
  • Long Game: It's slowly revealed across the final three episodes how involved Assane and Benjamin's plan to get Hubert to face justice at the charity concert was, from Assane's courtship of Juliette, to the disguising of Philippe, even down to Assane leaving a buzzer in Claire's apartment that would go off when the whole thing was finished so that he would get to see her and Raoul one more time.
  • Loser Son of Loser Dad: Raoul becomes incensed when Hubert tells him that Assane is a loser son, while Babakar was his loser dad.
  • Lost in Translation:
    • In the English dub of one of the flashback scenes, Assane tells Claire that he's the man of her dreams. However, what he actually says in the original French is "Je suis l'homme de ta vie," or "I'm the man of your life." Understanding that helps make Claire's response (that he technically is, since he's her only male friend) make a lot more sense.
    • At another point, teenaged Claire sees Assane reading his Arsène Lupin book and says, "c'est un chaud Lupin, non?" This is a fairly untranslatable Pun based on the French expression "un chaud lapin," literally meaning "hot rabbit" and used to refer to someone who is a real Casanova. The subtitles try to get around the issue by having her say that Lupin is "kind of a Romeo," but the sense of her original joke is lost.
    • Surprisingly inverted when Hubert tells Dumont that Babakar is "malin comme un singe," an expression used as an equivalent to the English "sharp as a tack" (although Hubert was no doubt using it in an ironic fashion). The subtitles, translate the phrase literally and have Hubert say that Babakar is "clever as an ape." This only adds to his characterization as a smug racist.
  • Makeover Montage: Philippe is transformed by Assane and Benjamin from an emo delinquent into a respectable, if youthful-looking, broker.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: Downplayed. While Guédira can't really be called "feminine" (he's more of a Nerd), his thoughtful and intellectual nature contrasts sharply with his more action-oriented, aggressive female partner Belkacem.
  • Master of Disguise: Assane and, apparently, Benjamin. Although in Assane's case many fans consider this to be something of an Informed Ability, since his disguises often fail to cover up his distinguishing features in any way at all.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • "Assane" sounds a lot like the French pronunciation of "Arsène," although it's not entirely clear whether or not this was intentional.
    • Fabienne's dog is named J'accuse ("I accuse"). This was the title of famous letter by Emile Zola that became part of the Dreyfus Affair involving a racially motivated Miscarriage of Justice in which a man was falsely imprisoned for theft, similar to what happened to Assane's father.
  • Men Can't Keep House: Assane's apartment is a dingy place filled with costumes, books and other random Arsène Lupin memorabilia, while Benjamin seems to live in his cramped little antiquary. Claire, by contrast, maintains an inviting, tidy home for herself and Raoul.
  • Minority Police Officer: Guédira is of North African descent, and Belkacem is Ambiguously Brown (the actress, Shirine Boutella, is from Algeria).
  • Mirror Character:
    • Guédira and Dumont. Although their motivations and rewards couldn't be more dissimilar, both are police officers working with those regularly carrying out illegal acts (Assane and Hubert, respectively).
    • Assane and Léonard. Both are crafty career criminals who regularly experience racial prejudice.
    • Claire and Juliette. Both women have lengthy (and difficult) romantic histories with Assane, and both struggle to reconcile their feelings for him with protecting what they hold most dear (Juliette with her foundation, and Claire with her son).
  • Missing Child: Claire and Assane get a major scare when Raoul disappears in Étretat. in Chapter 6 and part of Chapter 7. It gets worse when Guédira tells them that he saw Raoul getting kidnapped by Léonard. The entire sixth and seventh episodes revolve around both parents' desperate attempts to recover him.
  • Missing Mom: Assane's mother died when he was young.
  • Mistaken for Racist: Played with in that Assane uses his wealthy but socially conscious targets' fear of this to his advantage.
    Auctioneer: I must admit, Monsieur Sernine, that I wasn't expecting someone like you as a buyer.
    Assane: (frowns) Like me...what do you mean?
    Auctioneer: (laughs nervously) Well—so young.
  • Mistaken for Suicidal: Assane uses this to his advantage with the prison nurse. Her belief that he is on the verge of doing himself in leads to her letting her guard down around him.
  • Mock Millionaire: Assane attends the auction for the necklace disguised as a rich bidder named "Paul Sernine", complete with a fake Wikipedia page stating that he has a net worth of €576 million.
  • Mood Dissonance: Assane makes dinner for J'accuse while dancing to the Four Tops' "Reach Out (I'll Be There)." In another room, Pascal strangles Léonard to death.
  • Mood Whiplash: Assane pauses his interrogation with Dumont to have an emotional phone conversation with Claire about the state of his relationship with their son, and her worries about him.
  • Motherhood Is Superior: Downplayed. Although Assane loves his son, his unstable lifestyle means that Claire is basically raising Raoul alone.
  • My Car Hates Me: The fact that you can drive a Ferrari in a video game doesn't mean you can drive one in Real Life. Rudy, one of the loan sharks in the first episode, learns this the hard way, leading to the arrests of him and his accomplices.
  • My God, What Have I Done?:
    • Assane, when he thinks that he's gotten Raoul killed.
    • Claire when she sees Assane returning with Raoul after the kidnapping, knowing full well that the decisions she made in the meantime will result in his arrest—or worse—should he enter her apartment.
  • Mythology Gag: It's perfectly possible to watch the series with no prior knowledge of the Arsène Lupin character, but those who do so will miss a whole bunch of references to the original stories that turn up in every episode.
  • The Nameless:
    • The old woman who gets swindled by Assane is named Agathe Van Der Meulen. Her name is never actually spoken in the series; it is only through the credits that she can be identified as such.
    • In a milder example, Claire is the only major character whose last name is not given.
    • We never do find out Philippe Courbet's real name.
  • Never Be Hurt Again: Claire blames Assane for Raoul's abduction, and bans him from contacting either of them ever again out of concern for their safety. (Although "ever again" means for about three weeks.)
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: It's not hard to sympathize with Claire's panic and distress after her son is kidnapped. But her subsequent decision to give Assane over to Hubert Pellegrini in exchange for his return, on the other hand, isn't advisable in the slightest, and only leads to more problems for everyone involved.
  • Nice, Mean, and In-Between: Of the police officers, Guédira is the Nice while Laugier and Belkacem take turns being the Mean and the In-Between.
  • Non-Lethal K.O.: The "chloroform in spray" part of the necklace heist doesn't work as intended so Assane's crew resorts to fighting and KOing the Louvre guards in the locker room and security camera monitoring room.
  • "Not So Different" Remark: In order to get on Assane's good side, Dumont attempts to claim this about himself and Babakar (i.e. both did questionable things for the sake of their children).
  • Official Couple Ordeal Syndrome: Assane and Claire's relationship gets put through the wringer across the series, from Assane ruining any chance of Claire being a professional violinist, to his cheating and lying, to his not spending enought time with Raoul, to Raoul getting kidnapped as a result of Assane's actions, to Claire betraying Assane to the police because she thinks it will save her son and then trying to cut Assane out of their lives. Even so, it's made clear by the end of Part 2 that they'll never really stop loving one another.
  • Off-into-the-Distance Ending: The last episode ends with Assane visiting his family one more time and then running off into the night before the police can catch up to him.
  • Offscreen Crash: The loan sharks wind up crashing their getaway car through the glass roof of the subterranean section of the Louvre and getting stuck in a large glass sculpture; the actual crash happens offscreen. When we see them next, they are being unceremoniously arrested by the police.
  • Oh, Crap!: A major one for Assane when he sees Léonard's burning BMW, which, he believes, his son is trapped inside.
  • Old, Dark House: After kidnapping him, Léonard brings Raoul to a creepy abandoned hunting lodge in the countryside of Normandy.
  • Once More, with Clarity!:
    • Episode 1: Assane got his Louvre janitor job because the woman in charge originates from Senegal just like him so they easily bonded over it, he lied about his identity to the loan sharks and threw the necklace in a trash can in the struggle in order to retrieve it later as a janitor. And he expected them to betray him all along.
    • Episode 2: How Assane fakes suicide to get out of prison — he built himself a safety harness with a basketball basket's net so the hanging won't be fatal, and swallowed some meds to reduce his heartbeats.
    • Episode 8: Assane planned every bit of his supposedly "spontaneous" date with Juliette, up to faking her meeting with an investor and bribing the wait staff at the restaurant, as well as faking the heist of a painting at a museum.
  • The Oner: Chapter 10 opens with an impressive two-minute-long tracking shot that variously showcases Philippe, Dumont, Hubert and Juliette preparing for the fundraising concert.
  • The One That Got Away: Assane is this for Juliette.
  • Open Mouth, Insert Foot: While interrogating Dumont about Babakar's imprisonment, Assane briefly loses his cool and yells about "my father," instantly revealing his identity.
  • Opposites Attract: Assane is an outgoing, confident, charismatic and vengeful. Claire is caring, forgiving and prefers to remain far away from danger. The two find one another irresistible.
  • Outgambitted: Happens all over the place. Generally Assane is the one doing it to his foes, but there are also moments where Hubert Pellegrini manages to outsmart him.
  • Out-of-Character Alert: In episode 6, Assane figures out that Léonard is pretending to be Raoul in a text by making a deliberate error in reference to one of Lupin's storiesnote , since the real Raoul would immediately correct him.
  • Pac-Man Fever: Assane is seen playing video games with Raoul. The footage onscreen is Horizon Zero Dawn, a real game, but the show acts like it's a multiplayer game (it's not), and at the end of the scene Raoul claims that he headshotted Assane's character, despite the footage on the screen not being split-screen.
  • Phony Newscast: Assane and Benjamin make one to convince Juliette that a Pissarro painting has been stolen from the Musée d'Orsay. How? By taking a video of the museum's curator discussing the 2019 Notre Dame fire in vague terms and then manipulating the text carousel to contain information on the "missing" painting.
  • Plot Parallel: Chapter 6 contrasts Assane's quest to get Raoul back from Léonard with his theft of a violin in his teen years. In both cases, he winds up snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.
  • Police Are Useless: A common theme in the series, but the most blatant example is probably the Le Havre cops when responding to Claire's plea for help after Raoul's abduction, which had witnesses and was carried out by a man they had just released from custody.
    Police officer: We can accompany you to the police station to establish a missing person report, okay? And after twenty-four hours, if we have no news, we can send a broadcast to all services.
    Claire: A broadcast to all services...Do you realize that we're talking about a kidnapping?!
  • Pop Culture Holiday: In-Universe, the town of Étretat holds an annual festival to celebrate Maurice Leblanc's birthday.
  • Pop the Tires: Assane does this to Belkacem's police car when escaping from her at the gas station. It's the only time he uses a gun in the series.
  • The Power of Friendship: As talented as he is, Assane couldn't have accomplished much of what he did in Part 2 without Benjamin's help.
  • Prank Date: Juliette gets stood up by the French-Canadian businessman "Horace Valmont," a character created by Assane and Benjamin.
  • Prison Episode: Chapter 2.
  • Public Secret Message: Assane writes a comment on a news story about himself under the name "Ganimard." When Guédira sees this, he immediately suspects that Assane is trying to contact him, and manages to find a clue in the apparent gibberish Assane has written.
  • Punk in the Trunk: Léonard puts Raoul in the trunk of his car after kidnapping him.
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes:
    • Played for Laughs when Raoul and Assane jokingly do this to Claire when they're trying to get her to come to Étretat with them.
    • Later it gets Played for Drama when Claire begs Pascal to let her have a moment alone with Raoul in order to tip Assane off about Pascal and his minions' presence in her apartment.
  • Put on a Prison Bus: Hubert and Dumont are last seen being arrested and driven to the police station in squad cars.
  • Racing the Train: Assane does this during the pursuit of Léonard in episode 6, much to Guédira's horror.
  • Razor Floss: How Pascal kills Léonard.
  • "Reading Is Cool" Aesop: Assane's father encouraged his son to read when he offered him a Arsène Lupin novel, and Assane does the same with Raoul, who virtually stops playing video games as a result.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Monsieur Bouchard, the director of the College d'Andrésy, is a genuinely nice man who wants to see Assane succeed in life.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni:
    • Extroverted, confident Assane is the red to Benjamin's more sarcastic, nervous blue.
    • Confrontational, impulsive Belkacem is the red to Guédira's thoughtful, logical blue.
    • Passionate, outgoing Juliette is the red to Claire's demure, domestically-inclined blue.
  • Removed from the Picture: Very much averted in that Claire still keeps a photo of herself, Assane and Raoul on her dresser drawer even during the period in which she's not speaking to Assane. It's visible when she and Raoul are searching for the beeping watch that Assane left under her bed.
  • Revenge by Proxy: Léonard targets Raoul, both to bait Assane and out of spite. After Assane rescues his son, he and Benjamin try to weaken Hubert by going after Juliette.
  • Rewatch Bonus: In the prison flashback scene in the first episode, there's a brief glance of Léonard through the visiting room window... right before Assane's father is found dead as an apparent suicide, hanging in his cell. A few episodes later, in the present, Fabienne is murdered by Léonard who makes it look like a suicide by hanging. It's revealed in the final episode of Part 2 that Léonard was indeed the one who killed Babakar.
  • Roofhopping: Assane does this to get away from Léonard.
  • Running Gag: Fabienne's dog, J'Accuse, barks any time "Pellegrini" is said around him. This eventually becomes a major nuisance for Benjamin.
  • Safe Zone Hope Spot: Turns out Benjamin's secret bunker wasn't so secret after all...because when he fled his shop following Léonard's murder, he accidentally left a card detailing its location out in the open. When the police are called to investigate the shop, they quickly find it, and use it to locate him and Assane.
  • Scenery Porn: The aerial shots of Paris and Étretat certainly qualify as this.
  • Ship Tease: A few moments between Belkacem and Guédira hint at the possibility for a developing romance between them.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The name of the College d'Andrésy (aka Assane's boarding school) is taken from the maiden name of Arsène Lupin's mother.
    • "Raoul" is canonically Lupin's middle name, and one of his aliases.
    • "Horace Velmont," the name of the businessman whom Benjamin and Assane make up in order to fool Juliette, is another of Lupin's aliases.
      • So are "Jean Daspry" and "Guillaume Berlat," the names Assane gives to Fabienne upon initially meeting her.
    • The number "813," the name of a Lupin book, crops up a few times.
    • "Léonard" was the name of an assassin employed by Josephine Balsamo, one of the primary antagonists in the Lupin books.
    • Benjamin's yellow Fiat 500 is a reference to Lupin III.
    • "Gentleman Cambrioleur," the Jacques Dutronc song that plays as Assane ditches the cops in a speedboat in Chapter 10, was the theme tune to the Arsène Lupin TV series that aired in the early 1970s and starred Georges Descrières in the title role.
  • Show Within a Show: The Other Edition, which seems to be a play on the shows which can commonly be seen on the right-leaning French TV channel CNews.
  • The Shrink: In a flashback sequence, Claire visits one to express her frustrations about her relationship with Assane.
  • Significant Anagram: The aliases Assane takes, "Luis Perenna" and "Paul Sernine", are both anagrams of "Arsène Lupin".
  • Silly Reason for War: Assane's untrue claim about why he was held up on the train to Le Havre certainly falls under this:
    Claire: Where were you the whole time?
    Assane: I got in a fight.
    Claire: What?
    Assane: Yeah, but listen. I met a guy who said that The Mysterious Traveller is the best Arsène Lupin story.
    Raoul: So? It's good.
    Assane: But it's not the best. So I explain it to the guy, nicely and politely. He got worked up, and took it all wrong.
  • Sins of Our Fathers: Raoul is kidnapped by Léonard because of the actions Assane took against Hubert.
  • Skipping School: Assane and Benjamin often did this together when they were teenagers.
  • Smitten Teenage Girl: Both Claire and Juliette for Assane.
  • Stolen by Staying Still: In order to convince Juliette that he means business, Assane has Benjamin fake a priceless Pissarro painting. The two send it to Juliette and create news alerts that suggest that it has been stolen from the Musée d'Orsay. Juliette falls for it completely.
  • Strong Family Resemblance: According to Babakar, Assane takes after his mother.
  • Surprisingly Realistic Outcome:
    • Assane's James Bond-esque lifestyle wreaks havoc on his family life: he and Claire have separated, he isn't around for his son as much as he wants to be, and worse, Pellegrini has Léonard kidnap Raoul at the end of Part 1 and nearly kills him, which further strains his relationship with Claire, who considers cutting Assane completely out her and Raoul's lives for the sake of their safety.
    • The chloroform spray Assane gives the loan sharks for the Louvre heist doesn't knock out the security guards right away, forcing them to beat the guards unconscious.
    • Assane assigns one of the loan sharks (who's into racing games) to be the getaway driver for the Louvre heist. However, come the actual heist, the guy gets a red Ferrari as a getaway car, that while fast and cool looking, ends up attracting the police when the heist goes south. Also, it turns out that video games are the only experience the dude has in driving fast cars, leading to the escape going wrong when he can't handle driving the Ferrari and ends up crashing into a statue under a glass skylight.
    • Assane is able to fool people with disguises, but when the police find out his identity and post his picture everywhere, he has difficulty fooling people with his costumes, especially with his distinctive features (his wide nose and his height).
    • In Chapter 10. Sure, Assane managed to clear his and Babakar's names (for Léonard's murder and the theft of the necklace, respectively), while also getting Hubert and Dumont arrested for conspiracy and collusion, but he's still wanted for multiple high-profile thefts that he was genuinely responsible for, meaning that he has to go into hiding after stopping to say goodbye to Claire and Raoul.
  • Switching P.O.V.: The opening minutes of Chapter 6 show the events of Chapter 5 from Guédira's perspective, including his witnessing Léonard shoving Raoul into a BMW and driving off.
  • Sword over Head: Technically a knife, but this is how Assane gets Hubert to confess to all of his crimes.
  • Take It to the Bridge: The Passerelle Mornay across the Port d'Arsenal holds a special significance for Assane and Claire, as it was there where they chose Raoul's name (as such, they refer to it as "Raoul's Bridge"). After completing his revenge quest against Pellegrini, Assane arranges to meet both Claire and Raoul on the bridge before going into hiding.
  • Technician vs. Performer: Assane is the Performer while Benjamin is the Technician.
  • Terrible Interviewees Montage: When the police try to interview those who had seen Assane personally, they wind up getting wildly different physical descriptions of him, much to their dismay.
  • Time-Shifted Actor: The younger versions of Assane, Claire, Juliette and Benjamin in flashbacks are played by age-appropriate actors and actresses.
  • Triang Relations: Between Assane, Claire and Juliette. The state of this is still somewhat ambiguous at the end of Part 2, as the Assane/Juliette arc is unresolved (and it's not even all that clear to what extent his present-day feelings for her were genuine to begin with). On the other hand, the closing scene sees Assane and Claire returning to their perennial state of Maybe Ever After.
  • Tricked into Signing: Babakar is made to believe that confessing to stealing the necklace will reduce his sentence. It doesn't.
  • Trojan Horse: In Chapter 10, Assane is smuggled into the theater in a crate which, Philippe tells Dumont, is full of computer equipment.
  • Tunnel Network: The Catacombs of Paris, which Assane and Benjamin use to escape the police after Assane is framed for Leonard's murder.
  • Undercover as Lovers: Guédira attempts to conceal his identity from Assane while the two are chasing Léonard and Raoul, and tells him that he needs to make a quick phone call to his wife. After Assane agrees, he calls Belkacem from a pub; when Assane comes near him, Guédira is forced to awkwardly tell Belkacem that he loves her.
  • Unflinching Walk: Assane walks away from Léonard without looking back while the latter is being arrested by the cops at the Le Havre train station.
  • Using You All Along: Unfortunately for Juliette, Assane's whole courtship of her was done with the express purpose of turning her against her father. And it works like a charm.
  • Vehicular Kidnapping:
    • Subverted. To throw the police off the trail, Assane pretends to offload Dumont onto a van heading for a Parisian suburb, while actually bringing him to a room in the depths of City Hall (which is to say, the same building he'd kidnapped him from).
    • Unfortunately played straight with Léonard's kidnapping of Raoul. Then again in a more positive light when Assane uses a Van in Black to re-kidnap him from Hubert's goons.
  • Visit by Divorced Dad: Assane takes Raoul on a walk and offers him the Arsène Lupin novel he got from his father at the end of the first episode. Later, he visits Raoul and plays video games with him.
    • These end when Claire, furious with Assane after Raoul's kidnapping and horrified by the danger that he has brought into their lives, bans him from contacting them. This doesn't last too long, though, since Claire can seemingly never stay upset with Assane for much time.
  • Voice Changeling: Assane fools Dumont with a recording of his voice that has been doctored to sound identical to Hubert.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Where did J'accuse go after Assane had to run away from his apartment when he was framed for Leonard's murder? Assane is seen with the dog right after exiting the apartment, but J'accuse disappears completely after this.
    • Omar Sy has revealed that J'accuse is fine.
  • Where da White Women At?: Both of Assane's major relationships are with white women. In Juliette's case, this causes problems when Hubert bans the two from contacting each other.
  • White Man's Burden: While she truly does mean well, some of Juliette's speeches about her foundation have fairly strong overtones of this.
  • Who Names Their Kid "Dude"?: Claire jokingly rejects three of Assane's more ridiculous suggestions for the name of their child ("Maurice" [after Leblanc], "Assane Junior" and, of course, "Arsène") before accepting "Raoul."
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: When in prison, Assane goads another inmate to stab him with a shiv, so he can get to the infirmary and talk to the inmate who shared his father's cell.
  • Xanatos Gambit: After kidnapping Dumont, Assane gives him the chance to come clean. Seemingly outplayed by his foe, Assane bugs Dumont's house and makes preparations to release the information he's got on the crooked cop for his misdeeds.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: Assane after Léonard's death and Benjamin after he is implicated in Assane's situation.
  • You Do NOT Want to Know: Prior to Raoul's kidnapping, this was the closest Assane got to coming clean to Claire about his activities.
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Alternative Title(s): Lupin

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