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Peg + Cat (pronounced Peg Plus Cat) features a young girl named Peg along with her feline companion named Cat. Together, they explore numerous colorful settings and introduce children to basic math concepts with music, with two shorts per half-hour episode. The show made its PBS Kids debut on October 7, 2013.

Tropes featured in Peg + Cat

  • Accessory-Wearing Cartoon Animal: Roxanne the cat wears boots and a hat, Baby Fox wears a bandanna and diaper, and Richard wears bracelets and a belt.
  • The Ace: Ramone seems pretty talented at several things.
  • Acting for Two: "I Do What I Can: the Musical" has an In-Universe example: Peg and Cat play themselves, but also Ramone's parents.
  • Adaptational Heroism: The giants are based on the giant from Jack and the Beanstalk but don't eat people.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: Fairy tale characters like the Three Bears have more fleshed-out personalities.
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  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: This series turns Romeo and Juliet into just best friends.
  • An Aesop: Although the show was created to teach kids about math, there are other lessons taught as well, such as not judging others based on their size and sharing and such.
  • Affectionate Parody:
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  • Age Lift: Romeo and Juliet were teens in the original play but are adults here.
  • Aliens Speaking English: Big Mouth can speak English, but with a speech impediment.
  • Alliterative Name: Baby Bear from The Three Bears sometimes shows up.
  • All Witches Have Cats: Pig plays a witch's cat in "I Do What I Can: the Musical".
  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife:
    • Cat, who is obviously a cat, is indigo, although the series addresses it as "bluish-purple".
    • There's also Roxanne, who is a pink cat.
    • This show's version of ancient Egypt has several pastel-colored camels, including Epidermis, who belongs to Cleopatra.
  • Ambiguous Gender: On the farm, there are crows and a pig, whose sexes are never revealed.
  • Ambiguously Absent Parent: We never know why Peg's father is not around.
  • Amusing Alien: Big Mouth and Richard's antics are often played for comedy.
  • Anachronism Stew: Shorts can feature dinosaurs, Beethoven, superheros, outer space, ancient Egypt, or medieval settings — sometimes, two or more of those at once.
  • Ancient Egypt: An occasional locale: Peg and Cat are friends with Queen Cleopatra.
  • Are You Pondering What I'm Pondering?: In "The Tree Problem," when Cat is stuck in a tree (see Cat Up a Tree below), Peg opens up a present that she received, hoping for something that might save Cat, and finds a giant coloring book and a kaleidoscope. Deciding that she can stack them up to reach Cat, she asks Cat if he's thinking what she's thinking and Cat quickly replies "No."
  • Argument of Contradictions: Ludwig von Beethoven and the Three Bears have one of these in "The Play Date Problem" and then follow it up with another about the best way to argue.
  • Artistic License:
    • Food: "The Ninja Problem" has Cat tell Peg that "sushi is cut-up fish". Technically, sushi refers to the rice used in making such dishes, or the dish itself, but not to solely (no pun intended) the fish. Justified in that it's a relatively common misconception among non-native Japanese speakers, and enforced in that the writers were probably going for simplicity rather than all-out accuracy in a math edutainment show aimed at 4-7 year olds.
    • History: Beethoven doesn't seem to have any trouble with his hearing in this series.
  • As Himself: In-Universe, in "I Do What I Can: the Musical", Peg, Cat, the Teens, Ramone, the chickens, the Neighbor Ladies, and Big Mouth all play as themselves.
  • Astonishingly Appropriate Interruption: Peg says, "It's the coolest thing since—", then Cat sees the Teens and shouts, "Teenagers!" in "The Butter Problem".
  • Babysitting Episode: "The Baby Problem" has Peg and Cat babysitting Baby Fox for Mrs. Sheep. Soon after, the little tyke gets into trouble by building and climbing a very tall contraption.
  • Badass Adorable: Peg, especially in the genre parody shorts involving heroic deeds. (She's been a knight, a superhero, etc.)
  • Ballet Episode: "The Dance Problem", which centers around guest star Misty Copeland dancing in Swan Lake. Peg and Cat end up replacing two of the dancers when injury ensues during a key moment, though Cat does show concern that his tail will make him stand out too much at first.
  • Barefoot Cartoon Animal: Mama Bear doesn't wear shoes.
  • Beach Episode: Most of "The Roxanne Problem" takes place at the beach, although no one is swimming or wearing a bathing suit.
  • The Bermuda Triangle: This is the subject of "The Bermuda Triangle Problem" in which the Pig, who is obsessed with triangles, goes into it and finds it to be a world full of triangles. Peg and Cat have to convince him to come out before the portal in which they're all trapped closes and he gets stuck there forever.
  • Be Yourself: Peg encourages Cat to be true to himself in "The Roxanne Problem", sometimes even saying the name of the trope word-for-word.
  • Big Ball of Violence: The teaser for "The Pirate Problem" has the pirates engaged in one of these, leading Peg and Cat to wonder just what it is they're seeing. Maybe a tornado, a tumbleweed, or a giant hairball? It's seen in the story proper also.
  • Big Eater: Cat is shown to have rather a big appetite, as are the Teens.
  • Big, Friendly Dog: This is the resolution of "The Big Dog Problem". The big dog standing in front of the mailbox — that Peg and Cat keep running away from — is just one of these and even helps them to reach the mailbox so that they can mail their really important letters, once they make friends with it.
  • Bigger on the Inside: The chicken coop can fit all 100 chickens in it despite appearing like a regular one, as shown at the end of "The Bus Problem."
  • Bittersweet Ending: At the end of "The Giant Problem", the misunderstanding is cleared up, but the beanstalk has been cut down and so they can't dine with the giants.
  • Borrowed Catchphrase:
    • In "The Cleopatra Problem", Cleopatra says the "totally freaking out" line along with Peg.
      • The same happens in "The Girl Group Problem", except this time, Juliette, Tessa, and Aki are doing it too. Aki also mentions a big problem in the same episode.
    • In "The Roxanne Problem", Roxanne instead of Peg calls Cat a genius.
  • Brainy Baby: The Baby Fox built a contraption tower.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Characters will occasionally speak to the audience, especially Peg.
  • Cartoon Creature: It's hard to tell what species the Arch Villain and Flat Woman are.
  • Catch-Phrase:
    • Ramone will usually show up, do something to help out, and mention offhandedly, "I do what I can."
    • For Peg, "This is a (really) biiiiiig problem!" when one is discovered, and her sung "Prob-lem solved!" when one is, well, solved. Also, "I AM TOOOOTALLY FREAKING OUT!"
    • Pig says, "I love triangles".
  • Catchphrase Interruptus:
    • Sometimes, Pig will try to say that he loves triangles but another person will inform him that they know already before he can finish.
    • Peg tries to say her line about having a big problem in "The Butter Problem", but the farmer says, "You've got no problem at all!".
  • Cat Up a Tree: In "The Tree Problem" and "Another Tree Problem," the main problem in both is that Cat gets stuck in a tree. Inverted in "Yet Another Tree Problem," where Peg gets stuck up a tree. Taken to absurd levels and also inverted in "The Tree Problem of National Importance" when the Vice-President gets stuck up a national monument.
  • Cats Have Nine Lives: Alluded to in the superhero episodes. Cat Guy's superpower is the ability to do nine clumsy things without scraping his knees. This count resets every episode.
  • Character Tics: Whenever Peg freaks out, she flails her arms about.
  • Chewing the Scenery: Usually, only Peg and Cleopatra act dramatic, but in "The Three Bears Problem", Cat has an ambition to dance to the exclusion of other activities and behaves almost theatrically when talking about said ambition. In the same episode, the Three Bears accentuate every announcement of a problem with playing the theme on saxophones.
  • Christmas Episode: "The Christmas Problem," where Peg and Cat must do Santa's job when he and the reindeer are accidentally sent into space.
  • Clap Your Hands If You Believe: In one short, in order to restore Wise Wizard Ramone's sparkle, everyone who believed in wizards has to count up to twenty by twos. For those who don't believe in wizards, "There's a wizard right there. What more proof do you need?"
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander:
    • Pig sings instead of speaking and has an almost-obsessive love for triangles.
    • Big Mouth has a strange interest in everything yellow.
    • Cat is also pretty wacky, though not as much as the Pig or Big Mouth.
  • Comically Missing the Point: In "The Cleopatra Problem", Cleopatra and Peg say that the heavier pan in the scales logically has... to which Cat says, "A cold? Hiccups?", then when Peg says she's friends with the best cat in the world, Cat says, "Puss in Boots?".
  • Continuity Nod: In "The Allergy Problem", the lyrics to Peg's song "Getting stuck in trees, chasing after chicks, shaking it for the bees" are nods to the episodes "The Tree Problem", "Another Tree Problem", "The Chicken Problem", and "The Honey Problem".
  • Cool Old Guy: Peg admires Albert Einstein, who she actually knows somehow.
  • Couch Gag: Every episode's intro includes something related to the first short's topic. This can be as simple as an item in the background of the scene and/or tweaks to Cat's dancing to Peg's singing, or as elaborate as Cat's Jimi Hendrix tribute leading into "The Groovy Sixties Problem".
  • Crying Critters: Cat cries a Single Tear when he feels left out in "The Three Friends Problem".
  • Dawson Casting: In-Universe, Ramone plays himself as a baby in "I Do What I Can: the Musical".
  • Delicious Distraction: All the Teens, but especially Jessie, seem easily distracted by food.
  • Deliberately Monochrome: The Highlight Zone is this. The only way to restore color to it is to recognize the other differences between it and the "real" world.
  • Department of Redundancy Department: In "The Three Bears Problem", Cat talks about how all he wants is "to dance, to dance, to dance!".
  • Disappeared Dad: Peg's dad is never seen.
  • Disembodied Eyebrows: Police Chief Toad has them.
  • The Ditz: While Pig doesn't seem all that stupid, Peg does mention that he's the only one who isn't a genius in "The Giant Problem".
  • Does Not Like Shoes: The Giants always go barefoot.
  • A Dog Named "Dog": The main example of the trope is a cat named "Cat", who is in the title. There's also a pig called Pig, a little chicken named Littlest Chicken, a group of teens called The Teenagers (or, The Teens, for short) and many other examples.
  • "Do It Yourself" Theme Tune: Peg and Cat almost entirely sing the show theme tune, save that off-screen kids sing the parts with the numbers and also join for the final shouting of the title.
  • Dressed to Plunder: The pirates wear classic cartoon pirate outfits.
  • Edutainment Show: The show has some educational purposes, especially to do with math, but is also designed for entertainment.
  • The Eeyore: Richard, a little boy alien from the Purple Planet, is easily saddened when things go wrong, though he's quite amiable otherwise.
  • Einstein Hair: This show features the real Albert Einstein, who has frizzy hair.
  • Embarrassment Plot: In "The Roxanne Problem", the math nerd cat Roxanne is impressed by Cat because she thought she heard him counting by twos when it was actually Peg. Cat is embarrassed to admit to Roxanne that he doesn't really know math or sound like Peg.
  • Evil Laugh: Discussed during the end-tag of "The Straight and Narrow Problem" when Cat comments that "Villains have weird laughs" and Peg says, "I know, right?".
  • Exposed Extraterrestrials: Big Mouth wears no clothes and Richard wears accessories but nothing else.
  • Expressive Ears: Cat has them; they can get quite droopy when he's sad about something.
  • Fangirl: Peg becomes this whenever she's around the Teens.
  • Flash Back: Peg has several memories of past events in "The Allergy Problem".
  • The Fool: Cat. Although he sometimes lands in trouble for his spacey behavior, he always gets out, and his random playing around is usually what inspires Peg's ultimate answer to the problem of the episode.
  • Freak Out: Peg, and occasionally other characters but never Cat, shout, "I am totally freaking out!" whenever they're very nervous, usually accompanied by flailing their arms and legs about.
  • Friendship Song:
    • The theme song is partly a song about Peg and Cat's friendship, with the lines, "We are two, na na na na na, me plus you, na na na na na!".
    • In "The Allergy Problem", Peg's song about how much she misses Cat has a few lines about their friendship.
  • Fully Dressed Cartoon Animal: Two of the Three Billy Goats Gruff wear full ballet outfits, and occasionally, other animals have dressed in clothes.
  • Funny Animal: Several anthropomorphic animals, including Cat, the Pig, Roxanne, etc.
  • Furry Reminder: The Pig sometimes grunts and the Billy Goats Gruff sometimes bleat.
  • Genki Girl: Peg often announces and solves problems with pep.
  • Get Ahold Of Yourself Man: Once an Episode, when Peg is "TOTALLY FREAKING OUT" Cat puts out his hands along with a whistling noise as if to imply this.
  • Gentle Giants: The giant couple who offer to have lunch with practically everyone!
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: The fact that the Teens use the OMG! expression as part of their radical speech in a series aimed at preschoolers is definitely this. The series' Facebook page has actually received some parental complaints about it.
  • Good Luck Charm: Peg always keeps a sparkly marble (among other things) in her hat and occasionally gives it a quick toss before solving a difficult problem.
  • Good Parents: Peg's mother seems to be quite a good parent.
  • Grumpy Bear: A literal one appears in "The Grumpy Judge Problem".
  • Half-Dressed Cartoon Animal: Baby Bear wears nothing but a shirt.
  • Hammer Space: When performing the "Problem Solved" song, Peg pulls her ukelele out of nowhere.
  • Happily Married: The giants seem to be a happy couple, judging by how affectionate they are towards each other.
  • Happy Dance: In "The Butter Problem", Cat asks, "Are you happy now?" and the cow does a little dance.
  • Heel–Face Revolving Door: The Arch Villain is evil, reforms, then turns evil again.
  • Hippie Parents: Peg's grandparents (who are logically the parents of either her mother or father) are hippies who still love the sixties, both the set of numbers from 60 to 69 and the decade.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: Most episodes are called "The _______ Problem".
  • Idiot Ball: In "The Girl Group Problem", Peg's band mates think the map is blank when really they're holding it the wrong way. Then, they have no idea how to flip, slide, or turn the map.
  • Implied Love Interest: Cat acts like a schoolboy with a crush around Roxanne, but it's never stated to be romantic.
  • Inherently Funny Words: The mention of underwear causes laughter, most notably during the bathtub segment that bridges the two shorts in each episode.
  • It's the Best Whatever, Ever!: In "The Sleepover Problem" Peg declares that her sleepover is going to be the best sleepover ever!
  • Jack of All Trades: Ramone has a variety of jobs.
  • The Klutz: Cat often indirectly helps Peg by tripping over objects. However, his blunders are not always beneficial to the situation.
  • Lampshade Hanging: Much of the show's charm comes from how it's just as likely to play with their own recurring tropes (such as Peg's Once per Episode freakouts) to various degrees as it is to play them straight.
  • The Lancer: Cat acts as a sidekick to Peg.
  • Large Ham: Peg is just as boisterous as most young girls. She has at least one moment when she's "totally freaking out!" per short, whereupon Cat (or occasionally another character) reminds her to (usually) calm down by counting backwards from five. Cleopatra is just as dramatic as Peg.
    • The Pig's usually silent, but when he sings he bursts into a rich operatic tenor that wouldn't be out of place in an opera. He often plays villainous roles in the show's genre spoofs, such as supervillain Triangulo and tickling outlaw Bad Jack.
  • Left the Background Music On: In "The Three Bears Problem", the bears play the problem theme on their saxophones.
  • Leitmotif: There's a particular sequence of horns that plays whenever Peg realizes that they have "a really BIG problem!". A higher version of the same sequence plays when Peg is "TOTALLY FREAKING OUT!"
  • Like Is, Like, a Comma: The Teens and Peg occasionally say "like" in between words.
  • Limited Wardrobe: Characters with clothes will generally wear the same outfits unless the situation calls for something different.
  • Literal-Minded: In "The Giant Problem", Cat thinks the giants want to eat him and Peg because they talk about "having them for lunch", when they actually mean having them over for lunch.
  • Lucky Charms Title: Using a plus sign instead of the usual ampersand is justified, because the show is about mathematics.
  • Mad Libs Catch Phrase: After Cat does something that inspires Peg to find the solution (usually accidentally), she'll exclaim, "You did it, you (insert complimentary adjective) cat, you!" "Amazing" and "genius" are the most common choices.
  • The Mall: "The Mega Mall Problem" takes place at a mall.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • Big Mouth really does have a large mouth.
    • The Three Billy Goats Gruff have gruff voices.
  • The Medic: A doctor is mentioned in "The Allergy Problem".
  • Medium Awareness: Peg is well aware that she's in a show that has a website.
  • Melancholy Musical Number:
    • "The Allergy Problem" has two sad songs: Cat's blues song about Peg possibly being allergic to him, and Peg's song about missing Cat.
    • Downplayed for Pig's song about being stuck in a tree in "I Do What I Can: the Musical". He has lyrics like "poor me" but doesn't seem all too sad.
  • The Mentor: Peg and Cat often turn to Ramone if they're stuck with an issue at hand. Interestingly, Ramone appears to be just a few years older than the protagonist rather than being an adult.
  • Messy Pig: Zigzagged in "The Butter Problem", where a pig is seen dirty but likes being washed.
  • Mistaken for Thief: In "The Cleopatra Problem", Peg's marble and Epidermis the camel are found missing. They think the Pig did it as he was nearby, but really Epidermis stole the marble and hid.
  • Mistakes Are Not the End of the World: In "The Allergy Problem", Peg is sneezing a lot and thinks she's allergic to Cat, then a bird accidentally takes Cat away and Peg thinks he ran away. She and Ramone set off in search of him and a whale accidentally swallows them and Cat. When they come back, Peg miscounts the items in her hat before finding out that she's actually allergic to clovers. Then, everybody sings a song about how making mistakes isn't all bad.
  • Mister Strangenoun: Some characters' names have/are words: Big Mouth, Cat, Epidermis, etc.
  • The Musical: The whole show features singing, from the recurring ditty for solving problems to at least one tune specific to each short.
    • "The Scrap of Map Problem" and "The Magic Uke" are done near-entirely in song. "I Do What I Can: The Musical" also has a literal musical about Ramone.
  • Musicalis Interruptus:
    • In "The Three Bears Problem", loud noises interrupt the Problem Solved song several times.
    • In "The Potty Problem", they try to sing Problem Solved, but then Big Mouth does his "business" on the floor again, proving the problem is not solved.
    • Played with in "The Roxanne Problem" when Cat interrupts the Problem Solved song with lyrics of his own.
      Peg: "We solved the problem-_"
      Cat: "Actually-the-problem-was-getting-Roxanne-to-think-I'm-smart-but-now-she-won't-because-she-really-knows-me, so problem not solved."
  • Name and Name: A variant, it does list their names, but there's a plus sign instead of the word "and".
  • The Napoleon: The pirates are all short and cranky.
  • Nearly Normal Animal:
    • Cat seems like a Funny Animal but he's the same size as a real cat and doesn't wear clothes. Same goes for Roxanne, although she does wear clothes.
    • The 100 Chickens sometimes do human-like things, but they live on a farm and can't talk.
    • The Pig can walk around and talk, but lives on a farm.
    • Epidermis is mostly a normal camel, but has occasional human-like thoughts and can sort of talk.
  • Neat Freak: The Teens dislike getting dirty.
  • Nice Hat: Peg has a wool hat that she is rarely seen without. In "The Mega Mall Problem", she is (briefly) willing to let her neighbor dress her up in a pink dress with frills, pink shoes and pink bow, but insists that "The hat stays."
  • Ninja: Aki wants to be a ninja.
  • Nobody Poops: Averted in "The Potty Problem." Lampshaded in the Cold Open segment, where Peg asks if they can even say what is making that nasty smell.
  • No Name Given: Several characters are unnamed, including Peg's mother, the farmer, most of the 100 Chickens, the cow...
  • Non-Human Sidekick: Cat is always found with Peg but occasionally Richard the alien or the Pig tags along to help.
  • Non-Ironic Clown: Mac wants to be one of these in "The Clown Problem", and Peg + Cat help him by teaching the Rule of Three as it applies to comedy.
  • Non-Nude Bathing: The "Bathroom" segments showcase that Peg bathes in her swimsuit.
  • Ocular Gushers: Richard, who is prone to self-esteem issues, will sometimes cry these.
  • Once per Episode: When the really BIG problem of the moment starts to overwhelm Peg, she starts "totally freaking out!" It takes Cat holding up both hands toward her in a warding-off pose to get Peg to realize that she needs to snap out of it, most of the time this is done by counting backwards from five to calm down although there have been exceptions.
    • The "Problem Solved" song is typically sung twice in each short, once for the relatively small problem that comes up in the early going and a second time for the main problem.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted in that the Richard we know is one of several Richards in his family. Even his sister is named Richard.
  • The One with...: Almost every short is titled "The ______ Problem".
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: When Cat goes all gloomy and quiet in "The Three Friends Problem", Peg and the Neighbor Ladies are very concerned (they even wonder if he's sick) and sing a whole song about how "something's up with Cat".
  • Origins Episode: "Peg Meets Cat", which is mostly told through flashback, shows where Peg first met Cat: at a carnival.
  • Or Was It a Dream?: "The Highlight Zone Problem" ends this way.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: This one is red, bipedal, and loves spheres.
  • Our Giants Are Bigger: The giant couple from Jack and the Beanstalk (a much more benevolent version) appears in several episodes.
  • Phrase-Catcher: Sometimes, Pig will prompt other people to say, "We know you love triangles, Pig."
  • Pink Girl, Blue Boy: Zigzagged. While Cat is blue and Roxanne is pink, Peg also wears blue.
  • Pirate: This show features four pirates.
  • Plagiarism in Fiction: In "The Roxanne Problem", Pig claims he made the pyramid-shaped trash sculpture, but really Ramone did. This causes Roxanne to call him "Artist Pig" for the whole episode.
  • Plot Allergy: In "The Allergy Problem," Peg fears that she might be allergic to Cat, but turns out to actually be allergic to four-leaf clovers. They make her sneeze. This one can be chalked up as Artistic License – Biology, since four-leaf covers aren't chemically any different from regular clovers, they just have an extra leaf. If four-leaf clovers caused someone to sneeze, then surely regular ones would as well. Mrs. Giant also has allergies, as shown in "The Giant Problem".
  • Plucky Girl: The main character is Peg, an energetic little girl.
  • Polly Wants a Microphone: The pirates own a talking parrot.
  • Potty Dance: Discussed in "The Butter Problem". A cow is seen squirming and Cat asks if she needs to go to the bathroom, but really her udder was sore as she hadn't been milked.
  • Pun:
    • In "The Mega Mall Problem", Peg and Cat are counting the features of a dress she finds repulsive and she says, "I'm going to be six!".
    • In "The Butter Problem", Cat makes several puns replacing "better" with "butter".
  • Punny Name: One villain is called the arch-villain and turns things into arches.
  • Record Needle Scratch: This is used for the "Problem Solved" song in "The Highlight Zone Problem" when Peg restores the color to her bed, but realizes that it hasn't been restored to anything else.
  • Rhymes on a Dime: Romeo and Juliet speak in rhyme, being poetry lovers.
  • Rule of Three:
    • The comedic use of this trope is discussed and even made the subject of a song in "The Clown Problem".
    • The "Tree Problem Trilogy" sees Cat get stuck in a tree in all three installments... except the final one, where it happens to Peg in a rather clever inversion of the formula.
  • Say My Name:
    • Sometimes, Peg will say Ramone's name in a questioning way when he appears.
    • When Peg first met Cat, she shouted his name.
  • Serious Business:
    • Inverted in the superhero installments in which several of the times that Super Peg and Cat Guy encounter shape-based crime, such as stacking the 100 chicks in a pyramid, they point out that it really isn't that big a deal, though they still have to stop it.
    • In "The Mega Mall Problem", Peg seems overly unhappy at the prospect of never getting the opportunity to do a particular little dance.
  • Shaking the Rump: Cat sometimes shakes his bottom during dances.
  • Shout-Out/Parental Bonus:
    • In "The Big Gig Problem", Ramone demonstrates subtracting 1 from 11 (and that this is like counting backwards) on an amplifier that goes up to 11.
    • In "The Mega Mall Problem," when Peg complains about not being able to see to dance because she's wearing a zebra mask, Cat goes Yoda on her: "Your eyes can play tricks on you. Trust them, do not." (Though, technically, "Your eyes can deceive you. Don't trust them." was actually Ben Kenobi's line in the original film.)
    • "The Arch Villain Problem / The Straight and Narrow Problem" features a scene-changer that's a star (the one on Super Peg + Cat Guy's outfits) zooming forward against a spinning spiral, a la Batman. At the end of the second short, they tell us to watch them again, "Same Peg time, same Cat channel." A later Super Peg + Cat Guy short features the villainess Flatwoman, who's modeled on the show's take on Catwoman (which might be why Cat's attracted to her).
    • The Highlight Zone!
    • "The Friday the 13th Problem", an episode about the number 13, takes place at a campground, and the campground leader is about to tell them a scary story that took place on Friday the 13th. (He forgets at the last minute, though.) Additionally, during a music number, a character falls down, causing several objects to fly up into the air, including a familiar-looking hockey mask.
    • "The Pentagirls Problem:" "I have a fever, and the only prescription is more Peg!"
    • The original cover of Peg + Cat Really Big Album is clearly inspired by "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" from The Beatles. However, it seems that some lawyers may have gotten involved because at some point it was changed to a much more generic and plain cover featuring only Peg and Cat against a dull two-color background. (Either that, or it was for uniformity, as other PBSKids digital album covers sport a similar look, such as this one.)
    • Several fairy tale characters appear.
  • Signature Laugh: Cat has a habit of laughing, "Ha-ha-ha ha HA-ha!".
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis:
    • The titular Arch Villain in "The Arch Villain Problem", who's obsessed with arranging everything in arches. He reforms in "The Straight and Narrow Problem", but then he becomes obsessed with arranging everything...straight and narrow.
    • The Pig falls into this category from time to time, usually when triangles are involved. He even has a supervillain identity in the Super Peg + Cat Guy shorts: Triangulo, who once mentored Cat Guy but did a Face–Heel Turn.
  • Slapstick Knows No Gender:
    • In "The Butter Problem", Peg falls out of the window along with Cat.
    • In "The Girl Group Problem", Aki says, "Ouch" after doing the splits, and crashes into something.
  • Something Completely Different: "Follow the Bouncing Ball".
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Romeo and Juliet are alive in this show, despite dying in the original play.
  • Speak in Unison: In "The Girl Group Problem", the Pentagirls say, "No!" and "Totally freaking out!" in unison.
  • Species Surname: The Three Bears have "Bear" as their surname.
  • Speech-Impaired Animal: Cleopatra's camel Epidermis sometimes talks, but in a funny voice and it degenerates into camel noises.
    So everything waah!
  • Superstition Episode: Appropriately, "The Friday the 13th Problem", which is centered around the number 13 and takes place on Friday the 13th. During the events of the episode, Richard develops a fear the eponymous number and Peg and company attempt to get Richard to conquer his fear of the number. However, the number 13 proceeds to suddenly pop up seemingly everywhere in various forms, and everybody begins to worry that Richard's fears of the number are not unfounded, leading to them all totally freaking out. Fortunately, they are all able to remind themselves that 13 is just a number, and the various ways that 13 was turning up everywhere had a natural explanation: One of the teens was excited about being 13 years old and got carried away.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: In "Another Tree Problem", the reason that Peg wants to borrow Ramone's giraffes is not because Cat is stuck in a tree again. No, absolutely not.
  • Talking Animal: Several otherwise-normal talking animals, including the whale from "The Allergy Problem".
  • Teens Love Shopping: Downplayed. Everybody likes going to the mall, but the teens, especially Mora and Tessa, seem to like it a bit more.
  • Tertiary Sexual Characteristics: Zigzagged. Mama Bear wears a dress and a flower while Papa Bear wears a tie, however, two of the Billy Goats Gruff wear tutus.
  • Tickle Torture:
    • In "The Golden Pyramid Problem", the dragon threatens Peg + Cat with this, but is unable to because they're protected by a magic cylinder. Peg then uses this on him to get him to reveal what he did with the pyramids.
    • In the Wild West-set Bad Jack shorts, Bad Jack (aka The Pig) and his gang use this as their primary means of terrorizing the populace of the town. The first time out Peg and company fight tickling with tickling, but in "Bad Jack Is Back" she realizes that this will just create a vicious cycle and instead comes up with a way to get rid of both sides' weapons.
  • Title Theme Tune: "We're Peg + Cat, na na na na..."
  • Toilet Humour: "The Potty Problem" includes jokes focusing on Big Mouth "going potty" on Viv's rug and being potty trained, Viv comments that Peg was a "very stinky toddler" before she was potty trained.
  • Toilet Training Plot: "The Potty Problem" focuses on Peg, Cat and the Neighbor Ladies potty-training Big Mouth because on his planet, nobody uses bathrooms.
  • Tomboy: Peg doesn't like to wear dresses and is often willing to be part of the action or get dirty.
  • Toon Physics: Not normally, but occasionally Hammerspace will exist, and in "The Cleopatra Problem", the marble rolls uphill several times.
  • Totally Radical: The Teens, who often sprinkle their language with "totally" and other hip terms, though this is more Played for Laughs than a deliberate attempt at being hip. Peg also uses the word "totally" a lot, and she does sometimes use other hip terms although not as much as the teens.
  • Trying Not to Cry: Although he is prone to crying, Richard often remarks this when he's attempting to prevent waterworks caused by problems.
  • 20% More Awesome: Averted in "The Three Friends Problem" when Cat draws a graph indicating that Peg used to like him to infinity and now she only likes him to "about this much" (very low point on the graph) but likes Big Dog instead to infinity. Peg tells him that while there are lots of things that can be compared on a graph, her feelings for him can't be compared to her feelings for Big Dog or anyone else and that he'll always be totally special to her. Later, they both sing about it.
  • Undying Loyalty: Peg is so loyal to Cat that she wanted to keep him even when she thought she was allergic to him. She's also shown to be loyal to her other friends.
  • Unnamed Parent: Peg's mother's name is not revealed.
  • Vague Age:
    • The Pirates are roughly Peg's size, and tend to act like children who don't yet fully grasp concepts like "sharing" or "personal property"... but two of them have visible stubble!
    • Ramone is very advanced for his age, he's not a teen, but he's a bit older than Peg. He's somewhere between six (although that's not likely) and twelve.
  • Vocal Dissonance: The farmer's cow has a deep voice even though she's a female.
  • The Voice:
    • At first played straight with Peg's mom (her voice just checks in during the bathroom segments), but then averted starting with "The Birthday Problem".
    • Played straight for the children in the theme tune. They might be the audience, but then again, this show doesn't normally have Fake Interactivity...
  • Wacky Cravings: Inverted in "The Mega Mall Problem" when Jessie (who is a boy and obviously not pregnant) craves something round, pink, and sweet.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: True to ancient Egypt, the men in "The Cleopatra Problem" don't wear shirts.
  • Walk Like an Egyptian: "The Cleopatra Problem" features some ancient-Egyptian dancing, as does "The Girl Group Problem".
  • Wholesome Crossdresser: Two of the Billy Goats Gruff wear tutus, and Cat briefly did in "The Three Bears Problem", and you can't get very unwholesome with a PBS kids show.
  • Who Wears Short Shorts?: Mora, one of the Teens, usually wears a pink pair of short shorts.
  • With Catlike Tread: In "The Big Dog Problem," where Peg and Cat sing about sneaking past Big Dog while attempting to do so.
  • Wutai: The Japanese countryside is one of the many settings, and home of Aki, the ninja-in-training. It's Deliberately Monochrome except for splashes of pink for the cherry blossom petals, and looks more like a painting than other locales.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Tessa has purple hair and the mermaid has pink hair. The giants also have actual blue hair.
  • You No Take Candle: Peg slips into primitive grammar before freaking out in "I Do What I Can: the Musical", even though she doesn't normally do this, even when scared.
  • You Wanna Get Sued?: Beethoven's reaction to Peg + Cat singing a song around his 5th symphony in one "Amazing People" segment. Needless to say, fangirling ensues.
    Beethoven: Stop! You stole my symphony!

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