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  • Two shots in Ace Combat 7 show a dog that is a pair of badly cut out stock images of two completely different dogs.
  • Alone in the Dark: In the 2008 reboot, there's a gameplay mechanic that shows scratches and wounds on Edward's body the more he gets hurt. The problem is that the wounds look like they're just glued onto Edward's body, which makes it look incredibly fake. And in some cutscenes, wounds will sometimes glitch and hang off of Edward's character model.
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  • In Anachronox, through the windows on Sunder's starport you can see ships regularly landing and taking off. Moving even half a metre reveals these ships are actually miniatures flying not too far behind the windows.
  • The emotional climax of Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag is somewhat spoiled when you notice that just as Anne Bonny starts to sing "The Parting Glass" a empty chair quickly floats across the screen in the background.
  • BioShock mostly has beautiful lighting effects, but the developers forgot to make any kind of shadow for the playable character himself. You're most likely to first notice this in a room where a lone source of light is used to add tension to a splicer attack, which unfortunately sucks a lot of the atmosphere out.
  • BIONICLE: The Game is barely finished as it is. The least of its problems are goofs during which parts of the character models become plainly see-through, mostly under their armor pads and the back of Onua's head during his first cutscene. Pohatu's eyes also have a tendency to disappear. Most of the movements are jerky or humorously overdone, and there's clipping everywhere. Oddest of all, on the PC version of Gali's level, Nokama has some of her texturing messed up, leaving her with a red smudge for a face. The animation bones are even visibly poking through her model.
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  • In early Breath of Fire , some characters would just disappear when defeated, and it's unclear whether they're actually defeated for good or merely wounded, since some of them show up later on.
  • Burn:Cycle features live actors projected against pre-rendered backdrops. These environments don't always correspond to the actors' line of sight, especially the wide angles. When Sol his companion arrive at the hotel, the characters are projected at an extreme slant; Sol exits the frame by literally marching up the wall.
  • This is all over the place in Call of Juarez: The Cartel. Vehicle collisions have no weight or impact, the subtitles are usually either misspelled or don't match the dialogue (like, at all), characters jump around between cutscene and gameplay (most frequently to dump the player into the driver's seat of a car since the AI won't drive), facial animations are painfully limited, and game scripts and AI pathfinding are so buggy that a player-controlled Kim will most likely have to do most of AI Ben and Eddie's work for them in one level when they split up to cover a meeting.
  • The Command & Conquer series usually has decent cutscenes, despite them being largely FMVs on a greenscreen. But in Tiberian Sun, there are scenes where real actors are talking to noticeably CGI armies of soldiers.
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    • Emperor: Battle for Dune isn't all that better. The actors' skin occasionally has green highlights when there is no green light source nearby. The imperial crown is also very clearly made of rubber, and characters occasionally stretch it out when placing it on their heads.
  • The Visual Novel adaptation of Cross Ange is probably the prime example against using CGI in these kinds of games (and it's not like the anime had particularly nice animation either). Hands are almost always hidden; heavy amounts of Dull Surprise; characters often return to default positions and/or expressions after talking; No lip-sync; hair physics are uneven; and there's a terrible case of Sprite/Polygon Mix gone wrong at several points. About the only praise you can give it is that the Cel Shading used for the CG models is accurate to the show itself.
  • In both CROSS×BEATS and its arcade spinoff crossbeats REV., failing a song on a Survival or Ultimate Life Meter (two gauge types that instantly fail the player if drained entirely) causes the game to very abruptly cut to the Game Over screen, with no real transition from the gameplay interface.
  • The Deadly Tower of Monsters is designed to look like a 1950's B-Movie. One with effects that aren't particularly good.
  • Deus Ex has some minor examples of this (often in the final level, which is cobbled together from other unused levels):
    • One of the funniest is during the wrap-up to the Hell's Kitchen level, when JC goes back to UNATCO and eavesdrops on UNATCO chief Manderley having a conversation in his office with the shadowy FEMA director seen in the introduction. The FEMA rep walks out of the office by unlocking the inner door... and a cry of pain is heard and he immediately runs backwards as the door opens, ruining the moment.
    • During the last three stages, you can see small fires burning in inaccessible parts of the map. However, in the first area of Area 51, climbing on top of the crew quarters building and looking up at the plume of fire nearby reveals that it's a static two-dimensional image instead of an actual fire. This is notable, because objects can (and are often) set on fire with realistic in-game effects.
    • Also in Area 51, looking right up at the sniper tower with a pair of Tech Goggles immediately when you begin the level (just as Jock's helicopter is taking off) reveals a stationary NPC with its hands stuck way out to its sides, because it hasn't yet started its programmed patrol route.
    • During the entrance to Sector 4 in Area 51, the high-tension moment of JC discovering the cloning facility where he and Paul were born while Bob Page goads him is ruined by the unnatural arc of a door exploding from one end of the room to the other. It looks a lot slower than the force of the explosion would have caused. And then there's the "Kill Bob Page" ending, where you press the button to overload his chamber, Page screams as he's seemingly blown up, and... the action continues for a good ten seconds after that, where his body is still present and the player can unload as much small-arms fire as they want into him without his reaction.
  • Sometimes in Divinity: Original Sin or its sequel Divinity: Original Sin II, a character might die and their body falls against something... prompting them to literally have their bodies lie on thin air.
    • Both games are not very "cinematic", and use Limited Animation. This has the result of characters having conversations or even giving items where they are halfway across the room. Since talking is not a free action, this can also result in characters having a conversation when they are on fire (or even lying down) and are going just fine.
      • The Limited Animation even renders the climactic end scene of Original Sin II unintentionally hilarious because your character doesn't even walk to the throne to make their choice, they simply teleport there, and a text box promptly blocks them.
    • When the "wet" status is put on, it gives a "sheen" to the character models. The problem is, it appears even if you step in ankle-deep water, making the character look like they're wrapped in saran wrap or made out of rubber.
  • In DJMax Technika, if you fail a song by way of emptying out your Life Meter, the game momentarily pauses before suddenly transitioning into the Game Over screen. This is corrected from Technika 2 onwards, where, upon failure, shutters seamlessly come down on the screen without delay to show the "YOU FAILED" screen.
  • Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest:
    • In the lava stages, beginning with Hot-Head Hop, the kill barrier is located at the bottom of the screen, but the surface of the lava isn't, allowing you to pass below the surface of the lava without getting hurt. It's especially noticeable in the stage Red Hot Ride, which has slowly descending hot-air balloon platforms. Of course, no one's complaining from a gameplay standpoint, as it makes this already Nintendo Hard game somewhat easier, but it still looks weird.
    • The GBA ports of Donkey Kong Country 2 and Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble! have the new bosses Kerozene and Kroctopus. While the idea of having new bosses for the ports sounds like a good idea, Kerozene and Kroctopus end up looking very out-of-place. Not only do their sprites manage to be Conspicuous CGI thanks to being poorly modeled (in games that already have CG sprites), their animations are incredibly choppy and lifeless. Kroctopus is slightly more in-style than Kerozene, though his sprites are still far more cartoonish and less detailed than any boss from the original game. They end up looking very hastily thrown together just to add more content to the GBA versions.
  • Opening Remake 101: When remaking the Dragon Ball Z opening in CG, there's three things one should never do—make the characters look like arthritic Lego people that barely emote convincingly; have Chaozu look like he stepped out of the Uncanny Valley; and make sure that when Gohan flies past, not to 'noclip' through his head. Sadly, the opening to Budokai does all three.
  • The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion has a good example: the cheap, looping fire animations on the sides of the bridge between Skingrad and Skingrad Castle. It's made even worse by the fact that there's two rows of about twenty of them, all identical and looping in sync.
  • Dreamfall Chapters features some rather common Unity Engine oddities, in addition to its own special effect failures:
    • Because the Unity Engine doesn't render peoples' mouths very realistically, it looks like they repeatedly flap their mouths open and closed to simulate talking.
    • Characters' hair is rendered as a stiff piece. This is alright, given that they don't have any flashy Anime Hair... but when Zoë's hair is clipping through her clothing, you really notice it.
    • Baruti is being harassed by some thugs, and the player can choose to intervene. The scene veers into this hilariously when you notice that A) Baruti's hands are clipping through his arm and are clearly visible (Meaning his fingers are just stiffly sticking out), B) The man who speaks to you in Cantonese has a cane that visibly clips through him and C) a glitch can sometimes cause him to talk without moving his mouth.
    • However, the game also takes the liberty to avert a failure from the previous title: NPCs would vanish after they enter a door. Chapters made sure to have them walk around the doorway until the protagonist leaves.
  • In Escape from Monkey Island, in the cutscene where Elaine and Guybrush discuss their course of action right after arriving on Melee Island, the camera frequently is placed inside a monkey. Fortunately, most of the monkey is transparent; only its muzzle and several torso polygons are visible.
  • The Fallout: New Vegas add-on Dead Money pushes the limits of the Gamebryo engine when in dialogue with Christine. For the first half of the mission, she is unable to speak, so her conversation is a bracketed description of her physical responses to your dialogue. The game tries its best to have her character model imitate what the text says, to jarring results, especially when a "nod" is her expressionless face looking down and then up very quickly.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • The 3D versions of Final Fantasy IV have the characters swing in the direction of the other side to attack. During one particular encounter with Dr. Lugae and Barnabas, Barnabas attacks Dr. Lugae after misinterpreting his orders. The 2D versions have the same attack animation regardless of who is getting hit, but the 3D version shows Barnabas swinging in the direction of your party... yet Dr. Lugae, who is right next to Barnabas, is the one who gets hit. This makes the scene even funnier for all the wrong reasons.
    • Cutscenes in Final Fantasy VII tend to shift between low-poly models and CGI movies. Needless to say, it's pretty jarring. As if this weren't bad enough already, half of these movies render the characters with realistic proportions, whereas their field models use, by contrast, a Super-Deformed style. So you see Cloud randomly shift between his short, low-polygonal field model with Popeye arms and cube-shaped hands and his detailed CGI rendition that actually matches his character artwork in the middle of cutscenes.
    • Final Fantasy IX was ported to Steam and Android/iOS and all the character models were given much higher resolution textures that make everyone look smooth and crisp. However, the texture improvements also work against themselves due to the pre-rendered backgrounds still using the same low-resolution, blurry assets that the original Playstation version uses. It is believed that a fire that happened in the Square Enix offices some time ago destroyed a lot of the company's video game assets, which is why the developers couldn't use the original assets when it came to the backgrounds. You can see the worst of it when controlling Vivi for the first time in Alexandria, where his high-res character model sticks out a lot compared to the moving characters in the animated background as the game transitions from FMV to actual game; the characters in the FMV transition are hard coded within the FMV itself, therefore they're a low-res, blurry mess until you meet NPCs with their higher res models once the game begins. The sound effects also took a hit by having them compressed so that the game could fit on smartphones, but they're left compressed on the Steam version; many sound effects sound a bit lower or muffled, and the pitch for certain sound effects is higher than the original.
    • Final Fantasy X has a lot of cutscenes, and they're all pretty. Most of the plot-important ones are rendered in FMV, but the rest are regular engine-rendered. In Bevelle, there's a long series of plot-important cutscenes back-to-back. Some are in FMV, some aren't. The difference is very noticeable.
    • Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2 both received HD remasters and the visuals are absolutely stunning. The player character models were rebuilt from scratch instead of simply upscaling the textures on the old models, so that the character models can be consistent throughout the game. note  However, the transition to the new models isn't quite smooth, since a some of characters' facial animations look incredibly stiff (especially Yuna's expressions). Tidus' blue eyes can look a bit too blue in certain scenes due to the improved lighting and color correction, while Yuna's eyes look bigger than they originally did. There's also some minor glitches with the animations; one example is Auron pushing past a Guado guard as the party flees, and said guard gets knocked over about one second after Auron pushes him instead of falling down immediately.
    • Final Fantasy XII, due to a possible glitch, has Vaan's abs look really off to the point where people thought he looked anorexic, or 'spray on'. Luckily, this was corrected in the HD remaster. The game also has the background near zone borders look like cheap flat background as if it was green screen, which you can see when moving the camera. It's not too noticeable on the Playstation 2 version due to the lower resolution, but the HD remaster makes the effect a lot more obvious due to the higher details.
    • Non water surface reflections were added in the first expansion pack for Final Fantasy XIV. While it looks great, any character or object that is moving has the reflection move with nearly 80% of the frame rate missing on the reflection. While this was likely done to keep resource use down (being an MMO, dozens of enemy and player characters with active reflections could be problematic), but it makes the effect look completely terrible. Similar to the Divinity Original Sin example, player characters that enter water or get hit with a water spell will have their models look wet and the entire body will also become wet if a player only steps into the water at the ankles.
    • Final Fantasy XV is a very beautiful game, but unfortunately it has a few instances of this:
      • Early on at Galdan Quay, the water's waves sometimes don't render - which makes the water look like saran-wrap. It happens with most water bodies such as lakes, but it's especially notable at the Quay.
      • Prompto might take pictures of something, but plantlife gets in the way. The result is just about always a pixellated mess.
      • Lighting sometimes accidentally displays seams that should be invisible
      • NPCs sometimes just look off. Key NPCs like Cid, Cindy, or Ardyn are gorgeously animated... random shopkeepers? Not so much.
      • The game is designed for daytime lighting. This results in the open world being absurdly ugly during the night.
  • The Force Unleashed 2 has amazing graphics for the most part. Of course, if you start blowing up barrels, the barrels in the three-dimensional world look like some two-dimensional thing out of the Nintendo 64.
  • In one mission in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, you have to follow Caesar to meet up with everyone else for some illegal street racing. CJ's sister, Kendl, is seen riding with Caesar in the cut scene. During the actual game play, Kendl's model is strangely replaced with a female NPC.
    • In Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, during the mission "The Shootist", Tommy enters a shooting competition that sees him stepping up to a shooting booth, getting ready to fire. Instead of the gun being in his hand, it ends up floating nearly half a foot in front of it.
    • During the Paleto Score heist in Grand Theft Auto V, Trevor turns to shoot out a security camera with a shotgun when storming the bank. Said camera remains completely undamaged, even after sustaining a point-blank shot.
  • The remaster of Grim Fandango doesn't even bother to re-render any of the backgrounds, instead upscaling the 640×480, 256-color images to cover the probably-1080p screen. This despite a concerted effort to update the character models, add realistic lighting, and even re-record the entire soundtrack from scratch.
  • Halo:
    • Halo 2 really pushes the limits of the Xbox's graphics rendering engine, and it shows, mostly in the cutscenes. They sometimes take up to a minute to completely render, leaving the graphics fuzzy and indistinct, characters not appearing where they should be or most jarringly of all missing body parts. It's quite amusing when for about thirty seconds, you get told how awesome those indistinct blobs of the Orbital Defense network cannons are by a headless Sgt. Johnson, who is speaking to a floating helmet and arm.
    • Averted in Halo 3 where the explosions look beautifully rendered, especially in Theater mode. Bungie HAD to make the game look good because of Theater, since the player is allowed to examine the landscape as long as they want, wherever they want. The fact that they had to use so many cheats in the original Halo: Combat Evolved is the reason why Theater isn't included in the Anniversary re-release.
  • Harvester is well-known for two things: being really, really, REALLY messed up, and having hilariously bad FMV special effects during cutscenes.
    • The worst example is during one of the most notorious scenes: when your baby sister's eyes pop out. MS Paint would have improved on that.
  • Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, though graphically impressive, has some very low-quality sound effects, especially for things like footsteps and breathing, which you'll be hearing a lot. This is made all the worse by the game recommending you wear headphones.
  • I Wanna Be the Guy features the fake error message in the Castle of The Guy. It uses the default Windows XP theme, so if you're on XP with a different theme or language, or on a completely different OS altogether, it's particularly jarring and a giveaway that it's a fake.
  • The TurboGrafx-16 version of It Came From The Desert has plenty of these:
    • The (Stop-motion) ant at the power plant and the canyon doesn't crawl from the ground insomuch as slide up and move its appendages.
    • Whenever a character appears on TV, their heads poke out from the top of the screen.
    • The graphical quality of the game itself, which is extremely pixelated and grainy, also counts.
    • In cutscenes, whenever someone fires a gun, nothing comes out of it.
  • Upon release, Jump Force became infamous for the hysterically poor quality of its story mode's cutscenes, with one particularly painful example being Freiza flying up into the sky in a static standing position rather than a flying position.
  • Kingdom Hearts I has one at the very end. As the party is walking through the green meadow, they receive a missive from Pluto, who tears away with the party in pursuit. Look closely, and it's revealed that Pluto is clearly just sliding along, translating up the hill with no animation. This happens any time the scene appears (the beginning of Chain of Memories, the static-y memories of Kingdom Hearts 2), and even came back in the HD remakes.
  • Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords has Kreia's flashback about her last days as Dark Lady of the Sith. When Sion grabs her head and slams her against the wall, his arm briefly clips through the camera.
    • In the original Knights of the Old Republic, Mission pleading with the player to help her brother Griff could easily be spoiled if, for example, she is holding a vibroblade. Because she never actually puts down her weapons before begging, she proceeds to ram about three feet of vibroblade through her own head. This can also happen if you are holding a vibroblade and a civilian walks through it.
  • Left 4 Dead 2 has several quirks that can break the immersion of the game. The pistols have no walking animation in first person view, which makes them look like they're just floating in the air when equipped. The hunting rifle has a strange bug where if you play with a high field of view and aim up or down, the survivor's left wrist warps and twists to the point of being broken. When the survivors from the first game was ported over to the sequel, their arm models in first person view were never updated, thus their textures look plain and less detailed compared to the new survivors. On top of this, the bone rigging of the old survivors are still used from their home game and don't quite work with the new guns and items, which causes them to clip into the survivor's hands and fingers.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time has an animation for every possible movement Link can do, but there's no animation for Link doing a backflip while aiming the bow, slingshot, or hookshot; his model just rotates in a full circle without any animations at all. Strangely, the 3DS version gives Link updated animations and he still lacks animations from the previous backflip problem.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, Gyorg's introductory cinematic has an attempt at a "freeze frame" effect as the creature dramatically leaps out of the water, during which his name appears onscreen. However, the fact that the splashing water keeps moving well after Gyorg has stopped makes it very obvious that the effect is accomplished by just locking Gyorg's model in place for a few seconds during its jump animation and not actually freezing the image. The 3DS port rectifties this by making the boss move in slow motion during its intro.
  • The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker uses environment mapping for the flat surface of a shallow lake inside a boss room. The room, summoned enemies, and the boss itself are correctly reflected, but Link, the player character, is not visible at all in the reflection. Then again, by the time the developers got to that boss room, they were hastily trying to finish the game before the deadline. This is fixed in the Wii U HD version.
    • The game also features very impressive distortion effects that are marred by one flaw - anything near the point of distortion is reflected. This does not apply to heat-based distortion, which is perfect.
  • The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds: The devs wanted to mimic the top-down 3/4 perspective of A Link to the Past. However, for some reason, they refused to use an angled camera. Their solution? Making it so that nearly everything is actually leaning backwards. The problem is that you can make the camera angle change by merging into a wall, which in many places, lets you see that things are unnaturally leaning backwards, and it looks as ridiculous as you'd expect.
  • The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past: Gibo enemies use transparent sprites. The problem is that when they're onscreen, the effect is applied to plenty of unrelated sprites that shouldn't be transparent as well, such as the medallions' effects or any objects present, rendering them transparent for no discernible reason. The devs tried to hide this effect failure by not placing any objects in the rooms with Gibos, but you can still make objects such as rupees, bombs or fairies spawn in them, as well as use the medallions. This was fixed in the GBA port.
  • Lodge Massacre, at one point, has a ghostly, disfigured face floating past a window — which is literally just the memetic photo of Brian Peppers with a blue filter applied. Unfortunate Implicationsnote  notwithstanding, the comments of the Retsupurae video indicate that the use of this face fooled absolutely nobody.
  • Lost Odyssey, which sports very sharp visuals, nevertheless falls victim to this trope in one dungeon. There are some shallow pools of water which the dev tried to make display a ripply reflection of the characters as they move in and around them. While the ripples are quite nice indeed, they cheated on the reflections rather badly. Instead of showing a true reflection, the water simply duplicates the character as he appears onscreen before applying the ripple effects. This could even still work if they had inverted the reflection, having it appear upside down "below" the character, but they put the reflection BEHIND the character right-side up. The net effect makes the "reflecting pool" into a mirror you can look into and see the back of your own head.
  • Mario's fireballs in the 2D Super Mario Bros. games are usually colored red, orange, and white. When Mario is fighting a Koopaling in Super Mario Bros. 3, his fireballs are a gray and light blue instead, giving them a silver look. This is either a glitch in the graphics or limitations of the NES's color palettes.
  • Mario Kart Wii has all the characters look like they are very shiny as if they were plastic dolls or were dipped in grease. Likewise, the HD remaster of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas gives all the character models a very noticeable shiny look to them, which even applies to their skin.
  • The Mario Kart series typically handles its secret Mirror cup class by simply flipping the screen horizontally (except for HUD elements), instead of rendering the track models in reverse, which would take up more space on the disc/cartridge. This has predictable effects on not just course elements, like starting banners or roadside advertisements, but also on character models, like Lakitu's signs or the L on Luigi's hat.
  • Mass Effect
    • There are so many clipping glitches that listing all of them would break this wiki in half.
    • Rather than using dedicated skyboxes staying at a fixed distance from camera, sky throughout the series is rendered at a fixed position on the scenes. This usually isn't that obvious in outdoor areas, but inside spaceships, the space texture is drawn mere metres away from the windows.
    • You can also get some very strange arm, hand and head movements, especially in the third game, where the skeleton used for everyone concerned apparently has a much less restricted neck joint than human anatomy actually possesses.
    • For a very special kind of hilarity, there's your fish tank in 3. The fish are not actually restricted to the boundaries of the tank and can occasionally be seen "swimming" through the air, or the wall underneath the tank, or in extreme cases on your desk, three feet away from the glass.
    • If you romance Traynor in 3, they have a love scene in the shower which is unintentionally hilarious for multiple reasons. One is that in an especially lazy censor dodge, Traynor is showering in her underwear and Shepard joins her fully clothed. Another is that rather than looking wet, the overly shiny texture applied to them makes them look like they've been laminated.
    • The Illusive Man's cigarette in 2 tends to bounce around at random, sometimes floating a foot and a half from his hand. Presumably he cuts his tobacco with Element Zero.
  • Medal of Honor (2010) has something to this effect. Basically, every time a level starts, the whole map is generated, having different levels of detail depending on the distance. What happens is, after a cutscene, the game will load every texture in the farthest resolution and then add detail depending on the distance (sort of like a detail implosion-shockwave-thingy). While plenty of games do this, most other games get around this by loading the nearest ones first and then generating the rest of the visible environment. Here it takes around 5 to 10 seconds for the gun to gain detail. Ten seconds. Ten immersion-ruining seconds.
  • One stage late in the original PS1 Medal of Honor features a curator trying to reason with the player character over an intercom, who is eventually shot by his Nazi captors. It would be an effective Kick the Dog moment if it were a single scripted occurrence, but instead the audio-only scene is part of the BGM, so every time the soundtrack loops you'll hear the poor guy fussing over stolen artwork and getting killed again.
  • Done intentionally in Metal Gear Solid 2. When Fortune blasts the SEALs with her railgun, they come flying up in a manner animated to look like a bad stunt shot from a conventional movie, and one subtly collides with the 'camera'.
  • Metroid Prime is a visually stunning game and there's almost no flaws except for one at the Great Tree Hall. There's a platform that is invisible unless you look at it with the X-Ray Visor. However, looking at the platform normally and carefully will reveal that the raindrops splash in midair instead of continuing to fall. This little graphical quirk spoils the surprise of a hidden platform, and you can stand on the platform regardless of whether or not you can see it. The same effect failure happens in another room with invisible platforms, but every platform after the first has the rain pass through, which makes the quirk even more puzzling.
    • The X-Ray Visor also lets you see Samus's right hand through her arm cannon. The developers forgot to rig the skeleton to recoil with the weapon, thus it clips through the cannon whenever you fire it.
  • Metroid Prime 2: Echoes has U-Mos, who is completely immune to your weapons by using a psychic shield. The shield pops up when you try to attack him. During the scene where U-Mos gives Samus the Light Suit, firing at him will have the shots still bounce off of him, but the shield effect doesn't appear. It returns to normal once you acquire the item.
  • In Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, when you acquire the Plasma Beam, Samus fires off a test shot and the sound effect used is the same one from Metroid Prime since it's the same weapon. However, the sound effect used for the weapon in game is a different sound effect. Likewise, Aurora Unit 242 in SkyTown has his voice using a deep reverb to make it sound booming. When he tells the player to go east to the Federation Landing Site, the reverb is mysteriously gone, but only for that specific statement since the effect returns afterwards.
  • Deep Silver's "Masterclass" trailer for Mighty No. 9 quickly became infamous and memetic for single-sprite "explosion" effects that look more like pizzas, complete with a carpet bombing scene to draw attention to them. The original Mega Man games for the NES have better-looking explosions than this.
  • A very minor one in Mortal Kombat 9: during a story mode cutscene where Stryker is using a walkie-talkie, you can briefly see its antenna clip through the brim of his hat.
  • In Mortal Kombat 11, one of Cassie Cage's battle intros features her sliding down a rope tied to an airborne helicopter. The problem is that some stages take place indoors. Even so, you can still hear the sound of helicopter rotor blades spinning and for a split second, you'll see the rope clipping through the ceiling as Cassie slides down.
  • The actors in Night Trap sport some very obvious microphones. The costumes for the Augers also look incredibly hokey, even by the game's (relatively low) standards. In fact, the actors and film crew were laughing during filming.
    • In the second part of the driveway, when Weird Eddie flees from the threatening Martin cousins Jeff and Tony, if you listen hard, you can hear the boys' laughter followed by a director calling out "Cut!" from the background.
    • Also, when SCAT member Jason barges in to the Downstairs Hallway and crouches down, you can hear some stifled laughter from the crew before he speaks through his walkie-talkie.
  • The "Infinite Worlds" trailer for the otherwise amazing looking No Man's Sky has a brief one where the player-character emerges from an alien ocean... to look out at scenery from an earlier pre-release of the game. (It even says Planet1 in the Heads-Up Display!) Kind of jarring for a trailer with much better-looking content for the game.
  • Oracle of Tao has a weird mix of Stylistic Suck and a few actual animation glitches. When you defeat one boss, he is supposed to fall down dead with an animation. But since this animation typically doesn't activate until the next turn, this typically results in you targeting an empty screen before the game suddenly creates a dying animation.
  • In Pokémon Colosseum, despite Jumpluff's body being made up of four spheres, it's shadow is four squares. The sequel fixed this.
  • The Bonsly Photo in Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness is obviously just official art of Bonsly plopped over a screenshot of Phenac City with a bad drop shadow.
  • Pokémon Sun and Moon features non-interactive doors on various walls throughout the game in an attempt to make the game world seem larger without wasting cartridge space on additional rooms. This would have worked better if the "dummy" doors weren't of vastly lower detail than real ones, lacking tidbits such as door frames or 3D doorknobs, and they end up looking exactly like fake doors painted on a wall.
  • Resident Evil 4 was given an HD remaster on consoles and PC. While the game itself looks fine overall with the improved textures, lighting, and shadows, a lot of the textures in the environment look like they were just upscaled badly as a sharpened mess. This is even worse with the full motion videos where they're blown up into a blurry and jaggy mess. The reload animations for the rifles are strangely played in 30 FPS while everything else in the game runs at 60 FPS. Even the subtitles are screwed up where Leon's text during the commlink scenes can sometimes vanish before Leon is finished speaking.
  • The HD remaster of Resident Evil is done beautifully. All the character and enemy models have their textures redone to be crisp and sharp and many rooms and environments look spectacular with the upgraded textures and lightning effects. However, some areas are not as fortunate; certain rooms are simply upscaled and sharpened from their original versions instead of having an HD version, which makes it stick out quite badly. Overall, the graphical upgrades are still quite an improvement over the HD remaster of Resident Evil 4
  • The first three games in the Resident Evil games look fine, but the immersion can be broken if you kill a monster next to a wall. Because all the backgrounds are pre rendered, any enemy body that goes limp on top of the wall look like it's phasing into the wall. The game also has to do a quick load whenever you transition from one part of the room to another due to the camera switching angles and there's also a slight pause on the exact moment that you are killed.
  • Resident Evil 2 Remake has a slight goof during the scene between Claire and Annette in the sewers. Annette is speaking to Claire through a video monitor and the scene switches to Annette's view where she sees Claire on the screen. The screen shows Claire in her default outfit, even if you have her wearing something completely different.
  • In Rune Factory 2, there are some maps that are presented with a top-down camera angle, and others (like areas of the town) that are closer to the ground with more of a side-view camera angle. The problem is when it rains, it's simply an overlay of the rain animation on top of the screen. It looks okay in the top-view, but in the side-view you'll see the rain fall and splash on the sky itself. And sometimes NPCs will cut corners on the street and end up walking on top of the sides of buildings...
  • Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse has impressive graphics for the most part, but there's one little scene in Episode 1 where Sybil's box of belongings fall down into the sewer, and as Sam and Max look down the hole, the view below isn't even rendered in 3D, it's a pre-rendered 2D image.
  • In the first release of The Second Reality Project Reloaded, during the cutscene where the Glitch Cannon fires at the recently deactivated portal to the First Reality, the laser clearly flies past its intended target, rather than through it. It can be seen in this video. Later releases of the game avoid this by having the cutscene end just before the deception is revealed.
  • Several Sega Dreamcast games fall victim to this. Some examples:
    • In Sonic Adventure and its sequel, quite a few cutscenes feature the in-game character models placed against pre-rendered backdrops and videos, leaving a rather jarring Chroma Key effect.
    • The HD port of Sonic Adventure 2 does the game justice, but there's one cutscene that the dev team glossed over: one scene shows Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles conversing with each other while Amy comes in a moment later. Because the cut scene was originally created in the 4:3 ratio and not 16:9, you can see Amy standing to the side in T pose with a really weird facial expression. This is likely Sega's quirk in loading character models that are needed for a scene, but with a wider screen, the quirk looks bad.
    • In Jet Set Radio, at Shibuya-Cho there are some areas that you have to go through in order to get to the next area of the city, in which they put a pre-rendered 2D image of city buildings in front of it. It makes you feel like you're Blue and Steve, how they "skidoo" into pictures.
    • In the first Space Channel 5, all backgrounds and areas are pre-rendered videos, while everything else is 3D models placed in front of the videos. This will sometimes cause Ulala and the others to look as if they are walking on air or hovering above ground. This is fixed in the sequel, in which all backgrounds and areas are rendered in real-time, rather than being pre-recorded videos of 3D areas.
  • In Shadowverse, the tip of Rowen's spear fades out as it's normally too long to fit into the frame. But when his sprite positioned is shifted around, like to reflect him collapsed on the ground, the faded tip is plain for all to see.
  • The Silent Hill HD Collection completely butchers Silent Hill 2 and Silent Hill 3:
    • One of the first things people notice when starting a new game in Silent Hill 2 is the very thick fog, which adds to the creepy atmosphere. In the HD version, the fog barely exists and what you get instead is a fog-like "sphere" where you see nothing but a gray void a few feet in front of you no matter where you look. Several areas, such as the apartment complex, are made darker in the HD version where even setting the in-game brightness setting to the max is still too dark to see anything clearly. The first meeting with Maria at the lakeside shows the ground near the lake suddenly cutting off, and nothing else is rendered beyond that point, which is covered up by fog in the original version so that you can't see it. The first encounter with Pyramid Head has his chest glow red in the dark, but in the HD version, the glow mysteriously vanishes if you shine your flashlight on it. Lastly, Maria's "death" at the hands of two Pyramid Heads in the HD version has the texture of her right eye replaced with teeth, which, while very creepy and fitting to the nature of the game, completely ruins the scene.
    • While Silent Hill 3 doesn't suffer from many problems in the HD port compared to Silent Hill 2, there are still several notable issues. While all the textures in Silent Hill 2 were given the HD makeover, many textures for objects and background elements are simply scaled up from their low-res versions, making them a blurry mess. When Heather meets Douglas at the amusement park, the shadow he casts on the bench he's slumped over is extremely low-res and blocky. Some cutscenes have their dialogue changed, but the subtitles still retain the original lines, which can make the game look like a bad dub.
  • There is a cutscene in Silent Hill: Homecoming where a character's hand clips briefly, yet noticeably, through the camera's perspective.
  • The Sims 2: Seasons suffers this. Rather than creating the rain with particles (a technique which has existed for years), they decided to just overlay an animation of rain falling over the screen. This technique often looks fine, but not in a game with a freely movable camera. Half the time it looks like it's raining indoors, and when you zoom in on an indoor area and look out the window it's pretty clear that rain isn't falling outside. And worst of all, this makes the game lag like hell.
  • Singularity has a picture of a Soviet newspaper in one Info Dump scene. Looking closely at its text reveals that it's actually random strings of Latin characters, instead of actual words in Cyrillic.
  • The So Bad, It's Good Sniper: Path of Vengeance is another Obvious Beta. Among all the deforming, contorting characters and ludicrous clippings, some of the more famous goofs are the bus that clips through the prison gate before it opens, enemies regularly walking through doors, and the final cutscene, where the guns are missing and the characters enact a shootout by pointing with their fingers.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog (2006) is chock full of these thanks to its Obvious Beta status (and even some that would've stayed even if the game had been finished properly), from giant towers toppling over at lightning fast speeds with absolutely no sense of weight to them, to enemies clipping through scenery and getting Tele Fragged when picked up with psychokinesis, to the creepy Uncanny Valley humans and their wild, over-the-top talking animations.
  • In the Starcraft cinematic at the end of the Zerg campaign, when the Overmind rises after crashing into Aiur, you see fire at the edge of the crater it created. However, for the last few frames, while everything else is moving, the fire just... 'freezes' in place. It isn't all that noticeable, but once you've seen it...
  • In Star Control 3, there is a race called the Harika/Yorn. The Harika are a race of green goblin-like aliens, while the Yorn is a rodent species they use as food. As with most aliens in Star Control 3, they are played by puppets. At one point, the Harika captain you speak to eats one of the Yorn... which is done by having the Harika open his mouth, the Yorn puppet slide in an incredibly awkward fashion up the Harika's chest, go into his mouth, and sit there for about thirty seconds before the screen abruptly cuts to the original shot of Harika with Yorn in pocket.
    • For that matter, pretty much all of the aliens fall under this trope. It was actually marketed as a feature that they're 3D (this being about the time when 3D computer graphics were the "Next Big Thing" and thus they had to be used regardless of whether it was a good idea or not) but the models (Animatronic puppets in this case) are so poornote  that they all look considerably worse than the stylized animated 2D pictures used in SC2.
  • Star Fox 64 has one level that takes place in what can be considered the sun. The colors are mostly orange, red, yellow, and white and they are quite bright. On the Virtual Console version, the colors in the same level appear muted and are not as vibrant.
  • Star Fox Adventures has some very broken effects-heat distortion, water reflections, and floor reflections are incorrectly programmed, marring the graphics of an otherwise-graphically-impressive game.
  • Star Strike (1995), in addition to its notorious overuse of joystick-waggling Stock Footage, also has ships that are obviously miniatures.
  • Some levels of Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II render the sky by drawing a cloud- or star-textured ceiling not even very high above player's camera. Other levels on the other hand render a sky by drawing a 2D image that scrolls as the camera turns; this looks quite normal when looking at the horizon, but when you turn around while looking up...
  • Star Wars: Super Return of the Jedi has a sound glitch with the boss of level 2 in Jabba's Palace. When you reflect the boss' shots back at him, his hurt voice clip is the same one of the character you are using.
  • Streets of Rage 3 has some sounds mysteriously go mute during game play. This is mostly due to glitches in the programming. One example of this is the boss of round 5, who is supposed to laugh around 3 times before he fights you. However, his laughter can be either off cue or not heard at all due to the glitches.
  • Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People Episode 4 - Dangeresque 3 features an In-Universe example, perhaps taken as far as possible. In one scene, Strong Sad walks in wearing a motion capture suitnote  and shouts "Raaah! I'm a scary monster!"... at which point Strong Bad stops the movie and rebukes the Cheat for his terrible editing.
  • Super Mario 64 has the Chain Chomp enemy whose mouth is colored red. On the Virtual Console version, the red was strangely changed to purple, giving the enemy a purple mouth. Some people thought Nintendo was trying to censor the game, but it turns out that it was just a glitch with the game's emulator.
  • If a unit is in the red sea of Universal Century Earth in Super Robot Wars V, the sea background will be recolored to match. The problem? The sky is colored red too, even though it's commonly shown to be blue in other shots with the red sea. This can get particularly jarring when some attack animations show a red sky in one shot, only to transition to a blue sky in the next shot.
  • In Super Smash Bros. Brawl's Subspace Emissary, Pokémon Trainer is not CG-rendered like the other characters and instead just uses his ingame model. As a result he looks extremely out of place in the otherwise very well-designed cutscenes.
  • Chitose's death in Tales of Innocence R. In the original, she takes out her knife and stabs herself, conveyed in the limited model rather well - a simple "Fall down" animation plays. It was perfectly fine, but the Vita version changes this by making Chitose's model explode into a million pieces by pixellating. The fact that this happens for no apparent reason makes it unintentionally funny.
  • Tomb Raider:
    • Lara's teenage model in Tomb Raider Chronicles has a slight error when she holds a torch. Her hands are normally rendered as open palm, but when Lara holds a torch, the hand that is used to hold it suddenly switches to the hand from the adult Lara model, which is rendered as a closed, blocky fist and has a glove on it. This was most likely done in an attempt to save time on changing parts of the model with little effort.
    • Tomb Raider III has laser traps of different colors in one level. On the PC version, playing the game on high-resolution monitors can make the lasers nearly invisible due to them not being properly rendered for high resolution screens. Likewise, the HUD is rendered in squinty vision in the PC version when playing on high resolution screens.
    • The first three Tomb Raider games have Lara's upper body and lower body meshed together, but you can see the torso move independently from the waist if you use the look button. By the fourth game, they animated the look feature better so the movement looks more natural.
  • Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark: One of the game's more glaring faults is that it tries to mix in assets from a previous game into a new one with even worse assets.
  • A neccesary evil for Transformers: Devastation, as the character models are based off of their original character models, so constant clipping errors were bound to occur. Less excusable is the reuse of the same few car models during the opening cutscene.
  • The Turing Test: Most photographs featuring crew members look very obviously photoshopped.
  • The original Twisted Metal has, in its endings, a picture of Calypso... played by an actor with burn makeup that looks like a community theater version of Freddy Krueger. This is a holdover from the nine-different-levels-of-failure original FMV endings, which feature such highlights as Needles Kane played by a man in a pathetic clown mask. Understandably, the series used animated or CGI endings until...
    • The 2012 PS3 game decided to revisit the live-action FMV concept. Although they're not a complete failure like the scrapped cutscenes of the first game, they're still rife with Special Effect Failure. Although they tried to go for a So Bad, It's Good grindhouse vibe, the end result clashes with the grimdark feel of the game itself, making the FMVs just straight up crappy.
  • Ultima:
    • In the infamously unpolished Ultima IX, a cutscene has the Guardian chucking a fireball at Samhayne. The fireball misses the victim by a yard, upon which he spins in the wrong direction (from how he would have spun if the spell had actually made contact) and collapses. The cutscenes are rendered with in-game models by the game engine. This often has the limitations of stock character movements and timing cues, which may fall out of sync depending on the speed of the computer you're playing on.
    • When you poison Lord British with bread, he grabs his neck and falls...then stands right back up...then falls down again. Similarly, in the very beginning, the Avatar will get out of bed, then teleport back into bed, then get out again to step away. After a screen transition, you may appear in the next room nude for a moment. On some occasions, the camera may enter the character model of whoever you're speaking to.
    • In one scene, Raven throws a knife at Lord Blackthorne. It very obviously passes frighteningly, but nonetheless harmlessly, right by his face. Despite having clearly not been wounded, though, he wears a bandage over his eye in later scenes.
  • Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 3 and its two Updated Rereleases have notoriously short draw distances coupled with no fog to mask them. As a result, bridges and buildings just materialize out of nowhere as you drive towards them. While such disadvantage is very common on Playstation games, keep in mind that WMMT 3 is a 2007 arcade game.
  • One scene in Xenogears has Citan and Sigmund drinking tea on the Yggdrasil during one cutscene. As they drink, their sprites do not move at all, while the tea cups simply float to their mouths. They messed up tea cups...
  • The X-Files game is a FMV game, thus everything uses real life scenery and actors. When observing your surroundings, some areas have background events going on like a car going by. Said car can be seen going one way and then mysteriously going in reverse before going forward again. The backgrounds were clearly put on an endless loop, making it look painfully obvious.

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