Follow TV Tropes

Following

Half Human Hybrid / Video Games

Go To

  • The computer game Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura carries the usual run of fantasy hybrids - half-elves, half-orcs, etc. Of particular interest here are the half-ogre race as an example of hybrids viewed in a negative light: Half-ogres are a race created by a crude eugenics program. The game's rich gnomish society required a race of bodyguards, and found the rare half-ogres ideal. Because human mothers were a lot easier to obtain, this led to the mass kidnapping, rape, and eventually fatal impregnation of human women until there were enough half-ogres to continue the race in perpetuity. Gnomes are not nice people in this game.
    • All the races are evolved from either humans or dwarves. Orcs, ogres and elves all came from humans; gnomes and halflings from dwarves. (Why we don't see gnome-halfling hybrids is less clear.)
  • Alucard, Dracula's half-vampire son in the Castlevania games, though the vampires may not necessarily be a non-human species in Castlevania.
    • It is stated in at least one of the games that Dracula was a human, but when he lost his faith in God, he became something akin to a demon/vampire.
  • The Elder Scrolls
    • Significantly Downplayed in individual instances of racial hybrids. Throughout the series, several in-game books and backstory details indicate that each race of Men (Imperial, Breton, Redguard, Nord) and Mer ("Elves" - Altmer, Dunmer, Bosmer, Orsimer) can indeed interbreed, with the race of the offspring being virtually identical to the mother (averting All Genes Are Codominant) with a few of the father's traits potentially sprinkled in.note  For example, if an Altmer father and Nord mother produce a child, it wouldn't be a Magic Knight combination of each race. Instead, the child would be almost entirely Nord with the potential of having some Altmeri traits, such as slight points to his ears, higher cheekbones, or a slightly different skin tone.
    • Advertisement:
    • Over many generations, the trope can come closer to being played straight. This is actually how the Breton race came into being. Their (human) ancestors were Breeding Slaves to the Direnni Altmer of High Rock. Over the course of many generations, some of the Elven traits started to come through with greater dominance. This has led the Bretons to be the most magically inclined race of Men in Tamriel at the cost of some of the Humans Are Warriors traits of the other races of Men. It still isn't accurate to call the Bretons "half human" hybrids, however. They are still almost entirely human with some Altmeri ancestry.
    • Similar to the Bretons, the Bosmer (Wood Elves) are said to have come into being when the Aldmer (the Precursors to all the modern races of Mer) who settled in Valenwood started taking "Mannish wives." Opposite the Bretons, the Bosmer are still far more Mer than Men.
    • Advertisement:
    • Minotaurs come the closest to playing it straight out of the races of Tamriel. They are said to descend from the Divine Date coupling of St. Alessia (a Nedic woman) with Morihaus (an Aedric demi-god "man bull"). Their son, Belharza, was said to be the first Minotaur and ruled the First Empire following Alessia's death. Pelinal Whitestrake, Alessia's "champion" and Morihaus' divine "uncle," specifically warned Morihaus against this relationship, believing that they would "beget more monsters on this earth." (Which, if this is the true origin of Minotaurs, proved to be the case.)
    • The Septim dynasty, who ruled the Third Empire of Men out of Cyrodiil, were known to have a varied ancestry. Depending on the source, Tiber Septim himself was probably a full-blooded Nord (though this may have been propaganda designed to make the Nords more supportive of Septim's empire). Imperial, Breton, and even a little Dunmer genes made their way into the dynasty as well over its 500 year reign. And that's without getting into the supposed metaphysical "divine" ancestry the Septims claimed via connections to former Emperors Alessia and Reman Cyrodiil.
    • Advertisement:
    • In the backstory, the Tsaesci, a race supposedly made up of "snake vampires" hailing from Akavir who once invaded Tamriel, supposedly left behind offspring with the Tamriellic races who are considered "beautiful, if frightening." (Other sources indicate that the Tsaesci are men little different from those in Tamriel, downplaying the trope if true.)
    • Demiprinces are a form of lesser Daedra born from the union of a Daedra and a mortal. Their dual nature gives them an odd perception of the world and time itself.
    • In Arena, Big Bad Jagar Tharn is depicted as a human with glowing red eyes. Later games would retcon in an explanation that Tharn had enough (likely paternal) Dunmer heritage to have their red eyes, while being mostly human otherwise.
    • In Oblivion, Agronak gro-Malog, "the Gray Prince", is half-orc, half-human. Or rather, half-vampire.
    • Skyrim:
      • The Dragonborn is often mistaken for one of these, even in-universe, with various characters jokingly questioning which parent was the Dragon? The truth, however, is that their parents were always mortals, and biologically the Dragonborn is also mortal. However, the Dragonborn's soul is that of a dragon.
      • Karliah of Skyrim's Thieves' Guild is rumoured to be one, as she has violet eyes, opposed to the black and red eyes universal among Dunmer. However, it may also be because she is the granddaughter of Queen Barenziah, who also shares this unique trait.
  • Asellus from SaGa Frontier, is a Half-mystic. In her case, she was an ordinary human given a blood transfusion from the Mystic who accidentally ran her over with his carriage. She became a hybrid as a result. Humans generally fear and hate the mystics due to their magic and oppressive nature (as noted when Asellus tries to visit her aunt), but despite what guides tell you, the mystics, while somewhat mocking, mostly accept her. Canonically, she remains half-mystic, but the game has three endings that can either have her remain that way or become fully human/fully mystic. Asellus, as a hybrid, can use both a limited movepool of magic and a bunch of human techniques.
  • The Shokan in the Mortal Kombat series are said to be half-human dragons, despite looking like the long-lost children of the Hindu cosmology's Shiva (which, coincidentally, one of the more popular Shokan is named after). Furthermore, the Shokan Kintaro is also part tiger, thus further muddling the waters of Shokan DNA. (To be fair, though, Kintaro was originally going to be a simple tiger-man, which would still make him a Half-Human Hybrid.)
    • Similarly, Mileena is a half-Edenian, half-Tarkatan Mutant, though due to her nature as an artificial clone, she could also be considered a Mix-and-Match Critter.
    • Finally, Mortal Kombat Armageddon protagonist/antagonist Taven and Daegon are half-Edenian, half God. Technically, Rain is also one, but that goes into retcon territory.
  • Final Fantasy likes this trope.
    • Final Fantasy IV, Cecil and his brother Golbez are half-human and half-Lunarian. They're the same as regular humans mostly, but Cecil doesn't know of his heritage for most of the game, while Golbez and Fusoya are both damn powerful mages.
    • Final Fantasy VI has the character Terra, half-human and half-Esper. This mostly manifests as occasionally losing control of her powers and being controlled by a Superpowered Evil Side, as well as the power to use magic innately. The game also has a number of Magitek soldiers, though Celes and Kefka are the two most reputable. In order for Magitek soldiers to even go into production, the Gestahlian Empire needed a living sample as a template — the half-Esper. Celes is what happens when they get it right; Kefka's the result when they get it wrong.
    • Final Fantasy VII has Aerith, the last of the Cetra or "Ancients," who had a human father and a Cetra mother. According to Professor Hojo, she's 18% less Ancient-y than her mother. She's mostly normal aside from the fact she hears the planet speak to her, and can use magic without Materia.
      • Sephiroth is also half human via his two human parents Dr. Hojo and Lucrecia before having his fetus spliced with the DNA of whatever alien species Jenova is. Sephiroth does not take the news well when he finds out he's a hybrid.
      • In Final Fantasy VII, regular humans are an offshoot of the Cetra anyway, descended from those who gave up their nomadic lifestyle and close connection to the Planet and thus lost the accompanying powers of empathy and healing.
    • Final Fantasy X had a typical villainous example in the form of Seymour, a half-human, half-Guado. Main party member and White Mage/Summoner Yuna was also half-human, half-Al Bhed ... although this just manifested in one of her eyes being different colored and having a swirling pupil.
    • The Final Fantasy XI expansion Wings of the Goddess features Lilisette, a young woman who was part Hume, part Elvaan.
    • Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings introduced the offspring race of an Aegyl and Viera ancestor.
    • This is actually one of the many Dark Secrets of Ishgard in Final Fantasy XIV: many of the Ishgardians are actually part-dragon, due to them being descendants of the founders of Ishgard having consumed dragon blood. Their dragon side is incredible latent and is activated when dragon blood is consumed.
  • While Shin Megami Tensei usually features some damn horrific hybrids created by direct human-demon fusion or demonic infestation, a more traditional case of a half-human, half-demon hybrid (conception) appears in Shin Megami Tensei IV: Apocalypse: Hallelujah, one of your party members and a low-ranking member of the Ashura-kai. In a very fitting nod to the Book of Enoch, his father is the fallen Grigori angel Shemyaza. The Grigori were overseers, some whom, under Shemyaza's command, descended to Earth to fornicate with human women, eventually giving birth to the Nephilim. As a hybrid, Hallelujah has snow white skin, red eyes, and pink hair, and he can inherently cast extremely powerful fire, ice, and Almighty magic, although he still relies on his personal demon Chironup for his supportive spells.
  • In Tales of Symphonia, half-elves are treated as their own race, distinct from either humans or elves. They're also subject to prejudice from both species. It's never outright stated what degree of the other species makes one a half-blood, but there was a testing system in place to see if they were. Ironically, it's revealed that one has to have elven blood to use magic; thus, almost every player character has elven ancestors or some form of Super Empoweringnote . Talking to the residents of Exire makes it clear that half-elves are capable of maintaining their own population. A half-elf born from the union of two half-elves is indistinguishable from an half-elf born from the union of a human and an elf.
  • Since Tales of Phantasia is the distant sequel of Tales of Symphonia, the half-elven prejudice continues. One of the half-elves joins you. Her name is Arche Klein.
  • In Tales of Rebirth, elves are replaced by beastmen/Gajuma. Those born between Huma (humans) and Gajuma are called 'Halves', and not only they suffer the heavy prejudice, they're also stuck with a weak body, which means, unless miracle happens, they tend to have short lifespans. There are two Halves existing in the game: one of the Four Shields Militsa, and fortune-teller Hilda Rhambling, the latter joins you.
    • The party also finds a village with a significant population of halves.
  • Dante and Vergil of Devil May Cry, sons of the devil Sparda and his human wife Eva.
  • Fire Emblem:
    • Averted, subverted AND played straight in the Tellius games, where the Laguz can only breed within a tribe (Beasts, Birds, and Dragons), but each can breed with other groups in the tribe (Ravens with Herons, Red Dragons with Black Dragons, etc., but nothing like Hawks with Dragons). However, any of them can breed with Beorc (regular humans). They play the "outcast of human/Beorc society part" to a T as well. For whatever reason, the offspring of a Laguz that breeds with a Beorc has no ability to transform, and the Branded (as Beorc/Laguz hybrids are known in the games) are usually cast out of both Laguz and Beorc society so and generally pitied or hated (or both). Turns out that the reasoning behind the hatred towards Branded is entirely false. As Yune (a godly being) explains. there was no great god-made edict that everyone thinks there is. Notable Branded characters include Micaiah, whose grandmother was the Apostle of Begnion, who had planned to reveal her Branded status to the nation before she was assassinated; Soren, who is the son of Ashnard and Almedha, a princess of the Dragon Laguz tribe; Stefan, who is heavily implied to be descended from Soan, one of Ashera's three heroes, and lives in a village of branded that he eventually turns into a powerful country that he rules over as king; and Zelgius, whose Branded status is what led him to becoming Sephiran's most trusted servant.
    • There were also a few human-dragon hybrids in the Elibe games; Sofiya in The Binding Blade and Ninian and Nils in Blazing Sword.
      • Furthermore in The Binding Blade, depending on your pairing preferences in the prequel Blazing Blade, Roy can end up three quarters human and one quarter dragon, since Ninian is one of the three main characters that Eliwood can end with. All that said, due to Blazing Blade being released after The Binding Blade, this has no effect on gameplay or story.
    • In Fire Emblem Awakening, Nowi and Tiki of the Manakete race and Panne of the Taguel race can each potentially become the wife of one of the human males in the cast, which eventually leads to their hybrid children from the future (Nah and Yarne) assisting them.
    • The Avatar in Fire Emblem Fates is part dragon, and possesses the ability to transform into one. It turns out he/she's actually the child of the dragon god Anankos. Additionally, his/her own child, Kana, will be this as well, though as the below section will make clear, the degree of his/her human ancestry can vary wildly, ranging from 3/4 all the way down to 1/4 depending on who his/her other parent is.
      • As Kaden the Kitsune and Keaton the Wolfskin are available as husbands for most of the females, their respective half-breed daughters Selkie and Velouria will come to aid them eventually. The Avatar can potentially wed any of the four, which leads to the strangeness of having part-human, part-dragon, and part-Kitsune/Wolfskin offspring who are able to shapeshift into either animal form depending on the class they're using.
  • Mass Effect normally averts this. Most interspecies couples have to take steps to avoid poisoning each other with their bodily fluids. Bearing children is right out of the question. The asari, however, can mate with and produce offspring with any species, but that offspring is always an asari; the mating process randomizes the asari partner's DNA; no DNA from the other partner is carried on. Asari culture even encourages mating with other species, leading to a great deal of prejudice against the daughters of asari/asari unions. The reason for this prejudice is due to asari/asari unions having the rare chance to produce Ardat-Yakshi, who possess a birth defect that causes them to burn out the nervous system of anyone they mate with, causing their death.
    • While offspring are always asari, they often seem to have traits taken from their fathers (the parent who does not give birth is always called the father by asari). A matriarch you can meet who had a krogan father is gleefully coarse and violent and has had more children than her species normally seem to give birth to, from several different alien partners (including hanar). Whether this is due to genetics or being raised by said krogan is up in the air. Mordin once sings a snippet of a patter song that included the lyrics "Asari-vorcha offspring have an allergy to dairy", implying that there is some physiological difference.
    • Parodied when Matriarch Aethyta half-jokingly suggests that she passed some of her own krogan traits onto her daughter, Liara, who has taken several levels in badass since the first game. When Liara gets irritated at the suggestion that this might explain if she's ever had the bizarre urge to headbutt people, Aethyta then jokes that she's starting to go all "Blood Rage" on her.
    • Played with further in Mass Effect: Andromeda, where Peebee reveals that her father was an elcor. Peebee is more or less the complete opposite of an elcor in every possible way, personality-wise.
  • Samus Aran, the protagonist of the Metroid series of videogames, technically qualifies. Though born to human colonists, she was raised by a race of humanoid birds called the Chozo; at the age of three, she was genetically manipulated into a half-Chozo hybrid, to allow her to survive the harsh conditions of the Chozo colony world Zebes. Despite being a hybrid, the changes to her DNA haven't altered her appearance. It's pretty clear she's not entirely human when she can jump twice her own height outside of the Power Suit, though. Complicated to the point of Mix-and-Match Critter in Metroid Fusion, wherein Samus is injected with Metroid DNA in order to save her life from a parasitic organism. This actually does alter her appearance somewhat, in that her Power Suit—which is biologically linked to her—grows a layer of Metroid flesh on its exterior.
  • Touhou Project:
    • Youmu Konpaku, a half-ghost (don't ask) bodyguard. She is described as "half-human and half-ghost, half-dead and half-alive, half-phantom and half-reality, and altogether half-baked. Yet she has two swords." Instead of one body like most hybrids, Youmu's ghost half exists as a separate entity that follows her around. Kind of like a daemon in His Dark Materials.
    • Backstory also gives us Youki Konpaku, Youmu's half-ghost master and predecessor. According to Perfect Memento in Strict Sense, the Konpaku are a lineage of half-human, half-phantoms, so Youki is likely directly related to Youmu. But that just raises further questions.
    • The supplemental serial, Curiosities of Lotus Asia, stars the half-youkai Rinnosuke Morichika; however, this latter example is more notable for being the only canon humanoid male (aside from a couple of Posthumous Characters who exist only as names in the backstory) in the entire series, and a Non-Action Guy to boot.
  • In Dragon Ball Online, which takes place several centuries after the manga and anime, Saiyan DNA has pretty well proliferated a sizable portion of humanity due to ancestry from Goku or Vegeta (talk about explosive breeding), giving them exceptional combat strength and the ability to go Super Saiyan.
  • Laharl of the Disgaea series is this. He has a human mother. Beyond a single character noting he is half-human after being told of his mother, no one ever refers to him as anything but a demon.Though being an overlord/prince might have something to with why he always called a demon (or for simplicity's sake). Plus, call him anything else, and he will send you straight to hell.
  • A half-sepp, half-human appears in Endorph's ending in Soul Nomad & the World Eaters.
  • Lilica (half-demon) and Konoha (half-dog) from Arcana Heart.
  • In a rare example of a hybrid between two non-human species, the World of Warcraft universe includes the Mok'Nathal, who are half-orc and half-ogre.
    • Orc/ogres also exist in D&D: the offspring of a male ogre and female orc is a large, intelligent orc called an orog, whereas a female ogre and male orc produce a short, stupid ogre (covered, for no apparent reason, with bony protrusions) called an ogrillon.
    • Warcraft also features Garona Halforcen. Originally she was described as half-orc and half-human; when changes in the timeline made that impossible, she was said to instead be half-orc and half-draenei. Later continuity changes made this seem unlikely...but it was finally confirmed in the latest issue of the comic series. Which would also explain why she still looks fairly young.
      • And then, there's her son Med'an. Who looks more like a draenei than his mother does...despite the fact that his father is a human. (Then again, he was a mage, which might have something to do with it...) And he's The Chosen One.
      • Also, consider that draenei males look, well, more draenei than the females.
      • In the Burning Crusade expansion of World of Warcraft, there is one half-orc half-draenei. He looks mostly like an orc but with a different skin color and a slightly different face.
    • Warcraft also has half-elves, whose most famous example is the paladin Arator the Redeemer (the half-elven son of Turalyon and Alleria Windrunner).
  • Averted in the Dragon Age universe: Half-elves don't have any of their elven parent's traits and are fully human, which is one of the reasons the dwindling Elven society is strongly against human/elven unions. Word of God is that the same thing happens in elf-dwarf matches with the child being indistinguishable from a dwarf, but a human-dwarf will be a true cross that can "pass" as an unusually tall/short member of either. Few of these crossbreeds have been encountered in the games, one being Alistair whose mother turns out to be the elven Grand Enchanter Fiona but goes about believing his real mother was some random human maid. There is also a legend in the third game concerning Tyrdda Bright-Ax, an Avvar woman, whose children were sired by a dwarf.
    • Morrigan, who is human, may have a son with the first game's protagonist (if male) or with another male character from that game; this son has exactly the same appearance in the third game regardless of the race of his father.
  • DragonFable gives us Nythera, a half dragon NPC. In a rather hilarious scene in one of her flashback quests, Nythera's parents, a human wizard and a dragon mother are sitting down at dinner. Said dinner is a live Chickencow (half chicken, half cow), and her mother is in dragon form about to devour it. Her father sees nothing unusual about this at all.
  • Spoofed in "Reality 2.0" of Sam & Max Save The World, in which Bosco's avatar in an MMORPG is elf on one half of his body, and human on the other, as seen in the image for this page. Also used straight in a later episode, where Bosco changes time so that he's part cow. Dialogue in this part also implies that Sam and Max are "freakish animal-human hybrids", not just funny animals.
    • In the final episode of "The Devil's Toybox", Sybil Pandemik shows up pregnant with the child of the mechanically animated Lincoln's statue.
  • Happens a few times in the Star Ocean series.
  • The Tohno and Kishima families in Tsukihime and the supplementary materials like Kagetsu Tohya. Part demon, incidentally. Also Altrouge Brunestud, who is half Dead Apostle and half True Ancestor. In her case it's not actually entirely clear if True Ancestors are a genetically different species, however. Or if it was actually a cross breeding, though at least one has been confirmed.
  • A number of the Servants in Fate/stay night are partially divine. Lancer is the great grandson? of Balor, Hercules the son of Zeus and Gilgamesh is 2/3 god. What exactly constitutes a god in the Nasuverse is incredibly vague, however. Except they all seem to be jerks.
  • In the Myst / Uru games, the D'ni are capable of interbreeding with humans, despite their far longer lifespans and light-sensitivity. Gehn, a half-human, seems to have lived nearly as long as a full-blooded D'ni (350+ ), whereas his quarter-D'ni son Atrus was an old man before 200. Atrus's children, being 1/8 D'ni, lack the light-sensitivity of their father and grandfather; their potential lifespan is unknown, but longer than a full-blooded human's.
  • Jessica D'Alkirk from Lunar: The Silver Star and its remake is half-human and half-beastman.
  • Sands of Destruction's Naja is half-feral, being the offspring of a human woman and the previous Lupus Rex.
  • Brütal Legend has Eddie, the offspring of a human and a demon. Considering what the demons look like, the romance between Succoria and Riggnarok must have been a very, very special one. His birth explicitly killed his demon mother, but on the other hand she turns out to be the original wearer of his trademark shirt so who knows.
  • Phantasy Star IV has the eventual offspring of Chaz, an ordinary human, and Rika, a genetic construct. This doesn't really explain all the Newmans in the Phantasy Star Online games, though.
  • This is the premise of Hybrid Heaven, in which synthesized, half-human Hybrids are living in a secret underground facility underneath Manhattan, and each and every one of them (well, not ALL of them) have a superiority complex to humans, and simply want to take over the world because they think they're better. They plan to replace the President of the United States with an analogue so he can launch a world-wide invasion. In reality, they are led by 'the Master', a Gargantuan (who is ultimately revealed to be a parasite that took over the Master's body) who is called 'the Traitor' by fellow Gargantuans because of his plans to take over the world. You, as Secret Service Agent Johnny Slater, whom the Hybrids cloned to get close to the President, can't let this happen.
  • The main character of Rune Factory 3 is a half-Wooly (a sheep-like monster in the game), which leaves some questions about his conception which are best kept alone. He can also marry a mermaid and have 1/2 fish, 1/4 sheep and 1/4 human children! He can also pick a half-Phoenix and have 1/4 bird, 1/4 sheep and 1/2 human children!
  • In Lost Kingdoms, the Dragonoid and Dragon Knight monsters are half-dragon, half-human. How this works is not entirely certain, as all of the dragons in the game are much bigger than humans...
  • Dragon Quest games have half human hybrids.
    • The hero in Dragon Quest IV is half-human and half-Zenithian.
    • The hero in Dragon Quest V is part-Zenithian. That comes from the wife's side of the family, not the main character's.
    • The hero in Dragon Quest VIII is half-human and half-Dragovian.
  • In Golden Sun: Dark Dawn, Sveta, Volechek, and to varying extents, a majority of the Beastman populace all fall under this trope, having been formerly human just before and just following the Golden Sun event. It's uncertain if perhaps Volechek, as a boy (or if he's even the right age), underwent the transformation that many elderly Beastman recall throughout the game. It's also never mentioned if both of their parents were Beastman (their father definitely was), which might explain why Sveta appears as human as she does. It's also heavily implied at the end of the game that a majority of Belinsk's inhabitants — including all members of the band that played 'Arangoa Prelude' earlier — were formerly human, as only the 'human-borns' developed aesthetic, and in some cases, 'super-Beastman' ([seemingly] only increases in vitality, IQ, etc.) alterations following the blast from the Apollo Lens and the end of the Grave Eclipse.
  • The protagonist of Onimusha 2: Samurai's Destiny, Jubei Yagyu, is part demon (or Oni) by way of his mother, Takajo.
  • Despite fitting into the standard Mass Effect-y Star-Trekky milieu, this is happily averted in Sword of the Stars - interbreeding is impossible (obviously with the insect and aquatic races) but refreshingly so with the two ape-based humanoids, the Humans and th Tarka - they can, hypothetically, have intercourse but without offspring due to genetic differences.
    • For reference, the Tarka may be similar to primates, but they look like Lizard Folk, and their females lay eggs.
  • Aselia expresses a wish to bear Yuuto's child in Eien no Aselia, however, it's unclear whether spirits can actually bear children at all since they are a One-Gender Race that merely pops into being rather than being born.
  • In The Sims 2, if a male Sim gets abducted by aliens, there is a small chance they will be impregnated and have one of these. The aliens have black eyes, similar to The Greys. They also often have extreme facial appearances (no nose, small nose) and personality (often will be mean and neat).
  • One of the bosses of The Gunstringer is a half-lumberjack, half-alligator monstrosity.
  • In the Assassin's Creed series, Adam and Eve were two humans who were part of a breeding program that was started by the First Civilization to create hybrids of the master and slave races that possessed the sixth sense of "knowledge." Unfortunately, all that the humans carried over was the "Eagle Vision" that their descendants would possess, coupled with a natural resistance to the powers of the Pieces of Eden.
  • Roddy, the main character of the PlayStation sequel to Blaster Master, and his sister Elfie are the offspring of the previous game's protagonist, Jason, and an alien female. However, Eve was a Human Alien and the two have no discernible features which differ from those of full humans, unless one counts that nonsense Eve tells Roddy about how his alien half makes him more susceptible to evil.
  • Expressly defied, for the most part, in Rift: No hybrids between races unless planar beings such as shalastir (or, by extension, bahmi) are involved.
  • In Xenoblade, the royal family of the High Entia race has a tradition of accepting a Homs consort for the purpose of bearing hybrids. The only distinguishing trait most of them have are slightly smaller headwings, and they still possess the long lifespans and ether manipulating abilities of their pureblooded kin. They also have no risk of becoming monstrous Telethia, which is the primary reason that they were created.
  • The Shining Series is filled with various human/animal mixes. Some of these are playable characters, but most are enemies.
  • Dark Souls has Crossbreed Priscilla, who is half dragon half humanoid of vague origin. She was shunned and hated her entire life for being an "abomination", eventually ending up within a Pocket Dimension called the Painted World of Ariamas. Interestingly, she is a Non-Malicious Monster, and the only boss who doesn't immediately try to murder the player, instead kindly explaining how to escape the Painted World.
  • Magical Diary has Damien, a demon/human hybrid. He claims that he's a changeling and has no idea who his real parents are. He later admits that he was a deliberate hybrid, created to try and remove the weaknesses in his demon ancestry. It worked, too. From the looks of some other students, he's not the only hybrid in the school either.
  • Being based on Dungeons & Dragons, the Neverwinter Nights series has them by the truckload. Aribeth de Tylmarande in the first game may be a half-elf (she's either that or full-blood, and the game is never clear which). Xanos Messarmos from Shadows of Undrentide is a half-orc. Valen Shadowbreath from Hordes of the Underdark is a tiefling (he's specifically part demon).
    • The sequel has Neeshka, another tiefling (one-quarter devil this time), and the NPC aasimar twins Joy and Light of Heavens. Mask of the Betrayer has Gannayev-of-Dreams, a hagspawn (male offspring of a hag and a human male), and Kaelyn the Dove, a half-celestial. Storm of Zehir goes to town on it: Finch the half-elf bard, Quarrel the half-drow warlock, Belueth the aasimar rogue, and Grykk the half-orc paladin. Plus a couple of genasi NPCs.
    • There is also the 'red dragon disciple' class prestige class, which turns you into a half dragon at level 10, which would allow you to be a half elf, half human, half dragon.
  • The main focus of Icewind Dale 2 is on two half-demon antagonists who gather up an entire army, which includes hybrids, to get revenge on the rest of the world because they felt they were treated poorly.
  • Well, half-sentient-non-human-alien, anyway: In I Miss the Sunrise, Daszk is half-lacertian, half-Lesser.
  • In Heroes of Might and Magic V and VI, the beastmen races were created by wizards, experimenting on criminals in order to create new species that could be used as slaves. Variants of beastmen known to exist include goblins, orcs and Cyclops (all created from crossing humans with various types of demon), harpies, centaurs (human/nightmare), minotaurs, sharkpeople, Lamasu (human/manticore hybrids that look like winged sphinxes), and mermaids (supposedly human/dolphin hybrids, although they look nothing like dolphins).
    • And then there's Yog from III, who's half-human, half-genie. And Gelu, who is half-human, half-snow elf.
  • In Binary Domain, Faye is a half human half machine hybrid which is born from an artifical womb of a female hollow child, granting immunity to diseases, greater strength, speed and intelligence.
  • WildStar has the Luminai, the half-Eldan Cassians that lead the Dominion.
  • Kokonoe from Blazblue is the only half-human, half-cat hybrid in the series.
  • Dungeon Maker II: The Hidden War: In addition to creatures like the centaur enemies, there are also a few half human hybrids as named characters: notably Niko the apprentice at the magic shop who is half witch, as well as the Dungeon Maker and the Big Bad, who are both half demon.
  • In Shin Super Robot Wars, Eiji and Julia are part alien, thanks to a "genetic equalizer" device and a woman into Interspecies Romance among the "Boazan empire" folk who rescued their Earthling father from deep space.
  • The title character of the Shantae series. As the name of her fourth game proclaims, she is a half-genie hero. Little is actually seen of full-blooded genies in the games, however, with the actual circumstances behind Shantae's birth also being unknown (beyond her mother being the genie half of the equation).
  • The Wasp Lady in Harvester is the Crazy Cat Lady of the town, utterly obsessed with wasps and keeping entire hives in her house. If the player kills her, she falls over from the table she was sitting at, and Steve finds out there's another reason she's called that...
  • The Bizarre Adventures of Woodruff and the Schnibble: Woodruff is half-human and half-Bazouk.
  • In Arc the Lad: Twilight of the Spirits, the main characters Kharg and Darc are fraternal twins born to a human mother and a Deimos father. By the time they are reunited Human-Deimos relations are worse than ever and both have already taken a side. As a result, their family reunion is not a happy one. It takes the rest of the game for them to even begin to patch things up.
  • Discworld Noir: The bartender Mankin is half-elf, in the Discworld setting, that makes him very unpopular (since Elves are cruel and vain beings from a parallel dimension), and gives him no special powers. He is a very bitter person.
  • Creating one of these is implied to be the goal of the Great Ones in Bloodborne, since they can't reproduce otherwise. They haven't been terribly successful so far, with the possible exception of the Orphan of Kos in The Old Hunters DLC. The player character might end up becoming one of these, depending on how you interpret the True Ending.
  • In RuneScape, Lucien the Mahjarrat has a half-human daughter named Moia. The notes of Lucien's brother Zemouregal express a curiosity about "the breeding of mongrels such as this", and a section of gameplay from Moia's perspective notes that Zemouregal has been giving her creepy looks.
    • Safalaan Hallow, an amnesiac man whose existing memory spans centuries despite looking like a handsome twenty-something, is eventually found to be the product of a Happily Married Icyene-human couple. His longevity and Puberty Superpower come from his mother's side.
  • In Battleborn, Mellka is this as her background lore reveals. Her father was a human researcher who was born on the planet Penarch, and her mother was an Aelfrin refugee from the planet Eshteni.
  • In Puzzle Quest: Challenge of the Warlords, party member Cyrus Darkhunter is confirmed to be the son of a female human and an elf male, and was summarily rejected by both sides of his family.
  • In Unavowed it turns out that Genies, or "Jinns" as they prefer to be called, can produce off-spring with humans. A result of such a union is the main character, Mandana, who finds herself stuck between her Jinn side, which means that she Cannot Tell a Lie, and her human side who understands how foolish such a purely honest world-view is.
  • An upcoming feature in Stellaris is the "xeno-compatability" ascension perk. A xenophilic civilization willing to commit considerable social unity and effort to the task can figure out a way to allow any two species to interbreed. This will produce a hybrid subspecies that takes the portrait of one of the parents and gets a mixture of traits from both. It's an impressive feat of biology given how weird some of the species in question are.

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback