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  • Accidental Innuendo: The word "toa" is slang for "toilet" in Swedish.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • The Order of Mata Nui was created specifically to allow them to do things that the Toa's moral code would forbid. That hasn't stopped some of their more morally gray missions from pushing them into Knight Templar territory for some.
    • This video theorizes that, before his character, Mata Nui's character, and the entire universe were heavily retooled by BIONICLE's extension, Makuta was originally intended to be a noble Tragic Hero and Well-Intentioned Extremist who cared for his brother and wanted to bring him peace — and the Mask of Shadows corrupted him, twisting his thoughts and making him believe that Mata Nui could only find peace in slumber, away from the risks of ruling as the Great Spirit.
      Makuta: Sleep spares him pain. Awake, he suffers.
      • Alternatively, it could be that Makuta Teridax is a Well-Intentioned Extremist in canon: he did only decide to take over the universe after the Matoran Civil War and seeing that Mata Nui did not respond.
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    • Vakama's out-of-nowhere recklessness during Web of Shadows. Is it just an Out-of-Character Moment brought on by Executive Meddling, or did it stem from the belief that had he been a more resolute and decisive Toa, Lhikan would still be alive and the Great Cataclysm wouldn't have happened, causing him to misguidedly overcompensate? The novels lean into the latter direction, showing Vakama's gradual descent into recklessness the longer it takes the Toa to return to Metru Nui right up to the point they're captured.
    • Does Velika truly care about the Voya Nui Resistance Team and the other friends he made while disguised as a Matoran (such as Nuparu), or are they just expendable pawns to him? His interactions with them do indeed suggest he cares about them to some degree, and he helped defeat the Piraka when they had taken over Voya Nui, but perhaps he simply saw the Piraka as unworthy of power and too rebellious for their own good.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
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    • Considering that multiple species have been enslaved and tortured in his former body for a period of time, Mata Nui remained a pretty together guy.
    • Almost everybody on Bara Magna seems pretty together after going through a six-way civil war and an Earth-Shattering Kaboom. Granted, it's been nearly 100,000 years since it happened. Surviving in the harsh desert world seems to take precedence over angsting over what happened, or at the very least they've moved past the angsting phase since then.
  • Anticlimax Boss: The Voya Nui Online Game ends with a three-stage fight. First, five of the six Piraka all at once. Second, Vezon, who fights alone but is plenty strong to make up for it. And third is... Zaktan, all by himself, who is not only on the weaker end of the Piraka and doesn't have the others to back him up, but waited to attack you until after you grabbed the Mask of Life.
  • Ass Pull:
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    • Takanuva's revival at the end of Mask of Light. Apparently, a beam of light on his mask is enough to restore him. This is not explained in the movie, and it's never brought up again.
    • The later bits of the story were often built around ass-pulls and Shocking Swerves, as the writer openly admitted that his preferred way of writing was never planning ahead. See for instance: Velika having been a Great Being in disguise all along. Tuyet being alive and her corpse belonging to her Alternate Universe-self. Ancient's reveal of having been a mole from the Order of Mata Nui all this time which was rendered pointless due to the Shadowed One killing him for completely unrelated reasons. Or the conclusion to Brothers in Arms in which the characters are sucked in by a random dimensional portal.
  • Awesome Art:
    • Carlos D'Anda did the illustrations for the first nine BIONICLE comics, plus a few more shorter promotional comics for the Matoran and Bohrok, and he set the standard so high that no other comic artist for the rest of BIONICLE's ten-year-long run was able to meet it. Seriously, just look at the second page of the first comic. Look at that incredible attention to detail; all those minute cracks and imperfections in Kopaka's armor made him look less like a plastic toy and more like a legendary warrior. He was also one of the few comic artists to adapt slight stylistic touch-ups to the characters, giving them some needed bulk, better proportions, and convincing poses. Now imagine that same attention to detail for nine comic books straight. If first impressions are most important, then D'Anda nailed the first impressions of BIONICLE.
    • Christian Zanier was the only artist who most will agree managed to rise up to D'Anda, at least with regards to attention to detail. Not only were his characters near-perfect representations of the toys yet still lifelike, he also created pretty solid designs for random background creatures which looked LEGO-like and convincing as biomechanical beings at the same time: compare his take on the mutated Takea sharks to the actual model of a normal one. Sadly, he never became a regular artist, and his occasional over-reliance on copy-pasted lineart and using badly filtered photos as backgrounds wasn't to everyone's liking.
    • Advance Copenhagen's artwork of the Mata Nui robot, shortly after his rising and during the final confrontation with Makuta. For such a grand and important moment in BIONICLE history, Advance perfectly captured its magnificence, awe, and scale.
    • Leigh Gallagher's work on the comic lasted only a year (2008 for those who don't know), but what a pretty year it was.
  • Awesome Ego:
    • Fan-favorite Toa-hero Matau. He never stops talking himself (and the other Toa Metru) up, and also tends to prove that he can deliver.
    • Makuta Teridax. Considering his Plan worked, it's hard to argue this.
  • Awesome Music: Has its own page.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Ask around, and you'll find that Vezon is either one of the coolest villains in the franchise or an annoying character who overstayed his welcome.
    • The BIONICLE Stars are an interesting case. Few will dispute their quality, given that they use the much-loathed Av-Matoran build, but others will argue that it was interesting to see characters redone in a different system and there is also dispute on how grateful the fandom should be since it took a lot to even convince LEGO to release sets for 2010 rather than just outright canceling the series. Then of course there's the dispute on which characters should have been represented, particularly in the case of Gresh and Skrall.
    • The Toa Nuva, iconic as they are, haven't been viewed as favorably by some fans looking back. The main points of criticism are the less interesting weapons and the rather oversized "organic"-themed masks and details that didn't match the established aesthetic and personalities of the Toa Mata. Others still consider them some of the best designs the franchise has to offer.
    • How you feel about the Toa Hordika depends largely on how you feel about the 2005 story arc as a whole and the narrative developments made in that year. Mutated "feral" Toa that lacked conventional Kanohi didn't warm up to some fans, but others liked them for the same reasons on the grounds that they are different from the norm.
  • Badass Decay:
    • The Piraka are a mild case. For the most part, the Piraka utterly curbstomped the Toa Nuvanote , but they're significantly easier to deal with for the Toa Inika, though still challenging foes. Zaktan gets hit with this the worst with his (admittedly unique) defeat at Nuparu's hands and his Butt-Monkey status during the Toa Hagah serial.
    • The Skrall in the battle at the end of The Legend Reborn, where they go from being literally undefeated by a Glatorian to being taken out left and right in a few hits. Word of God justifies this by saying that 1) they were scared out of their minds by this giant made out of bugs that suddenly appeared, 2) the Glatorian, not being in the arena, have an excuse to employ all of those dirty tricks that they've learned over the years, and 3) Screw the Rules, I Make Them! / Hand Wave. Also, the Glatorian had the element of surprise, plus a handful of them now had Elemental Powers.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The revival of Takanuva at the end of Mask of Light (see Ass Pull above). No foreshadowing or lead-up. Still makes no sense, even to this day. And it's never mentioned again.
  • Broken Base:
    • The canonization vs. non-canonization debate can get pretty heated, to the point of nearly having a Flame War.
    • Vakama's Face–Heel Turn in Web of Shadows. Unnecessary character assassination of an interesting protagonist just for the sake of conflict, or an interesting and logical twist after so much Wangst in Legends of Metru Nuia, one that ultimately saved the character in many people's eyes? Fans can't agree on the subject at all.
    • Stuart Sayger‘s art for the Bionicle comics from 2006-07 is quite divisive between those who enjoy the unique and stylistic approach to the characters, and those who think his art style was ugly to look at and inconsistent from the past comic's artwork.
    • Set wise, the 2009 titan "Toa Mata Nui" is widely polarizing. Some see it as one of the worst sets ever designed, criticizing it as an inferior version of the 2008 Takanuva build with unnecessary pistons on the chest, and an ugly color scheme. Others, meanwhile, see it as a great set that fully encompasses Mata Nui’s status as a great being and improved said Takanuva set by making it more structurally sound. The one thing both sides agree on is that it was nice to have the Mask of Life in gold.
    • By far the most polarizing topic among fans is which era was the best:
      • Some say the classic years on the island of Mata Nui (2001-2003) were the best for its more simplistic and easier to follow storytelling and unique location and atmosphere, while others see it as a bad case of Early Installment Weirdness with sets that didn’t age well and a repetitive story structure with little variation.
      • The Metru Nui saga (2004-2005) is often criticized by some for straying far from the original years’ tropical island setting in favor of a metropolis island, disliked the Darker and Edgier tone and felt it overstayed its welcome, especially in 2005. Yet it’s also seen as the toy lines’ Growing the Beard for others with improved articulation in sets and appreciate the lore around the Toa and Matoran.
      • The years surrounding the death and rise of Mata Nui (2006-2008) is either lauded as the best years since the first 3 years with higher stakes, a great subversion of an expected story and wonderfully creative sets, or a downgrade from past years with nonstop Wangst, plot points that shouldn’t have happened or been explained and the rise of mediocre clone sets and flimsy pieces?
      • The Bara Magna arc (2009-2010) suffers the most. Some fans felt it was a breath of fresh air that the series needed, believing the gladiator-style environment was a perfect opportunity to expand on the lore of Bionicle after 8 years of staying on the same story that wrapped everything up nicely. Other fans criticize the decision to change everything up after so many years of an ongoing story that it felt too different from what came before and ended the series on a rushed and lackluster note. The fact that these changes happened when the toy line was on its last leg doesn’t help either.
  • Can't Un-Hear It: Most seem to concur that Christopher Gaze and Lee Tockar are the definitive voices for Vakama and Teridax respectively. Most readings of the books and comic dubs base their performances on them.
  • Complete Monster: See HERE.
  • Contested Sequel:
  • Continuity Lock-Out: Like you wouldn't believe. There are novels, Comics, Web serials, and Movies from which some novels are adapted from.
  • Crack Pairing: Onewa and Krahka, given the sheer rage Onewa has when she gets trapped in the Zone of Shadows.
  • Designated Villain: Turaga Dume and the Vahki get struck with this in the Vahki animations. The shorts all portray Dume's rule over Metru Nui as some kind of Orwellian oppressive government with the Vahki serving as brutal secret police. The main source material instead shows Dume as a well-intentioned but stubborn ruler. Similarly, the Vahki are mindless robotic law enforcers who haven't really independently done anything that villainous in the main storyline. Makuta WAS impersonating Dume at the time, but regardless he didn't mistreat most of the Matoran using the power granted by impersonating Dume until actually kidnapping them.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Amongst clone sets, the Rahkshi are easily the most popular, as well as some of the most popular mooks in the series for being genuinely intimidating as well as introducing jointed limbs in the sets.
    • Speaking of the Visorak Era, Keetongu as well, thanks to his memorably unique design and rare color scheme (a character that's actually yellow!)
    • For yet another Web of Shadows character, there's Roodaka, who's well-liked for adding a unique female presence beyond the token blue Toa, and also because, well... just guess.
    • Brutaka is easily one of the most well-received characters. Set-wise, he has an intimidating and cool design that catches the eye. Story-wise, he's loved for his overwhelming power, deadpan humor, and being a Fallen Hero that gets an awesome fight with Axonn at the climax of the Voya Nui arc. This was noticed by the creators, as he showed up in several web serials, made a Heel–Face Turn, and even took on Teridax briefly in another awesome fight.
    • Among the Makuta, Mutran is quite popular due to his very amusing and world-building serial "The Mutran Chronicles."
    • The Vorox for a multitude of reasons; their unique look and use of tan after years of absence of brown, their memetic quote, and to a lesser extent their role in the story. This extends somewhat to the Zesk as well.
  • Even Better Sequel: While it undeniably has its flaws, the second BIONICLE film was far better-written and executed, not to mention far better looking than its predecessor and is far above most Merchandise-Driven direct-to DVD childrens' movies. The third and fourth films, on the other hand, fall more into the realms of Contested Sequel and Sequelitis, respectively.
  • Evil Is Cool: The Makuta, for effectively being borderline Eldritch Abominations; the Piraka for being a Faux Affably Evil group of superpowered badasses; the Barraki for being monstrous marine Badass Normal characters in comparison to the Piraka; the Rahkshi for their utter domination of the Toa Nuva in their early appearances; and Brutaka for being the most powerful and deadly villain during the Inika storyline, with a cool design and a deeper backstory in comparison to the Piraka.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Several couples became this after the ship teasing moments in the 2001-2003 animations and afterward, even after Greg Farshtey declared all romance non-canon, it didn't stop the shippers.
    • Macku and Hewkii, set up and portrayed in MNOG and its following animations from Templar Studios; the pair is often the first couple mentioned when fans rebut "love isn't canon." The pair sharing a tender moment during the Bohrok siege of Ga-Koro is particularly iconic.
    • Jaller and Hahli, another pair first hinted at in the MNOG games and animations and in Mask of Light, but later reduced to a platonic friendship during Greg's novels for the Ignition era. Also likely by fans to be turned into a love triangle or poly relationship by introducing Takua to the mix.
    • Lewa and Onua, due to Onua's uncanny ability to save Lewa from situations where he loses his mask across both generations have to lead to this fanship.
    • Kopaka and Pohatu, the "Kohatu" ship dates to the two appearing together in the first comic and how Pohatu is one of the few characters that can break Kopaka's cold attitude.
    • Takua/Takanuva and Gali, due to their special psychic bond in the franchise. Gali could use her mind to communicate to Takua, used most notably during MNOG when their psychic link allowed her to show Takua real time visions of the Toa's fight against the Manas in Mangaia. Seemingly, a ship pair endorsed by franchise co-creator Christian Faber himself has shared fan art of the pair to his own social media pages.
    • Matau and Nokama, hinted at in a few brief interactions in Legends of Metru Nui. Even Greg's books suggested that during their stint as Hordika that Matau was feeling "animalistic urges" towards Nokama.
    • Vakama and Roodaka, with the not-so-subtle vibes of Roodaka, many fans have come to view her as a dom over Vakama during his brief fall to the proverbial dark side during the events of Web of Shadows. Even Nathan Furst's musical score for Web of Shadows has a song titled "Roodaka Seduces Vakama."
    • Norik and Varian, the two Toa's relationship was fleshed out in the canonized fan short story No One Gets Left Behind which has a strong relationship between the two characters. Varian has a very heartfelt goodbye with Norik before she was separated from him and imprisoned by The Shadowed One in a permanent stasis tube.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception:
  • Fandom Rivalry: Mainly with the rest of LEGO fandom, the AFOL community in particular who feel the theme doesn't fit in with the spirit or aesthetic of LEGO. It tends to flare up during fan polls or tourneys over the best overall theme that inevitably get flooded with votes from BIONICLE fans. It's all largely one-sided, though, as BIONICLE fans generally appreciate the other themes. Unfortunately, this occurrence would turn sour upon the Fan Ballot to decide which classic LEGO theme would get a high-end collectors' set for LEGO's 90th Anniversary, with BIONICLE amassing the highest number of votes and going up against Classic LEGO Space, LEGO Pirates, and LEGO Castle in the finals. Several YouTubers would insist that BIONICLE should not win for the above reasoning, citing the failure of G2 in particular. This naturally incurred the wrath of BIONICLE's fandom, who, as mentioned elsewhere on this page, are growing desperate for the line's legacy to have some actual recognition, especially after G2's aforementioned demise and the proposed 20th-anniversary Ideas set getting passed up for approval.
  • Faux Symbolism: The pathway leading to the resting place of the Mask of Life is exactly 777 Stairs. It means nothing.
  • Fanon:
    • Less gender-restrictive reenvisioning of the mythos like to interpret Tamaru as male-to-female transgender.
    • While several MOCists have their own interpretations of Lariska's appearance, one recurring trend is to interpret her as a combiner model of Nidhiki and Krekka, owing to her role in the former's Backstory and having been stated to have blue-and-green armor with a robot arm.
  • Foe Yay: Vakama and Roodaka. While she was using him, Roodaka at the very least seems much more genuinely invested in him than Sidorak, whom she strung along for her own benefit. Roodaka's line to Vakama near the end of Web of Shadows comes off just as much as a Woman Scorned as it does him going against her plans.
    Roodaka: And here I thought you could have been king!
  • First Installment Wins: The Toa Mata/Nuva are still the most iconic and well-remembered Toa to this day, to the extent that they've also made the most reappearances since their debut.
  • Fridge Horror: The Boxor vehicles are made of Bohrok parts. The Bohrok Were Once Matoran, making this a case of Human Resources.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With other LEGO themes like Rock Raiders, LEGO Exo-Force, and the line's spiritual predecessor Slizer, natch. But also with other adventure stories like The Lord of the Rings and Doctor Who.
    • Also, oddly enough, with Bronies due to uncanny similarities with the two stories especially regarding the power of teamwork and both having a villain with a shadow theme.
    • Bionicle fans get along pretty well with fans of Moana, considering Bionicle's borrowing from Polynesian culture. It helps that the film's island is also called 'Moto Nui' and that Tamatoa and Te Ka both have very Bionicle-esque designs.
    • Many fans see Xenoblade Chronicles as a Spiritual Successor to Bionicle, since it shares a similar premise of entire worlds living on giant robots.
    • While getting them mixed up is a sore spot, Bionicle fans are often also fans of Transformers, the other premiere Merchandise-Driven epic about Mechanical Lifeforms.
  • Genius Bonus: If you've spent any significant amount of time studying Hinduism, you might notice that "Unity", "Duty" and "Destiny" are three of the primary meanings of the word dharma — a word that's notoriously difficult to concisely translate into English. Depending on the context, dharma can be understood to mean "One's ultimate place in the world, as dictated by the universe itself", "One's moral obligation to find one's place in the world and fulfill one's destiny", and "The underlying direction of the universe, which binds all living beings together in one common purpose".
  • Hard-to-Adapt Work: LEGO initially turned down every adaptation of their BIONICLE line because every script given tried to add in humans until Miramax finally agreed not to do so.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Greg Farshtey's wife Jackina voiced the female characters in the story podcasts and was the namesake of the character Kiina. These fun pieces of trivia became harsher in light of the news that Jackina and Greg have since divorced.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • It's amazing how similar the fan-created Voriki was to future events.
    • Axonn and Brutaka. The former is an ax-wielding hero with a ruthless side, the latter an Evil Former Friend of his with the power to teleport objects across tremendous distances, wing-looking things on his back, and a huge double-bladed sword. Sound familiar?
    • Fans had a field day when it turned out that the island in Moana is also called "Moto Nui." (Although they're spelled differently, the pronunciation is nearly identical.) Not only that but in both cases an island also turns out to be the slumbering body of their setting's god.
  • I Am Not Shazam: Again, The characters are not "Bionicles." While it is generally acceptable to use "Bionicle" as a catch-all term for any character (especially when talking about the sets), the term "Bionicle" is actually a combination of the words "Biological" and "Chronicle". Though to be fair, it took a long time for the actual meaning of that title to make sense.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!:
    • The Bohrok-Kal, at least set-wise (their role in the story was better-received), due to being six Palette Swaps of the Bohrok sets, which were in turn Palette Swaps of each other, thus being six more sets that were identical in everything but the color and shield design to six sets that were already identical in everything but the color and shield design.
    • The Mata Nui Story Arcs tended to fall into this trap with the Rahi, Bohrok, and Bohrok-Kal. The island of Mata Nui is in danger, and the Toa need to collect masks of power so they can go underground and defeat the villains (through working together!).
      • Specifically, there's also the fact that in the first two examples Takua goes exploring Mata Nui and helping its residents, and that Le-Koro is being taken over by the villains (Nui-Rama in 2001, Bohrok in 2002) with Lewa's mind being taken over by the villains, Onua having to save him, and Kongu and Tamaru escaping the disaster and being helped by Takua to save the village.
    • A complicated set-based example that began in 2007. On one hand, the Palette Swap trend of the past six years was ended. On the other hand, the Piraka and Inika build from the previous years became the standard pieces for the rest of the run, and then 2008 introduced the Av-Matoran build that was used for the Agori and the Stars. This led, of course, to the fandom declaring that LEGO's set designers were being lazy and just reusing the same designs over and over.
    • The Vahki suffered this for much of the same reasons as the Bohrok-Kal due to sharing a similar build structure to the then-well received Rahkshi, which ended up causing some people to call them a rehash. Unlike the Bohrok-Kal, the Vahki only had a minimal impact on the story and due to their robotic nature didn't have much personality either. There's a bit of Values Resonance regarding the Vahki in hindsight, however, as it is now becoming understood that the Vahki are an allegory for secret police.
  • It Was His Sled:
    • Takua is the Seventh Toa.
    • Teridax isn't the only Makuta. For that matter, that he has a name other than "Makuta".
    • The Matoran Universe is actually a giant robot.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Given the line's lack of mainstream recognition as mentioned under Obscure Popularity, fans will come in droves if they even catch a whiff of a Shout-Out to the line in anything, no matter how tiny or throw away the reference is. Mother's Basement observed that a good amount of comments for one of his videos were all claiming to have watched it simply because they saw Mata Nui, who Thew put in the video's thumbnail.
  • LGBT Fanbase: Surprisingly, BIONICLE gained a following of transgender women around the start of The New '20s, most of whom grew up with brand before to their transition. It also helps that many of the sets for female characters had gender-neutral body proportions and appearances, and that the one female character that did have an obviously female appearance is a member of a species where even the males share the same body proportions and anatomy as the females.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Axonn is a powerful warrior of the Order of Mata Nui who once conquered a vast swathe of the Matoran universe with his own two hands and brilliant mind before joining the Order out of a desire for a higher purpose. Working with his close friend Brutaka in quelling villainous uprisings over the years, Axonn works against Brutaka when the latter betrays him, with Axonn uniting a group of Matoran into a resistance force against Brutaka and the Piraka. Successfully causing havoc throughout the Piraka ranks before beating Brutaka himself with quick thinking, Axonn later teams with Brutaka once more to unite entire islands of warlords with the Order to combat the rising threat of the Makuta and overcomes a mental trap and illusion set by Teridax himself, always showing himself to be an honorable, yet unflappable, force of power and will.
    • Brutaka was once a member of the Order of Mata Nui before growing disillusioned and striking out his own, manipulating the treacherous Piraka into hunting down the Mask of Life for him while plotting to betray them. Though taken down a peg when the Piraka betray him first and he is beaten by Axonn, Brutaka comes back better than ever, escaping the underwater prison of the Pit and taking time to foil one of Makuta Teridax's schemes out of sheer disgust at the latter's evil. Reenlisting with the Order, Brutaka forms the "Federation of Fear" by recruiting a bevy of villains to his side that he uses to pull off a daring mission while keeping them all in line and using their unique capabilities to succeed. After assisting Axonn in recruiting dangerous warlords to the side of the Order, Brutaka uses his connection to Antidermis to thwart any attempt to kill Teridax and doom the Matoran universe, instead helping partners in utilizing a less destructive method that ultimately plays a key role in undoing Teridax and saving the universe.
    • Toa Helryx was the very first Toa and the founder of the Order of Mata Nui, having grown ruthless and jaded towards the evils of the Matoran Universe and seeking to create a secretive society expressly designed for dishing out extreme forms of justice to those undeserving of mercy. Via the Order and her own personal interference, Helryx has been behind a near-insurmountable number of events, from training and inspiring fellow Toa to creating the legendary prison "the Pit", all while striking key blows against growing villains to keep many at bay. Upon deciding to step out of the shadows, Helryx recruits evil beings galore to her cause yet keeps many under her thumb, turns Vezon into a stooge, and sends him on a suicide mission, and decimates several Makuta strongholds with very little unforeseen circumstances. Though as shocked as the rest of the universe when Teridax attains godhood, Helryx takes advantage of imprisonment inside Teridax's mind to form a plan to kill the mad god even if it dooms the Matoran universe, and nearly succeeds in her plan before outside interference, proving once and for all that Helryx will do what she always has: "Whatever is necessary."
    • The Matoran Velika spends much of the story as apparently nothing but a notably clever bystander to the greater powers of the Makuta and Toa, however, upon Teridax's defeat, reveals himself to in fact be a power-hungry Great Spirit in disguise. Having played several minor events to his will, Velika decides to make his move on the reformed Spherus Magna, striking out and killing several of the most powerful beings in the universe in brutal ways so he can instill fear in the populace from an unseen threat, then swoop in as their savior and attain power above all. Plotting to even play the Toa to his tune before ridding himself of them, Velika takes advantage of a large gathering of beings on his hit list to forego any greater plans and simply bomb their location in the hopes to wipe them all out in one fell swoop, promising to then move on and complete his domination while no one ever suspects himself as the true culprit.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Mantax, as of SPIRIT's Mantax Facts P.S.A. video.
    • Onua has gained some popularity in this department.
    • Thanks to the fact that he was the only Toa Mahri to be given two guns instead of some variation on a gun and some other weapon, Kongu is commonly interpreted as being a trigger-happy Gun Nut obsessed with firearms and whose solution to every problem is to go Guns Akimbo and shoot everything that moves. It's not uncommon to see jokes about how any villain, antagonist, or significant threat in the canon would have been solved if they just let Kongu shoot it a bunch.
    • It seems that the makers of The Legend Reborn was trying to invoke this with Tarix, especially with his Nonchalant Dodge. It's taken further in a deleted scene where Tarix jumps into a crowd of Bone Hunters, fights his way through, and emerges without a scratch, then tosses aside his weapons to stare down and punch out a Skrall. He's arguably also this in-universe, as is the now-deceased Certavus.
    • Makuta has gotten a lot of respect in some circles for being one of few Evil Overlords whose Evil Plan actually worked.
    • The humanoid form of Mata Nui, when he finally awakens, is widely regarded by fans as one of the most awe-inspiring and overpowered figures in all fiction. Considering that he's a living God whose face is bigger than the entire island that bears his name, it's somewhat hard to argue with them there.
    • The line's Obscure Popularity and the resulting Fountain of Memes has turned it into one of these. Look at any memes made not too long after G2's cancellation and you'll find a lot about how extensive knowledge of the lore and having a vast collection of the sets makes you a god amongst men.
  • Memetic Loser: If the fandom is to be believed, then Tuma is a total wimp who does nothing but screams that he is "THE MIGHTY TUMA" while getting the crap beaten out of him, ignoring all of his appearances outside of The Legend Reborn where he is much more threatening and competent.
    • For a toy example, there's the lime green parts, infamous for shattering when looked at too hard, let alone trying to use them for building.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "BURN STUFF!!!" — any parody of a Toa of Fire, mainly Tahu.
    • "Beware My Stinger Tail!" and "I AM THE MIGHTY TUMA!"
    • *Insert character here* died for/to save your *Insert noun here*
    • "Who ate all the pies? Who ate all the pies?"note 
    • Who is Voriki?
    • "All aboard the Hype Train!" — in response to rumors of Bionicle's return in 2015.
    • Using the term "Kapura'd" as an alternative to "Ninja'd" in some fan circles.
    • The "Good Guy/Bad Guy" sets have achieved a fair bit of popularity, for being absurdly simple builds with really goofy names. In some circles, it's hit Memetic Badass levels, particularly thanks to Reviving Bionicle.
    • "YO, YO, PIRAKA". From the Piraka Rap, a song that was actually produced and released by LEGO for some reason.
    • Bonkle.note 
    • "TAKUUUUUUUUAAAAAAAAA!!!"note 
    • Move Along as the unofficial franchise Theme Song.
    • The red one.note 
    • Nuvaboobs.note 
    • The still from Mask of Light of Pohatu trying to get Tahu and Gali to get along is often used to try and mediate disagreements between fans.
    • Love isn't canon.note 
    • Kongu and his guns.note 
    • Pohatu's hips.note 
    • BioniCALS! note 
    • Hoseryx note 
    • The Dream™️note 
    • Simporak.note 
    • Bionicle Lore. note 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Ahkmou selling infected Kolhii balls to Po-Matoran in Po-Koro, leading to the outbreak of a virus.
    • Teridax takes a leap over the horizon by sending Mata Nui into a slumber and absorbing Nidhiki, Krekka, and Nivawk.
    • Nidhiki crosses it in Legends of Metru Nui when he drops Vakama toward the smelting pits even though Lhikan had surrendered.
    • Roodaka crossed it when she left a fellow member of her species for dead on the Mountain. Interestingly, this seems to be a Rite of Passage-type thing for her species.
    • The Piraka as a whole cross it by enslaving the Voya Nui Matoran. Several of them, however, have their own candidates for when they crossed it individually.
      • Reidak, Avak, and Vezok crossed it by releasing the Kanohi Dragon onto Metru-Nui.
      • Hakann crossed it by putting a hole in Vezok's Toa canister, fully intending on letting him drown.
      • Zaktan crossed it by doing... whatever he did to a Toa of Plasma.
    • The Skrall, or at least Tuma, cross it by the raid on Tajun.
    • Annona crossed it by sending the entire Iron Tribe to extinction by feeding on their dreams.
    • The Shadowed One lives, breathes and has taken permanent residence over the horizon for a long, long time. From ordering assassinations to stealing treasures, conquering lands, killing every Dark-Hunter who shows the slightest bit of opposition or weakness to him, and in one case, capturing the lifelong friend of a Dark-Hunter without said Hunter's knowledge in order to manipulate him into joining.
    • Tridax placed himself over it by creating an army out of the alternate counterparts of Takanuva whom he had brainwashed, thus dooming many alternate realities because of his absence.
    • Really, Mutran's pure sadism in his experimentations qualify him as irredeemable.
    • Karzahni, who instead of fixing Matoran properly as he was supposed to, gave them shoddy repairs and forced them to remain on his island, an infamous Eldritch Location that is Bionicle's answer to Hell, and not giving the slightest damn about what horrific fates they end up enduring.
    • Metus sold out his and the other tribes to the Skrall, which would mean massacres and pillaging for all tribes, and enslavement for all of the survivors.
    • Takadox for hypnotizing and leaving Jaller, Hahli, and Nuparu for dead on the island of Artidax, where the whole Visorak horde has already gathered, and where the volcano was on the verge of erupting.
    • Strakk crossed it by trying to kill his opponent in the arena, when he was only supposed to defeat them in a fair fight. Strakk doubly so because Ackar had already won the match, and Strakk only had the chance to kill him because Ackar had his back turned, and due to Malum trying to do this to Strakk himself. Malum avoids this due to the redeeming qualities he has regarding his care for his pack of Vorox.
  • My Real Daddy: Greg Farshtey might've been the writer for most of the storyline, but there is a large portion of the fanbase touting concept designer and co-creator Christian Faber as the true mastermind behind BIONICLE's success. It helps that Faber regularly posted concept art that shows very interesting What Could Have Been scenarios or early designs that would eventually shape the series' aesthetics.
    • In addition to Christian Faber; the three other people credited as a co-creator of Bionicle are Bob Thompson who created the original story pitch of "Doo Heads of Voo Doo Island", Martin Riber Anderson a Lego toy designer who worked on the physical toys, and Alastair Swinnerton who wrote the story bible. Many of the early story concepts including the Great Spirit Robot and the names of various characters were created by Alastair Swinnerton and then visually refined by Faber. Swinnerton in particular has an endearing story of how his first paycheck in 1999 from Lego went towards buying what he calls his "Bionicle Fridge" in his home. Of these four, Christian Faber was the only one to work on the line for its entirety from start to cancellation and onto the following Hero Factory line, while also providing a brief advisory role in the creation of G2 before he left working with Advance Copenhagen & Lego to start his own freelance company.
  • Narm: BIONICLE: The Game had some pretty dreadful dialogue all-around, but this line in particular really stands out:
  • Nightmare Fuel: Oh, where to start... Has its own page.
  • Obscure Popularity: Was popular enough that it helped save Lego as a company, went on for ten straight years, covered almost any type of medium even outside the main toyline, including books, comics, video games and four movies, even received an (admittedly less successful) reboot in 2015... But looking at what most people seem to think about it, the mainstream only seems to remember it as "that Lego thing with the colored robots", with a lot of people not even being aware of the greater plot, or any of the sets past the first movie.
  • Pandering to the Base: Just the sheer number of Ascended Fanon cases made by the author is enough to get on a significant amount of people's nerves.
  • Pop Culture Holiday: Starting in 2019, August 10 is celebrated by BIONICLE fans as "810NICLE Day". The BIONICLEsector01 wiki even commissioned past BIONICLE comic artists to draw new character artwork in observance of the "holiday", including Stuart Sayger's Lesovikk, Randy Elliot's Makuta, and Leigh Gallagher's Trinuma. Project Litestone Studios also released the first build of the BIONICLE: The Legend of Mata Nui REBUILT Game Mod on this day.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: BIONICLE: The Game was of debatable quality in terms of gameplay, and it arguably handled the lore worse than Heroes did; the latter game simply decided to ignore the lore in favor of gameplay (not to mention the galleries in the console versions detailing characters and items from the story to show that, apart from a few errors, yes, they did their research), while in the former, the game seemed to actually be trying, but ended up cannibalizing it. It's like a Cut-and-Paste Translation, except they didn't even need to translate. Also, sweet mother of Karzahni in a gravy boat was the voice acting atrocious. Seriously, the only redeeming factor about it was the soundtrack, which was filled to the brim with masterpieces, and for that, you can just look on YouTube.
    • The GBA version didn't fare much better, either: most of the Toa and Toa Nuva sprites are the same (except re-colored), there are only five voice samples in the entire game and they're all male (even for Gali), the controls are awful, the view is terrible, and it's insanely difficult. Again, its only redeeming quality is the highly underrated soundtrack.
  • Recurring Fanon Character: Voriki, the Toa of Energy, was originally created as part of a fan contest. He was never actually accepted into canon, unlike numerous other characters, but is still fondly remembered by the fanbase and often finds his way into fanfics.
  • Sacred Cow: LEGO is enough of a Sacred Cow of its own, so Bionicle is the Sacred Cow within the Sacred Cow. Its sheer history and complex Myth Arc still sets it apart from most other Merchandise-Driven franchises. So don't criticize it online if you know what's good for you.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The 2001 commercial for each Toa, but especially Tahu's, showing him rebuilding himself slowly and turning red upon putting his Kanohi on.
    • From the films:
      • Mask of Light: Jaller's Disney Death and Takua becoming Takanuva.
      • City of Legends: Lhikan's death.
      • Web of Shadows: The mutation scene.
      • The Legend Reborn: Mata Nui and the Ignika landing on Bara Magna, followed by the creation of Mata Nui's Toa body.
    • 2006 will be remembered for the Piraka Rap... for better or worse.
    • For 2007, Matoro's sacrifice is this undoubtedly.
    • The entire island of Mata Nui breaking apart as the living body of Mata Nui, which was revealed to be the entire Matoran universe, revealed himself.
    • The commercials from 2005-2008 utilizing songs by bands, but especially the ones with songs by Cryoshell, Daughtry, and The All-American Rejects.
  • The Scrappy:
    • The toy version of Solek. The Av-Matoran are already disliked, due to their simplistic builds, fragile, specialized pieces, and their odd head proportions, but Solek gets this the worst since his color scheme is white and grey, as opposed to the more vibrant Tanma and Photok (lime and orange respectively). Among certain circles, however, he's been elevated to the status of godhood precisely because of his notoriety. (The Agori, Shadow Matoran, and Stars escape somewhat this due to their more interesting and varied designs and color schemes).
    • Toa Hewkii Mahri's figure is often considered the worst the Inika Build had to offer, what with his awkward proportions and gappy armoring.
    • Gaardus for being pivotal in the loathed Red Star plotline, a massive jerk who screwed up everything for everyone, and mostly for having a build near-unanimously regarded as the ugliest in the entire franchise. Sadly, this was the final BIONICLE character made available in set form (in Gen 1, anyway).
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Toy-wise, any character with lime-green parts during and after the Mahri saga; due to a casting error, lime-green joints often broke even without play (the pieces were not properly set before they cooled, resulting in the plastic being extremely brittle). Lego tried to solve this with a new batch, but it wasn't completely solved until Phantoka, and even then most people were cautious with lime-green sets. It didn't help that sockets, in general, became very brittle after their redesign in 2008.
    • As mentioned above, sockets from 2008 onwards became terribly brittle, and they tended to break more often than not.
    • Red and blue pins for many are viewed as breaking up the color scheme of sets.
    • The playsets were this due to Bionicle being a predominantly Technic-based series. The playsets were instead based on the brick system, with their own Minifigures as well. This didn't go well with the fanbase, who were also slowly reaching their adult years and saw the playsets as a weird gimmick at best. It didn't help either that the playsets often depicted their own non-canon story scenes rather than reproduce anything from the story properly. They would be later replaced with vehicles before the entire series was canceled.
    • What later became known as the "Inika Build" was this for the canister toys; prior to the Toa Inikas, each generation of canister sets would have a unique build involving new parts and a mechanical function of some sort. After the Toa Inikas were released, each subsequent set often revolved around the same basic template: a basic skeleton with 13 points of articulation made from an existing set of parts with new limb and chest armor pieces and a new mask and weapon for variation. This only got worse later with the "Stars" build for the small sets; a single huge piece for the entire body with another 4 pieces for the other limbs, reducing the smaller sets to basically being disassembled action figures than true lego sets.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The Squid Shooters from 2007 were extremely difficult to trigger. Notably, there wasn't even a mechanism within the launchers themselves to shoot the squid; said launchers were essentially oversized grips to hold the squid in place while you yanked back the squids' tails to fling them like rubber bands, running the risk of eventually breaking the tails off. The squids were difficult to fit into the launchers, and priming them loose enough to fire but tight enough to stay in place was a chore. The launchers also had a very loose and soft axle, presumably because they were designed to be able to be launched in your hand alone, which consequently made them prone to falling off the set when not in use.
    • Shooter weapons in general, starting with the Squid Shooters and exacerbated by the Cordak Blasters, became a source of contention. Prior to the squid shooters, the weapons were at least comprised of pieces you'd assemble and had a fairly ingenious way of firing (even the Squid Shooters qualified). Fast forward to the Toa Mahri and the shooters became large and clunky, as well as housing special mechanisms within themselves rather than letting you build them. Lego later caught onto this and returned to having buildable shooter weapons with the Nynrah Ghost Blasters in late 2008, while the Thornax Launchers of 2009 were even more simplified.
    • Rhotuka spinners were widely disliked for being impossible to aim and requiring an additional piece to launch them.
  • So Bad, It's Good: The Piraka Rap, referred to by many as "the best worst thing" that ever came out of the franchise.
  • Special Effect Failure: Ever so noticeable in all four movies. Especially noticeable in Legends of Metru Nui, where every other shot has some sort of animation fault in it.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • Matoro's last moments as he sacrifices his life to reactivate Mata Nui and the Matoran Universe.
    • Lhikan's death will make you cry all night.
    • In the first movie Jaller's Disney Death, which leads to Takua becoming Takanuva.
    Jaller: (hands the mask to Takua) You were always different. (dies'')
    • Vakama's Face–Heel Turn, even if you saw it coming. Then listening to Matau's pleas as he's trying to reason with him. All while Vakama repeatedly tries to kill him.
    • While most of them were unrepentantly evil, it's hard not to feel a little pity for the Makuta in Karda Nui as the energy storms start up, all because Teridax deemed them dangerous to his new rule. Gorast's death, in particular, is noteworthy because, unlike the others who try to escape, all she can do stare into the storms constantly repeating how Krika was right, unable to comprehend that the one she swore her life to had intentionally led her to her doom.
      • Krika especially deserves mention, because he was seemingly on the cusp of becoming an Anti-Hero or possibly even making a full Heel–Face Turn... and then he gets killed trying to save the life of an unbelieving Gorast.
      • Antroz's last words as he defeatedly calls out for Bitil while he could do nothing else but watch him abandon them (in vain) are especially heartbreaking.
      Bitil! Come back here! Don't... don't leave us.
    • Already a sad story at its core, The Many Deaths of Toa Tuyet delivers an extra gut punch at the end by not only foreshadowing Nidhiki's eventual betrayal but also heavily implying that Lhikan was already well aware of the Air Toa's darker side and was actively trying to save himself from suffering another betrayal by a friend right on the heels of Tuyet's.
  • Tough Act to Follow: The series was LEGO's first attempt at a story-driven theme, running for nearly a decade and producing one of the most expansive fantasy settings to ever exist, practically saving the company, and thus every story-driven theme has to live up to BIONICLE and ultimately fails (though certain themes have gotten up there).
  • Uncanny Valley: Thank God these prototypes didn’t make it to the final stage.
    • Bionicle: The Legend Reborn used the actual LEGO toys as its character models with an absolutely minimal amount of tweaking, to make them seem more realistic while still keeping the intended "toy look". One added feature was the rotten-looking teeth and weird lips formed by a second row of mechanical teeth that slid over the real ones, but their true jaw-line still remained apparent. When they smiled, it looked horrifying.
    • The earlier movies also had shades of this, not with the designs (which did their best to avert this by redesigning the characters from their toy looks) but the animation itself. The movements in the first two were often very choppy, with the characters turning stiff a lot. Then, there are Tahu's cheeks, which flap like tissue as he performs a skydive inside a volcano, despite his mask being supposedly solid metal. Given that the mask has an odd, organic-looking design with many tubes running across it, this flapping makes it look like he has his facial muscles exposed.
  • Unpopular Popular Character: Matau, who is the Butt-Monkey and The Friend Nobody Likes, but the fans love him for being a Glory Seeker who constantly talks himself up.
  • The Un-Twist: Makuta was the mastermind behind so many evil plots, that fans quickly grew tired of how often he was revealed to be the Big Bad, especially in 2004, which featured a different setting, different heroes, and two new big bads — turns out one was just a Filler Villain to the Big Bad, who was in fact Makuta in disguise. It didn't help that the movie of that year, Legends of Metru Nui, spoiled that at the very beginning and contained like three subsequent "Makuta is the villain" reveals in later scenes, some of which even contradicted each other (at one point Dume is seen relaying information to Makuta despite being Makuta himself in disguise at that point). That being said, the novel Time Trap Retcons this and instead paints a picture of Makuta as being The Chessmaster, and the 2006 storyline makes his Big Bad status more subtle, while the 2007 storyline introduces a new set of villains with their own agenda who are acting independently from Makuta. The culmination of his plans in 2008, however, makes all of his previous schemes much more fitting in hindsight.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The change of settings from Mata Nui (tribal) to Metru Nui (futuristic) alienated a lot of fans, hence why the initial three years are often seen as the series' "golden years".
    • Almost every time a character received a new toy, this was the fandom's reaction, as with the exception of the Toa Nuva they tended to look very different.note  This applied very heavily to the Phantoka and Mistika Toa sets. The fans' complaining was actually one of the main reasons why set designers shied away from joining forums like BZPower.
    • The fan reaction to Makuta getting another name. The backlash was so strong, that Farshtey refuses to reveal the proper name he created for The Shadowed One, for fear of another outburst.
    • Depending on how you view it, either this trope (in regards to the earlier movies) or its polar opposite (in regards to the sets) can apply to the character design in The Legend Reborn. One major criticism of The Legend Reborn was that the character models were very close to their set counterparts, which critics lambasted as making the film look like it was about a bunch of toys. These same critics have no problem with the fact that all other BIONICLE media, including the comics, animations (including the much-lauded CGI animations by Ghost), online games, and videogames (sans BIONICLE: The Game), used the appearances of the sets. In fact, back in their day, the first three films were criticized by many fans for not keeping true to the set appearances.
    • Surprisingly little of this when the 2015 sets were leaked, and later revealed officially, especially considering they used Hero Factory's CCBS building systemnote  as opposed to the original BIONICLE's Technic system. Most seemed pretty fine with the designs. Though of course, that doesn't mean there were no complaints.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Karzahni's first appearance in 2006 ended with him finding out Mata Nui was real, inspiring him to leave his miserly island. His second appearance in 2007 had him follow the Toa Inika underwater, looking like he was going to confront them once more. He never sees the Inika/Mahri again, instead of encountering Makuta/Maxilos and immediately challenges him. Makuta fries his mind with a vision, leaving Karzahni nothing more than a mindless beast. In case you thought there could still be more to Karzahni after this, he gets unceremoniously Killed Offscreen in his last appearance in a serial.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • What would you expect from a Legoland California ride bearing the BIONICLE name? An epic romp through a recreation of environments from the stories? Well, you'll have to settle for BIONICLE Blaster, which is essentially a spinning teacup ride with a mechanical appearance and some Toa Nuva statues.
    • The Ignika was sentient before helping to awaken Mata Nui. Afterward, its personality became dormant so that the focus could be on Mata Nui wandering around Bara Magna. Because it obviously wouldn't be the least bit interesting to see Mata Nui and the Ignika interact and figure out their origins together. Also, the fact that Mata Nui's body was made of sand thus possibly impervious to injury is never addressed or explored.
    • Many have noted that the Bara Magna story arc had the potential to be fleshed out and explored into more detail had it not come out around the end of Bionicle’s original run.
    • Mata Nui's character arc in 2009's The Legend Reborn direct to DVD movie has some interesting potential. Having been betrayed by the leader of a rogue faction of nanomachines who were supposed to help regulate his giant mecha body in part because Mata Nui was too busy exploring the cosmos to figure out how to repair the shattered pieces of Spherus Magna as per his designated purpose by the Great Beings, you would think his crash landing onto an alien Mad Max-like culture and being a Fish out of Water with nothing to his name would have served for some solid character development with him learning to befriend those usually beneath him, which would be especially interesting given that Bara Magna had been set up as the inverse of the Matoran Universe. Instead, Mata Nui is already a Nice Guy and almost immediately finds allies to rather easily unite the tribes against the Skrall, with his former status as a Physical God being used mostly for brief mentions here and there rather than part of his struggle.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • Besides Roodaka, nobody has any Tertiary Sexual Characteristics, so we dare you to ID one of the girls without resorting to the color-coding — and from 2004 onwards, even that's hardly foolproof (Vezok, Takadox, Gorast, Vamprah, etc.).
    • Hell, even Roodaka's not a good example: Her entire species looks like that, males and females. The first male of her species shown in the comics was simply a green Palette Swap of Roodaka.
    • This was not the case "Piraka"/Nektann, as the fanbase by then had gotten used to blue villains being male in general and Skakdi always being presented as male in specific.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome:
    • The animations by Advance Copenhagen, often considered the highest-quality animations made for BIONICLE, even surpassing the Direct to Video films. Special mention goes to the Mata Nui Rising video; it really conveys the sheer scale of such a pivotal moment in the series' lore.
    • While the animation quality itself might not be so great, there's no denying the incredible level of detail put into the character models for The Legend Reborn. With the exception of Mata Nui for obvious reasons, the armor of every Glatorian, Agori, and Skrall is worn down by constant exposure to the elements and covered with cracks reminiscent of Carlos D'Anda's artstyle.
  • Values Dissonance: Greg Farshtey's justification for the strict No Hugging, No Kissing in the Matoran Universe is that its inhabitants have No Biological Sex, and therefore no capacity for romance. Such reasoning would come under fire in The New '10s as greater insight on the nature of asexuality (namely that asexual ≠ aromantic) became mainstream. Compounding this is the advent of Steven Universe, a show that revolves around beings with No Biological Sex and heavily features romantic elements nonetheless.
    Nick Anderson: We learned that lacking the ability to reproduce, the Matoran didn't know emotions like love! That's a big ol' middle digit to ace people.
    • To better explain the aforementioned rule, the characters of the line's first eight years were revealed to be tiny microscopic nanomachines servicing a colossal sized robot body, and therefore, it made sense that even with the free will that had been installed inside their programming by Velika, they had no biological urge to fall in love with one another as they hadn't been programmed for such behavior anyhow not that it stopped a lot of the hero characters from forming strong bonds of friendship with one another which can be construed as its own form of love.
      • And as for the Glatorian and Agori residents of Bara Magna who were stated in the lore to being primarily biological beings with mechanical parts, the complete opposite of their nanomachine counterparts in the Toa and Matoran, they could feel actual love as evidenced by Kiina's unrequited feelings for Mata Nui the latter of whom was essentially the AI program for the Great Spirit Robot who, therefore, fell under the rule of not being able to express romantic feelings much like the inhabitants of his old body.
    • In early 2021 Christian Faber shared fan art posted in the Facebook group Bionicle Maskposting of Takanuva and Gali in a passionate kiss; to his own Facebook page quoting Moulin Rouge! for the post's caption, “The greatest thing you’ll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return.” Not surprisingly man fans claimed that Faber had retconned Greg's prior statements on romance in the Bionicle universe though this is likely just a playful jab at Farshtey's long-held rule on romance in the series.
      • In an interview with the TTV Podcast later in 2021, Faber hinted that the story group early on discussed the idea of the Bionicle universe's inhabitants being capable of some form of biological reproduction; mentioning they discussed early on "how do a male robot and a female robot create new life, when they are robots?" but the idea was dropped as the series went on.
  • Values Resonance: Depending on how you look at it, Bionicle was ahead of its time. While not loud about it, it's likely that the line's set design and mechanical look helped it present to kids things that wouldn't get actively pushed for in multiple forms of media for quite some time. Using the original Toa Mata line as an example, there's varying body types note , including a heavy-set main character who isn't mocked or less important or powerful than his peers (Pohatu). Said body types aren't wildly different for the Smurfette on the team, and in fact, you could easily mistake her for a man if you didn't already know.
    • Early promotional material made it clear that Lewa preferred swinging from trees and gliding through the air specifically because he had difficulty walking, and Onua stayed underground because his eyes were incredibly sensitive and a small amount of light could blind him. All things considered, this is basically teaching children about disabilities, such as mobility problems or vision difficulties.
    • In general, the token female member of the hero teams (usually blue) being just as capable as the five male members they work with sits just as well now as it did back in the 2000s during the series original heyday.
  • Vindicated by History: Pohatu was the worst-selling of the Toa Mata. Apparently, kids didn't like brown-colored characters, though the fact that he didn't come with any prominent weapons besides foot extensions and a LEGO boulder hardly helped. Later renditions of the character (along with other stone characters) made a point to give him a "cooler" look and better weapons. Adult fans revisiting the series have since fully embraced Pohatu and expressed appreciation for all the quirks of his design, like his upside-down body piece and the foot extensions as well as his Nice Guy personality.
  • Wangst: Vakama in Legends of Metru Nui. Oh god, how much he angsts... He's also like this for much of Web of Shadows, but he gets over it by the end of the film.
  • The Woobie:
    • Krika, of all characters. Yes, a Makuta is now a Woobie. He doesn't agree with the Plan and rebels whenever he can, but only goes along with it because he feels that it's all he can do. After going to Karda Nui, the Pit Mutagen in the swamp locks him into a monstrous form and robs him of so many powers that he needs to absorb heat and energy just to prevent himself from fading away. He specifically notes to Tahu that Makuta hate Toa because they're everything that the Makuta wish that they could be, and when he realizes that Teridax plans to kill them all, he tries to warn his fellow Makuta and gets killed in a truly horrific way.
    • The first two Toa of Air introduced, Lewa and Matau. The former constantly has his village destroyed and gets mind-controlled twice, in addition to the nasty situation of having Tren Krom pull a Grand Theft Me on him, while the latter gets brought down HARD in the second year of Adventures when the first part of Metru Nui they revisit is the now-wrecked Le-Metru, and then he gets mutated into an ugly beast, a curse that he, in particular, is quite disturbed by considering how obsessed he is with his looks. Then after all the (admittedly not unearned) vitriol Matau throws Vakama's way, Vakama snaps and pulls a Face–Heel Turn, prompting Matau to feel quite guilty about being so hard on him. And as a Turaga, he gets mind-controlled and forced to help mind-control Lewa and suffers the same destruction of his new home.
    • And Lesovikk, another Toa of Air. He lost his entire team to Zyglak just because he hesitated, his Turaga went mad and shipped his Matoran friends off to Karzahni, and he spent thousands and thousands of years trying to get them back, failing every time. He was such a Failure Knight that, for the better part of 100,000 years, he didn't even consider himself a Toa.
    • As Wangsty as Vakama can come across, there's no denying that he goes through a lot of crap during his time as a Toa, in addition to the universe slapping him across the mask whenever he doubts himself, especially when he gets overconfident and then brought down HARD during the second half of Adventures.
    • Savage, a minor Dark-Hunter who is a Toa Hordika that was never cured and was attacked by his team when they didn't recognize him.
    • Matoro from Inferno onwards. He offered himself in place of Jaller as a sacrifice when the Ignika tested them, reasoning that the others were craftsmen or warriors, while he was just a translator, so his loss would be the least detrimental. This later foreshadowed his true Heroic Sacrifice, which just made it all the sadder because he was indeed much more important, to everyone, than he had thought.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?:
    • In The Legend Reborn, Metus is David Leisure — from the sitcom Empty Nest and the fictional (and dishonest) spokesman, "Joe Isuzu", from Isuzu car ads in the early 90s. On one hand, this does suit his introduced role as a Glatorian recruiter very well. Less so his role as the Big Bad, though his warning Mata Nui that he's not kidding around is done very well.
    • Sean Schemmel’s stint as Makuta Teridax in BIONICLE: The Game can be quite... jarring for those familiar with his most iconic role. But that isn’t to say that Schemmel was a poor fit for the role, given that he’s proven to have quite a diverse vocal range.
    Youtube comment: So, apparently Makuta was voiced by the VA for Son Goku in this. The Funimation version. What?


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