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Cryoshell is a Post-Grunge/Alternative Metal band from Denmark. They were spawned from an agreement between the LEGO Group and ad agency Advance. Their songs have been used to promote several LEGO brands, though they eventually split and became an actual band.

The band's core lineup is:

  • Christine Lore Lorentzen — Lead Vocals (2007-2011; 2013-present)
  • Kasper Asp Søderlund — guitar, bass
  • Mikkel Kal Maltha — keyboard
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  • There are two drummers who don't have nicknames. Jakob Gundel (until 2011) and Martin Pagaard (current).

If you know anything about them at all, you're most likely to have heard some of the songs they did for BIONICLE."Creeping in my Soul" was the first such song composed. The band was assembled based on this song.

Eventually, Danish Eurovision singer Neils Brinck did two songs for Cryoshell. "Face Me" in 2007 and "Gravity Hurts" in 2008.

Lore returned to do "Closer to the Truth" that same year. In 2009, "Bye Bye Babylon" was made to promote both the Glatorian sets and the upcoming movie, The Legend Reborn, in which it is played during the end credits.

In 2012, Lore became a mother. All seemed lost for the band, but the runner-up of the Danish X-Factor Tine Midtgaard took over for the next single, "Breakout". She also rerecorded "Gravity Hurts", the song that made them famous.

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In 2017, Christian Faber, also known for his work with BIONICLE, teamed up with Cryoshell to provide the music for his project Rebel Nature, and Cryoshell announced a new album in the works called Next To Machines. Another version of "Gravity Hurts" was released in early 2018, featuring Lore and the Budapest Art Orchestra.

Cryoshell contains examples of:

  • Anti-Love Song: "Creeping in my Soul" also sounds like she's afraid to be in love.
  • After the End: The "Bye Bye Babylon" music video looks like it's set in a post-apocalyptic desert.
  • The Band Minus the Face: Tine Midtgaard took over when Lore was on maternity leave. Neils Brinck also sang two songs for Cryoshell in Lore's place.
  • Bowdlerise: The music video and Legend Reborn release of "Bye Bye Babylon" edited out the word "Hell".
  • Broken Record: "Closer to the Truth" ends with "Take me home..." repeated four times.
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  • The Cover Changes the Gender: With Cryoshell, Nat King Cole's "Nature Boy" becomes "Nature Girl". Presumably to reflect what little details we have of the Rebel Nature project.
  • Cover Changes The Meaning: The Tine Midtgaard version of "Gravity Hurts" changes the lyric "Team up for battle we fly" to "Battle and soar in your mind", changing the impact of the song itself.
  • Darker and Edgier: The album compared to their BIONICLE work.
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • Would you believe that Cryoshell were a pop band before they were official? The "Creeping in my Soul" demo had jangly synth, heavy vocal emphasis, and an overall poppier vibe. The remix added a guitar, toned down the distortion on the rap part, and made an overall darker track.
    • "Gravity Hurts" was no different, being more arena rock than the later heavy metal sound they became known for.
  • Heavy Mithril: Almost by design. BIONICLE aside, their songs tend to have some sort of fantasy/higher power element to them.
    • "Creeping in My Soul" could soundtrack a horror movie, and "Trigger" is about an epic battle.
    • "Bye Bye Babylon" is perhaps the best example. It sounds mystic and otherworldly, and talks about the fall of empires.
  • I Am the Band: Not who you think. Kal is actually the main composer, producer, and songwriter who got the band together.
  • Intercourse with You: "Feed"
    If you drag me from this hole
    I think I know that
    I can promise you
    Now you can feed my soul
    Expelling the pain and I can let it go
  • Lyrical Dissonance: A common trend. "Trigger" has lyrics of longing, but has the hard guitar push of an arena ballad.
  • Metal Scream: All of the band's vocalists deliver these with incredible skill, always serving as a song's climax.
  • Mohs Scale of Rock and Metal Hardness: About a 6 usually. The exceptions are "No More Words" at 1, "Falling" and "Murky" at about 3, and "Trigger" at 4.
  • Power Ballad: Most songs, especially "Gravity Hurts" and "Falling".
  • Revolving Door Band: They've had three singers and two drummers.
  • Refrain from Assuming: "Closer to the Truth" isn't called "Take Me Home", although that phrase appears more often than the title. In fact, "Take Me Home" was actually originally intended to be the title of the song, justifying this trope.
  • Rock Trio: They do have four members, but the big three with stage names are the most iconic and often seen in images.
  • Shout-Out: All the promo songs reference the LEGO sets they're promoting in some way:
    • "Creeping in my Soul": The lyrics "Creeps from the deep's gonna freaking up your mind/Creeps from the deep's gonna feeding of your spine" reference the "Creeps From The Deep" tagline for the Barraki.
    • "Gravity Hurts": The lyrics "Team up for battle we fly" reference the main gimmick of the Phantoka sets, where each Toa (with flying gear) and Makuta (with bat wings) could pair up with a Matoran partner.
    • "Closer to the Truth": The lyrics "In swamps of evil lies" reference the setting of the Mistika storyline, the Swamp of Secrets. The lyrics "Take me home" are also thought to reference the Toa Nuva returning to the Codrex, the place of their origin.
    • "Bye Bye Babylon": The song's title itself contains mention of Babylon, which is a ruined ancient city in a desert that was once home to one of the earliest human civilizations before its empire fell. Since the song was written to promote the Glatorian Legends, Babylon can be seen as an analog for the setting of Bara Magna.
  • Stage Names: Kal, Lore, and Asp are abridged versions of their full names.
  • Symphonic Metal: It's noticeable in songs such as "Bye Bye Babylon", which combine orchestral strings with rock instruments like drums and electric guitar.
  • Truck Driver's Gear Change: At the end of "Gravity Hurts".

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