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  • Accidental Innuendo: During the Touch League intro from Gold:
    Wario: And if you lose your thingy...well, then you're just stuck using your finger.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • From Gold: Is 5-Volt really dumb enough to buy into the false claims of Mr. Sparkle's frying pans, or is she too Distracted by the Sexy that she's mesmerized into buying whatever he's selling?
    • Also from Gold, the true nature of Wario Deluxe. Is that Wario being possessed by some sort of evil force? Or is Wario just Drunk on the Dark Side, showcasing how truly evil he is after becoming all-powerful? And for that matter, there's the issue of whether the golden pot is just a potty like Lulu says or something more mystical in nature. The in-game cards imply that the pot itself is just a chamber pot and that Wario Deluxe is just a sleep-deprived Wario, which sounds more like a joke answer, but considering that this is WarioWare, it could very well be true. However, that doesn't explain the sudden voice and outfit change after putting on the pot, nor does it explain the lightning powers he got midway through his fight (all of which he loses the moment the pot is taken off), so it could very much be something much more.
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    • Also from Gold: Was Doris 1 legitimately enraged at Dr. Crygor for abandoning her in the forest or was she possessed by something that caused her to flip out?
    • Does Wario see his employees as actual friends? Or does he only see them as mere lackies that do his bidding? While Wario has stated that they're his friends in past games and has hung out with them, not only does he frequently screw them over at the end, but he was rather nonchalant towards them leaving him in favor of Diamond Software in D.I.Y and Gold shows him as not thinking too highly of them (calling them things such as chumps and lackies instead of friends), indicating that it's probably the latter.
  • Best Boss Ever: The bosses of the final stages usually fit:
    • The first game had you play through a hilariously crappy adventure-style game that switched controls on the fly to things you may have played through on an earlier level. Touched also had a similar set-up for Wario-Man's boss stage and plays Final-Exam Boss a bit more straight.
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    • The first WarioWare also has Orbulon's boss game where you have to defeat a boss Dragon Quest-style by picking the correct spelling of the words, and Dribble & Spitz's boss stage which is reminiscent of the shmup genre.
    • Tiny Wario's stage from Smooth Moves has Wario Dance Company where you had to dance to the beat and strike poses every now and then.
    • Twisted had 9-Volt's boss stage where you played through a level from Super Mario Bros. using the tilt controls. This returns as 18-Volt's boss stage in Gold.
    • Smooth Moves had Dribble & Spitz's boss stage where your Mii goes through an obstacle course before taking down a giant nose, and 9-Volt's boss stage where you played through a level from the SNES Star Fox (Corneria, Sector X and Titania on the respective difficulties) and had to take down R.O.B., who uses a Zapper.
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    • Wario Deluxe's stage in Gold gives us the return of Wario Dance Company, which now serves as an improved form of Wario de Mambo from Twisted and challenges the player by employing every previous control scheme as they match the movements of their fellow dancers to the festive sounds of Wario de Mucho. In the story mode proper, this boss microgame is also accompanied by Wario Deluxe having a minor Villainous Breakdown as you progress through his final challenge.
  • Best Level Ever:
    • 9-Volt's stages tend to be much appreciated by fans for its focus on Nintendo games.
    • From the first game, we have Ana & Kat's stage which is very Japanese flavored, having a song instead of interlude + game music, and having interesting microgames based on nature.
    • The first game also has Dribble & Spitz's stage for its sci-fi style and song rather than interlude + game music, similar to Ana & Kat's stage. It also has a great boss stage.
    • Smooth Moves feature Dribble & Spitz for having interesting games as well as the microgames' music once again being switched in favor for a song and having a great boss on top of that.
    • Game & Wario has the "Gamer" stage, which centers around 9-Volt playing video games past his bedtime. The microgames themselves are pretty basic, but the real challenge is hiding from his mother who is constantly checking if he's actually asleep. It's even styled like a B-Grade horror movie, complete with "Psycho" Strings and 5-Volt crawling out of the TV. The mode even made an encore performance in Gold as "Sneaky Gamer", this time playing with Gold's more engaging microgames.
    • Gold combines this with Best Boss Ever through its final stage: Wario Deluxe. Unlike other final stages in the series, it actually features an epic, climactic showdown against a Wario alter-ego, including great music, Charles Martinet at his finest in terms of voice acting, some unexpected Interface Screws to keep the player on their toes and, finally, a fun Final-Exam Boss stage (a remastered "Wario Mambo" from Twisted that employs all present control schemes instead of just the tilt sensor, making it less tedious and repetitive).
    • Kat and Ana's "Split Screen" challenge mode from Gold has only two simple gimmicks: microgames run on both the top and bottom screens so that one can start right after you complete the other, and the speed/difficulty gradually rises instead of increasing at intermissions. It doesn't need anything else, as the lack of any break between games turns it into one of the most frenetic experiences in the whole series, especially in its Ultra version where you have to be prepared for the game throwing every type of microgame at you with no guide beforehand (though Touch games can’t show up on the top screen, of course).
  • Breather Level: "Banana Munch" and "Hard Core" from the first game - in a game where quick timing and thinking is commonplace and you have to stay on your toes, just letting loose and mashing A a lot (even on the later difficulties, as it's just more A presses that required) is very much welcome. It helps that the two are identical in gameplay.
  • Character Rerailment: On top of acknowledging him as a treasure hunter again for the first time in a long time, after being treated as more of an Anti-Hero throughout the years, Gold brings Wario back to his roots as a villain and depicts him as the Big Bad again for the first time in decades.
  • Common Knowledge:
    • Mona's job (outside of being a dev of WarioWare) is that of a pizza delivery girl, which while true, is only one of the many jobs she has undertaken through the series. However many not familiar with the franchise tend to only know Mona's job as a delivery girl and are often not aware of the many other jobs she has.
    • Ashley is often cited by some to have originally been 8 in Japan, but changed to 15 overseas. However, Ashley's exact age has never been specified in Japan.
  • Contested Sequel:
    • Depending on who you ask, Game & Wario is either seen as an fun and underrated gem for the Wii U or an okay but forgettable minigame collection that while not terrible and not without it's good moments, largely lacks most of what made the series fun and unique to begin with.
    • Amongst the more traditional entries, Touched! seemingly has this reception compared to the previous GBA titles. While many fans are very fond of the game and find it to be a great entry, there are many others who find it to be an disappointing entry due to having less content and variety compared to the previous two games.
  • Creator Worship: Though not the creator of WarioWare, the series's character designer Ko Takeuchi is very popular with the fanbase. It helps he's one of the very few Nintendo employees to have a notable social media presence.
  • Creepy Awesome: A good deal of 5-Volt's popularity comes from the ridiculous, but terrifying stunts she pulls out just to make sure her son's asleep.
  • Do Not Do This Cool Thing: Game & Wario's "Gamer" has a warning before the game proper that you shouldn't stay up past your bedtime playing video games in real life.
  • Dork Age: After the release of Smooth Moves, the series started to have trouble staying on its legs. Snapped! proved to be the weakest installment, using a control scheme (that being the DSi's camera) that can be difficult to get working and only having 5 microgames per stage, all of them without boss microgames. D.I.Y., despite its positive reception, was a commercial failure, and even turned off a good portion of the fandom due to its overly complex game editor and a rather lackluster set of pre-built microgames (not helped by the fact that the difficulties feature was removed entirely). Game & Wario is the biggest offender, becoming a standard minigame collection instead, with only a couple of them being engaging enough to be worth replaying. Its poor sales ultimately contributed to the series' long dormancy until the release of Gold, which received a much warmer reception by both fans and critics.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: While Wario does have hints of being a Jerk with a Heart of Gold in canon, he is mostly portrayed as being relatively uncaring towards his friends and tends to pretty much use them for his get-rich schemes, never paying them for their hard work in the process. Nevertheless, many fans tend to portray Wario in a better light compared to canon, with some portraying him as a genuinely good friend in spite of his behavior and some even having him act as a surrogate father figure to the younger employees (despite canon showing him as treating them no differently from how he treats his older employees).
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the Wario Land series. As WarioWare got popular, Wario Land became less, and consequently, the latter series became dormant and Wario's appearance in Super Smash Bros. largely focused on the former series. This then sparked an ongoing debate on which series meshed better with Wario and thus should be more prominent. While fans who like both sub-series are not unheard of, the most vocal ones are at odds with each other.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • The nature and popularity of Ashley has unsurprisingly prompted this, with many fanfics centered around her past and her relationships with the others.
    • How Wario met the others and became friends with them is also a very popular fanfic subject.
    • Mona's Precocious Crush on Wario appears in many fanworks.
  • Fanon:
    • While none of the characters have officially listed agesnote  besides Orbulonnote , Fronknote , and Dr. Crygornote , certain estimates based on circumstantial evidence are popular with fans:
      • Wario and Jimmy T. sharing the same age, as they're childhood friends. And considering Mario is supposedly 24-25 (according to Word of God), both Wario and Jimmy are usually put in the same ballpark.
      • 9-Volt and 18-Volt being 9 and 18 years old respectively, despite both being in the same grade (while 18-Volt is a held-back student, we don't know by how much). 9-Volt being 9 is actually likely due to the fact that he's a fourth grader.
      • 5-Volt doesn't get the same name to age treatment for obvious reasons. People usually put her somewhere in her 30's as 9-Volt is still relatively young and she doesn't look old herself (plus women having children anywhere in their 20's is very common).
      • Kat & Ana both being 6, the most kindergarteners can have.
      • Mona being 18, the most an (average) high schooler can have (and to make shipping her with Wario more acceptable).
      • Not many people actually believe Ashley is 15, since she has some mannerisms that indicate a younger age (like carrying around a stuffed animal), 13 is a popular guess due to the connotations associated with the number.
      • Penny, being a middle schooler and around Ashley's height, is usually put at 11-13.
      • Young Cricket tends to be put in the same range as Mona (17-18), based on both of them having similar heights (as shown here).
    • While not confirmed in canon, many fans have widely accepted the theory of 9-Volt having inherited a good chunk of his Nintendo collection from 5-Volt. Especially since a lot of his collection is stuff that would have come from her childhood (Such as the Nintendo Entertainment System, the Game Boy, etc) and that she, like her son, is also a gamer who is shown to be very fond of Nintendo herself, even stating that the games in her collection in Gold (Which of course are Nintendo related) are all games that she has played in her childhood.
    • While the two don't interact much in canon and their exact relationship is unknown (though the one interaction they did have (which was on the Smooth Moves blog) was friendly, implying they're on good terms), Ashley and Penny are portrayed as having a close relationship in fanworks. What that relationship is exactly tends to vary across the fandom, varying between them being rivals, friends or even lovers.
    • Mike and Penny's relationship is largely unknown since the two don't interact much, but Mike is often portrayed as being a father figure to Penny alongside Dr. Crygor in fanworks. Particularly in fanworks that ship Dr. Crygor with Mike.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • The Super Mario Bros. fandom in general ships Mario/Peach and Luigi/Daisy, however what to do with Wario and Waluigi stumped fans for years. Some fans shipped Wario with Captain Syrup, however when Mona came along the fandom jumped onto the Wario/Mona bandwagon. Waluigi is primarily still seen as single, though some ship him off with Rosalina.
    • Despite how young they are, some fans love to ship 9-Volt with either Kat and/or Ana.
    • As noted lower on this page, Ashley gets shipped with almost everyone, however, judging by more recent fanart and fanworks, Ashley/Penny in particular seems to be picking up a bit of traction.
    • Ashley/Young Cricket is a notably popular ship among Japanese fans.
    • Dr. Crygor/Mike is an incredibly popular slash ship amongst the fandom. It helps that the two share a pretty close bond in the games, sometimes with a dash of Vitriolic Best Buds.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With the Rhythm Heaven series due to them being created by the same team, having similar styles, and the frequent crossovers between the two franchises.
  • Goddamned Bats: The Fronk microgames in Twisted and Gold. They have two distinct traits: their timers are a lot shorter than the average microgame, and they show up in the middle of unrelated stages instead of having a dedicated level (they appear in various stages of Twisted, while in Gold, they only show up in the first two Ultra League stages and the Challenge modes). None of them are complex, but once the speed starts picking up, getting a Fronk microgame can lead to a lost life before you get a chance to react.
  • Growing the Beard: As well-regarded as the first game is, it does suffer a little bit from Trial-and-Error Gameplay at times, as the controls are almost never explained prior to any of the minigames, meaning that if you make an incorrect guess as to how a minigame's controls work, the result is almost invariably an instant fail. Twisted (or Touched, for people in countries where that game suffered No Export for You) is where the series really came into its own, and began using control styles that were less frustrating, in addition to opening up more gameplay opportunities.
  • He Really Can Act: While he has done full voice acting outside of the Mario series before (such as portraying Orvus in Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack In Time), as Wario, Charles Martinet is usually limited to grunts and other short voice lines. But in Gold, he gets to do full voice acting for Wario, and many players consider his Laughably Evil, Large Ham performance to be one of the best parts of the game.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The game which basically inspired Wario to found his company is Pyoro, a game for handhelds that's highly successful and features a red bird as its mascot. Sound familiar?
      • As of 2014, the extremely simple yet (briefly) intensely popular Flappy Bird, which also features a red bird, makes for an even better point of comparison.
    • The description for the Kid Icarus record in Twisted is "This is as close as you'll ever get to a sequel." Nope.
    • Not to mention that there is also a record called NES Remix.
    • Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog has a character named Penny, who sings, has red hair, and a mad scientist is in love with her. WarioWare has a character named Penny who is a redhead, a mad scientist herself, and harbors a secret fondness for singing. Became even funnier when Felicia Day, who played Penny in Dr. Horrible, was cast as mad scientist Dr. Kinga Forrester in the revival of Mystery Science Theater 3000.
    • Mona's Steel Chef microgame in 2004's Touched bears a very uncanny resemblance to 2010's Fruit Ninja.
    • Gamer is a game where the player can't move from their preplaced spot, and must multitask multiple screens and use a hiding mechanic to avoid getting attacked by a mysterious, horrifying threat that comes from multiple angles. Sound familiar?
    • The "Classic Clash" microgame that's been a part of the series for a long time is vindicated when Bid Toys did a line of Ultraman and Godzilla-themed Mario and Bowser figures (called Ma-Nultra and Koopala) in 2020. The version seen in Mega Microgame$! even has Bowser grey and metallic like Koopala is.
    • In Mega Microgame$!, Wario runs a Shoddy Knockoff Product version of Dr. Mario as an ambitious Back-Alley Doctor in-game. Come Dr. Mario World, his ambition becomes a reality after 16 years!
    • Touched features Mona wearing a cap with eyes, with it emoting and everything. In short, she basically had her own version of Cappy a full decade before Cappy was properly introduced.
  • Ho Yay:
    • WarioWare Gold has a moment during the ending where Wario tries to escape with his money, but after tripping, Young Cricket runs up and grabs Wario's ass to hold him down while everyone retrieves the cash.
    • The fight between 9-Volt and 18-Volt in Smooth Moves is very similar to a lovers' spat.
    • Dr. Crygor chatises Mike for running off during his stage in Gold, tenderly saying to him "You know how I miss you...". Mike gags in response.
  • It's Short, So It Sucks!: Generally averted for the series; you can reach the credits of every game in about an hour, but there's tons of extras to unlock and each set is meant to be replayed for high score runs (and to unlock all of the microgames, since each set has more than the number you play the first time through). However, Snapped has 20 microgames in a series that usually has around 200 per game, and none of the sets are endless high score challenges, so it runs dry extremely quickly even as a 500-point downloadable title.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: A common criticism given towards Gold from both fans and critics is how derivative it is, with more mircogames being ones reused and recycled from past games than brand new ones. While this is somewhat alleviated by many of the reused mircogames receiving facelifts to look incredibly different than their original incarnations, fans and critics still expressed disappointment about how derivative Gold is and how it lacks the unpredictability and surprise factor of past entries.
  • Jerkass Woobie: While Ashley is certainly a jerk, it's hard not to feel sorry for her. As she is a lonely and introverted outcast who is not only mediocre at magic, but was implied to have been abandoned by her parents at a young age, and has no friends or anyone to comfort her (aside from Red). Jeez.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships:
    • Ever since Ashley was introduced in the series, and kind of inevitable due to her popularity, she has been shipped with nearly all the characters in one way or another.
    • Mike has quite a few ships to his name as well, being shipped with Dr. Crygor, Doris 1, Fronk, Penny, and Orbulon, among others.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Jimmy T's "Body Rock" song from DIY has become memetic in the SiIvaGunner community.
    • "It's pizza time" from Gold's intro, seemingly a continuation of Spider-Man 2's "Pizza Time" meme.
    • Also from Gold's intro: Wario calling people to make games for him, with other characters other than his friends being added to the list of people he's calling.
    • Gold's Studio mode gets use in creating ridiculous gag dubs, with Orbulon's intro (where he goes through a fast food drive-thru) and 5-Volt's intro (where she watches an informercial) seeing the most parodies.
  • Moe:
    • Kat and Ana qualify, being preschooler ninjas.
    • Ashley, especially after her redesign in Game and Wario. Both her initial and newer designs also qualify as Creepy Cute.
    • Penny as well. Her voice in Gold cranks the cuteness Up to Eleven.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • Smooth Moves has two pretty good ones: the 1-UP jingle and the Victory theme. Even its Game Over variant has a rather triumphant vibe to it.
    • Orbulon's laugh in Gold sounds quite adorable.
    • Ana's voice in Gold isn't without its fans, who think she just sounds outright adorable.
  • My Real Daddy: Nintendo employee Koichi Kawamoto created the "Sound Bomber" mode in Mario Artist Polygon Studio that was the basis for the series and thus is sometimes refered to as "the creator of WarioWare" in official interviews, although he's not actually been involved in the series proper beside "Concept" and "Prototype" credits for his work on Polygon Studio. While Hirofumi Matsuoka directed the original game, fans usually see Goro Abe as the true creative lead of the series as he was heavily involved in the development of the original game and directed most of the sequels.
  • Older Than They Think:
  • Popular with Furries: Dribble and Spitz are somewhat popular with the furry fandom, being the only Funny Animal characters in the game.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The objective of Listen to the Doctor from Mega Party Game$. You're instructed to physically do something stupid OUTSIDE of the game, and there's nothing stopping the other players from refusing to applaud you and thus denying you any points. There's a reason that very few multiplayer video games are reliant on the honor system.
    • Blowing into the mic in Touched is somewhat clumsily implemented, especially since background noise can very easily screw you over if you're playing on an original DS, DS Lite, or DSi. Playing on the 3DS has the opposite issue: its microphone's not nearly as good at picking up sound, forcing you to blow to the point of lightheadedness in some cases. Fortunately, it works fairly well in Gold.
    • Snapped was a Tech Demo Game for the DSi's frontal camera, and while it does work, it requires significant setup and good lighting for the camera to recognize the player. The recognition process has to be repeated for each microgame in a set, too.
  • Sequelitis: Snapped isn't remembered fondly by most fans, due to lacking the replay value of past titles (only four sets of five microgames each, and since high scores aren't kept there's no penalty for failing them) and the DSi camera gimmicks being fairly finicky.
  • Sidetracked by the Gold Saucer: Despite being a game already composed of minigames, some of the side things you can unlock can easily sway you away from the arguably main task of completing all the microgame gauntlets:
    • The first game has "Dr. Wario". Given that it's a fully playable bootleg version of Dr. Mario, its addictive properties should come as no surprise.
    • It's no surprise that Pyoro was such a huge hit In-Universe, given that it's a pretty distracting minigame.
    • Touched has the Orbit Ball minigame. It's essentially an Endless version of Kat and Ana's boss microgame, where you draw trampolines to keep a ball in the air.
    • The first game has a simple jump rope minigame called "Jump Forever", where the goal is to jump successfully as many times as you can without tripping on the rope.
    • The unlockable minigame "Pumpkin Panic" in Gold received plenty of attention and is pretty addictive. The fact that it stars Ashley helps a lot, too.
    • People who enjoy gag dubbing can easily spend a few hours in Gold's Studio.
  • Spiritual Successor: Super Mario Maker to WarioWare DIY. Both involve making your own short games for others to play. DIY, interestingly enough, is itself seen as the Spiritual Successor to Mario Paint.
    • WarioWare itself is the spiritual successor to Sound Bomber from Mario Artist: Polygon Maker, as the basic concept of microgames and even some of the games were taken directly from it.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: While Game & Wario was considered a decent game in its own right, it has proven to be divisive among fans for breaking away from what made WarioWare what it is to be what fans consider just another generic minigame collection. Its poor sales also nearly put the series in a coffin, as there wasn't another game from the series until WarioWare Gold in 2018, which was warmly received as a return to form, with new full voice acting and lots of bonus gameplay content.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
    • "The Frog Flap", Kat and Ana's boss stage in the first game as well as one of Dribble & Spitz's games in Gold, has music similar to "Music, Music, Music" by Teresa Brewer.
    • Mike's Song from WarioWare: Touched! has almost the exact beat from the chorus to "Greased Lightning" from Grease.
    • "Body Rock" from WarioWare: DIY is very very similar to "Physical" by Olivia Newton-John, even down to having similar lyrics at one point. This hasn't gone unnoticed.
    • The music for "Sloppy Salon" in WarioWare Gold bears a strong resemblance to the title screen/file select tracks from Paper Mario 64. Not too surprising, as Intelligent Systems is one of the main developers of both series.
  • That One Achievement:
    • Both of the achievements for Cruise Controls:
      • "Cruise Controller": Beat the game in 1 minute and 5 seconds? That doesn't sound so bad...wait, what do you mean I have to complete it at maximum speed almost the entire time? And I'm only allowed 1 mistake?
      • "Punctual Person": You have to complete the game in two minutes on the nose. Doing so requires a near-perfect balance of speed; going too fast or two slow for even a second or two can completely throw off your timing and cause you to miss the mark. It's not uncommon to beat the game a single second over or under the two minute mark.
    • All of the missions related to Wario Kard:
      • "Serious Card Collector": Getting all 147 cards is one hell of a Luck-Based Mission. Have fun grinding coins for literal days trying to get that single A-rank card you still don't have!
      • "Card vs. Kard", "The Ringer", and "Card Sharp", which require you to defeat 50, 100, and 200 enemies respectively in Wario Kard. The first dozen or so aren't too difficult once you've got a handle on how the game works, but later enemies throw such ridiculous restrictions on you (have fun trying to defeat a 3800 HP enemy both down a card in your hand and without using A-rank cards!) that the only conceivable way to beat them is to keep shoving coins into the Shufflers and hoping you can boost the cards you need. But that's not all! There are only 81 unique enemies in the game. Once you've defeated them all, you cycle through the same enemies again... with 150% HP. Beat them, and you the foes you'll have to go up against have double HP!
  • That One Boss:
    • Dribble & Spitz's boss microgame from Twisted, named "Basic Training". You must violently shake the system in order to outrun a boulder, while jumping over obstacles and holes. If you can see anything on the screen, you're not shaking it fast enough to outrun the boulder. Nearly unplayable on level 2 or higher. It returns in Gold, but is substantially easier because the graphics are better, there are no holes, and you race other railcars instead of having to outpace a boulder.
    • Wario-Man's boss microgame from Twisted, "Wario Mambo". Good luck trying to do it on Hard, as there's many moves you have to repeat. Miss one, and it's all over.
    • Jimmy's boss microgame in Touched!, "Rainbow Juice", which involves filling up an anthropomorphic bucket with rainbow droplets. While the first level can be over relatively fast, the second level gives the bucket a lid, which will constantly close for a few seconds to prevent any droplets from getting in the bucket. However, the third level is what really takes the cake. Not only does the lid close a lot more frequently, but the droplets fall VERY slowly, making the game feel extremely slow-paced. Even worse, as the bucket gets fuller, it begins to move faster, and if the droplets miss the bucket, they will create dunes in the underground that grow taller as more droplets fall on them. Once enough droplets have touched the dune, it will grow to the point where it can actually trip the bucket, giving the player an automatic loss.
    • Ashley's boss microgame in Touched!, named "Global Warning", in which you have to navigate Bullet Hell without getting hit once.
    • Orbulon's boss microgame in DIY, named "Wily Tiles", is basically this is you are not a fan of slider puzzle games.
    • The Gold incarnation of "Crossing Guard" is a lot worse than it was in Twisted; even on the first difficulty level, the game is a lot slower paced than it originally was, and the speedier ostriches are present from the start. The second level brings in even faster horseback riders and has you managing two separate bridges. The third level sticks with two bridges, but adds walking bombs that need to be dropped in the water before they reach the other side. On every level, even one mistake ends the game. This is Ashley's boss microgame, meaning that it's the first non-tutorial Twist boss you have to contend with; none of the later ones ("Basic Training", "Super Mario Bros.", and "Toilet Training") are as hard as it.
    • Kat and Ana's boss in Gold, "Top Notch", is this in spades. The premise is that you have to assemble ingredients on a plate and then squirt ketchup on it at the very end in order to match the example dish given as closely as possible, with the margin of error tightening with each level. Passing this game even at level 1 is difficult enough due to how picky the game is about your placement: having even one of the ingredients even a few pixels off is likely to set you back several points, and the mistakes stack up. But things get even worse in the two levels that follow, which not only have more numerous and complex ingredients to place and a higher accuracy requirement, but also throw in dummy ingredients that aren't included in the example dish. Slip up and put even one in your dish, and it's pretty much an instant failure. It also has That One Mission, which requires you to get 85% accuracy when even breaking 80% is a nigh impossible feat. And, to top everything off, it has the same problem as "Crossing Guard", in that it's the first non-tutorial boss in the Touch League, with the following three bosses ("Clawing for More", "Pro Bowling", and "Sneaky Snatcher") being nowhere near as difficult. Those who don't have an impeccable eye for detail are fat out of luck.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The art style that was used in Game and Wario was not well-received by some fans, due to Ko Takeuchi abandoning the Mario-esque but distinctive style from past games in favor of using Rhythm Heaven's artstyle, which some have accused of being derivative and felt didn't fit the series' cast compared to the previous artstyle.
    • While the art style change for Gold was received much better than Game & Wario's (as it looks more distinct from Rhythm Heaven's style), some redesigns have not been received well, especially with Manager Joe.
    • While the voice acting in Gold was largely well recieved by most, several fans are disappointed that Nintendo replaced the cast from previous games (bar Wario, who is once again played by Charles Martinet) in favor of professional voice actors. Some fans also despise the full voice acting period, preferring the Voice Grunting from previous games.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Some fans felt disappointed that Captain Syrup from Wario Land didn't show up or even get referenced in Wario's final stage in Game & Wario, despite the stage having a pirate aesthetic to it.
    • Vanessa from Touched is presented as being The Rival to Mona, which has a lot of potential for fun stories, especially since Vanessa herself is shown to have some Large Ham tendencies (such as blowing up in anger when she finds outs she’s number two), however she is never acknowledged at all again after Touched.
  • This Is Your Premise on Drugs: It's a minigame collection, on crack.
  • Uncanny Valley: Some people in certain microgames in Smooth Moves due to crude 3D graphics. Especially the girl in the "Take a Headshot!" minigame.
  • Unexpected Character: Or rather "Unexpected Microgame". Nobody expected "Eject Reject", "Finger Flex", or "Count 'Em Up" from the D.I.Y. games to be featured in Gold, due to all 3 being DLC exclusives that are no longer available to download.
  • Values Dissonance: Twisted! has a souvenir called "Fortune Cookie", which is exactly what it is. While most of the fortunes are traditional symbols of good and bad luck (Such as "Four-Leaf Clover" and "Broken Mirror", respectively), one of them, "Black Cat", is actually considered "Good Luck" by the souvenir, albeit at the lowest level of the "Good Luck" charms. This may confuse an American player, as black cats are widely considered to be "Bad Luck" over there, but to a Japanese and Australian player, this makes sense, as black cats are considered "Good Luck" in those countries.
  • Win Back the Crowd: Although Game & Wario was marketed as a Gaiden Game, it managed to sour many on the WarioWare series and caused many to believe that the series was over due to a lack of ideas. Fortunately, Gold managed to win back these fans by being a massive compilation of both old and new microgames using a mix of buttons, motion control, and the touchscreen, all coupled with some great voice acting for the cast (an incredible rarity for an extended Mario universe title) and a massive slew of bonus content.
  • Woolseyism:
    • The techniques in Smooth Moves have completely different names (and meanings) in Japanese and English, and they all make sense in the English translation. ('Tengu' becomes 'Elephant', 'Mawaryanse' note  to 'Chauffeur', etc.) A full list can be found here.
    • The French version of D.I.Y. contains a reference to the MER IL ET FOU meme in the D.I.Y. Forums.

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