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The book series provides examples of:

  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • Chapter 18 of The Last Olympian is titled "My Parents Go Commando." No, Percy wasn't talking about them not wearing underwear.
    • Mr. D regularly calls Percy "Peter Johnson." Both "Peter" and "Johnson" are common euphemisms for penis.
  • Acceptable Targets: Televangelists. In The Lightning Thief, Percy encounters one in the Underworld who was caught using donated money to buy luxury items like golden toilet seats and an indoor golf course, and died when he drove his "Lamborghini for the Lord" off a cliff during a police chase.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
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    • One that runs through all the series and not just the first one: just how much have the Greek Gods moved from being Jerkass Gods? It is clear they aren't all smiles and rainbows, but a fan can get a lot of mileage about wondering what their specific deal is. Have they become less jerkass over time, or have they become better at hiding it and pretending to be a lot nicer than they actually are? Do they have Blue-and-Orange Morality by human standards, so trying to go 'good gods and bad gods' isn't quite tenable? Are the Gods just so complicated they can be both loving and distant in equal, genuine measures? Or are they complete monsters and revel in it? Fans can run with a wide variety of interpretations. Trials of Apollo give more insight on the gods’ behavior, by virtue of having a god as a protagonist.
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    • One for Zeus specifically: Does he have an Inferiority Superiority Complex as the source of his behavior? He quarrels with Poseidon over who their mother Rhea likes better, is paranoid Poseidon is constantly plotting against him, demands respect when no one respects him, closes off of Olympus due to wounded pride in a later series, and tries to blame others for his mistakes while downplaying his own. He massive ego and demand people respect and obey him comes across as at least partially trying to cover up his own mistakes and knowledge he is a failure that no one likes, particularly compared to a non-senile Ra and Odin, who don't get mocked or defied nearly as much as he does.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • The preteen to teenage main characters aren't nearly as psychologically affected by always having to fight monsters that are trying to kill them so often as they probably would be in real life. At the very least, there's no sign of PTSD. However, given that they have to do this for years on end, it could be safe to assume they just get desensitized by it, or as demigods are more geared to handle such things.
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    • Neither Percy nor his mother seem particularly worked up about her having killed her husband through petrification in the first book. There's no denying that Gabe was a grade-A Jerkass who Percy concludes was also a Domestic Abuser towards Sally, but the fact that she outright murdered him and then sold the resulting statue for money, instead of considering something like, say, divorce, is never called into question.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: After being hyped up as a threat even bigger than Kronos, Typhon gets defeated in one paragraph, two at most, by a literal Deus ex Machina no less.
  • Author's Saving Throw: The Last Olympian does away with concerns over the Kissing Cousins nature of the demigods dating each other by clarifying gods do not have a DNA, so even though most of the gods are related to each other, it’s not really that Squicky for their children to date one another so long as they don’t share a godly parent.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Hades. Beloved for averting Everyone Hates Hades, being portrayed as a genuinely sympathetic and heroic figure, but there's a lot of debate as to whether or not he deserves all the praise he gets. Particularly the way he treated Nico and cursing the Oracle, indirectly causing Luke's Start of Darkness rubbed some fans the wrong way, others point out that he's still leagues better as a parent than most other gods, though that isn't hard.
    • Hermes, again for his parenting skills. Some argue that he did what he could regarding Luke, and see him as The Woobie or a tragic figure at worst. Others argue that he really should've known better, that he should've given Luke more attention. Him considering attacking Annabeth for talking back to him is especially a source of discussion, a genuine slip-up in the heat of the battle? Or a moment of him showing his true colors, but stopping himself at the last second?
    • Rachel. A likeable, funny character and a standout Badass Normal in a cast of empowered mortals? Or an unnecessary character who is a threat to Percabeth, despite having no chemistry with Percy? The latter died down after she became the new Oracle, essentially ensuring that she won't date anyone, at least sexually, but there are still debates on whether or not she fits into the series.
    • Bianca. A good sister who was just following her life and wanted freedom? Or an irresponsible girl who abandoned her brother at the first chance she found?
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
  • "Common Knowledge": For whatever reason, many fans, even long-time readers believe that Sally turned Gabe and his friends into stone by dropping Medusa's head on the poker table. She didn't. She only turned Gabe into stone and then sold his corpse as a live-like sculpture, with his friends not even being mentioned. While dropping the head on the poker table is convenient to get rid of both her husband and any potential witnesses, using Guilt by Association in this context would've made her look too cruel.
  • Crack Pairing: Tons. Rachel/Nico, Thalia/Nico note , Percy/Clarisse, Rachel/Luke, Apollo/Hermesnote , etc.
  • Crazy Is Cool:
    • The Party Ponies. These guys are so obsessed with fighting and partying, it's hard to believe that they are related to Chiron.
    • Apollo. He let a barely 16-year-old girl drive a flying, glowing bus and wears headphones during the Solstice, seemingly having not a care in the world.
  • Die for Our Ship: Rachel is frequently treated to this by Percy/Annabeth fans. It considerably lessened after the last book, however, mostly because she became the new Oracle.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Luke Castellan. While he does have a fairly sympathetic backstory and motives, he is still responsible for starting a war in which dozens of demigods and many more mortals died and would end up bringing The End of the World as We Know It had he fully succeeded. The fans tend to bring up his affection towards Annabeth as a redeeming quality, even though it didn't stop him from trying to kill the girl multiple times and effectively torturing her at one point.
    • Hades as well. Fans praise him as an aversion to Everyone Hates Hades and for being a step up from Zeus, glossing over the fact that the entire premise of the books was his fault and that he's not a particularly nice person either way. He tried to keep his children away from camp despite Zeus demanding that they be sent to stay there, and when that failed, he put a curse on the 12-year-old host of the Oracle for giving the prophecy in the first place, making it so that no one would be able to take her place until he and his children were accepted by the other gods.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Nico di Angelo gets the most love in this category, going from cute, annoying kid to an emo badass over the course of the series.
    • Fandom still showers attention on his sister, Bianca di Angelo, too. Never mind that she dies in her introductory book. Many fanfics explore either her life after death or her life in a "What if?" scenario should she have lived.
    • The twins, Artemis and Apollo, also get a lot of love, despite their very minor appearances. Quite a few fanfics are dedicated to them. Apollo was popular enough to have his own spin-off.
    • Similar to the above, the Hunters of Artemis get a lot of attention in fanfic, especially notable considering that very few members are named. Artemis's lieutenant, Zoë Nightshade, is especially popular.
    • Calypso has quite the following, and avoids the Die for Our Ship treatment that Rachel first suffered. Many rejoiced when she returned in the sequel series.
    • Beckendorf, a Genius Bruiser and nice guy who spends the fourth and fifth books at the front of the fighting.
  • Even Better Sequel:
    • Most agree that the books got better with each installment. The Battle of The Labyrinth had even more awesome moments and Character Development in comparison to the already strong Titan's Curse.
    • The Last Olympian, big time.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • R.E.D. for Rachel Elizabeth Dare.
    • Many fans refer to Rick Riordan as "Uncle Rick".
    • For simplicity's sake, the universe that the Camp Half-Blood Series, the Kane Chronicles, and Magnus Chase take place in is referred to as the Riordanverse by most fans.
  • Fanon:
  • Foe Romance Subtext: Luke and pretty much everyone. Particularly Percy, Thalia, Annabeth, and (if you squint) Grover.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Percy and Nico's first meeting is a pretty funny scene where Percy saves Nico's life and Nico proceeds to talk his ear off about mythology. It's significantly harsher after The Heroes Of Olympus showed a glimpse of Nico's POV in that scene —basically, he saw Percy as a mythical hero come to life, which only made his crush on Percy and Percy's failure to save Bianca that much harder for him to accept.
  • Genius Bonus: It might or might not be intentional, but the mention of a statue of Susan B. Anthony strangling Frederick Douglass in The Last Olympian might be a roundabout reference to how the two civil rights leaders, formerly steadfast allies, became divided over the issue of the Fifteenth Amendment allowing black males to vote, but not women of any race (and to add insult to injury, it was the first Amendment that explicitly mentioned male and only male citizens).
  • Growing the Beard: Most agree that The Titan's Curse was where the series really began to show its quality.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Percy catching Annabeth when she nearly falls off Olympus becomes cringe worthy after the events of the third The Heroes of Olympus book, Mark of Athena, where he catches her again while she's being dragged by Arachne's threads into Tartarus and this time around, he chooses to fall with her.
    • Promise (which seems to be the Arc Words in Luke's life), after reading The Diary of Luke Castellan.
    • The tense relationship between Nico and Percy becomes downright depressing after The House of Hades, where it's revealed Nico was hiding his true feelings about Percy.
    • It's easy to miss it, but in his introduction scene, Mr. D quips how his father (Zeus) likes punishing him. This is bad enough but it becomes ten times worse when you read the Trials of Apollo.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • "She made blue waffles and blue eggs for breakfast."
    • Tyson, a teenage boy, has a fondness for ponies.
      • For that matter, the fact that he named a hippocampus that he developed a particular attachment to "Rainbow".
      • It is mentioned that monsters (which Tyson technically is) age differently from mortals and he is, sort of, a child.
    • Towards the end of The Lightning Thief, Grover speculates that he will be reborn as a flower. Along comes Undertale, a video game which also involves a young, sweet-natured goat-like creature dying and being reborn as a flower.
      • In the same videogame, what happens to a monster if you kill them? They turn into golden dust- just like in this series.
    • Chiron's cover as Mr. Brunner is a teacher in a wheelchair. In the Nasuverse, the Heroic Spirit Chiron is summoned into a certain Holy Grail War by Fiore, a mage in a wheelchair.
  • Ho Yay:
    • See Foe Romance Subtext and Even the Guys Want Him. Percy's admiring descriptions of Luke's looks and skill come off less Big Brother Mentor and more Precocious Crush. Special notice goes to their last meeting in Thief. Percy finds Luke hacking apart the practice dummies in the sword arena and stares, entranced, marveling over his skill, the intensity in his eyes, his shirt clinging to him with sweat....Until Luke notices and Percy valiantly tries to quip his way out of the embarrassment. Now compare the scene in The Demigod Diaries when he almost loses a fight because he was watching Annabeth trouncing her opponent.
      • Hell, when Luke gives him the enchanted sneakers, Percy admits the gesture made him blush almost as much as Annabeth. Who he then jibes for being obvious about her crush on Luke.
    • Percy and Nico share a bit in The Last Olympian. And then in later books, it turns out that Nico actually has/had feelings for Percy.
    • Travis and Connor Stoll (from the Hermes cabin). Percy and Tyson, too, but the Stolls are almost never without each other. Of course, the Stolls are also full siblings, which makes it kinda squicky.
    • The descriptions of Luke are pretty generous. And seeing as they're told from Percy's point of view...
  • Inferred Holocaust: In the first book when Percy, Annabeth, and Grover face Hades, the god of the dead becomes so enraged that he causes not one but two earthquakes, and Percy remarks that it will not have been a peaceful night in L.A. When the kids resurface, Los Angeles is burning. No casualty numbers are given, but it could qualify as a "Funny Aneurysm" Moment, as Hades had just finished complaining about how the Underworld was overcrowded and didn't need more subjects. Kinda ironic.
    • Manhattan sounds pretty bad by the end of the last book. Everyone had fallen asleep, which probably includes people who were cooking things, people who were in the hospital getting surgery, etc. And Fifth Avenue is a disaster.
  • It Was His Sled: Practically anyone who is starting the series now is probably already aware that Luke is a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing. Especially since it was revealed at the end of the first book.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Considering how a lot of the half-bloods share parental issues...
  • Jerks Are Worse Than Villains: Zeus is a brutal Hypocrite and Ungrateful Bastard who has an inflated opinion of his own intelligence and is far harder to like at all than most of the Ax-Crazy (but often Affably Evil) villains from the first two series.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Percy Jackson, of course. Be they mortal, demigod, god, or monster, Percy has been shipped with practically every named character in the series.
  • Les Yay: Silena and Clarisse, Annabeth and Thalia, Zoë and Bianca. And just... the Hunters as a whole.
    • Clarisse and Silena in particular considering they play out the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus to its tragic conclusion. And we all know about them.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Luke Castellan, while introduced as a friendly mentor figure, is The Dragon to Kronos. Holding a resentment towards the gods due to feeling abandoned by his father, Hermes, Luke manipulated countless other demigods into joining Kronos's forces, convincing Silena Beauregard to act as his spy by tricking her into believing nobody at camp would get hurt. Under Kronos's orders, Luke steals both Zeus's Master Bolt and Hades's Helm of Darkness in an attempt to start a war between the gods, convincing Ares to help him when the war god catches him. In The Lightning Thief, when Percy is claimed by Poseidon, Luke summons a hellhound to trick Percy and Chiron into believing that Hades is the true culprit. When Percy succeeds in his quest to find and return Zeus's Master Bolt, Luke lures Percy into the woods and poisons him with a pit scorpion, not taking the risk Percy beating him in a fight. In The Titans Curse, to have her serve as bait for the goddess, Artemis, Luke risks his life by holding the sky to trick Annabeth into taking his place when she holds it to save his life. In The Battle of the Labyrinth, Luke persuades the inventor, Daedalus, into giving him the string of Ariadne so that he can find a route for Kronos's forces to invade Camp Half-Blood. Luke later allows the spirit of Kronos to take over his body after gaining nigh-invulnerability from the River Styx. Despite Luke's manipulative nature, he truly believed he was doing what was best for demigods, and when he realized how much he hurt Annabeth, ends his own life to stop Kronos.
    • Daedalus is a genius inventor from the times of Ancient Greece, infamous for constructing the self-aware and ever-expanding death trap that is the Labyrinth. After murdering his similarly gifted nephew Perdix in a fit of jealous rage, Daedalus lured King Minos into a trap to finally rid himself of the King of Crete's mad pursuit. Knowing he wouldn't be safe from Minos' specter Daedalus hid within the Labyrinth, transferring his consciousness into automaton bodies to ensure his immortality throughout the centuries. Approached by Luke in modern times with the offer to be made King of the Underworld should he help them navigate the maze and invade Camp Half-Blood, Daedalus takes up the identity of Quintus to observe the demigods and decide whether they stand a chance against the Titans. Eventually deciding to help Luke, Daedalus nevertheless leaves Percy his pet Hellhound Mrs. O'Leary to help the demigod. When betrayed by Kronos' forces Daedalus gives his life to destroy the Labyrinth and the Titan's army, content with his punishment in the Underworld as long as he gets to make amends with his nephew.
  • Memetic Badass: Sally Jackson, is by all accounts just a normal mortal woman, but considering how utterly understanding and loving she is to her son, how she managed to escape her abusive marriage by petrifying her asshole husband, and having quite a badass moment in The Last Olympian, many can see what Poseidon saw in her.
  • Narm: There's a reason why Antonio Caparo's art for the series is reviled, with special mention often being given to his artwork of Nico.
    • The audiobook adaptations can dip into this at times. While Jesse Bernstein overall does a decent job with the narration, there are a few questionable choices as well. Luke being given a "surfer bro" voice undercuts many dramatic moments, while Persephone's whispery voice makes her sound like a smoker, not the eternally youthful beauty she's described as, Demeter sounds like an Alter Kocker, and Mrs. Dodds completely lacking the southern accent she is specifically mentioned to have. Most questionably, he puts on a highly caricatured accent for Ethan Nakamura. This despite there being no evidence that Ethan isn’t American born and raised.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Rachel kissing Percy in The Last Olympian is a big one among Percy/Annabeth shippers. Even though Percy and Annabeth weren’t dating at the time, the way fans describe it would have you believe otherwise.
    • Bianca joining the hunt and abandoning her brother. Fans will always see her as a neglectful sibling who abandoned her brother in a new world she just got exposed to. Many fans view her actions as uncaring and use this as proof that she hated her brother
  • Periphery Demographic: Because of Riordan's attention to detail, some people who're outside the target demographic of young adults find enjoyment in these works.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Even people who like Rachel tend to agree that the Ship Tease between her and Percy is forced and unnecessary. Some even asked why Riordan bothered to put it in, since everyone knew that Percy and Annabeth will end up together.
  • The Un-Twist: The fulfilling of the prophecy in The Titan's Curse It says "One will be lost" and everybody assumes it means someone will die. But it never outright states dying, so with the usual Prophecy Twist you could expect Bianca to be lost and later found. It turns out she gets Killed Off for Real.
  • What an Idiot!: Several examples in the first book:
  • The Woobie: Everyone not named Gabe, Ares, or Kronos:
    • Luke's mother, May Castellan, also deserves a special mention here. She became a victim of Hades' curse on the Oracle, becoming an incomplete Oracle in the process, having visions that overtake her entire body and cause her to grab people and yell prophecies at them. This drove her son away, and seemingly unaware of that, she continues to bake cookies and pack lunches for a son that will never come home.
    • In The Last Olympian, the narration actually says that Hermes "looked like he needed a hug." If that's not baiting woobiedom, nothing is.
    • MRS. JACKSON. Ridiculously nice, sweet, and caring, and yet gets get stuck with an abusive slob of a husband and serious financial problems. Luckily, things get much better.
    • Even Dionysus has a little of this after he revealed his relationship with Ariadne to Percy in the third book, and after one of his sons dies in the fourth book. And then you get to his chapter in Percy Jackson's Greek Gods...
    • Tyson is another standout example: he's only 7-8 years old by cyclops standards, and he lives homeless in an alley and is covered in scars from being constantly attacked by monsters. When he's around other kids, they pick on him and take advantage of his timid, sensitive nature, or avoid him because he's a monster. His Only Friend is Percy, and even that's strained at times. One chapter in on the second book, and it's hard not to want to give him a hug.

Tropes which only apply to the films:

  • Actor Shipping: Logan Lerman and Alexandra Daddario, who played Official Couple Percy Jackson and Annabeth Chase, are rumored to have dated in real life and even been engaged at one point. This fact, and their flirty banter in interviews, led to many fans shipping them to this day, even after they have long since broken up. They are often referred to as "Logandra" by their shippers.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Percy seems to handle the sudden death/disappearance of his mother very well...
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Was Percy genuinely trying to warn Gabe to not open the fridge that stored Medusa’s head or was Percy counting on reverse psychology as a way to kill his abusive Step-father without dirtying his hands
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Kronos in Sea of Monsters, possibly intentional because the rest of the books might not be adapted to film.
  • Ass Pull:
    • The Sea of Monsters somehow not being in Poseidon's domain. Ignoring that this is in complete contrast to the books, the Greek myths, and basic logic, two of Percy's other powers (water healing him and his navigational intuition) are later shown to work fine within the Sea of Monsters, making this seem like even more of a lazy excuse for why he couldn't control the water to save himself and his friends from Charybdis.
    • Percy lamenting Tyson's "death", especially in contrast to the original book. In the book, he knew Tyson from school for some time before they ended up at camp and he found out they were brothers, he had to endure constant ridicule from the other campers over the relationship, Tyson was gone from the story for much longer than he was in the film, and Percy didn't spend nearly as much time reflecting on it. In the movie, the two have only known each other for a day or two, the only character who teases him about it is Clarisse, and Tyson is only gone for a few minutes of screentime, yet his sacrifice appears to drive Percy over the Despair Event Horizon until his friends manage to talk him out of it. As with the above, it comes off as a cheap excuse so that when Tyson does come back, Percy can waste time hugging it out with him instead of preventing the resurrection of Kronos.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Some were a little disturbed that Sally resorted to murdering Gabe by petrifying him instead of just divorcing him, by Percy's suggestion no-less. In the movie, Gabe is instead petrified by his own stupidity because he ignored a sign warning him not to open the fridge, which was storing Medusa's head. Even Rick Riordan, who notoriously loathed the movies, thought the change was Actually Pretty Funny.
    • While making Tyson look more like a normal kid undermines the drama surrounding him being a "monster" significantly, it also makes Percy look less like an idiot for not realizing that something was off about him.
    • The second film attempts to address the complaints about all of Annabeth's adaptation changes; now she has blonde hair, and Clarisse also features as a character.
  • Awesome Music: Despite the films shortcomings, they both have great soundtracks.
  • Badass Decay: Although her actual status as a badass is somewhat disputed (see Broken Base below), Annabeth still does a lot of things in the first movie and is actually helpful in several situations. Come the sequel and she does absolutely squat anymore despite tagging along as a main character for the whole film. Her position as the abrasive Action Girl has been taken over by Clarisse while Annabeth has become little more than a constant Damsel in Distress.
  • Broken Base: Whether or not Annabeth counts as a Faux Action Girl. Those who claim she is point to the fact that she has to be saved from Medusa by Percy, doesn't figure out the Lotus hallucination until after they're outside it and then does nothing in the climax - despite claiming to have lots of experience with battle strategy at camp. Those who say she isn't point to her beating Percy in their first duel (and he needs a power boost from water to match her), being the one to use Car Fu against Medusa, successfully shooting some guards and the hydra and merely being Overshadowed by Awesome - since only one person can wear Hermes's sneakers. In fact, Percy has to fight Luke alone because Annabeth nearly beat him and a kick from her sent him flying, requiring Percy to chase after him.
  • Complete Monster (The Lightning Thief):
    • Hades is the cruel, tyrannical god of the Underworld, a hellish realm where he keeps thousands of souls in horrific burning agony, with a vast collection of their lost hopes and broken dreams from life. Kidnapping the goddess Persephone, Hades would force her to be his bride in a loveless and abusive marriage. Incorrectly assuming Percy stole Zeus's master bolt, Hades captures Percy's mother to try forcing him to give him the bolt, desiring to use it to break free from the Underworld and wage a war on Olympus that would destroy the world. After getting the Bolt, Hades goes back on his word to spare Percy and his friends, trying to have them consumed by monstrous souls while boasting that he'll be King of the Gods.
    • Medusa was once a beautiful woman cursed by Athena to turn anyone who looks her in the eyes to stone. In the present, Medusa runs Auntie Em's Garden Emporium, where she turns anyone who enters into stone before adding them to her collection around her garden, including children. Introduced chasing a woman, whose husband she had turned to stone, Medusa eventually does the same to the woman, before attempting to turn Annabeth and Percy to stone as well, at one point threatening to use her snakes to force Percy to open his eyes.
  • Contested Sequel: The first film was already a contested adaptation, but the sequel ended up becoming this to it. While some appreciated it being Truer to the Text, others had actually come to respect the first film for adapting concepts from the source material while still trying to do its own thing. Whereas the second film borrowed so much from the books that it created a huge mess from trying to juggle all of it at once.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Even fans who don't like the movies tend to like Stanley Tucci's Dionysus. He nails the character's beleaguered and snarky frustration at being stuck as camp director.
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Grover is reimagined into a loud, animalistic Casanova Wannabe, while being played by a black actor, even though Grover's skin color was undefined in the books. While many didn't mind the idea of a black Grover, his rather stereotypical personality is generally seen as a major step backwards. He does get several moments of competency but the Jive Turkey behavior tends to overshadow them.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Medusa. Of course, she is played by Uma Thurman.
  • Fan Nickname: “Peter Johnson", since the fanbase refuses to associate the movie with the books in any way.
  • Fandom Heresy: If you call either of these movies "good", or gods forbid, "good adaptations", even after they have been disowned by Rick Riordan himself, let's just say... good luck. Heck, even mentioning them in the same breath as the books is bound to rile someone up.
  • Fight Scene Failure: During the climbing wall sequence in Sea of Monsters, we clearly see one demigod get pushed off, but another one simply jumps off.
  • Ham and Cheese: In the European Spanish dub, Hades's voice actor Gonzalo Abril seems to be intentionally blowing his delivery while vocing his character, which is exceptionally odd given that he directed the entire dub and is the only cast member that is not acting normally.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Magnificent Bastard: Luke Castellan, son of Hermes, became disillusioned with the gods following the death of his friend, Thalia, and them abandoning their children. Luke steals Zeus' lighting bolt and frames the son of Poseidon, Percy Jackson, to start a war between the gods. Befriending Percy when he arrives at Camp Half-blood, Luke tricks him into delivering the bolt to Hades by hiding it in the shield that he gives him. Though seemingly defeated, Luke returns and plans to use the Golden Fleece to raise Kronos from the dead. Using a spy to poison Thalia's tree, and putting the camp in danger, Luke kidnaps Grover and chases the heroes through the Sea of Monsters, at one point seemingly killing Percy's half brother Tyson, eventually managing to use the Fleece to raise Kronos. Always having a quip at hand, and constantly keeping Percy on the defensive, Luke proves to be as smart as his book counterpart.
  • Narm: In Sea of Monsters, Percy's Angst over Tyson sacrificing himself to save him not only comes off as melodramatic but a complete Ass Pull given how he previously treated him.
  • Never Live It Down: Poor Annabeth in the first film. She can't live down two moments; ending up as a Damsel in Distress with Medusa (never mind that she was immobilised because the woman holding her hand got turned to stone) and not realising the Lotus Casino's hallucination until after the fact. This solidifies her as the ultimate Faux Action Girl for some, although it's often forgotten that Percy ends up in exactly the same predicament with Medusa right after he saves her, and Annabeth then has to save him.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • The scene in Medusa's shop. While it isn't that creepy in the book (there the scene is a lot less ominous up until the Uncle Ferdinand bit), the movie added a panicking woman whose husband had already been turned to stone and she's hysterical with fright. She eventually gets turned into stone too, and the only mention that's made of it is when Annabeth explains how she scraped her wrist (the woman had been holding her wrist when she had been turned to stone and Annabeth had to pull her hand free).
    • Kronos' resurrected body in the second film is rather terrifying. And then he starts swallowing Half-Bloods whole.
    • Despite all the comic relief going on around them, the inside of Charybdis is still a disturbing location. We see that the monster digests its food by mashing it with gigantic, fleshy mallets.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Uma Thurman as Medusa. Her sequence is quite eerie (see above), and Medusa is very obviously enjoying toying with her victims. The actress even worked with a snake wrangler to work out how she would feel with snakes growing out of her head.
    • Steve Coogan as Hades, with a Mick Jagger inspired aesthetic, clearly having a good time in the role. For some, it makes the Adaptational Villainy of the character worth it.
    • Rosario Dawson as an extremely Fanservicey Persephone.
    • Nathan Fillion in the second film as Hermes. He's fully embracing the Camp and considered one of the highlights.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Alexandra Daddario would become better known for True Detective, White Collar and Baywatch (2017).
  • The Scrappy:
    • The movie-version of Annabeth. People unfamiliar with the books don't like her for being a rather one-dimensional Tsundere. People who did read the books despise her for being nothing like her book counterpart, not even in looks. The Jerkass, (potential) Faux Action Girl characterization is a far cry from the Badass Bookworm the readers grew to love. It only got worse in Sea of Monsters, where she was also turned into a Damsel Scrappy.
  • Signature Scene: The Lotus Casino segment in the first film is this for fans of the books due to it being generally considered the most faithfully adapted scene from the source material.
  • So Bad, It's Good: Some moments are like this. A lot of it overlaps with what's on the Narm page. But Grover dancing in the Lotus Casino is a notable example.
  • So Okay, It's Average: For those who have no connection to the books. They may not follow the books very well, but on their own, the movies could’ve been so much worse.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • The CGI in The Lightning Thief looks pretty good for the most part. However, a notably bad example goes to when the Minotaur grabs Sally—when he shakes her in his fist, she stays awkwardly straight and still the whole time, which makes her look like a JPEG being dragged around the screen.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Many fans of the books agree to this.
    • The fact that all the camp characters were given an Age Lift from tweens to late teens, given how it makes the idea of having multiple sequels borderline impossible without eventually replacing the actors. The fact that it was clearly inspired by the success of the latter Harry Potter movies, while completely ignoring that that series became popular for it's first installments, doesn't help.
    • Annabeth's character is changed completely, as a Composite Character of Clarisse (though she showed up in the second film). There's less emphasis on her knowledge, valuing brains over brawn (fitting as she's descended from the Goddess of Wisdom), and
    • Making Hades the bad guy, as usual. Even though the original book series is credited for averting Everyone Hates Hades, regardless of what one thinks of him as a character, they took a morally complex character and turned him into a one-note bad guy, simply because everyone else has done it before.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!: Most people who weren't fans of the book just wrote the first movie off as a rip off of Harry Potter.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously:
  • Unfortunate Implications: Grover's characterization in the film was such a nonstop barrage of black stereotypes that it lead one person to liken it to a minstrel show.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: Mildly but the film was shot in 2009 and released in 2010 - as a result has a few very timely references. Grover complains about Charon burning money "during a recession", Percy uses an iPod's reflection to see Medusa, the Lotus Casino features Lady Gaga's "Poker Face" and Kesha's "Tick Tock" prominently, and Luke is seen playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (released in 2009). There's also a distinctive lack of smartphones among the teens, and Annabeth requires a laptop to video call Luke over Skype.
  • Woolseyism: After Hades changes into a Big Red Devil, Grover asks "Please, stay in the Mick Jagger thing!" The Brazilian dub changes the reference to local singer Zé Ramalho, who does resemble him more (after all, Mick Jagger doesn't use a beard).

Tropes that apply to the musical

  • Award Snub: Even with the COVID-shortened Tony season, the musical didn't earn a single nomination for the 74th Tony Awards. Particularly egregious are its exclusions from the Best Original Score category, populated entirely by straight plays despite The Lightning Thief being the only eligible musical with original music, and the Best Lead Actor in a Musical category, populated entirely by Aaron Tveit for Moulin Rouge! and Aaron Tveit for Moulin Rouge! alone.
  • Awesome Music: Pretty much all the songs.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Clarisse in "Put You In Your Place". While she later sings in "Bring On The Monsters", "Place" is the only song in which she's the main singer.
  • Win Back the Crowd: The musical has been much better received by the fandom than the movies.
  • The Woobie: The main trio all get songs that present them as this: "Good Kid" for Percy, "The Tree On The Hill" for Grover, and "My Grand Plan" for Annabeth.
    • "The Campfire Song" highlights how the gods have ruined the lives of the campers in some way or another.

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