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Before starting his own LPs, Sorceror Nobody participated in a couple with the Final Fantasy Wiki, beginning with the first episode for Final Fantasy X – which was never released, since the LP didn't get off the ground – and then a handful of the Final Fantasy Adventure episodes. It's reasonable to say that Sorc wouldn't have had the confidence to do his own LPs without the experience from the wiki; however, he finds solo LPing easier in many ways, because he struggled to balance his level of participation in a group.

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Nearly all of Sorc's own LP series are titled "Nobody Plays X", because pun. The channel schedule is completely flexible, though he aims for five videos per week (one every weekday), and usually tries to ensure at least three per week. Videos are typically released at 7pm UK time.

You can find Sorc's videos on his YouTube channel.

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Universal

    Relevant tropes for Sorc himself 
  • Arc Number: Inasmuch as he actually has one, Sorc's arc number is 13. This is mostly due to the fact that his emblem is derived from the Kingdom Hearts Nobody emblem, which itself has connotations with the number. It's also reinforced by his secondary personal symbol, the Sorceror l'Cie brand, which carries a connection to Final Fantasy XIII.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Lives and breathes.
  • Fanboy: Of the Hermitcraft Minecraft community. Most especially Sl1pg8r. One could easily make a drinking game out of him mentioning Slip and the other Hermits. This is now part of the drinking game for Sorc's LPs. Also, used "Sl1pg8r" and "Mumbo Jumbo" as Minecraft world seeds for vanilla and Modsauce, respectively. And of course, there's also the fact that the Modsauce pack is the official pack for Hermitcraft.
  • Lovable Coward: Is a seriously jumpy person. YMMV on "lovable", if you insist.
    • Also takes an odd sort of pride in the fact that he's a genuine wuss, and thus isn't merely milking supposed jumpiness for a gimmick, unlike some popular YouTubers that could be mentioned.
    • His jumpiness is frequently a target of his Self-Deprecation, and he always leaves in any cases of keyboard clatter or other noises that result from his actual physical jumping when startled, then comments on them.
      [loud clunk] Oof. Ow. Yes, I just hit my hand on the underside of the keyboard tray thing. Ow. 'Cause I'm a jumpy wuss; I thought we knew this by now.
    • As of Alundra 2 episode 22, there is a name for this: the Sorceror Nobody Scaredy Clatter.
  • Pungeon Master: Just look how many examples there are for various wordplay tropes in the folders below.
  • Significant Anagram: States in the LP anniversary video that "Bat Conjurer"note  is an anagram.

    Tropes for the LPs in general 
  • Angrish: His commentary sometimes devolves into strings of gibberish (of variable length) when he's frustrated. This is usually caused by things like just missing a jump, or barely mistiming something. Crash Bandicoot Warped episode 2 features the following example:
    Don't you dare hit it... WHUNANDVJUJVDIDJVIDJI
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: Every iteration of his channel schedule has assigned Mondays to Minecraft. When Minecraft was divided into vanilla and modded, this was further invoked by putting modded on Monday (and vanilla on... er... Vriday). Also, Warped Wednesdays became a thing for the run of that LP, although in that case, it was simply a consequence of the available slot.
  • Art Evolution: A couple of stages of this, mostly after getting Sony Vegas. Obviously, there was an immediate general improvement in the editing quality (and scope for extra flair) due to the better tools available. Then, starting from mid-late February 2015, Sorc implemented much better rendering settings and also began recording and rendering all of his videos in 60fps. Then he got a new monitor and started recording in 1080p. The next part of the long-term plan will be to look into getting a proper microphone to improve the audio side of things.
  • Author Appeal: Several of the non-Minecraft LPs are old favourite games that Sorc first played over a decade ago.
  • Continuity Nod: The fourth iteration of the channel trailer, released on new year 2017, uses most of the very first LP-related video Sorc did, two years and seven months prior – the trailer for the original custom modded Minecraft series – for its opening segment, as a deliberate homage to the entire history of Let's Plays on his channel.
  • *Cough* Snark *Cough*: Sometimes attempted, but pretty much always edited out, because his microphone is not good enough to pick up that kind of sound without it coming out terrible on the recording.
  • Disorganized Outline Speech: Doesn't tend to plan out episode content in advance much beyond general "this project". Consequently, any attempts to plan or to summarise tend to become this to at least some extent.note 
  • Flat "What": On occasion. A flat "...seriously?" is common, too, sometimes accompanied by "Is this what we're doing now?"
  • Gosh Dang It to Heck!: While he is not a non-swearer by nature, Sorc generally avoids strong curses in his LP videos. This policy started right from episode 1 of modded Minecraft, where he censored his "Shitshitshitshitshit" response to a creeper ambush. While there are some minced oaths where it's pretty clear what word he was going for, the worst words you'll actually ever hear in his videos are the occasional "bastard" directed at specific in-game entities, and a couple of cases of This Is for Emphasis, Bitch!
    • "Balls" has emerged as his default response to almost any level of things going wrong.
    • If the game itself contains profanity, Sorc still won't curse strongly unless it slips through his self-filtering. But he's more lax about leaving it uncensored in such cases.
    • The tendency is now to leave curses in but bleep them. This provides a sort of compromise between his view on "natural" swearingnote  and the fact that he doesn't really want to use strong curses in his LPs.
  • Let's Play Curse: Has bemoaned more than once that "this would happen on camera" or "I'm normally good at this".
  • Mickey Mousing: A relatively subtle case is that Sorc tends to try and synchronise at least one thing with some part of the outro music in each of the "recent videos" clips. Also, more obviously and to be expected, using the music to inform video editing in montages.
  • Montage: For the channel itself, the channel trailers, and the LP anniversary video.
  • Out of Focus: Sorc began LPing Minecraft, and considered it his "flagship" series, but right from day five, when he started Sonic Adventure 2 as a "side" LP, Minecraft generally shared equal output with the side LP. Eventually, due to the long Minecraft hiatus, Sorc finally demoted it to just being one of three equally weighted LP slots... and vanilla and modded share that slot. His channel update video about this explicitly states that he no longer considers any of his scheduled LPs to be "side" ones.
  • Painting the Medium: A common feature since getting Sony Vegas, beginning in the Alundra and Warped LPs. Sorc sure likes to play with his expanded editing tools.
  • Pun-Based Title: Common for episode titles. Also, as noted at the top of the page, applicable to the entire "franchise", as it were, being under the "Nobody Plays" banner.
  • invokedSchedule Slip: All over the place; indeed, it's fair to say that the schedule itself slips more than Sorc's adherence to it does. A lengthy history of the schedule is contained in this note , for the curious.
  • Score Screen: Most of his non-Minecraft LPs have one. They've been getting increasingly elaborate with each new iteration, going from just death counts in Sonic Adventure 2, to tracking about a dozen things and downright showing off with the presentation of the list in Alundra 2.
  • Signing-Off Catchphrase:
    That's going to be it for this episode; if you've enjoyed the video, remember to leave a like. Share, favourite and comment; help support the channel. Follow me on Twitter to stay up to date with what's going on, and subscribe if you want to see more. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you next time!
    • Sometimes falls apart completely, if Sorc stumbles over the words, or more commonly, if he starts to sign off and then gets distracted by something that prolongs the episode. The latter case usually results in him subsequently signing out with something along the lines of:
      Okay, that actually is going to be it for this episode, remember to leave a like, blah, blah, I've already done the spiel, see you next time!
  • Title Drop: Inverted, arguably, by episodes named during editing by Sorc just picking a phrase from his commentary in that episode that he thinks will be a mildly amusing title.
  • Title Sequence: Previously, every scheduled LP had a unique intro for the series, and non-scheduled series usually had the series logo (or at least the game logo) splash on at the start of every episode, or at least on the first episode. As of September 2016, vanilla Minecraft retains its existing title sequence, and the occasional new series will have one, but generally speaking, the practice has been dropped.

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LP series

     7 Days to Die 
I'm sure I can handle a few zombies...
— Description on the series playlist.

This series was started intentionally so that its first episode was Sorc's 200th LP episode overall. It is the first LP series to be off-schedule from its inception.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Alundra 
Giving an underappreciated game some much-deserved exposure.
— Description on the series playlist.

The fourth side LP, started after the initial conclusion of Surgeon Simulator 2013. The main reason for choosing Alundra is that Sorc is very fond of the game and wants to get it more exposure; relatedly, the fact that the game is not hugely widely known just makes the "Nobody Plays" label even punnier.

The series is concluded, and consists of forty episodes, which made it Sorc's longest LPnote  until vanilla Minecraft caught up, several months later.note 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Added Alliterative Appeal: "More follow-y fireballs for... fun times to happen" in episode 24.
  • Artistic License – Physics: Played with, in the sense that Sorc comments on the successful application of real physics in the Ronan boss fight, then comments on how it doesn't work. Also see Ignored Aesop, below.
  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: The title of episode 7, in reference to getting distracted from the plot by treasure hunting.
  • Book-Ends: In a meta sense. Alundra was the incumbent side LP when Sorc changed his schedule to four series per week, and its finale was also the very last LP episode of the same (by then broken) schedule.
  • Blatant Lies: Any mention of how unrelentingly cheery the game is.
  • Brought Down to Normal: The purpose of rematching the final bosses in the last episode – Sorc uses the ePSXe cheat plugin purely to deprive himself of the Legend Sword and Spirit Wand. Although he still kills the very final boss ridiculously easily with magic even without the latter.
  • Buffy Speak: A particularly good example in episode 31:
    There we go, that's for the central elevator. Lift. Risey uppy thing... Up-Goer Five.
  • Call-Back:
    • To the Sonic Adventure 2 LP in episode 14 — Sorc mentions "cannon lizard" while stating the varieties of lizardman present in the Reptile Lair. The callback is reinforced by a caption repeating the promotional offer.
    • In episode 27, recites the title of episode 1, in response to the flashback of the line that it was named for.
  • Catchphrase: "Whatever" and "Nobody cares", whenever he takes repeated inconsequential damage from enemies or hazards, particularly at times when he just cares about crossing the room.
  • Department of Redundancy Department: The opening to episode 28.
    And welcome back, to you, and to you, and to you and to you. We are all here in Elene's subconscious with her multiple personalities, her multiple personalities, her multiple personalities, and an ongoing gag that's getting a bit tired.
  • Fun with Homophones: Episode 28 is titled "Suite dreams". Sorc declares this the best punny title for anything ever in the video description.
  • Glasses Pull: Invoked heavily in episode 33, in response to a pun in the narrative text after defeating Wilda. How heavily? An actual image of Alundra wearing shades, and the appropriate sound clip.
  • Grammar Nazi: Calls out the occasional errors in dialogue. Episode 26 in particular features him repeatedly berating Stenia for being inconsistent about the plural of "Gazeck".
    • While the localisation of the game to Commonwealth spellings is generally good, there are a few missed ones. This usually goes unremarked upon, but a particularly egregious case in episode 35, where "realize" and "realise" are used in consecutive sentences of dialogue, prompts a highlight of the two words and the caption, "WTH, localisation team?"
  • Gratuitous Latin: Episode 1, "Ego percussi gladio hodie".
  • Ignored Aesop: Points out in episode 35 that attempting to apply real physics to the game is stupid. Then points out that this will not stop him doing it, and indeed never has before.
    Naturally, I am going to completely ignore this lesson, just as I have done on countless previous occasions in my gaming career.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: Several episode titles. Mostly getting worse as the series progresses.
    • Sorc would like to assert that episode 28 is not an example, because its pun is not lame.
    • Episode 29's title is not so much lame as downright terrible, for the specific purpose of lampshading.
    • Episode 31's title is a pun that, invokedwhile really quite clever, is the pinnacle of incredible lameness.
    • Episode 33's title is painfully bad.
  • Large Ham Announcer: In episode 31, as mentioned under Shout Out below.
  • Mood Whiplash: The title of episode 20, contrasting the minigame timelapse at the start with Sybill's murder at the end.
  • Overly Long Gag: See Department of Redundancy Department, above.
  • Painting the Medium: Episodes created after Sorc started using Sony Vegas have fast-forward style effects on timelapsed sections.
    • The title of episode 34, which focuses on a mirror/inversion based dungeon, is "Nobody Plays Alundra Ep. 34: :μƸ .qƎ ɒɿbnυlA ƨγɒlԳ γbodoИ". Sorc considered also flipping the video thumbnail, but decided not to.
    • In the final episode, Sorc defeats the final bosses... then rewinds the game all the way back to before the fights for a rematch.
  • Perverse Sexual Lust: Sorc explicitly (and unsarcastically) calls Meia hot at least once.
    • He also originally remarked "I'd tap that" during the ending movie, but decided to cut it.
  • Retirony       : Invoked at the start of episode 27. Sorc would have mentioned it directly following the relevant remark in episode 21, were it not for the fact that it would have been an obvious spoiler to do so at the time.
  • Rule of Three: The last three episode titles, "Beginning of the end", "Middle of the end" and "End of the end".
  • Save Scumming: Present due to the game being played on emulator. Sorc's attitude towards scumming to reset puzzles was reluctance to begin with, but he soon gave in on the basis of it being better for the LP to not have to detour around rooms to reset puzzles if he messes up.
    • In particular, he is utterly unapologetic about save scumming on the roulette minigame. Because screw having to legitimately score four sets of five consecutive wins on what is a Luck-Based Mission.
  • Score Screen: Tracks Life Vessels, Magic Seeds, Gilded Falcons, Plot Coupons, Excess Herbs, characters who have died, and the number of times Jess says "You know what I am saying?" Regret has been expressed at it being too late to start counting how many times Alundra gets referred to as an elf, including a comment in episode 30 that a verbal instance of such (made by Sorc) would have been counted.
  • Shout-Out:
    Can a human breathe underwater? Of course not! But an elf with a magical green-tinted cape apparently can.
    • Episode 31 has Sorc saying "ENTER THE MURGG ARENA", which is promptly turned into an intentional shoutout by following up with "THE MOST MONKEY-FILLED ARENA... IN THE WORLD."
    • Also in episode 31, Up-Goer Five.
    • Episode 34's video description references Rule 34 (in its wording, not subject matter).
    • In episode 38, Sorc refers to the time control machinery in the Lake Shrine as "time rotors", and accordingly inserts the sound of the TARDIS when he restarts time.
  • Special Edition Title: The title sequence of the final episode is actually not the title sequence at all, but gameplay done in imitation of the title sequence as a fakeout.
  • Time Lapse: Speeds up many segments of wandering around (especially in later episodes), although any area that has not previously been explored will retain normal speed so as not to skip over anything.
    • Episode 20 opens with a timelapsenote  of completing the Riverside Pub minigames.
    • Episode 37 has a timelapse of the many deaths needed to earn the Legend Sword.
  • Tranquil Fury: In saying "Don't you dare" to Ronan when he begins to accuse Alundra for Jess's death in episode 27.
  • Wall of Text:
    • In episode 37, Sorc musing on whether his graphics driver updating has altered any colours in the video results in a caption about how he couldn't prove it even if it had happened, drawing a parallel with colour perception in general. The wall of text is Played for Laughs and then lampshaded, with the text getting smaller on each line, before trailing off and abruptly jumping back to larger text to apologise for the derailment. Then going back to small text to say there's no prize for having stopped the video to read it all, but thanks anyway.
    • The finale features one that explicitly starts off by telling viewers to pause if they want to read it.
  • invokedThe Wiki Rule: Occasionally mentions the Alundra Wiki, as he is a staff member on it.

    Alundra 2 
It's not as good as the original, but still underappreciated. Check it out!
— Description on the series playlist.

The inevitable follow-up to Alundra. This LP occupied the Friday slot.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Anti-Humor: The title of episode 28 is a Call-Back to that of Alundra episode 33... except that, as the video description points out, the "pun" makes absolutely no sense this time around.
  • Call-Back: To the Alundra LP by tracking plot coupons and excess herbs. Also, generally, by highlighting points of similarity with the original game, most of which Sorc believes to be intentional on the part of the developers.
    • "More follow-y fireballs for fun times to happen." is recited verbatim in episode 7, followed by a Flashback Cut to the Alundra episode it came from. And is also recited again at pretty much any suitable opportunity in later episodes.
  • Deadpan Snarker: In episode 3, after having berated Flint for a range of things that weren't his fault, Alexia then picks on Prunewell for "resting". Sorc's response?
    [caption] Alexia is an equal opportunities brutal taskmistress.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: Episode 1 has no Score Screen, and has audio issues where dialogue cuts out in cutscenes. Both episodes 1 and 2 have technical issues with the emulator that affect the screen scaling between gameplay, the pause menu, and cutscenes. Both issues are fixed as of episode 3.
  • Foreshadowing: Knowing the plot of the game allows Sorc to do things like specifically point out that the Varuna royal emblem is a duck, with the intention of later combining this with naming the music track that plays when we see the mysterious trio of ducks, all to deliberately hint towards the reveal that those ducks are the Children of the Crown's submarine periscope.
  • Hypocritical Humour:
    • "We should just ban all video games."
    • In episode 7, Sorc tells an enemy that their aim is terrible... then shortly afterwards, completely misses with an attack himself, and notes that his own aim is terrible.
  • Informed Attractiveness: Alexia. Lampshaded by Sorc in episode 3:
    If she weren't made of dubious polygons, she'd probably be quite hot.
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer:
    • In episode 1, after visiting a bathroom.
      Honestly, it's ridiculous, but that actually is important.
    • In episode 9, Sorc reveals the title of Axelya's song: "Who Changed Me Into a Jellyfish Like This?"
  • Not-So-Innocent Whistle: In episode 2, after breaking the villager child's piggy bank.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Invoked word for word in episode 9, both for Flint and Alexia. Sorc particularly lampshades the fact that Alexia's disguise involves her wearing less clothes than usual.
  • Perverse Sexual Lust: Implied towards Alexia. Though it's somewhat Played for Laughs, as indicated by Informed Attractiveness, above.
    • However, as the episodes progress, it becomes more and more dubious quite how much of it is just for laughs. Especially in episode 9.
  • Poke the Poodle: Mephisto is most definitely not a poodle poker in general, but there is one thing that does stand out: his utterly diabolical seal on Jeehan's dojo:
    Really? That's Mephisto's dark entrapment magic? Jigsaw puzzles?
  • Potty Emergency: Sorc essentially posits this as a theory to explain why Jeehan is making his apprentice write an essay about toilets, of all things.
    Probably because there isn't one in here, and he's kinda preoccupied with them. Unless that thing he's sitting on is one.
  • Precision S Strike: Narrowly averted in episode 7.
    You little s- I almost swore. You little... beast.
  • Running Gag: Mephisto is green, weird, and definitely not the main villain.
    • Sorc doesn't know what Deadeye Zach is, exactly, but notes that while Zach is green, he's not that weird, and definitely not the main villain, because that would be stupid.
  • Sarcasm Mode: The title and description of episode 9.
  • Score Screen: Tracks Puzzle Pieces, Life Crests, Elemental Orbs, excess herbs, the current item in the trading quest, the materials needed for the Valar Shield, the upgrade levels of Flint's sword, shield and elemental rings, the Gauntlet and Combo Lv, and plot coupons. But unlike Alundra's, it's not a plain text list — instead, it has icons of every item in question.
  • She's Got Legs: Sorc constantly mentions Alexia's legs, to the point that he's added it to the drinking game rules.
    • Played for Laughs in episode 9, where Sorc cites the length of Axelya's legs as one of the main pieces of evidence that she's Alexia in disguise.
  • Shout-Out:
    • A pirate uttering "He he he" in episode 9 results in a brief watermark of Hella Jeff. Episode 11 was actually meant to call back to this, as Sorc put faint text saying "SBaHJ.jpg wayermark" on another "He he he he" instance. Unfortunately, it turns out he made it too faint, meaning that compression during rendering caused it to become pretty much completely indiscernible in the final video.note 
    • The term "gold badger", also in episode 9, naturally prompts mention of Hufflepuff. Although Sorc then points out that he himself is actually a Ravenclaw.
    • "Why do I always get the icky jobs?" in episode 22.
  • invokedSquick: Toilets in Toroledo are just holes in the ground, which in itself isn't that bad. Until Sorc points out...
    Also, it's not in the ground, 'cause it was on the upper floor, so how does tha- ewwwwwwwwww.
  • Developers' Foresight: Discussed in episode 9, when Sorc wonders about the hypothetical scenario of not being able to afford a plot-advancing inn stay, and then remembers that there's a piggy bank in the back room of the item shop, most likely precisely because of that scenario.
  • Welcome to Corneria: Indirectly discussed in episode 10.
    And these two are probably like why's this guy running backwards and forwards and why does he look so much like Flint and why are we not doing anything about it... Except they're NPCs; they don't have thought processes.

    Antichamber 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    ARK: Survival Evolved 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Bastion 
Let the delicious narrative voice wash over you.
— Description on the series playlist.

Sort of a sequel/prequel/sidequel/callback series to Transistor, really. This series consists of 22 episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • April Fools' Day: Episode 20 starts out with Sorc playing Transistor but still acting like he's playing Bastion.
  • Call-Back:
    • The thumbnail for the first episode of New Game Plus is identical to that of the first episode, other than the episode number.
    • Because episode 16 features the cameo of turrets from Portal, the Portal LP's score screen makes an appearance.
    • A remark in episode 17 about trying to explain game mechanics logically is an oblique callback to similar remarks in Alundra episode 35.
  • Painting the Medium: Episode 20 reverts to Bastion via a ton of video effects and a test card screen.
  • Score Screen: Doesn't normally have one, but the "Turrets neutralised" one from the Portal LP makes a cameo appearance in episode 16.
  • The Teaser: Episodes 2, 6, and 17 feature episode highlight clips before the intro.

    Bioshock Infinite 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Braid 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Captive Minecraft 
im trapped in an achievement factory please send help
— Description on the series playlist.

When problems emerged with playing the Modsauce pack, Sorc was unable to record a second episode in time for the designated slot. TheFarlanders' Captive Minecraft challenge map was used as a gap filler, lasting for as many weeks as necessary until Modsauce started working. Which turned out to be one week. As such, the series has only one episode; however, Sorc does plan to probably bring it back sometime in the future, along with Captive Minecrafts II and III.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Captive Minecraft IV 
My only achievements in life.
— Description on the series playlist.

Following the release of Captive Minecraft IV, and with some lingering disappointment at how his original Captive Minecraft series went, Sorc decided to play the new map, making it his Wednesday slot series.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    The Climb 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    ClusterTruck 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: After the umpteenth failed attempt at the final boss in episode 7, Sorc stages a Rage Quit.
    "Are you ser... ah... jh... no... no. No. That's it. Nope."
    [voice getting fainter] "That's it. Had enough. Nope. Done."
    [door opens]
    [door slams, video cuts to black]
    Caption: TRUCK THIS SHIP
    Cue outro

    The Consuming Shadow 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Crash Bandicoot 2 
Long intended since the Warped series. A Friday slot LP.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Crash Bandicoot Warped 
Unquestionably the best game in the "time-travelling platforming marsupials" genre.
— Description on the series playlist.

After concluding Surgeon Simulator 2013 for the second time, Sorc had chosen the next game to be a side LP. Not wanting to stop Alundra, nor wait until it ended, Sorc decided to keep the Wednesday slot as being a different series to the Sunday slot, formally making his schedule a four-series rota... although that rota broke down almost immediately after the Warped LP began, due to the Minecraft hiatus. Go figure.

The series is concluded, and consists of fifteen episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • 105% Completion: The first time Sorc has ever achieved it, in fact.
  • Art Evolution: Due to being an active series during the changes, the improvements to video quality are quite apparent in this LP. Episodes up to 12 have frame resampling, meaning motion in particular is not very crisp. Episode 13 does away with that, as well as upgrading to 60fps. Episode 14 marks the further advancement from 720p to 1080p resolution.
  • Failure Montage: The end of episode 8, which is condensed down to a montage due to its sheer length as Sorc dies a total of eighteen times in a span of two and a half minutes.note 
  • invokedGenius Bonus: Episode 8's title for those who know anything about gemstones, and episode 13's, for anyone who knows the name of the shape time trial relics take.
  • High Resolution Echoes: Opens episode 14 by announcing the upgrade to recording in ten-eighteeee peeeeeee.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: The title of episode 13. Also doubles (triples?) as both a shoutout and a bit of a genius bonus.
  • More Dakka: While it could be argued that he doesn't use it enough (i.e. literally every possible opportunity) to qualify for this trope, Sorc certainly uses the bazooka rather more than is strictly necessary.
    • Explicitly invoked in the commentary for episodes 7 and 8.
  • Overly Narrow Superlative: The playlist description.
  • Painting the Medium: After defeating N. Tropy at the end of episode 3, and being told by the antagonists that it would make the Time Twister unstable, Sorc opens episode 4 by dismissing this warning. The episode naturally goes on to contain a few brief segments from previous episodes.
    • The phenomenon goes Up to Eleven in episode 5, containing two cuts from within the episode (one of which gets played back in reverse), one from the previous episode, and one from Crash Bandicoot 2, which Sorc hadn't even LP'd at the time.
      • It would not, in fact, be LP'd until about a year and a half later, with the part of the game in question being covered in an episode that came out more than 600 days after this one. Which then directly references this event.
    • An audio desynch in episode 8, caused by a lag spike, would have been easy to just outright fix as if it had never even been there. But Sorc decided to leave it in and play around with the snap back to aligned sound instead.
    • Episode 9 throws a few new effects into the mix, including a reversed lift journey (but with the footage mirrored so it's still going upwards on the screen), a temporary broken record effect that capitalises on existing repetition to make it less immediately obvious, and, best of all, a double psycheout by inserting a clip of an instance of an inserted clip from an earlier episode. And then there's also an inserted clip of Sorc not dying at one point, just for a change.
    • Episode 10 has a clip from episode 11 in it, and also messes around with a few fun things like making the time trial clock (and only the clock!) run backwards for one segment.
    • Episode 11 brings in the fast-forward effect first seen in the Alundra LP.
    • From episode 12 onwards, there are no clips inserted, but the episodes do have a huge amount of cutting and fast-forwarding. Episodes 13 and 14 do have slow-motion bits, though.
  • Portmanteau: "Terriballs" in episode 2.
  • Precision F-Strike: One occurred in the finale, and Sorc actually intended to leave it in (albeit censor bleeped), purely as a simple but powerful indicator that he'd gotten frustrated enough to cause a lapse in his self-filtering. Unfortunately, he accidentally edited it out, and couldn't be bothered to trawl through the raw recording to find it and put it back in.
  • Rule of Three: Three consecutive deaths almost at the end of episode 7. Lampshaded, of course.
    After the third death: [beat] "Hat trick!"
  • Running Gag: The clip of shooting a chicken with the bazooka gets reused every few episodes.
  • Save Scumming: Averted. Emulator save states are used only as a general precaution at the end of each recording session. Everything else relies on a legitimate save file on the virtual memory card.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Episode 5 (Immortal N. Gin), episode 9 (Gold predator), episode 11 (A sparkling plane) and episode 12 (Infernal entices) each reference one of the books in the Mortal Engines quartet. Sorc even considered using "Infernal entices" for episode 10 instead of 12 so that all four would also be in order, but eventually decided against it.
    • Episode 6, "Cortexy fun".
    • Episode 7's video description refers to the coloured gems as materia, since both come in the same five colours (red, yellow, green, blue and purple). The fact that episode number 7 happens to be the one to which such a joke is applicable is an unintended bonus.
    • In episode 9, Sorc remarks on the episode title with "i am the predator. its me".
    • Episode 13's title is pretty blatant.
    • Episode 14's title references BirgirPall's Surgeon Sim video (and the Surgeon Sim achievement named for it).
  • Stealth Pun:
    • Time-based ones in the description of episode 3, since it's the episode in which N. Tropy is fought.
    • The title of episode 8, "Brilliant cuts", is explained by the description as referring to editing cuts in the video. But the real meaning of the title is that invokedit refers to the gemstone cut of the same name.
  • Special Edition Title: Episode 1 lacks the series title sequence, as it instead shows the entire startup sequence of the game.
  • The Stinger: The running gag clip (see above) makes appearances at the end of episodes 5 and 15.
  • invokedThey Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Essentially his view on post-Warped Crash games, with the line most strongly drawn in the vicinity of Twinsanity.note  He is, however, gracious enough to say that modern Crash isn't bad per se, just that it's not a remotely adequate reflection on the legacy of Naughty Dog Crash.

    Crypt of the Necro Dancer 
Beating a dead corpse. To the beat.
— Description on the series playlist.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Aborted Arc: Decided after a few episodes that, although the game was fun, it wasn't really working as an LP series.

    Cuphead 
This game is the Cuphead of platformers.
— Description on the series playlist.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Lampshade Hanging: The playlist description satirises the fact that Cuphead is commonly called "the Dark Souls of platformers".

    Detached 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Aborted Arc: So far stands incomplete as of episode 7, because hunting for tiny objects floating out in the open wastes of space gets old pretty fast, especially after having already tried and failed over the span of a whole episode. Which is a shame, because aside from that, Sorc loves the game and thinks it's a phenomenal experience.
  • Painting the Medium: The reactor sequence in episode 6. CUE DRAMATIC VISUAL EFFECTS AND MUSIC!
  • Virtual Reality: Is a VR game.

    DLC Quest 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Element4l 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Final Fantasy III 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Running Gag: Ingus is an aloof git. And Refia is a betch.

    FTB Infinity 
Feeding the beast, infinitely.
— Description on the series playlist.

The technically current modded Minecraft series, which began on April 13th, 2015. It lasted for six episodes before losing steam and also falling foul of an upsurge in vanilla due to joining the Sl1pg8r Patreon server, at which point it ceased for almost a year. It was then resumed as of February 22, 2016, but it's pretty much stopped again.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Author Appeal: While FTB Infinity is a public modpack rather than a custom one, Sorc tweaked it by adding a few mods that he really wanted to have.
  • Call-Back: The title of the seventh episode to the title of the first.
  • Gratuitous Greek: Sure, episode 5 could just have been called "Mooshroom spawner"... but where's the fun in that when you can have "Automycobovogenesis" instead? Granted, "bov-" is a Latin root, but still.
  • Just for Pun: Due to the upgrade from FTB Infinity to Infinity Evolved, the revival episode is titled "...and beyond!"
  • Orphaned Series: Basically left hanging after Sorc joined the Sl1pg8r Patreon server and thus dedicated all of his time to vanilla.
    • However, has since been Uncancelled.
    • And then not officially re-cancelled, but has stopped again.
    • The playlist description previously acknowledged the halting of the series, observing that it was ironically short for something called "Infinity".
  • Shout-Out:
    • To Toy Story, obviously, with the first episode being titled "To infinity...". The seventh episode, which is the first to be in Infinity Evolved, completes this by being titled "...and beyond!"
    • Since the series began on the same day as A6A6A5 of Homestuck, Sorc initially used "ACT 6 ACT 6 ACT 5" as the seed. But that was a terrible seed, so he then went with "Caliborn".
  • The Teaser: Episode 5 opens with musings on a hat.

    Goat Simulator 
Goat is love, goat is life.
— Description on the series playlist.

Goat Simulator covered the Monday slot until Minecraft was resumed, after which it became an off-schedule series.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: Pretty much the way the LP operates, given the lack of specific end goals, but there are some particularly notable moments, such as the opening of episode 2.
    I thought I'd give Goat... Thingy... Bay... whatev- ooh, helicopter. Ohhh, helicopter! ...ooh, hello."
  • Blatant Lies: "Why is there glass everywhere? I have nothing to do with this."
  • Funny Background Event: The "chat" in Goat MMO Simulator.
  • Misplaced a Decimal Point: Done deliberately in episode 3. After suggesting a "5000 hours later..." cut, Sorc proceeds to cut to five thousandths of an hour later. Which is eighteen seconds.
    • May also count as a case of Malaproper, since the gag hinges on the similarity of the word.
  • Out of Focus: Sorc decides in the second episode that the solution to the dilemma of needing to bring Minecraft back sooner rather than later, but not wanting to stop Goat Simulator when it's only just out of the gate, is to relegate the latter to being a non-schedule series like Arbitrary Audiosurf.
    • The tragic thing being that there then wasn't another Goat Simulator episode until Sorc started doing episodes for all of his off-schedule series to celebrate 123 subscribers, seven months later.
  • Precision S Strike: In episode 3. Sorc decides to leave it uncensored since he was just quoting the game anyway.
  • The Teaser: Episode 4 has "Blllblllrrrlbrlbrllrlllrrlblrllrlrllblrl"

    Hiveswap 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Easter Egg: One that isn't even in the videos themselves, which you would really have to actively go looking for to have a hope of noticing: the episode numbering in the thumbnails is font size 413.
  • Shout-Out: Obviously, discusses and references Homestuck near-constantly.

    Home Improvisation: Furniture Sandbox 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Virtual Reality: Is a game that can be played in VR.
  • What Were The Developers Thinking?: The VR view is not shared to the screen, which just displays the player's avatar in the normal non-VR view of the game. Which is much less interesting to look at. Sorc is understandably perplexed by this design choice.

    I am Bread 
Sorceror Nobody gets in touch with his edible side. A Friday slot LP. Concluded with 10 episodes as Sorc felt the series had run its course.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Odd Name Out: The entire series, by being titled "Nobody is Bread" rather than "Nobody Plays I am Bread".
  • That Came Out Wrong: In episode 9.
    *executes maneouvre* "Nice."
    *promptly falls onto the floor* "Balls."
    "...that was not a composite statement."

    Infinifactory 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    INSIDE 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    LIMBO 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Little Nightmares 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Men Don't Cry: Defied hard in the final episode. Sorc audibly starts to get choked up when the Kid is turned into a Nome and he realises exactly where the game is going to go with it, and he openly breaks down in tears at the end.
    This is one of the most heartbreaking games I've ever played.

    Minecraft 
Join Sorceror Nobody as he larks about in a 1.8 vanilla Minecraft survival world!
— Description on the season 1 playlist.

A vanilla Minecraft LP, which started upon the release of version 1.8 of the game.

The series reached thirteen episodes, at which point Sorc accidentally destroyed half of his base and went on a total Minecraft hiatus. The series was finally resumed on April 6th, 2015. Furthermore, as of episode 19, Sorc joined Sl1pg8r's Patreon server.

Season 2 began when the server had its world reset and updated to version 1.9.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Added Alliterative Appeal:
    • S1E1, "Surviving Sl1pg8r", is a debatable case, due to the reason it's titled as such.
    • S1E4, "Nether navigation nuisance".
    • S1E5, "Progress, project planning, and preparations".
  • Borrowed Catchphrase: Opens the LP with an imitation of Sl1pg8r's standard intro as part of the homage.
    What is up the world? This is your friendly neighbourhood Sorceror here!
  • Buffy Speak: The season 1 finale, "World go boom".
  • Call-Back:
    • The playlist description is, of course, based on that of the custom modpack series.
    • S1E13's title, "Bad things", to S1E12's, "Good things"
    • S1E21's title, "A monumental undertaking", to S1E6's, "A titanic undertaking".
    • S1E35 starts with the opening of S1E1 before cutting to new content. It also has a near-identical thumbnail.
    • The title of the first part of the season 1 finale, "Surprising Sl1pg8r", echoes that of the first episode, "Surviving Sl1pg8r".
  • invokedCreator Breakdown: Sorc initially intended to take a short break, and only for vanilla, to fix the damage done to his base. Turns out the incident hit harder than he thought, causing him to stop doing Minecraft entirely (including watching videos) for four months.note 
  • invokedCreator Recovery: Seeing that the hiatus was approaching four months, Sorc decided to push himself to resume the series pretty much dead on the four month mark. Slightly to his own surprise, it worked.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: Generally thanks to Modsauce. The most common error is hitting R in an attempt to wield his sword, before remembering that he doesn't have Battlegear in vanilla and his sword is on his hotbar. Also occasionally tries to fly; thankfully, not usually while jumping off a cliff.
  • Funny Background Event: The in-game chat can be this, especially during first person timelapses. For example, in S2E10:
    <tegsirat> hey cornerfire
    <tegsirat> mind if i hit you with my sword until your head falls off?
    <CORNERFIRE> go for it, sorry I am recording so if I don't respond that is why:P
    CORNERFIRE was shot by tegsirat using [teg's might]
    <tegsirat> thanks!
    <tegsirat> :)
    <Sorceror_Nobody> That was not a sword
    <tegsirat> yeah, oops
  • Fun with Homophones: S1E15, "Which farm?", as explained under Incredibly Lame Pun, below.
  • Gratuitous Latin: The naming of tools and armour in season 3. Special mention to the diamond hoe, Meretrix, the name of which intentionally refers to the other kind of hoe.
  • Homage: As stated above, started the series in imitation of Sl1pg8r's standard intro, and used "Sl1pg8r" as the world seed.note  The episode is titled "Surviving Sl1pg8r" both because the world itself can reasonably be named for its seed, and as a reference to Slip's original "Surviving Sliptopia" survival Minecraft LP series.
    • Sorc initially planned to open S1E19 with the same intro due to moving onto Sl1pg8r's Patreon server, but that was scrapped in favour of a narrative scenario for the transition.
  • Interface Screw: Toggles off the head section of his Minecraft skin's second layer in S1E1. Since that part of the layer is his avatar's glasses, the video goes blurry until he toggles it back on.
    • The gag is reused in a later episode to avoid spoiling something another server member is working on.
  • Montage:
    • A ridiculous two montages of building the Iron Titan in S1E6.
    • Partial excavation of the main base in S1E7.
    • Building the pigman xp farm in S1E10.
    • The restoration work in S1E14.
    • The witch farm build in S1E18. Sorc still considers this one of his best montages by far.
    • (More montages in Season 1...)
    • The Sky Limit Amazeballs build in the "BEDROCK TO BALL LIMIT!" bonus video at the end of Season 1.
    • The blaze farm build in S2E2.
    • His base Nether hub in S2E10.
  • My God, What Have I Done?:
    • Managed to accidentally destroy about 90% of his base in the first part of Season 1, leading to the series hiatus.
    • Also accidentally broke the server by uploading a world onto the real server instead of the backup server during S2E11. This one didn't prompt a series hiatus, thankfully; the lack of server episodes for the subsequent two weeks was for unrelated reasons.
  • The Reveal: Sorc spends some time in a couple of episodes near the end of Season 1 talking about a hole that he is digging down to bedrock. He deliberately does not let on where this hole is or what it's for. Until finally, right before the two-episode season finale was recorded, a special timelapse video revealed it to be located in the server's Amazeballs Garden, and that its purpose was for him to build the Sky Limit Amazeballs in.
  • Pun:
    • S1E11, "Clerical errand".
    • The 'trigger' pigman for the xp farm is named "Crash Bandipig". This is both a terrible pun and a shoutout to both Crash Bandicoot and farm inventor TheSnocrash (because the pigman is aggravated using snowballs).
    • S1E15 is called "Which farm?" because he starts it by trying to build a witch farm, then moves to set up a dual witch farm in a different location, and finally ends up doing a slime farm first to get resources for the witch farm.
    • S1E20 is called "Sponge 101" because Sorc gets 101 sponges from his ocean monument.
  • Rule of Cool: Disco swamp. That is all.
  • invokedSeries Hiatus:
    • Four months, from 5/12/14 to 6/4/15.
    • Also a short five week break while building the Fortress for Slip's birthday; the Spectrum adventure map series took place at this time.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Sound-Effect Bleep: In S1E16, when Sorc falls into a dark cave, he manages to stifle a "fffff-", but then lets a curse slip when a skeleton starts shooting him a moment later. So it got bleeped.
    • Several of the bigger collab episodes feature bleeping due to some other members of the server being... not so careful with their language.
  • Special Edition Title: S1E35 incorporates the opening of S1E1 as a callback, which naturally includes the original iteration of the title sequence.
  • The Stinger:
    • S1E17 has Sorc's reaction to nearly falling into lava in the Nether.
    • S1E18 has Sorc killing a Wither skeleton and a ghast.
    • S2E7 features a "super zombie".
  • The Teaser:
    • S1E28 opens with Sorc going slowly insane from sheep exposure.
    • S1E45. Spiders.
    • S2E6 has the part of the pre-dragon speech that was made just as he started recording, before he was ready to begin.
  • 13 Is Unlucky: No prizes for guessing which episode he was recording when he wrecked his base.
  • Time Lapse: Demolishing the ocean monument at the end of S1E21, and building Papyrus at the start of S2E7.
  • Title Sequence: Has gone through four slightly differing iterations for quality upgrades, but is completely unchanged in design from the very first episode.

    Mirror's Edge 
Get ready to hardcore parkour!
— Description on the series playlist.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Genre Savvy: Sorc predicts ahead of time that the murderer is Celeste, and when he is later proven correct, he pops a trophy lampshading what he regards as the complete obviousness of the "twist".
    Sorc: "Can I get a called it?"
    Trophy popup: "Totally called it Correctly predicted the bleeding obvious twist."
    • He also suggested Jacknife could be the murderer, though it was the "too obvious" option. So he wasn't remotely surprised to find out that Jacknife was the one who took Kate from Merc's place at the start of the final chapter, though this one was not something he specifically predicted.
      Sorc: "You. I might have known."
  • Not Me This Time: Sorc generally does cop to deaths that are his own fault for messing up, which means that when one happens due to lag, he is emphatic about blaming the game for it on that occasion.
  • Painting the Medium: Some way into the series, Sorc began awarding himself faux PSN trophies whenever he reached milestones such as fifty total deaths on camera. And occasionally for sillier things like dying due to lag... or finding the secret cow that totally exists in the game, and wasn't just an audio oddity, honest.
  • Say My Name: Sorc tends to get quite exasperated with Faith when she doesn't do something he thinks she ought to, such as make a jump or grab a ledge. Usually meaning she plummets to her death. Which happens rather frequently.
  • Score Screen: Death counters are once again implemented.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The playlist description is a line from Jacksepticeye's I am Bread series.
    • If the name of a trophy isn't simply an Incredibly Lame Pun, it's one of these instead.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: Explicitly invoked as the name of one of the trophies.
  • invokedWhat Could Have Been: Sorc had two trophies planned for the final episode that he sadly fell just barely short of achieving. One was "Score!", which would have been for 20 deaths of the same type in one chapter.note  The other, no specific name planned ahead of time, was for being shot 50 times in total. In addition to this, there are other trophies that Sorc would have done, such as 20 total deaths in one chapter, were it not for the fact that they would have been earned in an episode that came out before Sorc started doing the trophies, causing a continuity issue had he done them in the finale.
    • The tragic thing is that, had Sorc counted deaths that he deemed to "not count" earlier in the series (ones that happened off-camera, or while replaying a chapter after clearing it), he would have met both planned achievements.

    Modded Minecraft 
Join Sorceror Nobody as he larks about in a survival world using his own custom modpack!
— Description on the series playlist.

The first LP on the channel, featuring gameplay in a custom personal Minecraft modpack put together by Sorc, with some additional mods being added in later episodes.

The series is concluded, and consists of one introductory video, thirty-five episodes, two unlisted bonus videos, a three-part retrospective of the series, and a short teaser for Modsauce just to round out the playlist to forty videos.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Added Alliterative Appeal
    • Episode 3, "Planning the Prism".
    • Episode 10, "Remodel the rainbow".
    • Episode 12, "More Mystcraft musings".
    • Episode 23, "A Minecraft miscellany".
  • Arc Number: Built the Brand (which itself invokes the number 13) in episode 13. This was not an intentional invocation of the number, however.
  • Beat: The best example for this series occurs in episode 10, when Sorc enters a Mystcraft age with an incredibly loud eternal thunderstorm.
    Holy... CRAP.
    [beat]
  • Blah Blah Blah: Episode 5 in general probably counts, but one particular segment is a serious offender, and accordingly has a text caption fill the screen with "blah"s.
    Good grief, eighty solid seconds of talking.
  • Borrowed Catchphrase: Nearly slips into Sl1pg8r's standard outro at the end of episode 14, but catches himself doing it.
  • invokedBlooper: Has two (genuine) outtakes at the end of episode 4, where his ghost dragon comes into shot while he is trying to conceal it.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Calls his untidy Applied Energistics ME network the "ME Spaghetti System" due to the cables going all over the place with little organisation. So it's the "M.E.S.S." for short.
  • Marathon Episode: Episode 5, the length of which was the main trigger for Sorc really starting to make an effort to rein in episode lengths. He still has variable success at doing so, but has improved considerably.
  • Montage:
    • Building the Prism in episode 7.
    • Completing the Prism in episode 10.
    • Building the Brand in episode 13.
    • Killing zombies in episode 15.
    • Building the Crockercrop tower in episode 20.
    • Going to the End and fighting the Ender Dragon in episode 25.
    • Building the Brand portal tower in episode 35.
    • The end of the retrospective.
  • The Reveal: Mentions in episode 6 that he has something planned for his dragon. The reveal came much later, in episode 25, where his plan turned out to be that he rode it in the Ender Dragon fight.
  • Reverse Psychology: Played for Laughs in episode 20, where he deliberately aligns a "SUBSCRIBE" subliminal message with a verbal comment about people wanting to stop watching the video.
  • Rule of Cool: Why wouldn't he fight the Ender Dragon from the back of his own mount?
  • Shout-Out
    • Sorc has 413 experience levels in the series introduction video.
    • Episode 6, "Pigmen and chickens and ghasts, oh my!"
    • His "Crockercrop" farm tower is a Homestuck-based pun.
      • The words "LIKE", "SUBSCRIBE" and "COMMENT" flash on screen during the commentary about the name, in the style of the subliminal messages used by the Condesce on B2 Earth.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: After the initial actual building segment, the music for the remainder of the MAC timelapse is really very inapt in how driving and upbeat it is. The retrospective states that this was intentional.
  • Stage Whisper: "I hope you have a great rest of yo' day!" after the fadeout at the end of episode 14. This was prompted by the Borrowed Catchphrase instance described above.
  • The Stinger: Episode 4's bloopers.
  • 13 Is Unlucky: Averted by episode 13, wherein the long-standing aim of finding a suitable Mystcraft age was finally accomplished; the episode is accordingly titled "Lucky thirteen".
  • Time Lapse:
    • Clearing out the caves at the end of episode 1.
    • Travelling to the Rainbow Forest biome in episode 2.
    • The rainbow tree decay timelapse in episode 7.
    • Building his MAC in episode 15.
    • The impromptu mining timelapse in episode 18.
    • The bonus video tied to episode 20.
    • The Wither fight segments in episode 22. Technically timelapses, since the footage is slightly sped up to fit the music.
    • Most of the individual parts of the episode 25 montage are also timelapses for the same reason as the Wither fight. Averted by the associated bonus video, however, which contains the entirety of the Ender Dragon fight footage that the montage is derived from.
  • The Teaser: Episode 35's is all about dat fez.
  • Title Sequence: Got a unique one from episode 25 onwards.
  • Unreadable Disclaimer/UNREADABLYFASTTEXT: At the start of episode 15, a disclaimer about the episode title scrolls up the screen really fast and, of course, thanks the viewer for making the effort to pause and read it.

    Modsauce 
Let's get saucy with modded Minecraft!
— Description on the series playlist.

The replacement to the custom pack modded series, which started shortly after the public release of the official Hermitcraft modpack, "Modsauce".

The series is effectively concluded, and consists of ten episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Mr Shifty 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Nefarious 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Hitbox Dissonance: Sorc's most frequent beef with the game, and a particular frustration in the final boss fight. He considers it the main thing that would take the game from good to great if fixed with a patch.
  • Running Gag/Shout-Out: Every single episode has an allusion to My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, accompanied by a brief image of a character from the show. Every single one. Though some are bigger stretches than others, being shoehorned in retroactively during editing rather than intended during recording. Especially the Owlowiscious one.

    Ori and the Blind Forest 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: Episode 8 stands out for one particular moment.
    "There's the energy cell... SQUIRREL!"
  • Buffy Speak: The description on episode 3.
    Our mission continues to recover the Shiny Ball so we can get into the Big Tree Place to make the Wetness Magic better.
  • Gushing About Video Games You Like: In-universe. While Sorc will frequently be complimentary to games he's enjoyed, this was the first (and, so far, only) game where he planned in advance all the things he intended to comment on, just to make sure he'd remember to say it all during the credits. And he praised just about every aspect of the game.
  • Shout-Out:

    Overwatch 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Call-Back: When Sorc dies in a match as a direct, unambiguous result of server latency in episode 10, the "Blame the game, not the gamer" faux trophy that appeared in episode 9 of Mirror's Edge pops up.
  • Virtual Reality: Sorc "attempts" to play Overwatch in VR as a joke at the start of episode 12.

    Oxygen Not Included 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Please, Don't Touch Anything 3D 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Virtual Reality: Is a VR version of an existing game.
  • What Were The Developers Thinking?: Although in principle an engaging VR experience, there were some issues. Most notable of which was the fact that the player perspective was locked facing backwards for some strange reason, making the game both patchy on tracking and pretty bad for a video, since Sorc had to primarily face away from his computer and, therefore, his Rift sensors and his camera.

    Portal 
|ng with portals! :: Now I'm thinki|
— Description on the series playlist.

Or more accurately, Portal, Portal 2, Thinking with Time Machine, and any other mods that Sorc feels like playing. This LP occupied the Wednesday slot. Technically not concluded, in that Sorc does hope to go back and finish the co-op courses, but that's a logistical issue that as yet remains unsolved.

The episode breakdown is as follows:

  • 1-4: Portal storyline
  • 5-6: Portal advanced test chambers
  • 7-16: Portal 2 storyline
  • 17: Portal 2 co-op
  • 18-19: Thinking with Time Machine
  • 20-29: Portal Stories: Mel
  • 30-37: Portal: Prelude
  • 38: Portal 2 co-op

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Beat: In episode 1, succeeds in grabbing a radio, only for it to hit the emancipation grill that was right below it.
    [radio fizzles] [beat] Okay then.
  • Blatant Lies: Episode 2 has two of them:
    I'm sorry, did I say GLaDOS? I don't know her name yet. Obviously.
    [after very deliberately fizzling two turrets] ...I'm not cruel.
  • Brick Joke: One planned right from the start of the LP, before even the first episode had been recorded. The "Companion cubes euthanised" score first appears in episode 2, and decreases by one at the end of Portal 2, when GLaDOS returns the original companion cube to Chell. Fourteen episodes later.
  • Call-Back: The later episodes of Portal 2 are full of them, especially the final one.
  • Delayed Reaction: Deliberately, of course, in episode 8:
    GLaDOS: "So there's nothing to stop us testing for the rest of your life. After that...who knows? I might take up a hobby. Reanimating the dead, maybe."
    Sorc: "Oh, that sounds co-wait a minute."
  • Even Pungeon Masters Have Standards: Invoked in the video description of episode 12.
  • For Science!: The justification for the deliberately ridiculous number of things kept count of during the LP.
  • invokedFridge Horror: Sorc has a fridge horror moment in episode 8, when for the first time he actually stops to think about why the dual portal gun would be found where it is.
  • It Is Pronounced Tro Pay: In episode 2, Sorc describes the inability to zoom in as strahnge, and then shortly afterwards, puts a kewb on ze bouton.
    • These pronunciations are deliberately reused in episode 9, too.
    • Portal placements are often described as being "hyar" (here) or "nyar" (there), which is a pronunciation habit picked up from ZombieCleo.
  • Kick the Dog: "Companion cubes euthanised: 1"
  • Painting the Medium: The Score Screen is fairly dynamic, often altering itself in response to things that change while it's still on-screen.
    • The first statistic is "Cameras detached", which is accompanied by "Statistics tracked: 1". The latter counter then gets an immediate additional +1 to account for the statistic counting itself.
    • "Transmissions received" are accompanied by the SSTV images the transmissions decode to.
    • Although "Turrets toppled" is the initial turret-related statistic, it self-updates to "Turrets neutralised" in episode 9 when Sorc first destroys a turret with a thermal discouragement beam.
    • "Mentions of cake" plays this for laughs by also counting visual representations of cake. The result is that it attempts to rapidly update to keep up with the flashing images on GLaDOS's screens in episode 4, but it quickly gives up and just displays "???". And then starts counting "???+1" etc.
      • This is then even further lampshaded in episode 10, where Sorc points out that he isn't counting all the turrets being thrown into the incinerator, because he'd just end up losing count, and he did that joke already with the mentions of cake.
      • And then reused in ''Portal: Prelude" when GLaDOS gets switched on, resulting in the deliberately stupid count of "???+???".
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: When he sees the radio perched on the edge of the incinerator in episode 3.
  • Saying Sound Effects Out Loud: "Donk" and "twang" in episode 2.
  • Score Screen: Taken Up to Eleven by tracking over a dozen statistics, including the pointlessly meta "Episodes concluded", "Storylines completed", and... "Statistics tracked".
  • Shout-Out:
    • Two in episode 2. First to Homestuck, when picking up a bucket, and second to Birgirpall's Surgeon Simulator video, with "Put a donk on it".
  • Sound-Effect Bleep: The first one on his channel in episode 2. Also, quite a lot of them in Portal: Prelude (accompanied by blurring the words in the on-screen captioning), especially in episode 33, due to the fact that the NPCs swear quite (or, very, in one case) liberally.
  • The Stinger:
    • Episode 11 repeats GLaDOS's core replacement autotune screaming. Because you can never have enough of that.
    • Episode 16 has "SPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACE!"
    • After the many technical issues that plagued episode 38, the outro is followed by Sorc's post-recording remarks:
    And that ordeal is over... "Portal 2.exe has stopped working." Yaaaay. Feel free. FEEL FREE, I DON'T CARE NOW.
  • invokedTrolling Creator: In episode 9, there is an outro psycheout after Sorc promises not to cut the episode short in precisely that way. Which is immediately made into a double psycheout by cutting back to the game with a needle scratch. The icing on the cake is that, as is usual for the outro, annotations appear over the recent videos with links... but for the psycheout, those links are both Rickrolls.
  • Unreadably Fast Text: "1500 Megawatt Aperture Science Heavy Duty Super-Colliding Super Button" scrolls across the screen in the span of just under two seconds in episode 7. Although it was deliberately done to invoke this trope, it ended up being somewhat more unreadable than Sorc intended. It can still be caught by pausing, though.
  • Unsound Effect: Describing the reset of a turret's laser sight to neutral as a "twang". Not an unsound effect because twang isn't a sound, but because no actual sound is made.
  • invokedWhat Could Have Been: Sorc belatedly decided that he'd have liked to have had some indistinct whispering going on, attributed to the companion cube, in episode 2; unfortunately, he'd already rerendered the video a few times to correct editing oversights, and frankly he could not be bothered by that point to edit around his existing commentary to add such a thing.

    Refunct 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Rock of Ages 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Sairento VR 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Scanner Sombre 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Skyfactory 3 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Sonic Adventure 2 
Watch now for your chance to win a free cannon lizard!
— Description on the series playlist.

The first side LP, started a short time after the custom modpack LP because Sorc felt like it.

The series is concluded, and consists of eleven main episodes and three bonus episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • invokedAnnoying Video-Game Helper: Omachao.
  • Flat "What": Invoked by a large on-screen caption when he outright clips through the road in the episode 9 timelapse.
  • Grammar Nazi: One particular error in the subtitles in episode 7 prompts a replay with a large flashing red text caption.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: A few of the episode titles. Special mention goes to episode 5, "The Blue Bluh", and the deliciously cringeworthy episode 6, "Darker and eggier" for the start of the dark side story.
  • Marathon Episode: The finale is almost exactly an hour long, mostly by happenstance, but partly by intent.
  • invokedMost Annoying Sound: The radar in Knuckles and Rouge's levels. Also, Omachao. Also, the turtle in Dry Lagoon.
  • Score Screen: On-screen death counters on Final Rush, Final Chase, Cannon's Core and the endgame bosses. Totals for all deaths (not just the ones counted on-screen) are given at the end of each story.
    0: That jammy echidna
  • The Stinger: Debatable whether it counts as a stinger, since it's a full five minutes of footage, but after the "official" end of the episode is a bonus clip to demonstrate what happens if time runs out on the FinalHazard fight.
  • Time Lapse: A few, to get through unimportant gameplay. Universally set to E.G.G.M.A.N.
  • Title Sequence: From episode 3 onwards.
  • UNREADABLYFASTTEXT: Serial escalations of the phrase "Famous last words" appear on screen extremely briefly in the finale, referring to Sorc describing the final boss as being less challenging than Biolizard.
    Famous last words.
    Very famous last words.
    The most famous last words of all.

    Sonic Forces 
Sonic Forces me to make the obligatory joke about Sonic forcing me to do something.
— Description on the series playlist.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Incredibly Lame Pun: When Infinite opens the portal to Null Space: "Well, this sucks."
  • Shout-Out: The video description for episode 6 is a play on the lyrics of Infinite's theme.
    When every ring I've grabbed has come and gone, only scores remain of what I've done. But the storyline will carry on — this game persists, I cannot quit, 'cause that's what it takes to beat Infinite!

    Spectrum 
A colourful and quirky CTM map by... kwirky.
— Description on the series playlist.

A Minecraft Complete The Monument map that Sorc played for five episodes while taking a break from the vanilla LP, due to his time on the server being spent on the secret project for Sl1pg8r's birthday.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Subnautica 
Damn nature, you scary.
— Description on the series playlist.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • invokedBlooper: Episode 9 starts with Sorc letting Jack's Septic Tank fill in part of the intro. It ends with a reel of the attempts where it responded with everything but the desired voice clip.
    Sorc: "Hello everyone, and..."
    Septic Tank: "Punch the like button in the face!"
    Sorc: "...well, you can do that, but that's not what I'm going for."
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: Episode 6, Aurora explorealis, a play on aurora borealis.
  • I Regret Nothing: Going out into the dead zone in VR was an entirely necessary experience to include in the series. As was doing it again (not in VR) just to make a point of encountering the maximum of three adult ghost leviathans at once. Totally Worth It, no matter the consequences for cardiac health.
  • Montage: Episode 14 features a "deconstructage" of his seabase.
  • Painting the Medium: Uses his test card in the episode 9 blooper reel.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Episode 9 features the Disease Research Facility and is, somewhat inevitably, titled "Down with the sickness".
    • Episode 11's title is a reference to the SCP Foundation.
    • Appropriately for a game that already references it, the titles of episodes 12 and 13 allude to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
    • Two to My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic: the description of episode 4 is a verse of Pinkie's Smile song, and the title of episode 17 is a play on Winter Wrap-up.
    • Episode 16's title is an obvious play on the Pokémon catchphrase. Heh... catchphrase.
  • The Stinger: The blooper reel at the end of episode 9.
  • Virtual Reality: Has VR capability, which Sorc demonstrates in parts of episodes 1 and 16.

    SUPERHOT 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • The Bus Came Back: The original game only got one episode, as something went wrong with recording the second one, and Sorc never got around to fixing it. After a substantial gap, the series continued with the VR version instead. Then, after another long gap, Sorc decided to finally continue with the original game.
  • Call-Back: In episode five, directly mentions one comment he made in his Mirror's Edge series (about wanting to pick up guns while doing fancy acrobatics), and further calls back to another (about punching guys off buildings).
  • Virtual Reality: Sorc played SUPERHOT VR as well as the base game.

    Surgeon Simulator 
I'm sure nothing can possibly go wrong.
— Description on the series playlist.

The third side LP, started after Transistor concluded, and initially intended to be a breather series, starting in a week of no Minecraft episodes being released; as such, the first seven episodes ran on a one-per-day output rate, as a new channel schedule was being instituted the following week.

The series is concluded, and consists of sixteen episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    The Swapper 
A puzzle-platformer currently occupying the Wednesday slot.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Shout-Out: In episode 2, an NPC saying "Look, it's too late now to apologise." prompts Sorc to put a caption on screen noting that he had to resist the urge to insert a brief clip of a certain music video in response to that line, and only the risk of a Content ID Match stopped him.

    The Talos Principle 
"Philosophical puzzler" is a lot more fun than it might sound!
— Description on the series playlist.

A philosophical puzzler that occupied the Wednesday slot.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Better Than It Sounds: Invoked by the playlist description.
  • Easter Egg: The icon for the QR code counter is a working QR code. It's a Rickroll.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: A minor one in episode 25 after his retaliatory dickishness towards Milton leads inexorably to Sorc being forced to uninstall him – something that he didn't want to do, and immediately regrets.
  • Score Screen: Deaths experienced, QR codes scanned, terminals accessed, mentions of the tower, stars located and collected, philosophical questions, epitaphs found, and mines detonated. The VR series adds "VR breaks".
  • invokedSeries Hiatus: For nine months after episodes 18, due to puzzle fatigue. And then picked back up with considerable gusto from 19 to 26, where the main game storyline was concluded and the main game series ended. A further hiatus ensued until Sorc got the VR version of the game and began the Road to Gehenna DLC.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: Averted. Sorc declines to restore a backup in order to undo his uninstallation of Milton, not out of a lack of regret, but instead arguably as a punishment to himself.
    I know, I could restore a backup, and go back before I uninstalled him, and not do it, but... I think I need to live with what I did.
  • Shout-Out: The title of episode 9 to a level in Crash Bandicoot Warped.
  • Space Whale Aesop: A touch of Black Comedy after the above My God, What Have I Done?. It Makes Sense in Context, mind you.
    Moral of this episode: don't be an ass to someone just because you can. You might end up being forced to uninstall them, and regret it.
  • The Stinger: Episode 5, due to the fact that the game footage spectacularly failed to record, has the audio of the moment when Sorc found out.
    That's been recording, right...? *clicking* Ffffff-
  • Take That!: In episode 26.
    ELOHIM: "I know you seek the truth. But if you stay, we can make our own truth."
    Sorc: "That's not how truth works. No matter how much the Trump administration might want it to."
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: Pretty much the entire theme of the game, but brought into focus by Sorc himself at the end of the game, where it's clear that he basically regards uninstalling Milton as having murdered him.
    This is the "Take it with you"... but I can't, because I kil-
  • Virtual Reality: Aside from the whole game being set inside a virtual reality, Sorc tackles the Road to Gehenna DLC in the VR version of the game.

    Thumper 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    TO THE TOP 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

    Transistor 
Begin Playlist(); plan Episode() x 15; execute Playlist()
— Description on the series playlist.

The second side LP, started shortly after the conclusion of Sonic Adventure 2.

The series is concluded, and consists of one failed attempt at the opening episode ("Episode 0") and fourteen proper episodes.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Animation Bump: The intro and outro sequence from this series are still Sorc's personal favourites compared to his other LP intros. Not so much for quality, but for artistry.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: Virtually all of the episode titles. Episode 8, "Spinal Tap()", is the most glorious by far.
  • Theme Naming: The title of every episode (bar 0) is a pun on the game's combat abilities, and the playlist description also invokes the combat function structure.
  • Title Sequence: From episode 4 onwards. As noted above, still Sorc's personal favourite.

    Windlands 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • invokedThat One Level: The Sky Challenge. Sorc subsequently completed it in VR instead.
  • Virtual Reality: The final two episodes were Sorc's first VR videos.

    The Witness 

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

Other videos

    Arbitrary Audiosurf 
Let's chill out and surf some sweet tunes.
— Description on the series playlist.

Sorc does not really consider this series to be an LP per se, and does not refer to instalments of it as "episodes". It does not count towards his LP episode total.

This series provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Added Alliterative Appeal: The series name.
  • Arc Number: "Shiny Tech" is the music used for Sorc's channel trailer, as well as the standard outro segment to all of his LPs as of the March 2015 schedule. This makes it arguably the "representative surf" for the channel itself, and Sorc therefore chose to make it number 13 in the series. He also released it on the 26th of the month.note 
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: It's Audiosurf, and the videos are released on no particular schedule. Though that's not to say what track is surfed is arbitrary, as it rarely is. Of the first ten episodes, only episode 9 is totally random (even retroactively speaking), because Sorc just picked a fairly intense song to surf to test rendering settings, and then decided there was no sense in wasting the rendered video.
  • Foreshadowing: Some surfed tracks are used as representation of Sorc's LPs, such as "Live and Learn" for Sonic Adventure 2. So if a game-related track is surfed, but Sorc hasn't done an LP for that game already, be suspicious.
  • Marathon Instalment: #15 is this. At 42:32 long, it's about eight times as long as the average length of an Arbitrary Audiosurf video, and three times as long as even the longest "normal" one, Cascade.
  • Off-Model: The third video came out somewhat poorly, due to it being only the second video Sorc had edited and rendered using Sony Vegas, and at a different aspect ratio (4:3) to his other videos (16:9). As a result, Sorc reverted to using Movie Maker for Audiosurf videos until he pinned down good rendering settings starting with episode 9 (and then rerecorded 8 and 10 for the improved rendering). Quality varies in episodes 1 to 7 anyway, because their release order doesn't correlate much to the order in which they were recorded and rendered.note 
  • Up to Eleven: Sorc normally plays Audiosurf in Mono mode on Casual and occasionally Pro difficulties; channel update videos in particular use Casual surfing for background gameplay. This series, however, is exclusively Ninja Mono.
    • "Channel anthology" videos are done after every third channel update video; these consist of Ninja Mono resurfs of the three tracks used in those updates. "Descend" (used in the fourth channel update) is an exception to this, however, as it had a video to itself.
    • While Sorc points out that he generally dislikes Audiosurf's puzzle gameplay modes, he does accept the challenge of playing "The Device Has Been Modified" with the [as-portal] tag, which applies first-person camera and enforces Pointman Pro mode.

    Feral Chaos Solos 
In which I smack Feral Chaos around
— Pertinent part of the description on the Dissidia 012 playlist.

Footage from battles against Feral Chaos in Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy using only one character. An old set of videos that had something of a revival with the release of a new video in March 2016, although that will probably be a one-off.

These videos provide examples of the following tropes:

  • Shout-Out: "Lightning VII" has Sorc quoting Undertale's Sans, complete with the text appearing on screen in Comic Sans font and with the preceding asterisk common to nearly all dialogue in the game.
    * geeettttttt dunked on!!!

    UHC 
Let's put my pitiful survival and combat skills to the test!
— Description on the playlist for the first Sl1pg8r fan server UHC.

Minecraft "Ultra Hardcore" matches.

These videos provide examples of the following tropes:

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