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  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • Tee's line to Lemres after learning what cake is.
      Tee: We don't have a lot of squishy things back in my world.
    • One of Lemres' spells in the English Puyo Puyo Tetris is "Cream Pies". Innocent enough at face value, being a dessert, but considering this is in the same game Schezo is in...
  • Adaptation Displacement: Outside of Japan, the arcade game is displaced by Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine and Kirby's Avalanche, to the point that some perceive the original as a ripoff. For fans of Puyo Puyo, this can cause backlash.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • At least during Compile's run, there are implications that Draco is competitive about beauty because of her own insecurity, either due to being boyish (being called out for this in her Tsu enemy description) or due to being part-dragon. Either way, Sega has closed the door on this by emphasizing her ditzy traits over everything else.
    • Possessed Klug certainly acts the part of a Card-Carrying Villain, but lacks any stated plans beyond restoring his original body and is never implied to have done anything objectionable in his known backstory. This has led some fans to speculate that the demon may not even be truly evil at all, but merely desperate to escape his prison and get his old body back and may be playing evil or been turned evil through mistreatment.
    • Is Ecolo a monster, a creature with Blue and Orange Morality that loves Ringo, or a Yandere that loves Ringo?
    • Klug and Raffina. Are they purely a Jerkass through and through, or do they actually have kinder tendencies and inner conflicts they don't want to admit? Evidence for Raffina from Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary implies that she might have self-esteem issues due to her weak magical abilities. On top of this, some people treat the conflicting relationship between Raffina and Klug as Belligerent Sexual Tension.
    • There is evidence in Compile's runs of Puyo Puyo and Madou Monogatari both that Witch may have a crush on Schezo (fawning over him in Puyolympics, calling him cool and wanting to touch him in Madou Monogatari Saturn). Are their belligerent interactions the result of actual accidental phrasing or is Witch really trying to tell Schezo she likes him but Cannot Spit It Out?
    • Is Sig as indifferent about his anomalies as he often claims to be or his he actually more concerned about them then he let's on? The series provides plenty mixed messages to add fuel for both sites.
    • Many characters introduced in Quest tend to bank on flavor text and descriptions for their characterization, and as such fans tend to give them their own interpretation of who they are. The most recurring one is the characters' relationships to one another, which range from anything from enemies to lovers and anything in between.
    • There's an In-Universe example with Popoi: Amitie takes all of his Prince of Darkness talk at face value, while Raffina - who reaches him way ahead of schedule - concludes that the whole deal is nothing more than Accord messing with her and her classmates. The game never gives a definitive answer, but only one character gets their brains scrambled for their assumption and it isn't Amitie.
    • Schezo goes back and forth on just exactly how evil he is, with some games treating him as a villain or just barely willing to work with Arle and/or Rulue while others treat him as a friendly rival. With a very ambiguous backstory as to how exactly he became the Dark Wizard seen in Madou Monogatari II, there is plenty of room for alternative interpretations, including that he was brainwashed into evil by the previous Dark Wizard or that he was genuinely evil but softened up due to gaining tentative friendships with the other cast members.
  • Americans Hate Tingle:
    • Despite Western releases, the series hasn't really caught on in many western countries due to a combination of Adaptation Displacement caused by Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine and Kirby's Avalanche, and Invisible Advertising for the scant games that didn't suffer from a Dolled-Up Installment treatment. However, with the announcement of Puyo Puyo Tetris getting a western release and SEGA utilizing social media to promote Puyo Puyo receiving positive responses, this has started to become subverted.
      • Notably, the most popular boss in Sonic Mania is a remake of the first Puyo Puyo, in the form of the aforementioned Mean Bean Machine. Yes, even Sonic fans love Puyo Puyo.
    • Ragnus Bishasi is well-liked in Japan, to the point of becoming an Canon Immigrant into the main Puyo games. In the west, he is a Base-Breaking Character, with some very dedicated fans who love him but other people who deride him as a Gary Stu due to his prominence in the convoluted backstory and in the Shin Madou Monogatari novels. There is also a third camp of fans who specifically love his Butt-Monkey incarnation in games like SUN or Minna and dislike or find him boring in Madou Monogatari, where he is played far more straight.
    • Feli is another example of beloved character in Japan (Stalker with a Crush, Elegant Gothic Lolita, etc.) that's very divisive overseas as her quirks are considered less cute and more creepy by the western fandom.
    • Arle/Schezo is pretty much the Puyo ship in Japan and while it does have a loyal following in the west it noticably falls behind its counterparts Amitie/Sig and Ringo/Maguro and has some rather vocal detractors. The most common point made against it is the significant age difference between them, but some also don't enjoy it due to the mostly antagonistic nature of their dynamic or simple preference for other ships.
    • While also perfectly well liked in Japan, Arle/Dark Prince gets this even more; since many western fans consider his canon crush on Arle already creepy as is, thanks to it's obsessive nature and the huge age difference between them, plus all the manipulative stunts Dark Prince pulls in order to trick Arle into liking him. Dark Prince himself tends to get backlash for this reason, but not as severe since he still gets the Draco in Leather Pants treatment.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: Sun Puyos in SUN mode. While popping them powers up chains, they are otherwise as obstructive as Nuisance Puyos.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Masked Prince in Tsu is a worthy True Final Boss. Masked Prince in Box's Scramble mode, on the other hand, is a downgrade from the four (potentially five) Yo~n-rule opponents that precede him.
    • The final match with Ecolo in 7 is also a complete joke and barely any more difficult then a match with a regular opponent.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Pocket Puyo Puyo~n, instead of trying to emulate its console counterpart's...unique gameplay traits, grafted Super Attacks and Yo~n aesthetics to its Game Boy Color predecessor. Said Super Attacks tend to be more offensive in nature instead of pure Comeback Mechanics, and aren't bound to specific characters.
    • Sega's Retool could be considered an attempt to breathe new life into the series following Compile's flooding of the market.
    • There's a minor example in the changes to Fever mode in 20th Anniversary, which involved not only returning to the ruleset version used in the first two Fever games, but also made chaining power in Fever weaker, causing an Unstable Equilibrium.
    • Big Bang mode from Puyo Puyo Tetris can be considered an improved version of 15th and 20th's Endless Fever modes, as matches become significantly shorter — the life bar is, at worst, slowly taking damage if players don't create the same amount of nuisance. Compare it with Endless Fever narrowing down to waiting for one player failing to match puyos, which can take a very long time given the prebuilt Fever chains.
    • BOX can be seen as an attempt to Win Back the Crowd after producing the controversial Yo~n and questionable spin-offs. Not only does it contain arcade faithful ports of of the first two arcade games, but it also contains a surprisingly extensive Quest Mode and a special Rally Mode where you can potentially face any opponent with any rule between the first arcade game and Yo~n. Though it was in vain since it would be the last Puyo Puyo game involving Compile, and also one of the last games Compile produced in general.
    • Tsu, often considered the most iconic entry in the series, has gradually been getting some Western exposure. The Genesis/Megadrive version was released at last on both the American and European Wii Virtual Console, and later on the original Arcade version was released as part of Sega 3D Classics Collection for the 3DS. Neither were altered from the Japanese versions (if to a fault, since the game's text is left untranslated).
    • Bringing Puyo Puyo Tetris to the West unaltered can be seen as this in light of the Cranky Food Friends debacle two years earlier. Also, it's only the second game (Minna being the first one) to have a generally well-regarded localization, coming right after Sega essentially copy-pasted fan wiki information into 3D Puyo 2's manual.
      • Sega announced a balance patch for Puyo Puyo Tetris after the AnimEVO 2017 tournamentnote , presumably in an attempt to combat the memetic level of Fake Balance between Puyo rules and Tetris rules. Unfortunately, the patch was not well-received, as it only nerfed a few of Tetris's overwhelming advantages over Puyo.
      • Arle doesn't use Diacute at all in the English dub, her attack chain having her go 'Want More?' instead of saying Diacute, due possibly in part to the backlash to Fever translating it as 'Diamond Cutie'.
      • For Sonic Mania, there's a partial remake of Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine... as one of the bosses, and it's been adored by the Sonic fanbase for its originality and gameplay.
      • It's this trope for Tetris fans as well, as the localization, including the use of Loophole Abuse to get the game onto platforms that are not part of the TTC-Ubisoft contract, shows that Ubisoft isn't completely invincible in its monopoly over Tetris games. It helps that Sega has a long-standing reputation of quality Tetris games (their first Tetris game in 1988 was a hit in Japanese arcades and influenced many elements of later Tetris games).
    • Prior to the release of Puyo Puyo Champions, the game was commonly criticized for its lacking content compared to past games, causing people to express reluctance to purchase it for its original 1999 yen asking price. SEGA, likely in response to this criticism, heavily discounted the game at launch till late November to only 500 yen. The much more cheap price has won back several people that were on the fence when the game was initially announced. The Western releases have a retail price of 9.99 USD, which is still better than the initial price in Japan.
    • One of the most common complaints from newcomers is the rather high skill floor, particularly compared to Tetris. While Puyo Puyo Tetris does offer a tutorial, it only teaches basic fundamentals and a few simple patterns, with no way to bridge the gap between "I know the basics" and "I can play competitively". A planned update for Champions will introduce a far more extensive tutorial to remedy this.
    • Another winning point for Champions coming to the West is that Western players haven't gotten a pure Puyo game in a while, particularly one that uses the much-vaunted Tsu rules and has netplay; Puyo Tetris lacks segregated rankings for the different play styles and modes, forcing Puyo players to bear the Fake Balance that comes with inevitably fighting Tetris players online unless they use community-run lobbies that agree not to use Tetris. Champions remedies this issue by being strictly a Puyo game with the two most commonly-used rulesets in competitive play.
    • When Puyo Puyo Tetris's PC version was released, it included the option to play using japanese voices while keeping the rest of the game in english. While this by itself already pleased people who weren't satisfied with the english dub, there was some disappointment at the fact the console versions were not updated to include this dual audio option as well. This issue is remedied with the release of Champions, which has dual audio in all english versions.
  • Awesome Art: After all the issues with other Disc Station games having bizarre art, Madou Monogatari: Tower of the Magician, a game created specifically based off of fan polls as a thank you to the fans, has a significant art upgrade, with cute on-model sprite work and cool and varied animations, including idle animations.
    • Yo~n's artstyle has received lots of praise and is one of the few things that even the game's detractors enjoy and wish to see more of.
    • The style from 20th onwards is generally considered the peak of SEGA's art direction for the series, to the point where even people who don't play or enjoy Quest have been known to follow it, simply because of the art for all the characters and their alt designs. With that said, the style used in Fever 2 and 15th, while simpler, is also very visually pleasing, and as the obscure Pachislot has shown, looks especially fantastic when animated.
  • Awesome Music: Here.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Any character that has a particularly annoying voice can invoke this. Since matches can potentially last for hours between skilled players, this can be justified. To put this into perspective, even Draco, despite being an otherwise surprisingly popular character, tends to get criticism for her voice clips being grating. This may also explain why certain characters like the Hohow Bird and the Frankensteins were quickly Put on a Bus after Puyo Puyo Fever 2.
    • Suketoudara. People either find him an amusing Plucky Comic Relief character, or an annoying and useless character. The fact he gets an oddly large amount of exposure in promotions and appearances in games also gives him some Creator's Pet vibes.
    • Raffina. She's still a popular enough character to avert the Put on a Bus problem a lot of characters go through, and as mentioned above in the Alternative Character Interpretation section, some people view her as sympathetic, but there's still a group of people that doesn't like her Jerkass attitude.
    • Ess is easily the most controversial Puyo Puyo Tetris character; some love her, while others can't stand her nasty attitude and treatment of Amitie.
    • Depending on who you ask, Ally is either very endearing because of her upbeat nature and obsession with love, or a flat and one-note character who adds little as a protagonist.
    • Arle herself, at least in the context of Puyo Puyo!! Quest. She has more alternate versions than any other character, which is either fine because she is the original protagonist, or not fine because she doesn't need more when there are other popular characters that either don't have alts or only have a few. The fact she got a gacha campaign focused on her doesn't help matters. Arle's cards also tend to be very overpowered compared to the other cards in a banner set, resulting in accusations of Creator's Pet. It is interesting to note that Amitie and Ringo have more alts than anyone not named Arle, yet don't receive nearly as many complaints.
    • The Puyo Puyo!! Quest characters included in Puyo Puyo Champions are easily the most divisive part of the game. On one hand, people appreciate Quest being acknowledged due to being filled to the brim with some surprisingly popular characters, but on the other hand, them effectively pushing out favorite staples like Lemres, Klug, and Feli also gave them a Replacement Scrappy reception for some. Then there's the third camp who likes the idea, but questions the characters chosen, with the omission of specific characters like Undine or fan favorite series like the Holy Beast Fighters or Sage series being commonly mentioned.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The infamous Schezo beheading scene from the PC-98 port of Madou Monogatari II. The scene never explains how Schezo's head just manages to fight on its own, serves no other purpose but to extend the fight in a bizarre, creepy manner and is not present in any of the other ports, making for a nasty surprise for anybody who played the other versions before this one. No subsequent games ever bring this up either, especially when the series went for a Lighter and Softer approach that would make referencing this really difficult.
  • Broken Base
    • Probably the most recurring one is how Compile and SEGA handle the Puyo Puyo franchise, and which one does it better. This often boils down to how the games are handled, which has the better designed characters, and how the stories and character interactions are handled. This sometimes gets bad to the point where certain fans only stick to one side and it borders on Fanon Discontinuity for the other side.
    • There's a little debate to how much of an issue that the Flanderization of the cast is in the Sega-developed games. This debate especially applies to a portion of the Compile-created characters such as Schezo, Rulue, Dark Prince, and Draco, but also extends to some of the Fever characters such as Amitie and Sig. Either it's a big deal and a waste of their potential characterization, or the change in characterization is overblown and the characters are roughly as "rounded" as they have been since they were introduced. Then, of course, there is a third camp that does not care about the story at all and doesn't see any of this as a big deal.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris was seen as something of a Contested Sequel before the localization was announced. The fandom collectively put the debates aside to celebrate the first English-language Puyo Puyo release in more than a decade, but it wouldn't be long before the familiar criticisms resurfaced. The primary issues raised by more seasoned Puyo fans are that fundamental differences between the two puzzle games make the Puyo vs Tetris matchup an exercise in frustration, as well as the fact that Puyo Tetris has a fraction of the modes of 20th (with most of the rulesets that it does include being of dubious quality).
      • Puyo Puyo Tetris getting a dub and apparently no dual audio option, invoking Subbing vs. Dubbing debates. On one side of the argument, people were open to the idea of characters finally getting an English voice and are curious to how they will be interpreted, while the other side didn't like the changes made and thought the Japanese voice acting was better. Then there was the third crowd that didn't care about either argument and were just happy that Puyo Puyo was getting another chance at capturing a western crowd in the first place. This has been somewhat alleviated by the Steam version gaining dual audio.
      • A specific mention goes to Sig's dubbed voice. In the Japanese version, he has a voice actress that gives him a youthful voice, while in the English dub, he's instead voiced by a male that gives him an awkward voice like he's going through puberty. Some people think it makes sense since Sig is implied to be in his early teens, while others hate how jarring Sig sounds with a deeper voice. However, an even more polarizing voice choice was Klug's, which gives him a rather loud nerdy voice. Its obnoxious tone put some people off, but it still has fans due to its Narm Charm factor, specifically from his infamous "You challenging me!?" line.
      • Puyo Puyo Tetris has also reopened the debate about Satan vs. Dark Prince. Either it's a relic of early-90s Moral Guardians and should be removed, or it's a close-enough descriptor of a borderline In Name Only rendition of Satan that won't garner any unwanted controversy outside of the fanbase. Certainly not helped by Sonic Runners leaving the name unchanged.
    • While some of Puyo Puyo Champions localizated names were accepted for the most part (like Seriri becoming the more Western-sounding Serilly), a few of them weren't. It's the case of "Demiserf" (Demon Servant), "Possessed Klug" (Strange Klug) and "Alter Ecolo" (Unusual Ecolo). Either they're completely unnecessary changes that serve nothing but to make characters harder to refer to (as they've held those names for years) or an comprehensible attempt from SEGA to use less Non Indicative Names (latter two) and avoid attention from the Moral Guardians (the former), similar to Satan/Dark Prince.
    • It should probably come to no surprise that Quest's crossover with Osomatsu-san, a series infamous in the West for its..."flavor" of Shipping, is far from universally-loved. This is not helped by the crossover designs themselves, which are disliked by pretty much everyone who's not already a large fan of Osomatsu-san.
    • The 3D visuals of Puyo Puyo Chronicle also have fans split; one side enjoys them and the more lively presentation compared to earlier installments, while others find the usual 2D art more appealing and don't care for the chibi approach to the character models.
    • Exclusive to the western fandom is a persistent one on whether or not age gaps between certain characters are problematic for shipping purposes, usually in reference to Arle/Schezo and Arle/Dark Prince. This in turn causes both ships to become a far more divisive subject in the west than they ever were in Japan. Things become even murkier if you take into account the Shin Madou Monogatari Light Novel timeline and ensuing Cosmic Retcon, as this event ended up creating a whole new reality where everybody is an ageless replica of the original cast (save for Dark Prince).
  • Casual/Competitive Conflict:
    • Not immediately obvious, but a variation of this seems to govern the mindshare surrounding the gameplay rules: Tsu is the "competitive" rule while everything else (but especially Sega-developed rules) plays the role of "casual." Mechanics like Sun Puyo, continuous offset, and Fever/Transformation are fun for players who are indifferent about huge chains but get in the way of more serious players; likewise, more serious players find Tsu's simple, sharp mechanics fun while others find it "vanilla" and Nintendo Hard.
    • As alluded to above, high-level players were not happy with the Fake Balance in Puyo Puyo Tetris. It only got worse when the September 2017 patch not only failed to fix the balance, but also made questionable changes to the game speed in Puyo vs Puyo matches. That hasn't stopped the game from receiving tons of praise from both newcomers and a sizable portion of the pre-existing fanbase.
    • To a lesser extent, there's the importance of gameplay versus the importance of story in Puyo games. Gameplay-first fans tend to take more issue with the series' multiple Scrappy Mechanics and are more likely to stick to playing Tsu, the Anniversaries, and Chronicle. On the other hand, fans who are into the series primarily for the characters and the lore tend to claim that Puyo games are similar enough in quality that the character interactions are what really distinguish them. This came to a head with (what else?) Puyo Puyo Tetris, particularly after the aforementioned patch dropped and a number of top-level players fled for greener pastures. Thankfully, there's a lot of middle ground here that can agree that the characters and story are a major draw and might even be worth enduring gameplay flaws, but do not outright excuse said flaws.
      • The early reaction to Puyo Puyo Champions falls into the exact opposite issue as the other contentious games, as it is being marketed as a budget-priced release existing solely for playing Tsu and Fever rule matches and appears to have dropped fan favorite characters Klug, Lemres, Feli, and Ecolo for Puyo Puyo!! Quest characters. Gameplay-first fans are happy to be free from Tetris's borderline Gameplay Derailment and even to be able to play Fever rule on PS4/Switch, while story-first fans lament the loss of the aforementioned characters and ultimately think that the game is pointless without a significant single-player mode.
    • Similar to the point above, which characters should be mainstays and whether the 24 character rule imposed by Sega for their rosters is a horrible thing or nothing to get worked up about. Casual fans tend to be attached to their mains and lament the fact that so many characters have been Put on a Bus, while competitive players don't tend to care since the characters themselves don't play all that differently from each other (barring some exceptions such as the Super Attacks in Yo~n and the Fever dropsets) and wish the casuals would stop whining about it.
    • It could argued that the seeds of this trope had been there since the inception of the series, upon comparison of the original arcade versions of the 1992 Puyo Puyo and Tsu. The first arcade game has the cutscenes and wacky characterization that the series has since become known for, but the gameplay very quickly breaks down once players pass a certain skill threshhold. While Tsu is near-universally seen as a massive gameplay improvement, including a new roulette-style single player system, the original arcade version does not have any character interactions and reduces each opponent to a short description. This is the most likely reason why both share First Installment Wins status in Japan and within the series, instead of Tsu completely overshadowing the first arcade game.
  • Character Tiers:
    • The Super Attacks in Yo~n caused huge discrepancy in character tiers (with Arle and Doppelganger Arle being far better than Kikimora and Draco, who are in turn bounds ahead of everyone else), which was part of the reason the game was so maligned when it was first released.
    • Fever and henshin rule gives each character different chain powers and dropsets, leaving room for this. However, the Puyo players most likely to be affected by said tiers are generally playing Tsu rule instead, meaning that very little discussion actually happens.
    • For Fever rules, Arle is a mixed bag. She's limited to pairs only, allowing the pros to efficiently create their massive chains in whatever way they want to build it with less clutter. The drawback to this is that due to her low puyo count, she builds chains slower than larger drop sets and has far less opportunities to offset to get into Fever. On top of that, she has to conform to having two X's on the field, meaning she can't utilize all of the space to build.
    • On the other hand, bigger drop sets can bring in more puyo on the field quickly and thus having material to harass the opponent with small chains, build freestyle chains, or having an easier time getting into fever/henshin. This has the disadvantage of having much more puyo to manage, leading to a lot of unnecessary clutter. Carbuncle, who has the "biggest" drop set in the game, is sometimes considered a Tier-Induced Scrappy because of this.
    • There are also chaining power tiers inside and outside fever/henshin, though those effects are really noticeable when you rack up big chains. Even then, building higher than a 10 in the heat of battle is challenging to attack with, and anything lower is nothing too game-changing.
  • "Common Knowledge": The unfortunate combination of being obscure and having very few localizations led to a ton of this in days past, though thankfully most of these aren't spread as much in the present day. Outside of the Older Than They Think entries listed further down the page...
    • The English arcade game being called an unlicensed bootleg, seemingly based on MAME's first English romset being extracted from a bootleg board, is arguably the biggest case.
    • Draco being a master of kung-fu is an educated guess, sure, but her martial arts discipline (if any) is never explicitly stated. That didn't stop several places from stating it as fact.
    • Some claim that Puyo Puyo Tetris wasn't localized for the Xbox One due to the Ubisoft contract...except that it released simultaneously with the PS4 version in Japan, the latter release requiring Loophole Abuse even in its home country. The most likely reason it didn't get localized is because it's a niche Japanese game on a platform not known to be friendly to niche Japanese games.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • Some people never play anything other than Tsu, and/or Fever, and/or Henshin modes (possibly playing only Arle or Carbuncle due to their drop set in Fever/Henshin). Good luck trying to find someone to play other modes like Excavation.
    • In a sad twist, it seems that most of Puyo Puyo Tetris's online population flat-out refuses to battle Puyo players. Good luck trying to play any online mode that isn't Versus or Swap either way, especially with competitive players. On the other hand, Sega seems well aware that most people play Puyo Puyo for Player Versus Player and Tetris for Marathon, as the Switch version has quick start options on the title screen that drop you straight into those modes.
  • Continuity Lockout: The international versions of Puyo Puyo Tetris is a characterization-based example. Sega made next to no effort to properly introduce (and in the case of some characters, re-introduce) the cast to its new Western audience, making certain portions of the game's script feel like a large In-Joke. Possibly the biggest offender is Ringo's "last adventure" line (which possibly referred to the events of 20th, the likes of which has not been localized).
    Ringo: We just got back from our last adventure! DON'T WE GET A BREAK FROM ALL THE PUYO PUYO!?
    • However, there is the possibility that this may have ended up paying off in the long run, as some have supposedly looked into Ringo's line, resulting in an intrigued many finding out that the aforementioned line was not without some truth to it, with many being quite surprised at Puyo Puyo's extensive history. There's even been some who end up learning about the existence of Madou Monogatari (the RPG series Puyo Puyo spawned from).
  • Critical Research Failure: Sega America has been guilty of this: the N-Gage Puyo Pop uses Mean Bean Machine terms like "beans" for the Puyo and "refugee" for garbage, and an official Sega blog covering 3D Puyo Puyo 2 states multiple times that Mean Bean Machine was derived from Tsu. (It's derived from the first arcade game, not Tsu.)
  • Crosses the Line Twice:
    • Many of Schezo's innuendos, some going as far to imply molestation.
    • Yu & Rei's story in 20th is all about them offering to kill other characters in horrible ways (like trying to electrocute Maguro with a high-voltage power line), as if they were doing them a favor. The morbid aspect of the whole thing is all but forgotten due to Yu's constant ghost puns and overly happy animations.
  • Cut-and-Paste Translation: The English arcade game, and Puzlow Kids by virtue of sharing ending text with it. In addition to inventing the "Black Kingdom" (a group bent on domination at a galactic scale), the translation alternates between keeping the characters roughly the same as their original versions and turning them into Card-Carrying Villains.
  • Designated Hero: Played for Laughs. A fair few matches throughout many games' campaign modes are set off by Arle mocking or bullying a passer-by, angering them into challenging her. Sometimes she's even depicted as a Comedic Sociopath, gleefully beating up the other characters. Meanwhile, several of the other playable characters are even worse.
  • Designated Villain: Dark Prince. He is more or less treated as the series' resident villain, despite not doing anything truly evil ever since the early Madou Monogatari days. Schezo in comparison is far more selfish and power-hungry, and was even behind the darkest scheme in the series yet, but no one really treats his as a potential mastermind for anything nowadays, to the point Arle literally calls for his help in Tetris as if he were a longtime friend or something.
  • Dork Age: Between 1998-2001, due to a combination of Puyo Puyo~n suffering from Sequelitis and Compile desperately trying to Follow the Leader with various fads at the time like Dance Dance Revolution and Pokémon. Some would argue the franchise was starting to show signs of entering a Dork Age with Puyo Puyo SUN having more mixed reception than its arcade predecessors, and the general exploitation of the franchise's popularity with an increasing saturation of games. Perhaps not so coincidentally, these were the years where Sega owned the series yet Compile still had near-complete control.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Ecolo is either an Omnicidal Maniac (7) or Well-Intentioned Extremist (20th) who on at least two occasions induces apocalypse-tier disasters that threatened the universe, and has implications of Crazy Jealous Guy towards Ringo. However, in the fanon, this aspect doesn't come to play, either highlighting his general goofiness or his humanoid "Unusual Ecolo" persona being cute (sometimes with Ringo for Shipping reasons).
    • Schezo and Dark Prince commonly got this treatment back in the Madou Monogatari days, when they were more threatening and clearly villainous. Nowadays, they're more likely to be victims of Ron the Death Eater.
  • Ear Worm:
  • Enjoy the Story, Skip the Game: You read that right; this trope applies to a Falling Blocks game! The cast of characters and the wacky situations that they are put in is a major selling point for some. Sega has definitely caught on, with the traditional games increasingly leveraging single-player and Quest serving as a never-ending stream of new characters.
    • In particular, Puyo Puyo~n is widely considered to have aesthetics that are nice and gameplay that isn't, with individual opinions often coming down to how bad the gameplay is and if the art and story are worth sticking through it.
    • The late Compile era in general, while seen as a Dork Age due to the shameless milking of the franchise's popularity in a desperate bid to save Compile's business, is a gold mine for lore fans who are more than happy to take this trope to its logical conclusion and get the details through videos and summaries instead of playing through every single one of the games.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • The classic examples for the Puyo Puyo series are Draco and Witch, both of which were generic enemies in the Madou Monogatari series, but quickly gained a strong following within the fanbase (Witch was the 3rd most popular character behind Arle and Schezo in Compile's day), enough so that Draco got her own story scenario in SUN and Witch got her own DiscStation title called Comet Summoner and a prominent role and backstory in Tower of the Magician, a game made specifically after Compile asked which characters fans would like to see in a game without Arle (which Schezo and Witch won). Both characters' absence between Fever and 15th was often criticized, enough that their return in 7 was seen as a highlight.
    • Sig is a huge fan favorite, to the point where he is arguably the most popular Fever era character. The sentiment appears to be shared by Sega's staff as well, as he tied with Arle and the Puyos for 2nd place in their 25th Anniversary poll.
    • A countless number of characters from Puyo Puyo!! Quest qualify. Some examples include the Angel Series, Devil Series, Warlock Series, Holy Beast Fighter Series, along with individual characters like Undine. Sometimes invoked if an otherwise minor character gains an alternate card or a series gains a voice set.
    • Doppelganger Arle, despite the sparse appearances in both Madou Monogatari and Puyo Puyo, is a fondly remembered character among fans. This may have to do with her appearance already being based on a popular character, but also the fact she's a rare example of an antagonist taken seriously.
    • Possessed Klug is among the most beloved Fever characters, big reasons for this include him being Sig's Evil Counterpart and the backstory that connects them.
    • The characters exclusive to Tetris are a borderline Germans Love David Hasselhoff case. Since the game itself has a surprising following outside of Japan, this by extension also applies to characters like Tee, O, and Ess.
    • Ocean Prince's human form, Unusual Ecolo, and Black Sig. The former two even tend to get more fanart then their "normal" forms.
  • Even Better Sequel:
    • Puyo Puyo Tsu was a massive improvement over the 1992 Puyo Puyo in terms of gameplay, increasing Puyo Puyo's popularity and viability as a competitive game, while also improving the single-player part of the game, with even more characters.
    • Fever 2 is considered much better than its predecessor, which was a Retool that had the whole Compile era's shoes to fill, so it was contested from the start. The writing, presentation and worldbuilding were vastly improved, the campaign was much expanded upon and characters like Sig, Lemres and Feli became popular enough to become series mainstays.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Pairings involving the 'A Girl' and the 'S Boy' of the same ARS trio (Arle/Schezo, Amitie/Sig, and Andou Ringo/Sasaki Maguro) are always the most popular pairing of their respective eras. This is a lot less dominant in the western fandom, but all three still retain support there as well, especially Amitie/Sig.
    • Schezo/Witch is also really big, thanks to noticeable teasing in canon and a very popular alternative for fans who don't like Arle/Schezo.
    • Sig/Klug, Schezo/Lemres, Sig/Possessed Klug, and Salde/Otomo are all particularly common Yaoi pairings, while the Yuri site strongly gravitates towards Arle/Witch, Arle/Doppelganger Arle, or Ally/Rafisol.
    • Schezo/Lemres and Arle/Sig are by far the most strongly supported ships between a Compile and a SEGA character, which is notable, because most of the commonly seen pairings usually stick to two characters of the same era.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception: Mentioning that a Puyo Puyo game looks like a ripoff of one of its Dolled Up Installments will make for some very unhappy Puyo fans.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • For a very long time, the Puyo Puyo fandom took out much of its frustration regarding the series's minimal western presence on the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, feeling that Sega America is overly-obsessed with Sonic at the expense of their other properties. It also dipped into Fan Hating, with Puyo fans accusing Sonic fans of believing that It's All About Them. While Mean Bean Machine is still a sore spot, the combination of the localizations of Puyo Puyo Tetris and Puyo Puyo Champions, Puyo Puyo being referenced in Sonic games (most notably a boss battle in Sonic Mania that requires the player to win a Puyo match), and Sega's increasing willingness to use Puyo Puyo for crossovers has led to this cooling down quite a bit.
    • Thanks to a swath of Puyo Tetris fans complaining about Puyo Champions not having Tetris, Puyo Puyo fans have issues with Tetris fans due to missing the entire point of Champions.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot:
    • Red Amitie and Dark (Black) Sig (their alternate forms from 20th Anniversary) are often understood to be destined enemies, presumably in a future where Sig gets fully possessed by his demon ancestor and Amitie obtains power from the people who were responsible for sealing said ancestor (usually through her hat). In any case, it's a common plot in angsty Sig x Amitie stories, where one side tends to tragically die and the other ends up despairing as a result.
    • Doppelganger Arle returning and getting to find redemption is a very popular plot among fans who want a Happy Ending for Doppel and frequently used as a vehicle for Shipping her with any character of choice.
    • No thanks to all the disturbing content found in the original Madou Monogatari games, the series is a huge source of Dark Fics. Those almost always star Schezo dealing with or succumbing further to the corruption of the Rune Lord, and often feature Arle as a Hero Antagonist. And, well, let's just say things tend to get real ugly for both characters...
    • A more lighthearted version of this involves Klug actually befriending the demon living in his book (in his little red form, which Klug strangely ignores in the games), with said demon becoming a sort of mentor or parental figure to Klug.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • Characters besides Klug getting possessed by the demon is a fairly popular subject for fan art. Possessed Sig is a obvious example, but there are plenty others out there, such as Possessed Witch or Possessed Tee.
    • As noted in One-Scene Wonder, some people enjoy coming up with Mini and Mega forms for characters not present in 7, such as Lidelle, Accord or Witch.
    • How and why Yu and Rei died? There are hints this was a tragic affair, but it's never further elaborated in the games proper since it would be a massive case of Mood Whiplash involving dead children.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • Even if it's not widely seen as a bootleg anymore, the English arcade game is still barely acknowledged even by diehard fans. It's seen as laden with Narm and unnecesary Dub Name Changes, and it doesn't help that a common theory is that it was soft-launched, flopped, and led to Mean Bean Machine. In fairness, this didn't stop fans from celebrating its inclusion in Sega AGES Puyo Puyo.
    • "Dark Prince", perhaps not-so-coincidentially having its origins in the aforementioned arcade game, is a name change utterly despised by a large number of pre-Tetris fans. This goes so far as to see blatantly-Woolsey'd lines in Puyo Puyo Tetris attributed to "Satan" instead of Dark Prince. For reference, the only other name changes that even reach Broken Base territory are in Champions, and the fandom is otherwise incredibly receptive to changes in localization. The most likely motive comes down to sticking it to Sega's attempt at Bowdlerization, regardless of how much of a borderline In Name Only rendition of Satan that the Puyo Puyo character is. The exception is "Onesie Prince", which is seen as hilariously fitting even by those that generally reject the Dark Prince rename.
    • The Canon Welded timeline from Shin Madou Monogatari was largely dismissed by the early fanbase for being out of place for a lighthearted puzzle series. In the late 2010s, after multiple Newbie Booms, it "evolved" into base-breaker status. Some find it an interesting change of pace, love that it completely changes how Doppleganger Arle is viewed, and enjoy having a sense of continuity between series; others still find it ridiculous that a game about matching blobs needs that level of serious writing, and claim that it's trying too hard to connect a series that is just fine having mostly Negative Continuity.
  • First Installment Wins: The 16-bit arcade games are the most influential games in the series, with Tsu being the "definitive" Puyo Puyo rule (cemented by Puyo Puyo Tetris choosing Tsu rule to represent the series) and the first arcade game being heavily referenced through its music and characters. This does not carry over to the western Puyo fandom, however, for likely obvious reasons; some even find Sega's cast and aesthetics to be a case of More Popular Replacement.
    • Any collaboration with an outside property will likely reference Arle, Carbuncle, and/or slightly less popular Compile characters like Dark Prince and Suketoudara over Sega's cast, though this is slowly being evened out as Sega becomes more open with using the Puyo series in crossovers.
    • If Puyo Puyo!! Quest and Puyo Puyo Chronicle are any indication, Arle is slowly but surely regaining the spotlight from Amitie and Ringo within the series as well. She has more alternate versions than any other character in Quest (even having multiple alternates of her alternates), and is the primary protagonist in Chronicle.
    • An internal poll conducted by Sega staff and published in the 25th Anniversary Book has nearly all of the major Compile-era characters capturing at least 1% of the votenote , with Carbuncle being the undisputed winner. Meanwhile, the newer entries are only represented by Sig, Ringo, Yu & Rei (!!), Paprisu (!!!), and Amitie.
    • Unlike most characters, Draco's AI in the Compile-era vastly varied between games. When it came time for Draco to return to the series, Sega went with her original AI.
    • It wasn't until Puyo Puyo Chronicle that Sega included Compile characters newer than the first arcade game in a traditional, post-Retool Puyo Puyo title, and even then, not only are they only playable in Skill Battle mode, but there’s only two of them.
    • Puyo Puyo Champions trims the Primp and Suzuran cast down to bare essentials while not only retaining every single Compile-era character from Tetris, but also making the aforementioned Skill Battle-exclusive characters from Chronicle fully playable.
    • This even extends to Madou Monogatari, with the vast majority of the characters carried over into Puyo Puyo coming from 1-2-3. In particular, ARS doesn't have a single debuting character make the roster of a mainline Puyo game, the closest being Succubus having a blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo in Pocket Puyo Puyo~n. Going even further, Madou Monogatari I received more remakes than II and III, being the only game of the trilogy to be ported to the Mega Drive and PC-Engine CD.
  • Foe Yay Shipping:
    • A possible reason for the massive popularity of Arle/Schezo, since their interactions and fight in Madou Monogatari II are considered the series' Signature Scenes, with Schezo's interest on Arle's magic being easy to misconstrue as Freudian Slips both in and out-of-universe. Arle/Dark Prince and Ringo/Ecolo may count as this too, since neither girl reciprocate their respective antagonist's feelings.
    • The basis of Sig/Possessed Klug, since the latter wants the former's body very much, as Schezo would put it.
    • Klug/Raffina has a respectable following, in spite (or maybe because) of them being at each other's throats most of the time.
  • Franchise Original Sin:
    • The fact that 3 Game Gear Nazo Puyo titles were released within a year and a week should've been an early warning that Compile was going to milk the cow for all that it was worth.
    • As mentioned under Dork Age, Compile's last years with the franchise were spent chasing popular gaming trends. The series was founded on the premise of adding Madou Monogatari characters to a Tetris-type game. The difference is that this approach was novel in the early 90s, given that puzzle games up to that point generally didn't have much in the way of aesthetics.
    • The move to mostly humanoid, non-mythological characters started as far back as Sun, where every single "new" character was at least partially humanoid and only one (Kikimora) was based on mythology. The complaints arguably started around when Puyo Puyo 7 was released and the more oddball characters were starting to be demoted from the series, causing some people to accuse SEGA of catering too much to the "school kids" archetype.
    • Speaking of Sun, Sun Puyo were arguably the series's first Scrappy Mechanic. Not as many fans take issue with Sun as they do with Yo~n because the former still holds up for fast, casual play. One could even argue that Sun Puyo were predated by Point Puyo in Tsu, the difference being that Point Puyo are significantly less obstructive and locked behind the rarely-used Rule Henka option.
      • As Sun Puyo placement overrides Garbage Puyo placement for one "turn," Sun has a primitive, janky version of "continuous offset." Said offset quirk is better known for helping to create the lengthy deadlocks that Fever rule and its derivatives are known for.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Yo~n is rife with my game-breaking super attacks. Compile's attempt to balance the moves by way of unique starting levels and charge rates completely falls flat, as many of the faster-charging powers are situational at absolute best. The rule fares marginally better in Box; it comes with moves more akin to its Pocket cousin, but it has the drawback of applying the infamous slow and floaty physics.
      • In the console version, Arle's and Doppelganger Arle's super attacks block your Nuisance Puyo from falling for 15 and 30 seconds, respectively. Kikimora's attack completely gets rid of Nuisance Puyo, with Draco's doing the same if a Nuisance Puyo is the highest-placed Puyo on the field.
      • In Pocket Puyo Puyo~n, Arle's barrier might actually be more broken: the time is much shorter, but it actually "clears" Nuisance Puyo instead of simply holding them off. In addition, Skeleton T's and Panotty's powers lock rotation and manual drop respectively, and Dragon can turn all of the opponent's Nuisance Puyo into Hard Puyo.
      • Kikimora's special attack in Pocket Puyo Puyo ~n removes a chunk of your Puyo stack and gives it to the opponent. This means you can barrage them with nuisance for free, whenever you want.
      • Box's super attacks include Kikimora's console attack, Dragon's GBC attack, nerfed versions of Arle's and Doppelganger Arle's barriers, and a new power that erases everything above the player's fourth-from-bottom row.
    • The Fever mode, from, well, Puyo Puyo Fever, is this at least part of the time. Being defensive by offsetting your opponent's Nuisance Puyo eventually leads to you going into Fever mode and results in either you making a devastating series of counterattacks, or if your opponent is skilled enough, them going into Fever as well and prolonging the match quite a bit.
    • The Transformation mode in 7, giving up between 22 and 99 seconds of invulnerability letting you build a noticeable amount of nuisance quickly and with no hurry. It is supposed to be balanced through its very low chaining power, but given how much time one has, how powerful Mega can be at harassing, and that the Mini preset chains in even numbers and its length increases by at least two (e.g. if you extend an 8-length chain to 9, you'd get a 12-length chain afterwards), it becomes overwhelming. This is especially noticeable in Endless Battle, where if you have enough time and a 99 chain in Mega mode, you can One-Hit Kill dozens of opponents before time runs out.
    • The as-of-yet unnamed Puyo Fest Magic School series (as of the time of this writing comprised of Dark Sig, Red Amitie and Gallant Lidelle) are often considered to be the most overpowered characters in Quest thanks to their Skills. They have a variation of the Sage Series's Leader Skill (increases Attack based on how many different colours are in the second to five members of the deck and in the hiree card) that also increases HP (so that they do not become Glass Cannons), and their Active Skills are not slouches either (increases Attack for one turn, based on how many colours are in the first five members of the deck and in the hiree card, to a limit of 3.5x). With both skills alone, you can get an Attack boost of 6.5x... which stack with everything else that may be active, such as Prism Balls, which grants damage based on the card's Attack stat multiplied when cleared; combination boosts; a Sage/Red Amitie/Dark Sig/Onesie Prince/Vigorous Draco hiree, etc. With a merely decent deck you can rack up millions of damage, and have mass attack skills that hit on the range of 500,000 damage without even trying.
  • Gameplay Derailment:
    • The lack of any defensive mechanics in the first arcade game and its predecessors means that matches between two moderately-skilled players break down into tests to see who can build the fastest 5-chain and/or who can keep their currently-controlled pair off of the ground the longest; the latter is generally accomplished by mashing the rotation button as quickly as humanly possible.
    • Fever deadlocks qualify, as well. Fever mode mostly consists of watching giant preset chains pop, the only diversion being to add an extra chain or two onto the normal preset chains.
  • Gateway Series: In the West, Puyo Puyo Tetris does has its share of players who only ever play Tetris due to being intimidated by Puyo's comparatively complex learning curve, but it did inspire a wave of new Puyo players, with the localization of Champions reinforcing the hype amongst those who want to get more involved with Puyo, especially those sick of getting rolled over by Tetris players in Puyo Tetris.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris is surprisingly a popular import title, despite Puyo Puyo having very little presence among the western audience. According to an interview with Red Bull 5G and the producer, Hosoyamada Mizuki, the demand has certainly not gone unnoticed, and was actually the reaction they wanted.
    • Competitive Puyo Puyo has a cult following with the French, to the point where Puyo Puyo simulations like Puyo Puyo Vs. and forums have dedicated sections for French players.
    • Dapper Bones has a surprisingly noticeable western fandom, who mourn his continued absence from the series, aside from Quest. In Japan, Oshare does fare better then most non-humanoids, but still tends to get less attention then even many of the least prominent human characters.
    • Ringo/Tee is a very popular ship with western fans, especially compared to Japan, where it tends to be overshadowed by Ringo/Maguro, Ringo/Ecolo or even Ringo/Sig. Puyo Puyo Tetris getting localized and leading to a lot of new fans, who were introduced to Ringo alongside Tee and their Ship Tease, likely helped a lot.
  • Girl-Show Ghetto: Presumably the reason why SEGA and Nintendo wanted the first arcade game Dolled-Up for an American/European release. Notably, Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine being based on an American cartoon, while Kirby's Avalanche has a noticeable amount of American Kirby Is Hardcore both for advertisements and in-game. This may of also contributed to how Puyo Puyo rarely made cameos and crossovers with other SEGA properties despite being a rare example of a long running SEGA franchise, and why the games suffer from a lack of advertisement outside of Japan.
  • Good Bad Bugs: In almost every Arcade/Mega Drive version of the first game (including Mean Bean Machine!), holding left or right on a CPU player's joystick/D-Pad disables their ability to manual drop. Sega released an alternate arcade board that eliminates this bug, but it apparently came too late for the English or console versions to inherit the fix.
    • Arle no Roux allows players to skip Minotauros and Rulue by finding an invisible tile that triggers Dark Prince's puzzles.
    • Sometimes, the automatic drop speed becomes so fast that holding down on the D-Pad/Joystick actually slows your pieces down.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • Puyo Puyo was originally a pretty straightforward clone of Tetris, where the goal was to simply get the highest score. The first arcade game was when the series started to gain an identity for itself with its focus on multiplayer and character casting, while the sequel perfected the formula and showed the hidden potential of high skill play.
    • For a while, SEGA's handling of the Puyo Puyo brand was rather lacking. There were straightforward ports of Puyo Puyo Tsu on the Neo Geo Pocket Color and WonderSwan, a really bad version of Puyo Puyo on the N Gage, and an original game on the Gameboy Advance that blatantly tried to copy Compile. Puyo Puyo Fever was when the SEGA-era titles started to gain an identity with its new setting, artstyle, and gameplay mechanics.
    • Localization-wise, Puyo Puyo games have had a history of having shoddy work done on them, with the exception of Puyo Pop on GBA. This includes spelling mistakes, translation oversights, inconsistent names, and lousy voice acting. Puyo Puyo Tetris is a HUGE leap in quality in this regard, even making clever improvements in some areas.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Puyo Puyo shifting focus on multiplayer starting with the first arcade game was due to the rising popularity of Street Fighter II. After the large success of both the first and second Puyo Puyo arcade games, Capcom would create their own Street Fighter/Darkstalkers spin-off called Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo in an attempt to rival Puyo Puyo Tsu in particular, effectively making it a case of Follow the Leader come full circle.
    • Doppel was Put on a Bus after Puyo Puyo~n. The way you defeat her normally is burying her in up to a million Nuisance Puyo, something that she was planning to do to Arle. She didn't come back AT ALL until Puyo Puyo Quest, over a decade later! I guess it took a while for her to recover from her loss...
    • It seems that Puyo Puyo is not above pinching a few ideas from its imitators. In particular, Ice Blocks rule is a blend of Taisen Puzzle Dama and Puzzle Fighter, and characters transforming during Limit Breaks in 7 was done a full decade prior by Magical Drop F.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris, considering that Sega published the version of Tetris that popularized arcade puzzle games, which paved the way for Puyo Puyo to eventually become a big hit. There's even a Jinnai Tomonori skit that pokes fun at this long before the crossover was established.
    • On Japan's side, there's several fanart pictures of Ringo with a more sinister and sadistic personality, tagged "Poison Ringo". Then Puyo Quest shells out an actual Poison Ringo, in the form of a Wicked Witch that poses as an apple peddler. A poison apple peddler.
    • One of the light novel titles is "Satan's Space Amusement Park". Hey uh, Dark Prince, Eggman beat you to to the punch on that one.
    • A time ago, Dark Prince had a masked "alter ego" named "Masked Prince". Spring forward to 2017, his English voice actor happens to be Xander Mobus. Who else does he voice? The protagonist of Persona 5. Doubly hilarious considering Satan is a persona you can create and fight with! Looks like our dark prince was a phantom thief a long time ago...
    • In Puyo Tetris, Act 8 involves Witch creating a show called "The Beauty 'N The Beast." A young witch in "Beauty And The Beast", you say?
    • Puyo Puyo!! Quest is a massive departure from traditional Puyo games...but also returns to heavily pulling from real-world mythology, something that had been dropped once Sega took over.
    • In the anime Neon Genesis Evangelion, an episode briefly showed miscellaneous SEGA products such as a SEGA Saturn and different games, one of which is a Lawyer-Friendly Cameo of Puyo Puyo Tsu called "Poyo Poyo II". Fast forward several decades, and Puyo Puyo!! Quest would feature a collaboration between the Puyo Puyo and Evangelion franchises.
    • Harpy was doing "4-wide" stackingnote  before the Puyo Puyo Tetris metanote  made it cool.
    • Kira Buckland was cast as Love Freak Ally in Puyo Puyo Champions, which released in North America and Europe in May 2019. That same month, Kira Buckland voiced another Love Freak protagonist - Arcana Heart's Heart Aino, who was introduced as Downloadable Content into BlazBlue: Cross Tag Battle. Put another way, Ally's so In Love with Love that one game isn't enough to hold it.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Lemres to Schezo in 15th Anniversary.
      Lemres: I appreciate the offer... But I apologize, I just don't swing that way.
    • And then there's Lemres to Dapper in this exchange.
      Oshare: I would be madly in love with you. That is, if hadn't already met someone else before.
      Lemres: Guess someone beat me to you long ago. What a shame. I wanted to meet you while you still had long blonde hair.
    • Klug's admiration for Lemres has become a defining trait of his character. He is obsessed enough with Lemres that one of his lines in Puyo Quest shows he dreams about him ("Hn... Lemres... Ah! Ahem. I-it seems I was a bit half asleep"). He even asked Lemres to lick sugar off his hand in 20th...
    • Thanks to all his Accidental Innuendoes, Schezo's story in Puyo Puyo Tetris makes it sound like he's a Stalker with a Crush on Sig.
      Schezo: I just want to examine him all over!
      Schezo: I just want to ask Sig for his hand!
    • During the aforementioned Schezo story, he encounters the Ocean Prince. His reaction to how adorable the prince is comes off as very homoerotic. Not helping is Schezo squeeing with flowers coming out of his head, similar to how they come out of Dark Prince's head when he talks about Arle.
  • Irony:
    • Puyo Puyo Sun, that game about the oversized sun and the sweltering summer heat? First hit arcades in December 1996, generally one of the coldest months in Japan and much of the Northern Hemisphere.
    • It took the base-shattering Puyo Puyo Tetris for the series to get the exposure that the western fanbase had wanted for so long.
    • And before that, mobile game Puyo Puyo!! Quest created new western Puyo fans...despite mobile gaming largely being to blame for the sentiment among general western gamers that retail puzzle games like Puyo Puyo are Deader Than Disco.
  • It's Hard, So It Sucks!: The high skill floor that's comparable to Fighting Games is pretty much the prevailing complaint about the series by players unfamiliar with it, and contributes to why the majority of online players in Puyo Puyo Tetris are Tetris players, not helped by Tetris having an edge over Puyo at the highest levels. Most players will attempt to make a chain more than two segments long, get frustrated and wonder how anybody can build those beautiful 10-chains without relying on extreme luck, and either quit (if they are playing an exclusively Puyo game) or just switch to Tetris exclusively (if they are playing Puyo Tetris). It's also very difficult to find good beginner guides especially if you don't read Japanese, leaving a great chasm between "I know the basics of the game" and "I can play competitively."
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: Some fans feel this way about the roster selection in more recent games, especially after the Loads and Loads of Characters in Quest. Sega seems adamant on sticking with 24 characters, and there are 17 characters that are considered mainstays.note  That leaves 7 slots to be shared between new characters and only slightly-less recurring characters like Lidelle and Ocean Prince. It should be noted Chronicle did exceed the 24 character "rule"...exclusively for Skill Battle mode.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris is even worse in this regard, having those mainstays be the entire representation for the Puyo cast, with the rest of the characters be the Tetris representatives!
  • Jerkass Woobie: The demon sealed in Klug's book. If Fever 2's backstory is to be believed, he never did anything more than stay in his castle and read books before some cruel humans decided to seal half his soul in a book as part of a prank. He's been in there for hundreds of years, unable to get back to his body. It's no wonder he wants a fight!
    • Rafisol was only even a villain because she was born without any concept of the world around her or just why she was even born and only knew that she was created from dark magic, to the point where she refers to herself as an evil existence. Even after her Heel-Face Turn she is still hinted to not only loath her own existence, but also purposely hide her emotions, because she feels like she doesn't deserve happiness.
    • According to the official Shin Madou Monogatari timeline, Doppelganger Arle is actually the result of Arle's soul being split apart after being greatly damaged following a grueling battle against the Creator of the old Madou world. Dark Prince (after remaking said world, following its destruction) sought out her soul, and only retrieved one half of it, leading the other half to be left behind and wander the void between dimensions alone for hundreds of years. When Dark Prince allows her to return to the Madou world out of pity, she is mistaken for a doppelganger, while Doppelganger Arle in turn mistakes the new Arle for a fraud. She attempts to regain her old life, setting the events of Yo~n into motion, but is ultimately defeated and fades away. It's not much of a stretch to say that Doppelganger Arle may very well be the most tragic character in the whole franchise.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: The Puyo fandom is well aware that most people bought Puyo Puyo Tetris to play the puzzle game that is not named after a slime monster. This phenomenon straddles the line between being a source of nonstop Self-Deprecation humor and being a source of frustration. One news source even stated that it's exclusion in Champions was a downside.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Good grief. With the Loads and Loads of Characters and numerous interactions, this is inevitable.
    • Sig may very well be the fanbase's poster boy for this trope. Amitie, Possessed Klug, Klug, Arle, Lidelle and Raffina are only the tip of the iceberg. He is even shipped with characters he has yet to interact with, like Maguro, Serilly, Doppelganger Arle and Rafisol, Quest characters such as Dalida and Rebecca and on rare occasions even Madou Monogatari exclusives like Rune Lord and Lala. It helps that Sig's demon heritage, shades of being a Clueless Chick Magnet and endearing Hidden Depths leave a lot of room for fans to come up with good scenarios, interactions and commonalities between him and practically everyone else in the series' massive cast.
    • Schezo, with his "I want you!" line being rife with subtext, is currently paired with Arle, Rulue, Witch, Dark Prince, Serilly, Ragnus, Succubus, Incubus, Lemres, and Doppelganger Schezo. You could still count how many ships he has with two hands, but the interactions he has with them easily back why they exist.
    • As the most prominent protagonist in the franchise, Arle naturally falls under this as well. With her pairing choices going all the way from fellow Compile characters Schezo, Dark Prince, Witch, Rulue, or Doppelganger Arle, Madou exclusives such as Camus, Lala or Devil, to SEGA's own characters, led by Sig and Amitie.
    • Despite only making sparse appearances, Doppelganger Arle has found herself paired up with Arle, Dark Prince, Doppelganger Schezo, Schezo, Rulue, Sig, Possessed Klug and Rafisol. Rather impressive, for someone who lacks any on-screen interactions with anyone besides Arle, in all games she appears in.
    • One of the more surprising examples of this would be Klug, since his Insufferable Genius personality plays off well with essentially most of the Fever cast, be it ditzy Amitie (she likes to tease him), Raffina (they're always bickering), Sig (usually involving their mutual connection with Strange Klug), Strange Klug himself, Lemres (who he obsessively admires), Feli (like Raffina, they bicker a lot, but mostly because of Lemres) and even young innocent Lidelle. And we're only talking about the Fever characters here...
  • Les Yay:
    • Witch towards Arle, grabbing hold of her even in her sleep and uttering the following line in SUN. It's even more pronounced in Tottemo! Puyo Puyo, where at one moment Witch tries to drug her tea to get closer to her.
      Witch: I love you so very much!
      Arle: Where are you touching me?! Stop!!
    • And Ms. Accord for Rulue in 15th Anniversary. She straight-up admits Rulue is quite attractive after meeting her.
      Ms. Accord: She's very sexy and quite wonderful.
  • Memetic Badass: Arle. She has beaten up an Owlbear in Madou Monogatari A when she was only 4 years old, climbed up a monster infested tower and successfully beats Mamono/Fudoushi to pass her exam at only 6 years old in Madou Monogatari 1, rips out (not opens) doors and chucks them into space in Puyo Puyo BOX, she battles against Satan himself on a daily basis, can easily beat dozens of opponents and in some cases even mocks them, has a lot of powerful cards in Quest, and all this while still being adorable.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Dark Prince is already a Butt-Monkey in canon due to his failures to marry Arle and his Manchild tendencies, but the fanbase likes to exaggerate it to the point where he's a complete embarrassment to society. In particular, his Onesie Prince and SUN personas tend to be Snark Bait in the community.
    • Ever since her return to the series via Puyo Puyo 7, Draco has gotten this a lot as well, thanks to her pathetic AI and ditzy characterization.
    • While not usually an example of this, Raffina quickly becomes the subject of laughs and jokes at her expense whenever the subject of her damage animation introduced and kept since 15th Anniversary is brought up, thanks to how much more distinct and humiliating it is compared to everyone else's animations. It's infamous enough to spawn a fic dedicated to making fun of it.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Though, exclusive to the western Puyo fandom, Risukuma's been called Pedobear for his attacks (I love you), and...well...the following quote.
      Risukuma: You can touch as much as you want...
    • Schezo gets this reaction. It's because he really doesn't understand how his statements could be taken the wrong way.
  • Memetic Mutation
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris' entire script is full of hilarious & quotable lines. Here are just a few fan favorites.
      • "The time has come for me to clear my reputation... by assaulting this young girl!" explanation 
      • *slightly louder than average screaming*/*screaming loud enough to be heard in the vast vacuum of space* explanation 
      • "I am wounded by your cruel, curel finger pointing!" explanation 
      • "She doesn't play Tetris!?" "He doesn't play Puyo Puyo!?" explanation 
    • "The Tetris player is at a slight disadvantage." explanation 
    • Puyo Puyo is a glorified Candy Crush mod.explanation 
    • Puyo Puyo is a psychological horror gameExplanation 
    • Oof.Explanation 
  • Memetic Psychopath: Ringo as Poison Ringo is characterized as a psycho out to poison people, sometimes for money. Not helped by her Evil Laugh alternate voice in the Japanese version of Puyo Tetris.
  • Moe:
    • Lidelle is a very gentle and sweet girl. So much so it'll make you feel bad for curb-stomping her in Puyo.
    • Nekomimi Schezo of all people is this. Stick cat ears on Schezo, and you have a Dark Wizard who actively denies how much he enjoys wearing them, and has his power boosted the more he feels embarrassed. He even has a perpetual blush at his ★5-6 card ranks!
  • More Popular Spinoff:
    • Puyo Puyo is much more popular than its predecessor Madou Monogatari. Part of the reason may be due to a number of the Madou Monogatari games being limited to Japanese computersnote . This has gone to the point where Madou Monogatari: Big Kindergarten Kids was advertised as a "Puyo Puyo RPG".
    • Puyo Puyo!! Quest has become this during SEGA's run. SEGA's Puyo Puyo games are often budget titles with modest sales, but Puyo Puyo!! Quest is by far one of SEGA's most successful mobile games, raking in millions in revenue, with advertisements, streams, and cross-promotions with other mobile games being centered around Puyo Puyo!! Quest.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris is a mixture of this and Germans Love David Hasselhoff. It was originally intended to be a simple crossover, but it has become so popular it has been ported 8 times on multiple handhelds, home consoles, and even computers. It's also easily the most successful Puyo Puyo title sales-wise in western territories, with the Nintendo Switch version alone raking in a million copies globally and the Steam version quickly becoming a top 5 "wish-list" choice.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • Harpy's voice is very shrill, though it was likely intentional since her terrible singing is part of her character.
    • Matches can dissolve into voice clips constantly repeating themselves after the 7th chain. This is most blatant with high level play on Tsu, which due to the limited voice samples and players being able to play dozens of matches at a given session, means you're going to hear "Bayoen!" and "Uwaaaah!" repeated a lot.
    • Another blatant example is the recurring Non-Stop Fever and Big Bang modes. Take the above mentioned problem of repeated voice clips, and make them come out faster. If playing in a 4 player match, pretty much all of the sound is drowned by every character's voice.
    • Because Puyo Pop Fever taunts can be activated with the DS' microphone, playing the game in a moving vehicle with the sound on is NOT advised. "Youyouyouyouyouyou BETCHA!"
    • Several voices in the English dub of Fever tend to get this reaction from many fans, but no example is as infamous as English Carbuncle and his 'Ta-dah!' speak.
    • Some specific characters receive heat due to their voice clips being obnoxious in their own right. For example, Draco in more recent games is infamous for her rather shrill voice.
    • Pretty much the entirety of the N-Gage Puyo Pop and Haro no Puyo Puyo. The former has an uninspired yet aggravating MIDI track that plays throughout, not to mention that a bizarre audio issue causes the scream that plays when Nuisance Puyos are dropped to sound like a gargle. On the other hand, the latter game has incredibly shrill sound effects and the primary instrumentation for the music ranges from "kind of basic for a late Game Boy Advance game" to 90s-LCD-game-caliber.
      • In a bit of irony, Haro no Puyo Puyo is the one Puyo Puyo game that addresses the repeating voice clip annoyance beyond the ability to mute voices altogether; players have the option to set the chain phrase sequence to loop instead of going back to the 1-chain phrase every time. Alternatively, you can invoke this trope and have Amuro scream "Matilda-saaaaan" with every 1-chain.
    • In Champions, beginner players can expect to get sick of hearing "One!"/"Ichi!" (when you get a 1-chain) very, very quickly if they don't learn how to chain.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The jingle of an All Clear! is one satisfying sound...because you get to send an extra juicy serving of Nuisance Puyo to your opponent!
    • The jingle that plays whenever you win a set in the Sega games, especially after an intense round.
    • When playing as Tetris in Puyo Puyo Tetris, there's the epic sound you get once you score any kind of back-to-back.
  • My Real Daddy: Either Masamitsu Niitani of Compile or Mizuki Hosoyamada of Sega, depending on which side of the Compile-Sega fracture you sit on. Niitani's role in the creation of the series was relatively minimal, while Hosoyamada didn't play a major role until 15th. Both are more recognized than Kazunari Yonemitsu, the man who actually developed the game.

    Tropes N to Z 
  • Narm: The voice acting occasionally dips into this, though in certain cases some find it charming:
    • The PC-98 version of Madou Monogatari 1-2-3, while boasting slightly more traditional monster design and pushing itself as a Darker and Edgier version of the trilogy, still uses goofy voice acting fit for the Super-Deformed MSX2 version.
    • The voice acting in the English arcade game. You can almost taste the indifference in "Silvana's" voice, while the rest of the cast is hammier than their Japanese counterparts. In all fairness, the Japanese version has its own share of off-putting weirdness (like Schezo's squeaky Areiado and Zombie's baby-like "Ugeeee"), just none as omnipresent as Silvana's Dull Surprise.
    • Sun's voice work wasn't terrible, but it is obvious that there weren't many professional voice actors on board. Some of the worst examples were recast between the arcade-perfect Saturn port and the later N64/PSX/PC ports.
  • Narm Charm:
    • One of the arguments against the English dub of Puyo Puyo Tetris is the fact that it (naturally) loses all of the Asian Speekee Engrish, particularly in the case of Suketoudara.
    • While Klug's Puyo Tetris English voice has mixed reception, a handful of players found his character selection line,"YOU CHALLENGING ME!?", to be oddly endearing.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Cranky Food Friends, to the point where it has hit minor Memetic Mutation among SEGA and Puyo Puyo fans that any localized Puyo Puyo game will have all the characters replaced with grouchy food.
    • Dark moments in the PC-98 ports of the original Madou Monogatari trilogy define the entire Madou Monogatari series as far as the majority of the English fanbase is concerned. In particular, it's not a stretch to say that the battle with Schezo's decapitated head in its version of Madou Monogatari II is the most iconic moment in the series for said fanbase. This is despite the mostly-Lighter and Softer Madou Monogatari I receiving the most remakes and reimaginings, as well as the early Puyo Puyo games revisiting the Super-Deformed style of the MSX game.
    • IGN claiming that Tetris is slightly worse than Puyo Puyo in a Puyo vs Tetris match. To be fair to them, a mediocre Puyo Puyo player can easily flatten beginner and even lower-intermediate Tetris players...it's just that Puyo stands no chance against a player who can fully utilize the speed of Tetris.
  • Newer Than They Think: The first game to have 24 characters is 20th Anniversary, meaning that the 24 character "limit" has only been a thing since the 2010s.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The face melting scenes in Madou Monogatari I. Not only is there copious amounts of Body Horror, some versions have either Black Eyes of Evil or worse, no eyes at all!
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Many people claim that Compile sold Puyo Puyo to Sega sometime between 2001-2003. In reality, Compile "loaned" the series to Sega in 1998 with the apparent understanding that they would buy it back once they turned their fortunes around...but never came up with the money. In addition to Sega's name showing up on the title screen of every Puyo Puyo game since then (and being credited for the characters in games that feature them but are not explicitly Puyo games), the NGPC Puyo Pop was ported entirely by Sega and published by SNK.
    • Due to the obscure nature of Discstation games (and the Madou Monogatari games in general, for that matter), many characters that are introduced in them are much more recognized by their first Puyo Puyo appearance. The major example is Sun: Ragnus is the only character out of the five "newcomers" that actually debuted in the game, and even he debuted in a Madou Monogatari novel; the rest come from Daimadou, Strange Story, and/or the Game Gear version of Madou Monogatari III.
    • Witch not having a name is often attributed to Sega's era, but was actually introduced in Madou Monogatari: Tower of the Magician, with the explanation that witches who have yet to pass their examinations are only referred to as "Witch".
    • The first game to give the vast majority of the cast their own story is Haro no Puyo Puyo, beating 15th Anniversary by more than a year. (Haro no Puyo Puyo also has multiple possible scenes per stage in each story, which has yet to be done in a proper Puyo game.)
    • Technically the first game that allowed players to change the skins of Puyo was SUN, not 15th like popularly believed. Specifically the player had the option to change the contrast of the Puyo with 5 presets in the settings.
    • SEGA 3D Classics Collection is not the first time Puyo Puyo Tsu was released in the west. It was predated nearly two decades ago with the release of Puyo Pop on the Neo Geo Pocket and later a release of the Mega Drive version of Puyo Puyo Tsu on the Wii Virtual Console service.
    • Puyo Puyo Chronicles is not the first time the franchise has a RPG mode. Several of the Nazo Puyo games borrow elements of RPGs, while Puyo Puyo BOX had a similar Quest mode. Also technically the series was originally an RPG series with Madou Monogatari before Puyo Puyo eventually overshadowed it. It's also not the first time characters are shown as 3D models, with Puyo Puyo DA! being the first to do so, and there was a manga that depicted Arle and Draco as low polygon models as part of a Shout-Out to Virtua Fighter.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • The Mini and Mega transformations in 7. Transformation might be a Scrappy Mechanic gameplay-wise, but that's not the case art-wise since they are canon depictions of the mostly teenage cast as children and adults respectively, making for easy fanart fodder. Coming up with Mega and Mini forms for characters not featured in 7 is also Fanfic Fuel.
    • Gogotte enjoys a decent following in the Japanese fandom, despite being a minor opponent who only shows up in Fever 2.
  • One True Threesome: Considering the amount of shipping present in the fandom, it's unsurprising that there would be plenty of these out there.
    • Amitie/Sig/Arle is one example, both due to the already existing friendships between the three and the surprising amount of things they have in common. This includes Arle and Amitie's very similar spell themes and both Arle and Sig suffering from Heart Trauma, with their other halves still existing, in the form of Doppelganger Arle and Strange Klug.
    • Some people just go straight for Schezo/Arle/Dark Prince in order to avoid the shipping wars. Others may even include Rulue while at it, since she has fun dynamics with all 3.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy: Not the series proper, but a fangame titled "Magical Stone" is this. It treads the legal gray area for being a free to download and play arcade-perfect clone of Tsu, with the intention of it being brought into eSports territory. Once drama broke out of it being developed with money obtained through Real Money Trade, (a.k.a. dirty money), a snowball effect of dwindling support struck. The short-lived attempt to get it greenlit on Steam was pulled overnight, several top Puyo players that supported the fangame went on hiatus, and development came to a grinding halt. While the western fans didn't mind its shady background and see it as an accessible way to play Puyo online (keep in mind that this was years before Puyo Tetris crossed overseas), Japan is absolutely frigid about it. The trailer for the game even has an overwhelming number of dislikes.
    • Cranky Food Friends would of just been another Puzzles & Dragon clone with generic food as characters, but people quickly caught on that the game was basically a Dolled-Up Installment of Puyo Puyo Quest. Since then the game became notorious both for Puyo Puyo fans and gamers in general for being a cheap imitation and proof that SEGA of America/Europe has no confidence in its own franchises. Not helping that the soft launch was a case of really poor timing, since vice president of SEGA Haruki Satomi stated around the same time that he wanted to improve the company's reputation after feeling fans lost faith. Though not stated, this may of played a role in the game's eventual closure in early 2016, and not even getting a proper release.
  • Polished Port:
    • Puyo Puyo CD for the PC-Engine CD includes full voice acting for cutscenes involving familiar voice talent from the industry at the time, extended cutscenes on the hardest difficulty, and higher quality music thanks to the CD formatting. It's also notably the only port that fixes Rulue's lack of voice clip. Puyo Puyo on the PC-98 is also worth a mention, due to the higher resolution sprites and the addition of a Mission Mode.
    • The Nintendo Switch port of the first arcade game adds counterclockwise rotation from the Mega Drive port and double rotation from Tsu, addressing the two biggest control issues in the original System C-2 version.
    • Every version of Tsu after the Mega Drive version includes more features, such as the return of cutscenes from the first arcade game, full voice acting, a beginner course, Rally Mode, and Mission Mode.
    • The 3DS version of 20th was released later than the other versions, as a result it added extra polish to the game. New animations for characters are made in both the story cutscenes and the matches, and there is an exclusive mode that allows the user to create Puyo skins using the 3DS camera.
    • After the initial ports of Tetris, later ports for Xbox One, Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, and PC would include all of the DLC in the game for free, along with minor changes to the music and artwork, and balance changes between Puyo and Tetris.
  • Porting Disaster:
    • Puyo Puyo for the Game Boy is the most prominent example, arguably being the single worst game in the entire series. This port, farmed out to Winkysoft of early Super Robot Wars fame, is an agonizingly slow, terrible-controlling mess that is essentially unplayable on anything except a Super Game Boy due to lack of color differentiation. (Which, of course, defeats the point of porting it to a handheld in the first place.) It looks even worse next to the Compile-developed Pocket Puyo Puyo Tsu, which manages to be infinitely more playable even in monochrome.
    • Puyo Puyo Tsu CD is a more minor case. The gameplay itself works like intended, but the game has vibes of being an Obvious Beta due to the bizarrely low quality sound effects and music, and lacking certain graphics such as frames of animation and backgrounds during matches. This is especially jarring since its predecessor Puyo Puyo CD is considered a Polished Port.
    • If you count the N-Gage Puyo Pop as a port of the first arcade game (some do, others don't), it belongs here. The gameplay is only slightly better than the aforementioned Game Boy port, only it replaces totally unreadable graphics with painfully-basic MIDI music, truly awful sound effects, and inexplicable ugly recolors of the first arcade game's character portraits. Yes, the N-Gage was a glorified early-2000s cell phone, but surely Sega could've done better than this.
    • The PC version of Puyo Puyo Tetris was released in a sorry state. While the core gameplay still worked fine (when the game wasn't randomly crashing), the game's audio was bugged in just about every way imaginable, there were graphical glitches, and the game's online was inexplicably region-locked which only served to exacerbate the problems listed under Complacent Gaming Syndrome. Thankfully, unlike the above games, these issues were capable of being fixed by patches, which Sega did in short order.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: Haro no Puyo Puyo is an interesting twist. It's not a bad game on its own merits (aside from the game's audio, especially the cringe-inducing chirp associated with moving pieces), but plays notably worse than the other Game Boy Advance Puyo games. It forces five colors like the first arcade game, the controls are stiff, and the entire game feels laggy.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: More like rescued from Americans Hate Tingle, but Rafisol initially caught a lot of heat from western fans, who were disappointed to learn that the final character of Chronicle was an Ally doppelganger, rather than a returning fan favorite villain or something newer, which caused many to decry her as a uninspired Evil Knockoff. This lead a dedicated fan of the character to post a comprehensive write-down of information on Rafisol, allowing fans not versed in Japanese, to learn that she is actually a surprisingly developed character, who pulls a Heel–Face Turn and is conflicted between craving love, while feeling she doesn't deserve it, due to her being a creation of dark magic. This shifted the western view on Rafisol completely, with some now even citing her as a big example of how well SEGA can do with their writing, to the point that she's arguably more well-liked than Ally herself.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • Dark Prince's creepiness and manipulative tendencies are often cranked up to overshadow his genuine love for Arle, as well as the tragic element of Arle being Lilith's reincernation.
    • Schezo in the modern titles can be said to be a case of this as well. He still often attacks people for their powers, but is an overall less antagonistic presence and has become more willing to team up with Arle, to punish Dark Prince.
    • Arle herself may get this from people who would rather ship Schezo or Dark Prince with other characters (or even each other), in which case she becomes far meaner.
  • The Scrappy: Both Puyo Puyo Fever and its sequel have Hoho, Tartar and the Frankensteins, three very unpopular characters that are hated for their obnoxious Verbal Tic and unappealing designs. As a result, after Puyo Puyo Fever 2 those characters were quickly Put on a Bus, and even when they returned in Puyo Puyo Quest their presence is heavily downplayed.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Perhaps this will give the Complacent Gaming Syndrome entry a little perspective...
    • The first Nazo Puyo title on the Game Gear does not give you a hard number on how many pieces you have remaining to solve a puzzle. Instead the game gives you the few pieces that are actually relevant to the puzzle, and then endlessly dumps "dummy" pieces. Since the Nazo Puyo games in general invoke Guide Dang It!, it's very easy to get confused on what pieces are related to the puzzle until it's too late. Thankfully this problem is fixed in future Nazo Puyo titles, where it's made obvious on how many pieces the player has to use.
    • SUN has Sun Puyo. In theory, they're designed to be a Comeback Mechanic that helps players recover from damage or adds extra punishment to their chain, but in practice they are often times obstructing since they behave like nuisance and can easily disrupt a player setting up chains.
      • SUN also has an unintentionally heavily nerfed version of All Clear. In SUN, an All Clear drops free Sun Puyo onto the user's field, with the amount of Sun Puyo equal to the last chain set off. However, since getting an All Clear in the first place is difficult due to the RNG, normally a player will get an All Clear from the start of a match due to the RNG being generous enough to give the players the correct colors. This means normally a player will get a minimum of one chain, and therefore only one Sun Puyo, two or three at best every blue moon.
    • Yo~n is not so fondly remembered due to its Super Attacks, which have the potential to deadlock a game that is already slower due to "gravity" modifications. The super attacks themselves are extremely unbalanced too, due to Compile underestimating the balance between Super Attack charge times and the effects.
    • 7s Transformation doesn't get much love either, with players claiming that the system is completely busted in terms of balance. Specifically, Mini acts like Fever but even more extreme, while Mega can potentially cause a snowball effect with minimal effort. But the main kicker is that the timer is a lot more lenient, capping at 99 seconds instead of 30 like with the Fever rules, meaning a player can potentially last A LOT longer then a Fever can and by extension inflict a lot more damage.
    • The general Fever mechanic. In theory it's a Comeback Mechanic that helps players get out of a tight spot, but in practice it often causes both players to enter Fever and cause a long drawn out stalemate, until RNG forces a player to lose. SEGA might of been aware of how annoying these stalemates end up being, since in 20th the Fever mechanic received several changes that nerf how effective it is.
    • In Madou Monogatari, you're not given information on any stats barring how much gold you have. Instead, the game uses visuals in order to tell how strong or weak your character is, how much damage you're inflicting, and how much damage you're receiving. Since everything is extremely vague due to the lack of numbers, it's easy to underestimate or overestimate how strong your character is and unintentionally loss more health then expected.
    • Puyo Tetris's Puzzle League has virtually no Puyo/Tetris segregation in Versus play, which leads to a variety of problems, especially those who prefer to play Puyo or at least the same mode as their opponent to ensure an even fight. While the developers have made attempts to balance Puyo and Tetris so that you can just pick whatever you want, Tetris still has an advantage over Puyo, meaning that if you want to dominate the rankings, you pretty much have to pick Tetris.
    • The rotation mechanics in the first System C-2 arcade game are very restrictive, especially if one plays it after playing any of the sequels. There's only one rotation button (clockwise) even though some previous games did allow counterclockwise rotation; furthermore, it's impossible to rotate puyos if they are stuck between two columns. These two traits were disliked enough that Tsu added counterclockwise rotation and double rotation to solve each problem, and are still disliked enough that the Nintendo Switch version of the first game gives players the option to use both mechanics.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: The first Puyo Puyo arcade game was a unique falling blocks game with its multiplayer focus and a story mode featuring several characters, which was practically unheard of in the genre beforehand, and was appropriately ported to every platform under the sun. Nowadays, ask the average fan about the 1992 Puyo Puyo and they'll likely bring up the aggresively-low skill ceiling that outright punishes chaining beyond a 5-6 chain, and the subsequent stalling via rotations.
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop:
    • Sun compared to the first two arcade games; its Normal difficulty doesn't even have Difficulty by Acceleration.
    • Fever 2's WakuWaku course has 6 stages instead of 8, and Possessed Klug is noticeably easier to beat than Popoi, the original HaraHara boss.
    • Rulue no Roux, as Nintendo Hard as it is, actually has a difficulty curve. That's more than can be said for Arle no Roux, which skips most of the basic puzzles typically seen at the start of Nazo Puyo games and instead opens with challenges like testing your ability to navigate a block maze.
    • The Puyo AI in Puyo Puyo Tetris (outside of Core AI mode) is a notable downgrade from 20th's AI, likely due to the fact that a Tetris player can easily hamper the long Puyo chains that 20th's higher-leveled AI can perform.
  • Sequel Displacement:
    • When people talk about the "first" Puyo Puyo game, they are almost always referring to the arcade game instead of its MSX/FDS predecessor. In fact, several outlets (including the official 25th Anniversary Book) treat the 8-bit games and the arcade game as a single entity.
    • As far as most people are concerned, the first English, non-Dolled-Up Installment entry is the GBA Puyo Pop. Nobody talks about the NGPC Puyo Pop, and those that do remember the English arcade game question its legitimacy.
  • Sequelitis:
    • Puyo Puyo Sun, coming off of the series-defining Tsu, was seen as a disappointment in the gameplay department for high-level players; however, it is mitigated by the increase in production values and the hilarious story mode cutscenes. It was followed by Puyo Puyo~n, which despite a well-received Art Shift and storytelling approach, is usually considered deeply flawed at best. From the inexplicable gravity changes that make the game a slog to play, to the thoroughly-awful character balance, the console version of Puyo Puyo~n is often considered the worst mainline game and one of the very few Puyo Puyo games that possibly goes beyond Tough Act to Follow and into being an outright bad game. It speaks volumes that Pocket Puyo Puyo~n, the Game Boy Color port that is essentially a Mission-Pack Sequel to Pocket Puyo Puyo Sun, is more fondly looked upon.
    • 7 on the other hand was initially seen as a blatant cashgrab, between the game having a fraction of the modes of 15th for no good reason, Transformation being hastily cobbled together from two completely incompatible gameplay modes, spotty presentation, and what many viewed to be the unnecesary introduction of new characters and a new setting. Unlike Yo~n, reception to 7 has gotten slightly better over time, especially with regards to the characters that it introduces and the Fanfic Fuel Transformation designs.
    • More cynical fans might claim that the series as a whole has been zigzagging this trope for a while, with 20th being an exception between the tepidly-received 7 (for reasons detailed above), Tetris (for the Fake Balance and lack of compelling rulesets beyond VS, Swap, and maybe Big Bang) and Chronicle (for the questionable RPG mode, shift to 3D models, and forgettable original heroine).
  • Shipping: One might be caught off guard by how developed of a shipping fandom Puyo has, with pairings that cover everything from existing relationships, to countless pairings between characters who never even met in canon. Arguably borders on Shipping Goggles at times, though it should be said that most relationships in the series tend to be static and not particularly deeply explored, which gives fans a lot of room to play around with.
  • Ship Mates: Adding to the above, there are plenty of combinations fans ship the characters in. Many Arle x Schezo fans will also ship Dark Prince x Rulue and Witch x Ragnus or Witch x Draco, for instance, while many Schezo x Witch fans instead ship Arle and Dark Prince or Arle and Ragnus together, just to name a few.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Hoo boy...
    • An obvious example of this would be the one that is sorta reflected in-universe as well (Arle/Schezo vs. Arle/Dark Prince). The Dark Mage and Prince are known to start obnoxious Cock Fights over Arle. The fans aren't that different...
      • That's not even getting into the third camp of fans that find both ships creepy and would rather ship Arle with anyone else, as well as being against any ship featuring either character for similar reasons.
    • Arle/Schezo and Schezo/Witch fans are also known to dislike each other's ships. The very unambiguous Ship Tease for the latter only adds more fuel to the fire.
    • Ringo/Maguro fans do not like either Tee or Ess. And the less said about Ecolo, the better.
    • While many fans are happy to ship Sig with multiple characters, thanks to him being such a popular ship launcher, Amitie/Sig and Sig/Klug fans can get hostile with those that ship Sig with someone outside of their prefered pairing.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: The above mentioned Ragnus/Witch is only one of many ships of this kind, in the fandom. Doppelganger Arle in particular is an outright launcher of this type of ship, since she never interacted with almost the entire cast, which doesn't stop her from getting paired up with countless characters, even with Rafisol and Sig, despite how much of a non-entity Doppel is in SEGA's games, besides Quest.
  • Signature Scene: The battle against Schezo in the PC98 version of Madou Monogatari II is this for the Madou series. It receives a lot of fan art from Japanese fans and is the first taste of Madou Monogatari that many western fans tend to get, thanks to just how infamous it is.
  • So Okay, It's Average: The general opinion on 7 has grown to become this, after healthy amounts of vindication. The game's questionable story and writing quality, sometimes clunky new art, mixed with a overabundance of reused art and lack of competitive potential for Transformation mode are still frequently criticized, but most will agree that the game still plays just fine and is merely nothing special in the grand scheme of the franchise. This is especially visible when comparisons to the far more deeply flawed Yo~n are drawn.
  • Surprise Difficulty: Puyo Puyo has an impossibly-cute cast of characters, as well as an emphasis on chaining and general long-term planning that is arguably not approached by any other puzzle game. Many newcomers got a rude awakening when they played Puyo Puyo Tetris and were met with Puyo's unusually massive learning curve, causing them to stick to Tetris whenever possible.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • For a crossover between two puzzle franchises, Ringo's line to Tee when he and his crew have to go back to the Tetris dimension with no way of knowing if they'll ever see their new friends again is surprisingly heavy. Puyo Champions only makes it worse; while it's perfectly understandable why the Tetra crew aren't in it, it just further reinforces for many fans that they and the Puyo cast will, in all likelihood, never see each other again.
    Ringo: I want our last memories to be smiles.
    • The beautiful closing credits and especially the ending message of "Thank you for playing!" are also bound to turn on the waterworks.
    • Klug's depressive fit during his story in 20th, crying to Amitie over everything he's had to deal with.
    • At the end of Schezo's story in Puyo Puyo Tetris, Schezo has defeated Sig, and Sig decides to give Schezo his demon hand. Before Schezo takes it, Sig says good-bye to the family of bugs living in his hand. He asks Schezo to take care of them since they're his now.
  • That One Boss: Ecolo in Tetris uses the same AI as in 20th (where he is the Final Boss) and is fast and precise with his Tetris play. Upon release many players freaked out online about being unable to beat the blob. Their chagrin intensified when this is immediately followed up by playing against him in Puyo.
  • That One Rule: The unspoken limit of 24 fully-playable characters, starting with Puyo Puyo!! 20th Anniversary and continuing through the other 2010s Puyo Puyo games, is far less cute to the fandom than it apparently is to the developers. Puyo Puyo Champions is the most extreme case of this trope upsetting the fanbase, as it trims what the fandom considers major characters in Ecolo and the Klug-Lemres-Feli triangle in order to hit 24 characters.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Sega's Retool and Soft Reboot in its entirely receives this from a small number of fans, with said fans believing that the soul of the series was lost when Sega turned the cuteness Up to Eleven.
    • Cranky Food Friends received endless flak when it was (very quickly) discovered to be a cheap reskin of Puyo Puyo!! Quest. Zigzagged with Puyo Quest itself: it was initially met with a lot of skepticism, but has since become the most popular topic of conversation in the English fandom. However, the general disdain for mobile games by western gamers definitely crops up at times, and Puyo Puyo announcement teases invariably attract snarky comments claiming that the announcement will be about Quest or another mobile game.
    • The Fever cast, aside from Amitie, falling increasingly Out of Focus is a sore subject for Fever era fans. This is not helped by a unfortunate combination of unresolved plot points, Sig and Raffina losing their positions as main protagonists and everyone else either vanishing from the franchise with the sole exception of Quest or having their playable status frequently sacrificed, to make room for more returning Compile characters or new additions to the cast.
    • A truly bizarre (and, for much of the fandom, extremely frustrating) variation where those who played Puyo Puyo Tetris are upset that Puyo Puyo Champions does not feature Tetris in any fashion.
    • The western fandom was generally receptive to Sega America's name changes (aside from Dark Prince) until the icon list in Champions revealed the "official" English names for the vast majority of the cast. This includes the likes of "Dapper Bones", "Ragnus", "Possessed Klug", "Alter Ecolo", and especially "Demiserf", which rubbed the fanbase the wrong way. This has lead some to mix-and-match which official names they accept and which ones they reject, similar to how Dark Prince is treated by many of the pre-Tetris fans; this includes Puyo Nexus wiki, which has yet to take an "official" stance on the matter and currently uses a mix of of pre- and post-Champions names.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: The Loads and Loads of Characters nature of the series means that often times characters will appear for a few games then disappear with no fanfare, but below are some notable cases:
    • After her well received appearance in Yo~n, Doppelganger Arle was relegated to the Rally Mode of BOX and a rather downplayed appearance in Quest, leaving her character largely unexplored and without any real resolution.
    • Chico from the same game suffers from a similar problem. Arguably, her case is even more conspicuous than Doppelganger Arle's since supplementary material goes into a lot of detail over her daily life.
    • Dapper Bones is shown to have a desire to find his long lost lover, along with hints of resentment caused by past events. 15th implies that whoever Oshare's lover was, they shared a resemblance to Dark Prince. However none of this would be resolved, as he would be absent from the series from 7 onward.
    • Possessed Klug has a connection between him and Sig due to the "bad" and "neutral" sides of the original demon being split apart, along with details about his past in general, such as how he got sealed up in the first place. However all this is only brought up in Fever 2, with Possessed Klug only making the odd cameo in future games, and even in Fever 2 his presence is rather anticlimactic.
    • Somewhere between this trope and the next is a general desire by some fans to have the cast (particularly from Sega's end of the series, but also sometimes extends to the returning Compile-created characters) featured in a more structured plot that allows for Character Development and the fleshing out of their personalities, instead of simply using them in largely slapstick-driven Excuse Plots.
    • Pretty much no one is surprised that the S.S. Tetra crew aren't in Champions, but it doesn't stop fans from wishing they would get another game, much less reunite with the Puyo dimension. It doesn't help that the final non-DLC scene of Puyo Tetris is of Tee and company having to go back to their home dimension with most likely no way to visit ever again.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Due to Sega acquiring the rights to the Compile-created Puyo Puyo characters, and not the Madou Monogatari universe said characters originated from, any and all backstories for the original Compile-created characters as well as the very world they all hail from (both of which were greatly expanded on through the Shin Madou Monogatari light novels) were dropped like hot potatoes, requiring plot contrivances to explain the characters' presence in every game ever since Arle and Carbuncle's appearance in Fever. Interestingly, some Puyo Puyo games developed by SEGA have featured the occasional reference to plot points and overall concepts pertaining to Compile's take on Puyo Puyo and even Madou Monogatari, such as Dark Prince offhandedly mentioning his tenure as a Magic School headmaster in most of the Madou games, Witch's grandmother Wish and the magical exam Witch must take to be granted a name, and Doppelganger Arle's somewhat cryptic Flavor Text in Quest, which has her vaguely hint at the fact that she and Arle were originally one being.
    • Most of the backstory and plot elements of the Fever era haven't been explored much, if at all, for a long time, due to the series shifting its focus away from Primp and its inhabitants starting with Puyo Puyo 7.
      • Ms. Accord's puppet Popoi was implied to be a great demon, perhaps even Primp's version of Satan. This was promptly dropped after Fever.
      • Possessed Klug's desire to return to his original body has been brought up in later games, but never returned to as a serious plot point apart from in light novels.
    • 20th has an unfortunate amount of these:
      • Amitie's story hints that her hat is actually sentient and trying to communicate with her in her sleep. However it's only shown talking to Amitie at the very beginning, and the situation was dismissed as being nothing by Ms. Accord by the ending.
      • At one point during Raffina's story Lemres reveals that he is aware that Raffina turns her martial power into magic power, thanks to her pouch. Her reaction strongly hints that Raffina is actually quite insecure over her lack of natural magic power. This could have been used as a solid vehicle to explore aspects of her character that are otherwise never shown, but it never comes to this, since her following encounter with Rulue does away with it, without any fanfare.
      • Sig in his story finally begins to wonder about his anomalies, which leads to heavy implications that Lemres knows of his true nature, as well as the blue spirit that comes out of Sig's body and the demon in Klug's book being briefly discussed. Nothing comes out of any of it and none of the characters learn anything about Sig's demon nature, with Accord once again, refusing to give any straight answers.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Both Arle and Doppelganger Arle's special moves were incredibly broken in Yo~n, delaying all garbage from hitting them for 15 and 30 seconds respectively. A skilled player with 15 seconds of effective invincibility could easily use that time to counter with an even more powerful chain, which is difficult to respond to in turn... Unless you were also Arle or the Doppelganger and countered with your own invincibility. Combined with the floaty physics of the game playing as either of those two would cause matches to go on far longer than necessary and quickly become boring.
    • Arle's and Carbuncle's reputations are at least part of the reason why Fever rule plays second fiddle to Tsu. Coincidentally, in the most recent games, Carbuncle zigzags between being playable and being Demoted to Extra.
    • Puyo itself is this in Puyo Puyo Tetris, managing to simultaneously be both flavors of this trope. On lower skill levels, it's stronger due to the lack of ways Tetris can stop the strong disruptions Puyo can make. On higher skill levels, it's far weaker because of its incredibly slow speed preventing it from getting massive chains because of the level of disruption Tetris can cause with quick successions of Tetrises and T-spins, forcing it to play on the defensive most of the time and having any disruptions it does get off being easier to clear or just work around by the time Puyo can get another chain off. And heaven help you if you get bad RNG, as not getting the colour you need is far more debilitating than not getting the Tetris pieces you need.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • In terms of gameplay rules, Tsu rule has been the competitive standard for 20 years. Fever is the only other rule that gets any sort of attention, and even then it's not as much as Tsu rule.
    • In terms of overall game packages, the "lighter", more experimental games (7, Tetris) are inevitably compared to the feature-packed Anniversary titles.
    • At least some fans argue that Chronicle flips this trope on its head, claiming that the game has major flaws and is only seen as a good entry due to the massive Casual/Competitive Conflict surrounding Tetris.
    • Early on, Puyo Puyo!! Touch was unfavorably compared to Puyo Puyo!! Quest. A good chunk of the Fake Difficulty has been taken notice by the devs, and were given rebalancing updates to smooth out the difficulty curve and downplay the trope. Ultimately, the game was unable to carve out its own niche and shut down roughly a year after it was launched.
    • Fever 2 is the gold standard for fans who are especially invested in the writing and story aspect of the series, since no other game in the Puyo sub-series has ever had the same extensive lore, elaborations on character backgrounds and worldbuilding that Fever 2 provided in its story and unlockable extras.
  • Toy Ship: Panotty/Archan has a cult following, enough so that them being close friends is a popular piece of Fanon even among those who don't necessarily ship them .
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Madou Monogatari: The Final Test's artstyle is unsettlingly different from the other Windows installments.
    • Arle's face sprite in the beta version of Madou Monogatari II. Unlike the final version where she changes expressions depending on her health, she always stares at you with the same unnerving expression throughout the whole game.
    • Ocean Prince in Puyo Puyo Chronicles can look strange depending on the angle viewed from, with side views in particular giving him a strange "flat" appearance.
  • Underused Game Mechanic:
    • Puyo Puyo~n tries some interesting things with the various field rules in the story mode. Unfortunately, since Yo~n's pacing is broken on a fundamental level, it only serves to make a slow game even more of a slog.
    • Alternate costumes were used in 20th Anniversary and nowhere else, as far as main games go. While on the surface costumes seem to be a purely cosmetic thing, the costumes come with unique AI patterns. The AI patterns for 20th's alternate costumes are higher-leveled patterns roughly comparable to the classic Schezo-Rulue-Dark Prince trio, giving more variety to the "strong, but not quite Perfect-Play A.I." tier of CPU opponents. It really would've been helpful in Champions, where almost all of the high-level opponents outside of the aforementioned trio (like Lemres, Ecolo, and Accord) were excluded.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Zoh Daimaoh and Nasu Grave appearing in 15th Anniversary, especially considering that it took the next game to bring Draco back into thre and the game after that to get Witch.
    • Every time Puyo Puyo! Quest adds a lesser-known character or alternate form from Compile's end of the series. Demiserf takes the cake here (most of the western fanbase couldn't tell you what Demiserf even looked like before he was added to Quest), but not a lot of people were expecting the likes of Jaan, Mandrake, Nega Kikimora, Cool Schezonote , Green Witchnote , or Flash Attack Ruluenote .
    • The inclusion of Quest characters in Puyo Puyo Champions caught the entire fanbase off guard.
  • Unpopular Popular Character:
    • Schezo is disliked and mocked by most characters in-universe, with Arle in particular being not at all afraid to rip into him. Fans on the other hand adore him, to the point where fan works frequently portray his relationships with the cast as more amiable then they ever were in the games, as a means to downplay his Butt-Monkey status, at least a little bit.
    • The fandom loves Klug, in spite of his very arrogant and confrontational attitude towards most people he meets. Raffina even claims he has no friends in an official 4-koma.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • All About Puyo Puyo Tsu reveals that Baromett is actually a male, contrary to his general appearance and voice.
    • Ocean Prince's human form looks like this. Despite the heavy emphasis on pink colors, he's male.
    • Dapper Bones. While not as often as other characters, his effeminate mannerisms, attraction to male characters, and usage of feminine Japanese speech have led some fans to initially believe he was female, despite Fever 2 officially listing him as male. This confusion seems to happen more often amongst Japanese fans.
    • Respectively, Jay and Elle. Probably intentional, as even their website info questions which one is which.
    • Oddly, a handful of the male characters in Quest have feminine characteristics, to the point several of them can invoke Dude Looks Like a Lady and throw off players (since gender is relevant to gameplay in regards to combinations). Examples include Greap, Sullivan, Osa, and Yamato. The worst of them all, however, has to be Ander, who is a Wholesome Crossdresser based on the titular character of the The Little Match Girl.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • Puyo Puyo 7 and its characters originally garnered a lot of heat from the international fandom, but things have cooled off with time and now 7's cast have gained a following with the game itself even gaining some respect. It helps that 7's flaws are nowhere near as readily-apparent as the likes of Yo~n.
    • Downplayed with Yo~n itself. It was seen as a floaty, boring, badly-balanced game with great art back then and still is now, but the aesthetics and story have received more attention over time. Yo~n digital artbooks go for hundreds of dollars online versus other Compile artbooks, which tend to be sold much more cheaply.
    • When the English fanbase first discovered the Shin Madou Monogatari timeline, it was laughed off as ridiculous and was completely forgotten. Come the latter 2010s, lore fans rediscovered it and have made it one of the most infamous pieces of Compile-era lore.
  • Woolseyism
    • While Minna de Puyo has been localized as Puyo Pop, the original Japanese game curiously has a built-in English setting, with the script entirely in Surprisingly Good English. The US dialogue has a bit more liberal translations as opposed to the more faithful JP version, but there are a couple of gems that awesomely showed off Arle's Deadpan Snarker side. The incredibly memorable "Octagon as in 'stop'." being one of them.
      • The JP version:
      Incubus: Hi, honey. Where are you off to?
      Arle: Whatever... talk about your stuck-up smartalecks.
      Incubus: Oh darling, even your troubled face is cute in my eyes.
      Arle: Jeez... And fifty other lines to get you nowhere.
      Incubus: You poor baby... Here let me, beautiful me, warm you up.
      Arle: Stop it!
      • The US version:
      Incubus: Hey, baby. Come here often?
      Arle: ...Go away.
      Incubus: Hey! I just want to get to know you! What's your sign, baby?
      Arle: Octagon. As in "stop."
      Incubus: Oooh, I like a girl with a sense of humor! Let's make jokes together...
      Arle: That does it.
    • In the Japanese version of Puyo Puyo Tetris, the Tetris characters are directly named after their respective Tetrimino type. The English version meanwhile turns them into a Punny Name by retaining a similar pronunciation, for example J & L in the Japanese version are now referred to as Jay & Elle in the English version.
    • Also in Puyo Puyo Tetris, the localizers had quite the task with handling Schezo's botched phrasing. For example, in the very first encounter with him, he utters his catchphrase to Arle as per Running Gag. While it is humorous to a Japanese player, it doesn't exactly translate well to a Western player. The localized version gave us this wonderful blunder.
      • Japanese Version:
      Schezo: I am the Dark Wizard, Schezo!
      Regardless of how many times it's repeated, I am no pervert.
      I...only...want you!
      • English Version:
      Schezo: I am Schezo the dark mage.
      And I demand you stop screaming "creeper" at once!
      I prefer you to scream my name when we're together.
    • Another notable change with the dialogue in Puyo Puyo Tetris is how sounds are handled. Instead of simply writing out stuff like "Ahhh" or "Hahaha", the dialogue describes the sounds in a literal fashion, causing some rather hilarious descriptions.
    • The game's song titles for the official OST releases on iTunes, Google Play Music, Amazon Music, etc. were subject to this, even if a handful of the titles were already in English. To name one, Suketoudara's theme, originally titled "Suspicious Dance Shoes", was renamed to "Fishy Dance Shoes", keeping the same meaning but throwing in a fish pun at the same time.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?:
    • Kaori Nazuka as Draco elicits this reaction among the English fanbase, with an incredibly high-pitched voice that is much different than any other incarnation. You know it's bad when Ayame Kizuki, whose main job appears to have been designing instruction booklets and game packages, has a better-received portrayal than a professional voice actress. Though in fairness to Nazuka, her Draco is arguably a better fit for Draco's characterization in the Sega games.
    • This was also the initial reaction to English Sig and Klug, given the very different takes on the respective characters. Over time, Sig has more or less a neutral standing, while Klug is much more love-or-hate it.
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