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  • Acclaimed Flop: According to an interview for Sega Ages Puyo Puyo Tsu, current series producer Mizuki Hosoyamada was given the keys to the franchise after Fever 2, a game well regarded by most who played it, fell well short of Sega's sales expectations.
  • Acting for Two:
    • More like acting for three in the English dub of Puyo Pop Fever; Ali Johnston voiced Arle, Ocean Prince and Donguri Gaeru in the game. See Talking to Himself below for some examples on the Japanese side.
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    • As of Puyo Puyo Tetris and onward:
  • Actor Allusion: For Arle, they have Kotono Mitsuishi say "oshioki yo". She even does a Puyo-flavored, Sailor Moon-esque In the Name of the Moon in Bayoe~n!! The Mega Tracks of Puyo CD.
  • Bad Export for You: The iOS Sega Columns Deluxe is a port of the Japanese Puyo Puyo~n & Columns phone game, except with the characters removed.
  • Blooper: In Puyo Puyo Tetris 2, one cutscene mistakenly had one of Lemres' lines ("Just, uh... try not to hurt me, okay?") voiced by Ess' voice actress, even though it was clearly Lemres speaking in the Japanese script. The direction of the text boxes, too, reflects the original intent. This was fixed in the February 4, 2021 update.
  • Cash Cow Franchise:
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    • Puyo Puyo was a household name in mid-90s Japan, thanks to the success of the first two arcade games and subsequent merchandise. This made Compile's spectacular collapse all the more jarring.
    • Sega initially seemed content to release low-budget, moderate-return games every few years. Then along came Puyo Puyo!! Quest, which was a huge success and is currently one of the flagship titles for Sega's mobile division. To wit, Quest is SEGA's 3rd highest grossing digital title, beaten by only fellow mobile title Hortensia Saga and hit MMORPG Phantasy Star Online 2.
  • Casting Gag:
    • Despite the constant shifting of voice actors (see The Other Darrin below) the late Yuko Mizutani, who voiced Draco Centauros (among many other characters) in the PC-Engine Puyo Puyo games, returned to voice Witch in Puyo Puyo~n.
    • Likewise, Kazuki Yao, who voiced Dark Prince in the PC-Engine Puyo Puyo games, returned to the series in Puyo Puyo Tetris to voice Ex.
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    • There's also Kenichi Ono who voiced Dark Prince in Puyo Puyo~n, and later returned to the series exactly a decade after Yo~n's release to voice Risukuma for every game following the latter character's introduction to the series in Puyo Puyo 7.
  • Colbert Bump: Giant Bomb's Quick Look of Puyo Puyo Tetris, which showcased the contrast between the colorful puzzle mashup and Ubisoft's critically-panned Tetris Ultimate, played a significant role in getting western gamers interested in the game and the series in general. The Puyo Puyo team would later admit that they were actually counting on internet buzz such as this to make a case for localizing the game.
  • Content Leak: In late December 2020, dataminers uncovered voice clips for several planned DLC characters in Puyo Puyo Tetris 2, all before Sega announced who any of them were going to be.
  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Carbuncle (except in the Saturn port of Tsu), Ragnus, Donguri Gaeru, Klug, Ocean Prince, Sig, Rei, Onion Pixie, and CD Tsu's Nohoho and Baromett. Ocean Prince has this in two fronts with the English dub of Puyo Puyo Tetris.
  • Cut Song:
    • The Mega Drive version of the first game has Rejection of Puyo Puyo, which is not used anywhere in the game. According to All About Puyo Puyo, it was intended for a cutscene that occurs between the Witch and Zoh Daimaoh battles that was cut for storage reasons.
    • The Game Gear version cuts the Curtain Call but retains its theme.
    • The Mega Drive version of Tsu contains the melody that plays upon defeating Dark Prince in the first game.
  • Denial of Digital Distribution: The PlayStation 4 port of Puyo Puyo Tetris was only available as a physical disc until 2019 due to issues caused by an exclusivity license granted to Ubisoft for Tetris Ultimate. When Tetris Ultimate was delisted, a digital version of Puyo Puyo Tetris almost immediately followed.
  • Dueling Works:
    • Puyo Puyo~n and Magical Drop F. Both were the 4th mainline entries in their respective series, released in 1999 (Yo~n preceding MDF by roughly 7 months), skipped arcades, featured an Art Shift, and experimented with Limit Breaks. Yo~n "won," but it was nowhere near enough to save Compile's business, and Compile-era Puyo ultimately outlasted the Magical Drop series by just a bit more than a year.
    • Soldam, which released in 1992 (some sites put it at September), might also qualify as a direct competitor to the first arcade game. Like Puyo Puyo, it is a puzzle game whose aesthetics are heavily based on a previous game by its respective developer. There's no question as to who won this contest and, what's more, the Nintendo Switch reboot of Soldam features an art style heavily "inspired" by the post-20th Puyo Puyo artstyle.
    • For a same-company example, there's Minna de Puyo Puyo vs Columns Crown, two Game Boy Advance puzzle games released within very close proximity of each other; in particular, the games' North American releases were separated by a single week. Minna won, solidifying Puyo Puyo as Sega's premier puzzle series while all but ending Columns beyond the occasional re-release.
  • Dummied Out:
    • Almost all of the SNES and Mega Drive Puyo Puyo games (Mean Bean Machine and Kirby's Avalanche included) have menus that are normally inaccessible to players.
    • The first arcade game has a "stuttering" Diacute, akin to what happens when you use Diacute twice in Madou Monogatari.
    • The Mega Drive version of the first game has an "Insert Coin" prompt from the arcade version hidden within it. The Dreamcast version of Fever also has graphical assets that are used in the arcade version's main menu, alongside completely-unused English equivalents.
    • Super Puyo Puyo's debug menu features a "Sousai" (Offset) option; however, it is only partially implemented. The same debug menu has a "Hard Puyo" option, which forces Nuisance Puyo to be "cleared" twice before they disappear.
    • The Mega Drive version of Tsu has several unused voice clips, including alternate spells for Arle and catchphrases/lose quotes for a few enemies. Some would be used in later ports.
    • The GBA Puyo Pop almost exclusively recycles voice clips from Sun, so it shouldn't be much of surprise that Sun's Title Scream is buried within the game's audio data.
    • Schezo has one unused expression for 20th Anniversary shown here.
    • Looking at the voice clips for the playable characters in Puyo Puyo Tetris 2 shows that there were versions of the online greetings recorded with the alternate voices that ultimately went unused.
  • Fandom Life Cycle: Sits comfortably at Stage 3, in part of the Puyo Tetris games and Champions giving it an overseas foundation. There's a couple of dedicated circles that attempt to push towards Stage 4 by way of tournaments, but it struggles to get mainstream attention outside of Japan (solid Stage 4).
  • Fan Nickname:
    • "Madou-era" is used interchangeably with "Compile-era" to refer to Compile's Puyo Puyo games.
    • "OPP" (as in Original Puyo Puyo) is the most common shorthand for the first arcade game among the international fanbase.
    • A number of games were referred to under different titles in the early fanbase, either to differentiate between similarly-named entries, to skip over difficult kanji in the Japanese titles, or simply due to lack of research. While many of these aren't used anymore, some of them (particularly the Disc Station games) have survived on pure fandom inertia:
      • "Puyo Puyo Disk Drive" for the Famicom Disk System Puyo Puyo, whose official name is Famimaga Disk Vol. 5: Puyo Puyo.
      • "Rulue's Spring Break of Fists" for Rulue's Iron-Fist Spring Break. The fandom of the time admitted that they didn't know how to translate "Tekken" and came up with this.note  This one is still widely accepted, especially after Sega used the Puyo Nexus wiki as a point of reference for 3D Puyo Puyo 2's manual and went with "Rulue's Spring Break of Fists".
    • "Rally Mode" refers to both Tsu's Expert (Tsu) Mode and Box's Scramble Mode, both being character gauntlets with definite start and endpoints unlike the endless competitive modes in Pocket Puyo Puyo~n and the Anniversaries.
    • Some fans like to refer to Possessed Klug as Ayashii (inspired by his Japanese name Ayashii Kuru-ku), since the demon still lacks a proper name in canon.
    • In Japanese, Ragnus/Lagnus's name (ラグナス) has the kana for eggplant (なす), so Japanese fans will often draw an eggplant beside him or refer to him as Eggplant. Similarly, the English community sometimes gives him nicknames revolving around the word "lasagna".
    • "Pedobear" for Risukuma, due to his design in 7 and his "You can touch [me] as much as you want, little miss (Amitie)" line. Has fallen into disuse over the years, though.
    • "Tara Stacking," "Harpy Stacking," and "Frog Stacking" refer to the act of mimicking the strategy of a CPU-controlled Suketoudara, Harpy, and Nohoho respectively.
    • "Harassment," the name given to the act of sending small amounts of garbage to slow or stop the construction of the opponent's main chain. The fandom didn't really catch onto the "unfortunate" part until Sega's tutorial video covering this technique generated snark from the gaming community at large.
    • Klug's English alt voice in Tetris 2 is often called “uwu Klug” or “Kwug” due to his Elmuh Fudd Syndwome resembling online UwU speak.
    • Ess's Southern Belle alt voice Tetris 2 is nicknamed the punny "TexEss".
    • "Gender" for Rozatte, due to his extremely feminine appearance (and voice in the English dub).
  • Fan Translation: Fan efforts to translate the many non-exported games include:
    • The Famicom Puyo Puyo, Super Puyo Puyo Tsu, the PC and Nintendo 64 versions of Puyo Puyo Sun, and the DS versions of Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary, Puyo Puyo 7, and Puyo Puyo!! 20th Anniversary. 20th Anniversary is notable in that the original effort was halted following a server crash and required a new team to complete it, and that both it and the aforementioned translation of Madou Monogatari II were coincidentally released within mere hours of each other. Puyo Puyo 7 would see a revised translation in 2021 for the Wii version.
    • A partial translation of Fever 2 was released after years of Development Hell made it apparent that it would never be completely finished.
    • A couple of the smaller Disc Station games also saw fan translations. Namely, Comet Summoner and Puyo Card, for having minimal text to translate.
    • A pre-release of Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue's Roux on Super Famicom.
    • Arle no Bouken was translated under the title "Arle's Adventure: Magical Jewels" in a nearly 15-year effort. This game is particularly notable in that there were actually several attempts to translate it during the dying days of the Mon fad that failed because, to quote the programmer who eventually succeeded, the game is "coded as if someone wanted to make this a nightmare to be translated by fans". For perspective, it was the sixth separate team and seventh release overall that produced a fully-functional translation, twenty years after the game's release.
    • A fan translation of the 3DS game Puyo Puyo Chronicle is currently in development by Precise Museum (the same team that translated 20th Anniversary). They post progress updates semi-regularly on their Tumblr page and YouTube channel.
  • Follow the Leader:
    • Puyo Puyo was Compile's answer to Tetris and Dr. Mario. The first two arcade games' successes saw dozens of competition-focused puzzle games featuring wacky casts of characters hit the market. Hebereke's Popoon and Konami's Taisen Puzzle Dama are particularly blatant from a gameplay standpoint (the main differences being that they are Match Three instead of Match Four). As mentioned above, Magical Drop F takes a lot from Puyo Puyo~n despite Magical Drop having fundamentally-different gameplay.
    • Much of Compile's 1999-2000 output was them desperately trying to apply Arle and friends to popular gaming trends, from Pokémon to DanceDanceRevolution to Super Robot Wars. They were going to try to imitate Puyo itself with Pochi & Nyaa after they lost the series, but went out of business before the game released.
    • Puyo Puyo!! Quest is a thinly-veiled take on Puzzle & Dragons. You collect cards, form teams, even go through the same Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors motions as the latter game.
  • Fountain of Expies: Arle would be the basis of not only other protagonists in the Puyo Puyo series, but other Falling Blocks/Puzzle Game titles. Several characteristics she has would be retooled for future characters like Amitie, Ringo, and Ally, while outside of Puyo Puyo puzzle games (or games that borrow puzzle game elements) like Panel de Pon, Twinkle Star Sprites, Baku Baku Animal, and Star Sweep would have similar Badass Adorable female leads.
  • He Also Did:
  • I Knew It!:
  • Invisible Advertising:
    • If there was ever an English-language Puyo Puyo ad prior to Puyo Tetris, the fandom sure hasn't found it.
    • Hilariously, SEGA themselves have largely not advertised Puyo Tetris, preferring to basically let the game advertise itself, to stunningly huge success!
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes:
    • SEGA only seems interested in releasing the Compile-era Puyo Puyo games that they themselves published. This especially hurts in the case of Tsu, where each version after the Mega Drive port adds new features. Interestingly in 2019, this became averted, as the Super Famicom version of Puyo Puyo Tsu became available in all regions as part of the Nintendo Online SNES service on Nintendo Switch, marking the first time that specific version got a re-release in more than 2 decades.
    • The English version of the first arcade Puyo Puyo game, presumably released in 1992, was so ridiculously obscure that it was discovered through a bootleg board several years later, and then its ROM was exported for use in MAME. Combine this with the lack of any official information about this version, a lot of people believed this was a bootleg game instead of an official translation. It wasn't until 27 years after its presumed arcade release that the english version of Puyo Puyo was confirmed to be official and re-released, as part of the SEGA AGES series of games on the Nintendo Switch.
    • Don't have an N-Gage or later Symbian OS phone? Tough luck trying to play the N-Gage Puyo Pop. Even worse than the English arcade game because, as of this writing, there isn't a single N-Gage emulator that plays non-Java based games. Puyo Pop wasn't made with Java.
  • Late Export for You: Puyo Puyo Tetris was first released in Japan in 2014, and it took until 2017 to get localized for non-Japanese markets. By then, Puyo Puyo Chronicle had been released in Japan.
  • Limited Special Collector's Ultimate Edition: The DS version of 20th Anniversary has a limited edition "Anniversary Box" version, which packs in a hand fan and a set of keychains of the Puyo cast, the Puyo themselves, and the 20th Anniversary label. The 3DS version, on the other hand, has a set of 41 metal pins.
  • Marth Debuted in "Smash Bros.":
    • Anything and everything that debuted in the Madou Monogatari series is this whenever it shows up in a localized Puyo Puyo game.
    • The characters Maguro, Risukuma, Ringo, Paprisu, and Sig made their first western appearance in the Sonic Runners x Puyo Puyo Quest collab.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris marks the first appearance of Sig, Ecolo, Feli, Lemres, Rei, and Oniko in the west. note 
    • Champions marks the Western debut of Ally, Rafisol, and any characters who first appeared in Quest.
    • Puyo Tetris 2's Skill Battle mode is marketed as "new" despite debuting in the Japan-only 3DS game Puyo Puyo Chronicle.
    • To put things in perspective, the only characters who both appear in a localized game and avert this trope are the characters who debuted in Puyo Pop Fever (14) or either of the Puyo Puyo Tetris (10) games.
  • Meaningful Release Date: The various ports of Puyo Pop Fever were released on the 24th of a month, since 24 is the Goroawase Number for "Puyo" and the series' Arc Number.
  • Milestone Celebration: Three of them; special games were made for their 15th, 20th and 25th anniversary. Unfortunately, to date, NONE have been released in the West. Seemingly averted with the 30th anniversary, with a release just beforehand instead.
  • Money, Dear Boy: Series producer Mizuki Hosoyamada flat-out stated in an interview that there is not a "true" Free-To-Play version of Puyo Puyo because it will permanently rob them of the ability to sell packaged releases, regardless of how many more features are included.
  • Name's the Same:
  • Newbie Boom: Sega has pulled this off at least three times:
    • The first Fever reinvigorated the series in Japan.
    • Puyo Puyo Quest was not only a hit in Japan, but it also unexpectedly attracted a number of international fans with its cute character designs.
    • By far the most notable example is Puyo Puyo Tetris, benefiting from the perfect storm of internet buzz, the critically-panned Tetris Ultimate, and a young Nintendo Switch. It was a breakout hit, creating countless new Puyo fans while kickstarting Fan Translation efforts for the other Puyo Puyo and Madou Monogatari games.
  • No Export for You:
    • It's easier to list the Puyo Puyo games that were localized, especially prior to 2016's Sega 3D Classics Collection which marked the beginning of Sega's efforts to localize the games on a more consistent basis. The only games that were localized between 1991 and 2016 were the first arcade game, Dolled Up Installments, the Neo Geo Pocket Color and untranslated Mega Drive (via Wii Virtual Console) ports of Tsu, Puyo Pop on the GBA (Minna de Puyo Puyo), and Puyo Pop Fever (with North America only getting two versions of Fever out of the eight or so). Puzlow Kids is a particularly painful example, as the cartridge was already bilingual.
    • Even after 2016, western countries only received two ports of Puyo Puyo Tetris, missed the standalone release of 3D Puyo Puyo 2, and completely missed Puyo Puyo Chronicle.
    • Inverted with the N-Gage Puyo Pop, which was released everywhere except Japan.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Japanese: Happened quite often during Compile's run. The earliest entries had Compile staff and employees of the RCC Broadcasting company provide voices, NEC commissioned professional voice actors for the PC-Engine games, and a mostly different set of professionals were used in Yo~n. And that's before getting to the characters that changed actors between individual ports. Even during Sega's run, Nasu Grave got a different voice actor for his reappearance in Puyo Quest, when occurrences of this happened were quite few. Carbuncle in particular is a necessitated example due to the passing of Tamaki Nakanishi, with Tomoko Kaneda taking up the role in her place.
    • English: English dubs would see a casting change in every game due to the sporadic releases. None of the voice actors in the English Arcade Puyo Puyo made a reappearance for Fever, not even Arle's (er, Silvana). None of the actors in Fever returned to reprise their roles either, though considering the huge gap in releases, it was rather inevitable, as that cast either moved on to other roles or were never heard from again. In fact, Champions is the first game to avert this trope.
  • Port Overdosed: If a game in the series happens to be a major success, expect it to be ported to pretty much every modern platform for its time (and then some!).
    • The first arcade game and Tsu are easily the most notable games in this regard, especially Tsu which has seen numerous cases of being ported multiple times on a single platform.Examples 
    • Puyo Pop Fever started as an arcade game, then followed a port for the Playstation 2, Dreamcast, Gamecube, Xbox, Xbox 360, Mac, Game Boy Advance, Windows, Pocket PC, Palm OS, Nintendo DS, and PSP. If we count the budget rereleases on the Playstation 2, Dreamcast, and Gamecube, that's exactly twelve ports in its lifetime.
    • Puyo Puyo Tetris was released 8 times in its lifespan with 2 major iterations. More specifically, it was released in all tabletop consoles of the last two generations (though the PS3, Xbox 360, Wii U and Xbox One versions were not released outside of Japan), the Nintendo 3DS (also Japan-exclusive), and Steam.
  • Pre-Order Bonus:
    • Anyone that preordered 20th Anniversary was given "Puyo Puyo!! Anniversary Soundtrack Collection", a collection of the game's songs throughout the entire series, as a bonus.
    • For Puyo Tetris, a code that grants "Arle ver. Puyo Tetris" for Puyo Quest was included with the game. What is the code printed on? A physical Puyo Quest-styled card that's the size of a common TCG card, which can slip into a card binder or sleeve for safekeeping. The PS4 and Xbox One versions did the same thing, containing "Ringo ver. Puyo Tetris" instead.
    • For Tetris 2, a set of skill cards (including a few Sonic the Hedgehog-themed ones) for use in Skill Battle mode.
  • Promoted Fanboy:
    • S2PID, one of the leading Puyo players in the US and major contributor of the Puyo Nexus wiki, was hired by Sega to create a series of tutorials for the English release of Puyo Puyo Tetris.
    • For the European playerbase, BlueHairKei, a former tournament player and chairman of Puyo GB, contributed three tutorial videos for Sega Europe's channel using Puyo Puyo Champions.
    • Erica Mendez, Arle's voice actress in Puyo Tetris, stated that she is a Kirby's Avalanche fan.
    • In a Nintendo Life interview, Alexey Pajitnov, the creator of Tetris, stated that he loved Puyo Puyo.
  • Prop Recycling:
    • Unsurprisingly, the Dolled-Up Installments pull assets from the original Puyo Puyo. An especially-amusing example is Kirby's Avalanche's title screen: if you look closely, you can see "PUYOPYO" [sic] written several times in the background.
    • Many of Puyo Puyo's sound effects, particularly the "serious" effects used in the first two games' respective Dark Prince battles, were first used in M.U.S.H.A. The jingle that would eventually become associated with All-Clears is also present within the game.
    • The voice samples were taken from Madou Monogatari 1-2-3. This is the most likely reason why Rulue lacks a vocal catchphrase.
    • The English arcade game recycles voice clips in instances that the Japanese game did not. This is due to space issues, with the game inexplicably using more space for fewer samples.
    • Puyo Puyo CD Tsu features the pre-battle cutscenes from the Saturn and Super Famicom ports as an unlockable...except that they all take place in the "meadow" featured in the first game.
    • Puyo Puyo eSports reuses the graphical style of Puyo Tetris and uses the character art from Puyo Quest. The series regulars use the exact same pose of their 7* art, but those with altered appearances had them redrawn to their 20th appearance.
  • Real-Life Relative: Kikuko Inoue voiced Will 'o Wisp and one-third of the Banshee Trio in Puyo Puyo CD Tsu. Her daughter Honoka Inoue - who wasn't born until roughly two years after CD Tsu's release - is the current voice of Ally. We did mention that Puyo Puyo is a Video Game Long Runner, right?
  • Reality Subtext: Puyo Puyo Box was blatantly designed as a send-off to the series, with Compile jamming in as much from the four mainline games as they could. Given that Compile still had time on their deal with Sega, either they flat-out couldn't make another Puyo Puyo game, or they realized that Puyo Puyo wasn't going to save them.
  • Relationship Voice Actor: In Puyo Puyo Tetris and Champions' English dub:
  • Remade for the Export: In a sense, the Nintendo Switch version of Puyo Puyo Tetris qualifies; see Screwed by the Lawyers below for why it took the Switch version for the game to be brought over.
  • Schedule Slip: Waku Waku Puyo Puyo Dungeon was slated to release in late 1997, but ended up getting delayed to spring 1998. What makes this delay so significant is that it allegedly played a role in forcing Compile to restructure.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers:
    • It's been heavily implied that Sega is the reason why Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory's Moe Anthropomorphism of Compile (who, naturally, is full of Puyo Puyo references) remains Japan-exclusive and doesn't show up for the remake. Seems like Puyo Puyo and Compile Heart do not mix.
    • Many blamed Ubisoft for the fact that Puyo Puyo Tetris, a title that western gamers had shown an abnormal amount of interest in, initially did not see a Western release. Elevating this theory beyond Wild Mass Guessing was the fact that nearly every digital, English-language version of Tetris went offline shortly before the release of Ubisoft's Tetris Ultimate. A Tetris Company rep confirmed to USgamer that there was an exclusivity deal in play, but Sega was able to work around this, and eventually announced a western release for the PlayStation 4 (physical-only release) and (then newly-announced) Nintendo Switch in 2017. The reason? The licencing deal didn't include PS4 physical media or the Nintendo Switch overall, which was then only a rumor known under the development name of "NX" when Tetris Ultimate came out. However, this hurt the Nintendo 3DS and Xbox One versions of Puyo Puyo Tetris, where Ubisoft did cover those holes in the contract. Ubisoft's grip eventually loosened in late 2018 with the PC version of Puyo Puyo Tetris and the PS4 game Tetris Effect, and Tetris Ultimate's delisting in early 2019 appears to signify that the contract is over. Not-so-coincidentally, a digital PS4 version of Puyo Tetris was made available shortly afterwards.
  • Sequel First: The first Puyo game to be released internationally was the 1992 arcade game, skipping the original MSX and Famicom Disk System version.
  • Sequel Gap:
    • It's been more than ten years since the last "mainline" Puyo game, 2009's Puyo Puyo 7.
    • If we're talking strictly localizations, then not counting the two rereleases of Puyo Puyo Tsu on the Virtual Console and 3DS, or Cranky Food Friends, it's a 13 year gap between Puyo Pop Fever (2004) and Puyo Puyo Tetris (2017).
    • 6 years between Puyo Tetris and Puyo Tetris 2...in Japan. In the West, the gap is much shorter (3 years) due to the problems with the Tetris license delaying its localization.
  • Short Run in Peru: Puyo Tetris 2 released in the West on December 8, 2020, two days before the Japanese release date of December 10. However, for people in the Americas especially, this was effectively a one-day gap due to Japan being 11-17 hours ahead.
  • Sleeper Hit: By most accounts, Puyo Puyo Tetris is this. Given past localization efforts didn't sell well, many fans hoped, but didn't expect the game to do well, but it was one of the top selling games early in the Nintendo Switch's lifespan.
  • Spoiled by the Cast List: Before all of the DLC characters were added in, Puyo Puyo Tetris 2's closing credits listed all of the voice actors, albeit only the Japanese voice cast, which were more than the launch roster required. While the characters themselves aren't listed, fans who are familiar with the series' vocal cast could easily match up the extra voice actors with characters who were not included in the base game.
  • Spoiled by the Merchandise: Squares was the only Puyo Puyo Tetris 2 character whose existence was kept hidden before the game was released... except for Japan, where Puyo Puyo Quest revealed him hours before the game was released there.
  • Swan Song:
    • Puyo Puyo Fever was the last first-party title to be released on the Sega Dreamcast, and by extension the last game Sega would ever publish on one of their own consoles.
  • Talking to Himself: While this is to be expected of the earlier games, even now there are a few examples.
    • For Japanese casting, we have Arle and Klug, Yu and Rei (being twin siblings), Jay and Elle (also twins), Doppelganger Arle with, obviously, Arle, Lemres and Akuma, to name a few.
    • In English, the "twin" characters Yu and Rei, Jay and Elle share their voice actor.
  • Urban Legend of Zelda: In a strange twist on this trope, it was widely believed that the English arcade Puyo Puyo was an unlicensed bootleg or even a Fan Translation. While there is no known release date and probably never will be (even the Japanese version has a nebulous official release date of October 1992), All About Puyo Puyo Tsu makes mention of a "European" version that changes Harpy to a "Dark Angel" and renames Panotty to Johnny. The book was published in 1996, which all but eliminates the fan translation possibility and, combined with the English arcade game's similarities to Puzlow Kids, makes it tough to argue that the game wasn't at the very least developed officially. The most likely explanation is that early 2000s fans saw MAME add a bootleg board-derived version of the game (see Keep Circulating the Tapes above) and decided that the game itself was fake. The theories finally ended when Sega announced that the English arcade game would be included in the Nintendo Switch port of arcade Puyo Puyo alongside the Japanese version, all but confirming its legitimacy.
  • Voiced Differently in the Dub:
    • Sig and Klug in the Japanese games have high-pitched young boy voices. This extends to the Japanese version of Puyo Puyo Tetris, but not the English dub which makes both characters' voices much, much deeper.
    • Schezo is subject to his, but is a bit more subdued in comparison. In Japanese, he sounds like an older teen, especially when taking account the Compile games. In English, he sounds more like an adult man.
    • Arle is also a victim of having a deeper voice in a localization, but not in Puyo Puyo Tetris- rather in Puyo Puyo 1 and Puyo Pop Fever, where in both games her Japanese voice was much more higher pitched, and her English voice was so deep it didn't fit a 16-year-old girl in any capacity. Puyo Tetris was the first time she was dubbed with something akin to her high-pitched, energetic current Japanese voice.
  • What Could Have Been: Has its own page here.
  • The Wiki Rule: The Puyo Nexus Wiki.
  • Word of Dante:
    • A popular Origin Story for Doppelganger Arle, in which she is the "true" Arle who lost half of her soul between the Madou Monogatari and Puyo Puyo universes, is Wrongfully Attributed to the already dubiously-canon Shin Madou Monogatari. Per this site (and the original blog post via Internet Archive by former Compile developer "Inaken", all but confirmed to be Kenichi Ina), the idea was actually an unused plot thread that would've been used to make Pocket Puyo Puyo~n compliant to the Madou Monogatari Chronology. Like Arle no Bouken's alleged Sequel Hooks, covered in the same blog post, there's no sign of the story in the final game. Despite this, the plot is still (considered) canon by a number of international fans.
    • In a straighter example, Inaken states that they think of Box's Scramble Mode as a way of resolving a Time Crash that resulted from Dark Prince ending the time loop established in the Chronology, but admits that they had nothing to do with that game.

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