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  • 4 Runner had only one top 40 hit with "Cain's Blood" in 1995. The group never hit the Top 40 again in the States (although the followup "A Heart with 4 Wheel Drive" was a minor hit in Canada), but a series of label mergers and an abrupt membership change blunted their first album and caused their second one to vanish without a trace. They briefly revived in the early 2000s for another album, but did not have any further hits before disbanding again (although the title track of their last album, Getaway Car, was later a minor hit for Hall & Oates).
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  • Buddy Alan, the son of Buck Owens, had several entries on the country charts, but the only one that is considered a hit was "Let the World Keep On A-Turnin", his chart debut duet with his father.
  • Daniele Alexander had a Top 20 hit in 1989 with "She's There", but despite releasing two albums, she was never heard from again.
  • Jessica Andrews charted several minor entries between 1998 and 2003, but her only one by which most would remember her was her #1 smash "Who I Am". The song was a crossover on the pop, AC, and even Latin Airplay (!) charts, and was used as the theme to Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye.
  • Actress Susan Anton's only chart entry anywhere was "Killin' Time", her duet with Fred Knoblock (see also S-K-O, below), which hit #10 at country, #28 on the Hot 100, and #5 on the AC charts. Despite its chart success, it never appeared on an album.
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  • Renée Armand had only one hit as an uncredited guest vocalist on Hoyt Axton's "Bony Fingers". She was more successful as a songwriter.
  • Artists of Then, Now, and Forever was the one-time gathering of 30 country artists who performed "Forever Country", a medley of "Take Me Home, Country Roads", "I Will Always Love You", and "On the Road Again" to honor the 50th anniversary of the Country Music Association awards in 2016. It was a top 40 smash in several countries, and held the #1 position on Hot Country Songs for two weeks. While none of the involved artists is a one-hit wonder on the country charts (except Kacey Musgraves, listed below), it is unlikely that any more material will be released under this name.
  • Leon Ashley had his only #1 hit in 1967 with "Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got)". Most impressively, he promoted and distributed the single by himself and managed to get it all the way to #1 after failing to even chart on three different major labels beforehand. And the song was popular enough that five other versions charted in the next decade. Ashley had a few other hits on country radio, such as the top 10 "Flower of Love" and the Canadian number-one hit "While Your Lover Sleeps," but neither are well-remembered today.
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  • Asleep at the Wheel is one of the most famous names in Western swing, but only one of their singles was a chart hit: "The Letter That Johnny Walker Read", at #10 in 1975. Despite their lack of chart success, both they and frontman Ray Benson are well-known names in the industry.
  • Chet Atkins, despite being one of the most famous guitarists in the genre, had only one major chart hit, when he covered Boots Randolph's "Yakety Sax" on guitar (and accordingly re-titled as "Yakety Axe") in 1965. Atkins later surfaced in 1983 backing Ray Charles and George Jones on "We Didn't See a Thing", but it was still mainly Charles's song.
  • Sherrié Austin had previously had a minor pop hit in 1992 as half of the duo Colorhaus, before charting several country singles between 1997 and 2003. Despite releasing four albums and ducking into the country top 40 a few times, her only hit was "Streets of Heaven" in 2003 before she disappeared.
  • Steve Azar had a huge hit in late 2001-early 2002 with "I Don't Have to Be Me ('Til Monday)", but follow-ups stalled out, and his career was sidelined for several years due to a vocal cord cyst. By the time he finally came back in 2005, country radio had moved on, although he continues to record.
  • Backstreet Boys are obviously not one-hit wonders, with multiple pop hits over the years. But in 2017, they were featured on Florida Georgia Line's "God, Your Mama, and Me", which hit #1 on the Country Airplay charts long after the Boys' prime.
  • Moe Bandy is not himself an example, but two of his collaborators are:
    • Judy Bailey was featured on his 1980 single "Following the Feeling", but nothing else she put out reached top 40.
    • Becky Hobbs sang duet vocals on the 1983 single "Let's Get Over Them Together" but none of her single efforts made it past #31. She had some later success as a songwriter, most prominently Alabama's Christmas single "Angels Among Us".
  • R. C. Bannon's only major hit was backing his then-wife, Louise Mandrell, on a cover of Peaches & Herb's "Reunited" in 1979. The two had many other collaborations, and Bannon had a handful of solo singles, but none were as well-known. He was more successful as a songwriter.
  • Bobby Bare Jr. had only one hit: the 1973 single "Daddy What If", with his more famous father, Bobby Bare, when the younger Bare was only 5 (see also the Bill Parsons example in the Rock subpage). He recorded one more single with his mother Jeannie, but it only got to #41. Interestingly, Bare Jr. went on to become an alternative rock artist in his adulthood and is now a member of indie stalwarts Guided By Voices.
  • Benny Barnes, a former rhythm guitarist for George Jones, had the #2 hit "Poor Man's Riches" in 1956 and nothing else of note. His second single didn't chart until 1961, nor his third until 1977.
  • Greg Bates had a Top 5 hit in late 2012-early 2013 with "Did It for the Girl". Bates got screwed over by his label's policy that albums are not released until the second single; said second single failed to make Top 40, and he ended up getting dropped. No other label has picked him up since.
  • Jeff Bates (no relation) had a Top 10 hit right out of the gate with "The Love Song", but nothing else he put out afterward made a dent (even though his 2005 single "Long, Slow Kisses" spent a then exceptionally long 38 weeks on the charts).
  • Tucker Beathard, son of Nashville songwriter Casey Beathard (and brother of San Francisco 49ers quarterback C. J. Beathard), had a big hit in 2016 with "Rock On" due to it being part of the iHeartMedia "On the Verge" program. The label usually only releases albums on the second single, but the second single's failure, combined with a restructure that eliminated the division he was signed to, cut him off entirely.
  • Actress/model Barbi Benton, best known for her appearances on Hee Haw, was also a prolific singer for Playboy Records (yes, it was a division of Playboy magazine, which she appeared in regularly). She had only one chart hit with "Brass Buckles" in 1975.
  • Natasha Bedingfield is not a one-hit wonder at pop, but at country, her only success was backing Rascal Flatts on their late-2011 single "Easy", which hit #3.
  • Stephanie Bentley had exactly one hit, as a duet partner on Ty Herndon's "Heart Half Empty" in 1996. She was previously heard singing on Pam Tillis's 1992 hit "Shake the Sugar Tree" (Stephanie sang the demo, and Tillis's producer decided to incorporate the demo into the final recording), and later had songwriting success with Faith Hill's "Breathe" and Martina McBride's "Concrete Angel".
  • Jeanne Black's only country chart entry was "He'll Have to Stay", an Answer Song to Jim Reeves's "He'll Have to Go". The song reached Top 10 on the Country and Hot 100 charts, and #11 on the R & B charts.
  • Lisa Hartman Black: Mainly an actress, she got Advertised Extra credit for singing backing vocals on her husband Clint Black's 1999 single "When I Said I Do", which hit #1 on the country charts and Top 40 on the Hot 100 (coincidentally, the only time Clint ever hit Top 40 there). While Lisa was a guest artist on some of Clint's later material, none of it fared as well.
  • Blue County: A short-lived duo consisting of Aaron Benward (formerly of the Christian duo Aaron Jeoffrey) and soap actor Scott Reeves. They had a #11 hit in 2003 with "Good Little Girls", but later singles didn't fare as well. They cut a couple singles for an unfinished second album, and a couple cover songs on the Evan Almighty soundtrack, before breaking up in 2007. Benward later went on to become an actor as well, and Reeves largely returned to acting, although he also co-wrote Toby Keith's 2011 hit "Made in America".
  • James Bonamy had a #2 hit in 1996 with "I Don't Think I Will". He never again made the top 20 stateside ("She's Got a Mind of Her Own" and "The Swing" hit top 20 in Canada), although he did have a few minor top 40 hits.
  • Bon Jovi are by no stretch of the imagination considered one-hit wonders by anyone, and Jennifer Nettles has had several hits as half of Sugarland, but their 2006 chart-topping collaboration "Who Says You Can't Go Home" became the former's only major hit on the country charts, and the latter's only major hit independently of her duo. After Sugarland went on hiatus in 2011, the duo's other member Kristian Bush had a minor hit with "Trailer Hitch", but has not seen top 40 since; Nettles also put out a couple solo singles during this hiatus, but none were successful either. Bon Jovi released two other singles to the country format ("You Want to Make a Memory" and the LeAnn Rimes duet "Til We Ain't Strangers Anymore"), but neither was even remotely successful.
  • The Oak Ridge Boys are by no means a one-hit wonder at country or pop ("Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" both crossed over), but longtime tenor vocalist Joe Bonsall is. As "Cat Joe Bonsall", he backed Sawyer Brown on their 1986 hit "Out Goin' Cattin'", which reached #11 on the country charts.
  • Debby Boone's "You Light Up My Life." MAD once quipped that she was trying to make a lifetime career out of one hit song. Boone — the daughter of 1950s pop singer Pat Boone and granddaughter of early country pioneer Red Foley (Pat's father-in-law) — would have a few more successes on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart, including a #1 hit with 1980's "Are You On the Road to Loving Me Again", although none are as remembered.
  • Larry Boone (no relation), despite recording five major-label albums between 1986 and 1993, had only one hit with "Don't Give Candy to a Stranger" in 1988. He was far more successful as a songwriter, in particular for Tracy Lawrence.
  • Bobby Borchers had only one hit, with 1977's "Cheap Perfume and Candlelight" at #7. Interestingly, he was also the first artist to record "What a Way to Go", later Covered Up by also-one-hit-wonder Ray Kennedy. Borchers also wrote Tanya Tucker's hits "The Jamestown Ferry" and "Texas (When I Die)".
  • Season 7 The Voice winner Craig Wayne Boyd had a #1 country hit in January 2015 with "My Baby's Got a Smile on Her Face", but this was due entirely to a download spike during a slow week; the song fell off the charts entirely after only one week, and was never even sent out to radio. That being said, some of his covers from the show charted beforehand. Not long after its release, Boyd asked out of his record deal for fear of Executive Meddling.
  • Don Bowman had only one hit in his career with the novelty song "Chit Atkins, Make Me a Star", which hit #14. He was better known as a radio host (he hosted American Country Countdown before its most famous host, Bob Kingsley), cult comedy figure, and songwriter (Jim Stafford's 1974 pop Top 10 "Wildwood Weed" and Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson's 1982 duet No. 1 "Just to Satisfy You").
  • Danielle Bradbery, the Season 4 winner of The Voice, had a hit in 2013 with her debut release "The Heart of Dixie", but struggled to get any more hits afterward.
  • Terry Bradshaw, the legendary quarterback for the Pittsburgh Steelers, had a short-lived country music career, scoring a hit with his take on Hank Williams' "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" before returning his focus back to football.
  • Walter Brennan is primarily known as an actor - he's one of only a handful of actors to ever win three Oscars - but he had a big country and pop hit in 1962 with "Old Rivers". He had a few other minor hits on the pop charts although he never troubled the country charts again.
  • Jim Brickman is a very prolific pianist with a host of hits on the AC charts, but his only major entry on the country charts was backing Martina McBride on the #9 hit "Valentine", which appropriately made its chart debut on February 14, 1998. (The song was originally sent to pop stations from one of Brickman's albums, but after a few country stations spun it as an album cut, it was added to one of Martina's albums and officially shipped to the country format.)
  • Lane Brody is known almost entirely for her duet vocals on Johnny Lee's 1984 chart-topper "The Yellow Rose", a rewrite of the old standard "The Yellow Rose of Texas" which was the theme song to the short-lived NBC soap opera The Yellow Rose.
  • Karen Brooks: Another female singer whose only hit was a duet with someone more famous: namely, T.G. Sheppard, on the #1 hit "Faking Love" in 1983.
  • The Buffalo Club hit Top 10 in 1997 with "If She Don't Love You", but the next two singles tanked, and the band broke up after less than a full year. One of its members was then-former Restless Heart drummer John Dittrich, who quit before the third single and eventually rejoined that band. Interestingly, they were also the only act on the entire Rising Tide Records label to ever see the country top 40, as that label closed in March 1998.
  • George Burns released a novelty record in 1980 called "I Wish I Was Eighteen Again", which was a moderate crossover hit. The song made the then-84-year old actor/comedian the oldest artist ever to score a Top 40 country hit, a record that stands to this day. (It also made him the oldest act to enter that chart overall until 2008, when Eddy Arnold made one last chart entry with the #49 "To Life" shortly before his death at age 89.)
  • Carl Butler and Pearl are known almost entirely for their 1962 chart topper "Don't Let Me Cross Over". The song was also recorded seven years later by Jerry Lee Lewis and his sister Linda Gail Lewis. While Jerry Lee was immensely popular on both pop and country, the same was not true of Linda Gail, who had no further success.
  • Sarah Buxton, though a prominent songwriter and backing vocalist, has had nothing reach higher than #23 on her own ("Outside My Window", which was blunted by her label closing). But as an Advertised Extra on David Nail's "Let It Rain", she went all the way to #1. (Curiously, the week it hit #1 was also the first week on which she was credited.) Buxton has been more successful as a songwriter, including songs by Keith Urban, The Band Perry, Florida Georgia Line, and Chris Lane.
  • Cam had a big hit in 2016 with "Burning House", yet another song from the iHeartMedia "On the Verge" program, which got to #2. Her followup single "Mayday" withered at #39. A cover of "Burning House" was also the only chart hit for Emily Ann Roberts, the Season 9 The Voice runner-up, whose rendition got to #4 based on post-show downloads (although it got no airplay). None of her other songs from The Voice made it past #19, and she's yet to release any original material.
  • Craig Campbell's only major hit was "Keep Them Kisses Comin'" in 2014. Interestingly, in a strange inversion of Network to the Rescue, his label closed when the song was in the mid-teens, so he spent several weeks calling in requests to radio stations by himself in order to push it into the Top 10. While another label picked him up in 2015, his only two releases for them failed to take off.
  • If you know Henson Cargill for anything, it's very likely for "Skip a Rope", his only #1 hit and only Top 40 hit on the Hot 100.
  • Bob Carlisle and the Raybon Brothers were both one-hit wonders with the same song at the same time: the 1997 hit "Butterfly Kisses". Marty Raybon, one of said Raybon brothers, previously had several hits as the lead singer of Shenandoah (which he later rejoined), and Carlisle previously had several hits on the Christian charts. (Incidentally, there was a third version of the song by Jeff Carson out at the same time, although he wasn't a one-hit wonder.) This happened more often in the 1950s, when record labels released competing versions of popular songs tailored to different audiences, but in 1997, Bob Carlisle's popular radio song was very hard to find because he personally chose to only release the CD single to Christian media stores. This helped sales of the Raybon Brothers' cover, because it was simply easier to find. The result? While Carlisle's original version of the song was a Top 10 pop airplay smash then and the better remembered version now, it didn't make the Hot 100 and only the Raybon Brothers' version charted, peaking at #22. Carlisle's album of the same name topped the Billboard 200, but never reached higher than number 191 afterwards. Meanwhile, Carson's version was little more than his label Curb Records cashing in on the trend.
  • Highway 101 is not a one-hit wonder, but after lead singer Paulette Carlson quit in 1991, her only solo success was with "I'll Start with You". (She had released a few solo singles before Highway 101, but none were successful either.) The song was later used in advertisements for the retail chain Canadian Tire in the early noughties.
  • Kenny Chesney is by no means an example, but many of his collaborators have been.
    • 2008's "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" credited The Wailers for singing the last chorus, even though their part was cut from the radio edit. Obviously, Bob Marley and the Wailers are by no means one-hit wonders in any other genre, but it was their only time seeing the country charts.
    • The next single after "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" was "Down the Road", a duet with the song's writer and original artist Mac McAnally, which also topped the country charts. Mac had previously been a one-hit wonder on the pop charts with "It's a Crazy World" in 1977. While he had a #14 hit on the country music charts in 1990 with "Back Where I Come From", that song also came to be more associated with Chesney, as he put versions on two different albums and sang it in concert for many years. Despite his lack of long-term chart success, Mac McAnally is somewhat well-known as a songwriter, producer, session guitarist/vocalist, and member of Jimmy Buffett's Coral Reefer Band.
    • Dave Matthews has had several hits as the leader of the Dave Matthews Band. But on his own, his only hit was accompanying Kenny Chesney on the 2009 release "I'm Alive".
    • His 2016 hit "Setting the World on Fire" credited backing vocals provided by P!nk, who is obviously not a one-hit wonder at pop, but has no other contributions to country music.
  • The Clark Family Experience, a band consisting of six brothers whose names all began with the letter A, had a hit in 2000 with "Meanwhile Back at the Ranch", but Executive Meddling from their label stalled their album and ultimately resulted in them filing for bankruptcy. Three of the brothers later won FOX's The Next Great American Band as The Clark Brothers, and later renamed themselves Sons of Sylvia. Although they appeared on a Carrie Underwood album cut, Sons of Sylvia never notched any hits of its own and broke up. Ashley Clark attempted a solo career in 2015, but his label closed before he could release anything.
  • Anita Cochran had a #1 hit in late 1997-early 1998 with "What If I Said", a duet with Steve Wariner — and the song remains her only Top 40 entry to date. Wariner had several other hits dating to the winter of 1981, but hadn't touched the charts in nearly three years when this was released. This song was part of a brief late-90s Career Resurrection for Wariner, but Cochran never made Top 40 again despite staying on the same level for seven years.
  • Tammy Cochran (no relation) had only one big hit with her 2001 ballad "Angels in Waiting", which hit #9 in late 2001-early 2002. Two other singles hit Top 20, but none are as remembered.
  • Kellie Coffey had a big Top 10 debut in 2002 (which also crossed over to pop and AC) with "When You Lie Next to Me", but all follow-ups withered, and her second album was never released due to Executive Meddling.
  • Shirley Collie, who was briefly Willie Nelson's wife and bass player, had only one hit: a duet with him on "Willingly", Nelson's first chart entry, which hit #10 in 1962.
  • Brian Collins had only one hit, with his 1974 cover of Jack Greene's "Statue of a Fool" at #10.
  • Jessi Colter is known almost exclusively for her 1975 hit "I'm Not Lisa", and for her longterm marriage to Waylon Jennings. Although she had two more Top 10 hits ("What's Happened to Blue Eyes" and a duet version of "Suspicious Minds" with Waylon), neither is remembered.
  • Randy Cornor was a sideman for Gene Watson and Freddy Fender, but had only one hit of his own with "Sometimes I Talk in My Sleep" (written by a then-unknown Eddy Raven) in 1975.
  • Dick Curless hit Top 10 in 1965 with his debut single "A Tombstone Every Mile", and this remains the only single by which most people know him.
  • Miley Cyrus is by no means a one-hit wonder at pop. But at country, her only hit was backing her father, Billy Ray Cyrus, on "Ready, Set, Don't Go", which hit #4 in early 2008. The song was originally a solo release by the elder Cyrus, but partway through its chart run, it was reissued with her on duet vocals. Her only other entry on the country music charts was "The Climb", which only got to #25 on the country charts but fared much better at pop.
  • Davis Daniel had a hit in 1991 with "For Crying Out Loud", but a series of label mergers stalled his second and third albums, and with them, any chance of building another hit.
  • Clay Davidson had a #3 hit in 2000 with "Unconditional", but Virgin Records' Nashville branch closed soon afterward and he was never heard from again.
  • The Davis Sisters (not to be confused with the gospel group) had a #1 country and #18 pop hit with "I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know" in The '50s, and absolutely no other chart action. Betty Jack Davis died in a car crash right after the single's release, and the other member (Skeeter Davis, who wasn't actually Betty Jack's sister) briefly recorded with Georgia Davis, who was Betty Jack's sister. This arrangement didn't work out, so Skeeter went on to have several solo hits.
  • Linda Davis is known almost exclusively for her duet vocals on Reba McEntire's "Does He Love You", which went to #1 in 1993. Davis was between record labels at the time, and working as a backing vocalist in Reba's band when Reba insisted on putting her on the song. The song's success led to Davis getting a contract with Arista Records Nashville, but the best she fared afterward was with the #13 "Some Things Are Meant to Be" in 1996. Despite this, Davis has toured frequently with Kenny Rogers, and she is the mother of Lady Antebellum's Hillary Scott.
  • Devin Dawson had a #2 hit in 2017 and 2018 with "All on Me", but the second single fizzled out at #52 and the third didn't even chart.
  • Martin Delray was one-and-done with a cover of Johnny Cash's "Get Rhythm", featuring an uncredited vocal from the Man in Black himself, in 1991. He retired from singing after a second album failed, and was last known to be working as a tennis instructor.
  • Kevin Denney had a hit in 2002 with "That's Just Jessie", but his only other single never made it past #30 and a second album never materialized due to label management changes. His only subsequent work was co-writing Craig Morgan's 2009 hit "Bonfire".
  • Little Jimmy Dickens had his only #1 and only Top 40 pop hit in 1965 with "May the Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose". Although he had a few other Top 10 hits, all are forgotten today, and he had no other hits after this one.
  • Dottsy (her actual first name) had a #10 hit with "(After Sweet Memories) Play Born to Lose Again", which was also recorded by Ronnie Milsap, before disappearing. She was also the first artist to record "The Sweetest Thing (I've Ever Known)", later Covered Up by Juice Newton.
  • George Ducas had his only hit in 1995 with "Lipstick Promises". However, he was more successful as a songwriter.
  • Catherine Dunn, a cousin of Tim McGraw, is very unlikely ever to have another hit other than her Advertised Extra backing vocals on his 2015 hit "Diamond Rings and Old Barstools", which went to #3. Dunn doesn't even have her own Wikipedia article.
  • After Brooks & Dunn split up in 2011, both of its members maintained solo careers on the same label. Ronnie Dunn scored a Top 10 hit with "Bleed Red" but failed to follow up, and was abruptly dropped due to Executive Meddling. Dunn had a few solo releases before Brooks & Dunn, and a few featured credits during their heyday, but his next-best showing was a #17 peak as a guest vocalist on Lee Roy Parnell's cover of "Take These Chains from My Heart" in 1994 (for which he wasn't credited).
  • Eagles are by no means a one-hit wonder in rock. But at country, their only success was the #8 peak of "Lyin' Eyes". Similarly, Lead Drummer Don Henley has multiple solo chart singles at pop and rock, but his only success at country was backing Trisha Yearwood on her 1992 hit "Walkaway Joe".
  • Clint Eastwood is extremely famous as an actor, director, and politician, but as a singer, he only had one major hit: the 1980 chart-topper "Bar Room Buddies", a duet with Merle Haggard featured in Eastwood's movie Bronco Billy.
  • Edens Edge had a hit in 2012 with "Amen", but the follow-up "Too Good to Be True" went nowhere, and the third single was never even released due to lead singer Hannah Blaylock quitting. The other two members haven't been heard from since.
  • Bobby Edwards and the Four Young Men had a top 5 country and top 15 pop hit in 1961 with "You're the Reason", but were never heard from again.
  • Emilio, the mononym of Tejano singer Emilio Navaira, was one-and-done in country music with his 1995 hit "It's Not the End of the World". He was more popular in Tejano music, scoring several hits on the Latin charts (including a Spanish translation of the song titled "No es el fin del mundo"), and even won a Grammy for his work in that genre, but "It's Not the End of the World" remained his only country radio hit before his 2016 death.
  • Ralph Emery, a popular radio and TV host in the genre, had a hit with "Hello Fool" in 1961. The song was an Answer Song to Faron Young's "Hello Walls".
  • Ty England, a former guitarist for Garth Brooks, had a hit in 1995 with his debut single "Should've Asked Her Faster". Although he had a total of three major-label albums, nothing else released from them made any impact.
  • Jace Everett is known almost entirely for his 2005 single "Bad Things". While it didn't chart upon its initial release, it later gained popularity in 2008 when it was chosen as the Real Song Theme Tune to True Blood, causing it to hit #2 on the Norwegian charts.
  • Little Big Town is not a one-hit wonder at country or pop, as several of their singles have fared very well in the Top 40 of the pop charts due to strong sales. But group member Karen Fairchild had exactly one hit in 2016 as a duet partner on Luke Bryan's #1 hit "Home Alone Tonight"; her only other solo credit, on John Mellencamp's "A Ride Back Home" seven years prior, failed to chart, and she is unlikely to do any other solo work due to her band's success.
  • The Farm (aka The Farm Inc., to distinguish them from the British band of the same name on iTunes) had a hit in 2011 and 2012 with "Home Sweet Home". A second single barely cracked the charts, and a third came and went without anyone noticing. The band has some pedigree, though: Nick Hoffman was Kenny Chesney's fiddle player, Damien Horne was an alumnus of Big & Rich's songwriting team, the MuzikMafia; and Krista Marie had previously been a solo singer.
  • Rodney Atkins is by no means a one-hit wonder. But his 2018-2019 single "Caught Up in the Country" featured backing vocals from the Fisk Jubilee Singers, an African-American A Cappella group consisting of students from Fisk University. Despite only peaking at #21 on Country Airplay, the song spent a record-breaking 58 weeks on that chart.
  • Big & Rich do not qualify, as they have had multiple country radio hits (with "Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)" only being their third-highest on Hot Country Songs). Group member John Rich does not qualify either, as he had two surprise political-themed hits a decade apart: "Shuttin' Detroit Down" in 2009 (recorded while Big & Rich was on hiatus), and "Shut Up About Politics" a decade later. However, the latter features credited guest vocals from the hosts of the Fox News Channel panel show The Five, an anomaly very unlikely to be repeated.
  • Ella Fitzgerald is surely not a one-hit wonder from a pop or jazz standpoint, but her only country hit was her take on the pop standard "When My Sugar Walks Down The Street", which hit #2 in 1944.
  • Bobbie Gentry is known almost entirely for her 1967 hit "Ode to Billie Joe", which was a #1 pop hit despite only reaching #17 on country. Although she had a somewhat sizeable hit with "Fancy" a few years later, it was later Covered Up by Reba McEntire in The '90s. Interestingly, neither is her biggest country chart hit; she and Glen Campbell got to #6 with a rendition of The Everly Brothers' "All I Have to Do Is Dream" in 1970, but it failed to displace the original in public consciousness.
  • Billy Gibbons is certainly not a one-hit wonder as one-third of the rock trio ZZ Top. But his only solo contribution is backing Brooks & Dunn on their last single, "Honky Tonk Stomp" in 2009. Interestingly, Gibbons is also a one-hit wonder on the pop charts as well with his only solo hit being uncredited spoken word vocals on Nickelback's "Rockstar".
  • Terri Gibbs, a blind country singer from Georgia, got lucky right out of the gate with the song "Somebody's Knockin'". The song got to #8 country, #13 pop, and #3 AC, and won her the first-ever Horizon (now New Artist) award from the Country Music Association, but follow-ups tanked. She moved to Christian music to little success, and retired in the 90's.
  • Eric Church is nowhere close to a one-hit wonder, but Rhiannon Giddens, his duet partner on his late 2016-early 2017 hit "Kill a Word", is unlikely to have any more country hits because she normally doesn't perform in that genre. (In a bizarre subversion of Advertised Extra, the album version featured her and independent pop singer Andrea Davidson on backing vocals, but the radio edit turned it into a true duet by giving Giddens a few lines to herself.) She's better known as the frontwoman for the Americana group Carolina Chocolate Drops and for a critically acclaimed solo career that largely brings her airplay on adult alternative radio.
  • Billy Gilman had a hit in late 2000-early 2001 with the ballad "One Voice", making him the youngest solo male artist to enter the country charts (the aforementioned Bobby Bare Jr. being the youngest overall). Once the novelty of a precocious 12-year-old singing a narmy ballad wore off, he was never heard from again, although he has continued to record. He later appeared on the eleventh season of The Voice, where he finished as the runner-up.
  • Girls Next Door, a rare Girl Group in country music, had a Top 10 hit in 1986 with "Slow Boat to China". Their career was stunted by their label closing partway through the release of their second album.
  • Gloriana had a massive top 5 hit in 2011/2012 with "(Kissed You) Good Night", their first release after the departure of occasional lead vocalist Cheyenne Kimball (who has her own entry on the Pop subpage), but nothing else before or after her departure seemed to catch on. While their debut single "Wild at Heart" made some initial buzz, it was quickly forgotten.
  • Billy Grammer had a hit with "Gotta Travel On", which went to #5 country and #4 pop in 1959, but nothing else took off. However, his cover of Lawrence Reynolds' "Jesus Is a Soul Man" (see the Pop subpage for his entry) was a Top 5 country hit in Canada in 1969.
  • Jack Grayson and Blackjack hit the charts in 1981 with a cover of Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman" and that was it. However, Jack Grayson was more successful as a songwriter, having written three hit singles for Freddie Hart.
  • Pat Green, though popular in his native Texas since the mid-90s, managed only one big airplay hit on country radio with the #3 "Wave on Wave" in late 2003-early 2004. He had a few other songs reach Top 40, including "Feels Just Like It Should" and "Let Me", which both fell just short of the Top 10, but "Wave on Wave" remains the only song by which most people outside Texas would recognize him. He is but one of many examples of a Texas-based artist whose rowdier stylings are out of step with what radio in the other 49 states will play.
  • Jack Greene is no one-hit wonder on country radio, but his breakout smash "There Goes My Everything" was his only pop crossover hit.
  • Lee Greenwood had numerous hits on country radio in the '80s, but outside that audience he's known for only one song — "God Bless the USA". While it wasn't his biggest hit on country radio upon its initial release in 1984, seventeen years later the patriotic ode the United States was re-released following the 9/11 attacks. Interest in the song shot up, and it reached #16 on the Hot 100. Naturally he never charted anywhere again. In fact, most younger country fans today probably only know him for that song.
  • Bonnie Guitar is only remembered by mainstream audiences for her cover of pop-standard "Dark Moon", although she had a few other hits on country radio.
  • The Harden Trio released "Tippy Toeing" in 1966 but never had any other hits. After they broke up, member Arlene Harden became a one-hit wonder in her own right four years later with her cover of Roy Orbison's "Oh, Pretty Woman", titled "Lovin' Man (Oh Pretty Woman)".
  • Jennifer Hanson, who was previously voted Miss California in 1994 and is married to Nashville songwriter Mark Nesler, had only one hit with "Beautiful Goodbye" in 2002. After failing to score another hit, she turned to songwriting.
  • Rod Hart had an odd hit in 1976 with "C.B. Savage", about a Camp Gay, Double Entendre-laden voice that two truckers hear on the CB radio before realizing that it's actually a policeman affecting the voice to distract them from the fact that he's caught them. After the novelty wore off, Hart was never heard from again.
  • Walker Hayes had a big hit in 2017 with "You Broke Up with Me" but followups fell short of Top 40. He had previously gotten to #40 exactly with "Pants", but it was released on a different label, was different than the style established by "Broke Up", and was never put on an album.
  • Heartland is one of the few acts to have a #1 country hit but no other songs that even entered the top 40: specifically, their 2006 smash "I Loved Her First". Although it was the first Top 40 hit for their entire label, and it made them only the second country band ever to send a debut single to #1, their label's inexperience with Top 40 radio and indecision over what the next single should be stopped them in their tracks. The band later scored a second Top 10 hit in 2015… with a re-entry of the same song, which had a momentary surge due to a viral video in which a man translates the song into sign language at a wedding.
  • Eric Heatherly had a Top 10 hit in 2000 with his rockabilly-flavored take on The Statler Brothers' "Flowers on the Wall", but management changes at his label blunted his first album and prevented the release of his second. He moved to DreamWorks Records, where yet another album never got released, and still continues to record occasionally to this day.
  • The Henningsens had a Top 20 hit in 2012 with "American Beautiful" but their only other single stopped at #36 and the label dropped them without ever releasing a full album. However, the members wrote singles for Highway 101, The Band Perry, and Billy Currington among others.
  • High Valley has had several hits in their native Canada, but in the States, their only country radio success was "She's with Me". However, the preceding single "Make You Mine" spent a whopping 54 weeks on the Country Airplay charts in spite of a much lower peak.
  • James House, despite recording for three different labels in his life, having album cuts of his Covered Up by The Mavericks and Trisha Yearwood, and writing songs for the likes of Martina McBride, Dwight Yoakam, and Diamond Rio, is known only for one hit: "This Is Me Missing You", which hit Top 10 in 1995.
  • Julianne Hough's only success at country radio was "That Song in My Head". She had one abruptly canceled single for a second album, and gave up singing in favor of focusing on her work with Dancing with the Stars.
  • Rebecca Lynn Howard had a #12 hit in 2002 with "Forgive" but never saw Top 40 again. She tried to follow it up for several years on 4 different labels, racking up three unreleased albums in the process. She was also a one-hit wonder on the AC charts, as the featured vocalist on Jim Brickman's "Simple Things".
  • Red Ingle, a novelty country singer, had a popular hit in 1947 with "Tim-Tay-Shun", a parody of the Perry Como hit "Temptation", which hit #2 on Country and #1 on Pop. None of his other singles ever went anywhere on any chart.
  • Autry Inman's only major hit came from "That's All Right" in 1953. His 1968 song "Ballad of Two Brothers" was a minor pop hit, however.
  • Casey James, a finalist on Season 9 of American Idol, had a hit in 2011 with "Crying on a Suitcase", but followups went nowhere. It probably didn't help matters that his label closed in the middle of the song's chart run.
  • the JaneDear girls (yes, that was really how they capitalized their name) had a hit with "Wildflower" in 2010, but broke up almost immediately afterward. Member Danelle Leverett co-wrote Big & Rich's "That's Why I Pray" and began a solo career as Nelly Joy.
  • Shooter Jennings, the son of country music legend Waylon Jennings, had just one country chart entry with "4th of July", a duet with George Jones that made it to #26 in 2005. Shooter subsequently released a string of well-selling and critically acclaimed alt-country albums, but he never made the country singles chart again.
  • Jewel is not a one-hit wonder at pop, but at country, she was one-and-done with "Stronger Woman" in 2008.
  • Jamey Johnson is known almost entirely for "In Color", from late 2008-early 2009. (A previous release, "The Dollar", made #14 in 2005, but it was quickly forgotten due to a combination of Early Installment Weirdness and a label restructure that killed the corresponding album.) Despite his lack of chart success, he has recorded several critically acclaimed albums, and has written hits for George Strait, Trace Adkins, and Joe Nichols among others.
  • Lois Johnson, despite touring with Hank Williams, Jr. in The '70s, had only one big hit with "Loving You Will Never Grow Old", at #6 in 1974.
  • Anthony Armstrong Jones built his career almost entirely on cover songs, but only one of them was a hit: namely, his 1970 take on R. B. Greaves' "Take a Letter Maria".
  • David Lynn Jones had a hit right out of the gate with "Bonnie Jean (Little Sister)", one of the last few examples of a truck-driving country song. It hit #10 in 1987, but he never had success with anything else. However, he also wrote Willie Nelson's #1 hit "Living in the Promiseland".
  • George Jones is by no means a one hit wonder, but many of his collaborators have been:
    • Jeanette Hicks sang duet vocals on his 1957 hit "Yearning", which went to #10. Hicks has become so obscure that she doesn't even get her own listing in Joel Whitburn's Hot Country Songs books (which list every artist who ever made the country charts alphabetically).
    • Brenda Carter's only hit was backing him on "Milwaukee, Here I Come" in 1968. Carter never charted again.
    • Tina Byrd, who was then Jones's stepdaughter (Jones was married to Tammy Wynette at the time), had exactly one chart hit when she was featured on "The Telephone Call" in 1974.
  • Grandpa Jones, one of many regulars on Hee Haw, had his only hit in 1962 with "T for Texas".
  • Toby Keith is by no means a one-hit wonder, but many of his collaborators have been:
    • In 1997, he coverd Sting's "I'm So Happy I Can't Stop Crying" as a duet with Sting himself. While Sting has had several pop hits both by himself and in The Police, this was his only visit to the country charts. Interestingly, the duet version also outpeaked the original on the Hot 100.
    • Keith's frequent writing partner Scotty Emerick made his only visit to the country Top 40 in 2003 with "I Can't Take You Anywhere", previously recorded by Keith in 2002. Emerick's version featured a guest vocal from Keith, and likely due to his presence, it far outperformed any of Emerick's other singles (although Emerick's album was still never released).
    • In 2004, Keith recorded a version of Inez and Charlie Foxx's "Mockingbird" as a duet with his then-19-year-old daughter Krystal Keith for a Greatest Hits Album. While Krystal later began her own singing career in The New '10s, nothing else she put out made a dent.
  • Josh Kelley, brother of Lady Antebellum's Charles Kelley, had a few minor hits in AC. But his only country album produced a Top 20 in "Georgia Clay", and he has not been heard from since.
  • Ray Kennedy, "What a Way to Go". His debut single hit #10 on the charts in 1990, and he never returned to the top 40 afterwards. However, he has kept himself in the black as a record producer, usually with Steve Earle as the production team "Twang Trust".
  • The only Top 10 hit for The Kentucky Headhunters was their 1990 cover of Don Gibson's "Oh Lonesome Me". However, the only song by which most people would recognize them is its predecessor "Dumas Walker", which only got to #15. The Headhunters suffered from a Sophomore Slump, at which point frontmen Ricky Lee and Doug Phelps departed for a new duo called Brother Phelps. This duo's debut single "Let Go" hit the Top 10 in 1993, but nothing else made any noise, and Doug later rejoined the Headhunters.
  • The Kimberlys, two brothers who were married to two sisters, were featured on Waylon Jennings' 1969 album Country-Folk, and notably backed him on its cover of "MacArthur Park". Although it won both acts that year's Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, the Kimberlys were never heard from again.
  • The Kinleys, a duo consisting of identical twin sisters Heather and Jennifer Kinley, had a Top 10 hit right out of the gate with the ballad "Please" in late 1997-early 1998, but were unable to repeat the feat. It didn't help that their second album got caught in Development Hell, further exacerbated by the label choosing to release their "Somebody's Out There Watching" from the soundtrack to the TV show Touched by an Angel as a stalling tactic.
  • Pee Wee King had several country hits, but his 1951 #1 pop smash "Slow Poke" was his only crossover hit. His more famous composition "Tennessee Waltz" found more success after being covered by other artists, though it was a big hit from him on country.
  • The King Sisters had several pop hits in The '30s and The '40s, but their only country chart entry was a cover of Merle Travis's "Divorce Me C.O.D." in 1946.
  • Alison Krauss & Union Station is a curious example. Despite being one of the most critically acclaimed country groups of the 1990s, they were also primarily a bluegrass band, and that genre hardly gets any airplay on country radio at all. Their only major hit on the format was their their 1995 cover of Keith Whitley's "When You Say Nothing at All", an unexpected hit from a tribute album to him. In an inversion of what usually happens when a member of a group records material independently, Krauss herself has three Top 10 hits as a guest vocalist: on Shenandoah's 1995 hit "Somewhere in the Vicinity of the Heart", which immediately preceded "When You Say Nothing at All" on the charts; Kenny Rogers' 2000 chart-topper "Buy Me a Rose", which also featured non-one-hit wonder Billy Dean; and Brad Paisley's 2004 hit "Whiskey Lullaby". In addition to all of these, Krauss holds many more credits as a backing vocalist.
  • Kris Kristofferson, although one of the most prolific and praised songwriters in country music and a somewhat successful actor to boot, had only one major hit on any chart as a singer: the #1 hit "Why Me" in 1973. Kristofferson later became a one-hit wonder a second time as one-fourth of The Highwaymen, a supergroup consisting of him, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Willie Nelson (none of whom are by any means one-hit wonders in their own right). This group had only one hit with "Highwayman" in 1985. Interestingly, Kristofferson also wrote several other entries on this list, including "One Day at a Time", "Help Me Make It Through the Night", and "Lovin' Her Was Easier".
  • Cristy Lane had multiple chart entries, including several top 10 hits, but the only one that is remembered is her 1980 chart-topper "One Day at a Time".
  • Blaine Larsen had a hit in late 2004-early 2005 with "How Do You Get That Lonely", but had no other success despite releasing two albums and multiple singles for what would've been a third. The only thing he's really done since is write George Strait's "I Gotta Get to You".
  • Comedian/actress Vicki Lawrence, better known for her roles on The Carol Burnett Show and Mama's Family, had a major pop and country hit with non-comedic song "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia". None of her other releases went anywhere, and "Georgia" was later Covered Up by Reba McEntire.
  • English singer Leapy Lee had only one hit with "Little Arrows" in 1968, which hit #11 on the country charts and #16 on the pop charts. It also topped the Canadian country music charts, and went to #2 in both England and Australia.
  • Chris LeDoux, a rodeo star and singer-songwriter, had been recording and sporadically charting since the 1970s. His only hit was "Whatcha Gonna Do with a Cowboy", a 1992 duet with (an uncredited) Garth Brooks, which went to #7. LeDoux has a large catalog of popular songs, but only one other cut of his ("Cadillac Ranch", which came right after "Whatcha Gonna Do with a Cowboy") made even Top 40. Despite his lack of chart success, LeDoux is well-known in both rodeo and country music circles; he has a large catalog of well-known songs far surpassing their low chart showings, and he was well-known enough to be name-dropped by Garth in "Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)" (and memorialized after his 2005 death with Garth's tribute song "Good Ride Cowboy").
  • Zella Lehr's only hit was her debut single, 1977's "Two Doors Down". The song was later Covered Up by Dolly Parton.
  • Aaron Lines, yet another Canadian more successful in his homeland than stateside. He hit #4 in late 2002-early 2003 with "You Can't Hide Beautiful", but only had two other chart entries in the US. He's maintained popularity in Canada, although the lack of an archived country charts for many years there has left his actual degree of popularity a mystery.
  • Demi Lovato is far from a one-hit wonder in pop, but her only country music chart entry was as a duet vocalist on Brad Paisley's 2016 single "Without a Fight".
  • Lyle Lovett had only one major chart hit, 1986's "Cowboy Man". His quirky, idiosyncratic brand of alt-country made him lucky to have even that one hit. Over on the rock charts, he also only has a single major hit: "You've Been So Good Up to Now" in 1992. The only chart where he has more than one big hit is adult alternative, where he's had five entries. Pop culture knows him more for his big hair and his short-lived marriage to Julia Roberts than for his music.
  • The Lost Trailers are known almost entirely for their 2008 hit "Holler Back". Their other claim to fame is that they were the first act to record "Chicken Fried" before Zac Brown Band's version became a chart-topping debut; the Trailers version was withdrawn just as it got released, due to the Trailers' label ignoring Zac Brown's request that the band not release it as a single.
  • Maddie & Tae are known almost solely for their chart-topping debut single "Girl in a Country Song", as it was the song that ignited the backlash against "bro-country" movement. While followup "Fly" got to #8, this was largely due to the buzz surrounding "Girl" and it failed to leave much of an impact otherwise.
  • Henry Mancini is by no means a one-hit wonder as a film composer, with multiple notable hits such as the "Pink Panther" theme and "Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet". But at country, his only hit was backing Charley Pride on the 1972 release "All His Children", the theme which Mancini composed and produced for the film of Ken Kesey's Sometimes a Great Notion.
  • Much like C. W. McCall below, Jay Hughley was an advertising executive who wanted to take advantage of the C.B. craze of The '70s. Asked one day to incorporate C.B. jargon into a jingle, he purchased a citizen's band radio, listened for awhile and took notes ... and after writing his jingle came up with a tune called "The White Knight." Recording as Cledus Maggard and the Citizen's Band, he took the comic tale about a truck driver suckered into a corrupt highway patrolman's speed trap (full of mid-70s C.B. jargon) to #1 on the country charts and top 20 of the pop charts. Nothing else he put out afterward made top 40 in either chart.
  • Brad Martin was one of two out-of nowhere, traditionally-minded singers who had a hit in 2002 (the aforementioned Kevin Denney being the other). Martin hit #15 with "Before I Knew Better" and completely disappeared afterward, outside a very brief stint with the duo Martin Ramey in 2008.
  • The Mavericks had several minor radio hits, several platinum albums, and a Grammy, but their only major radio hit was 1996's "All You Ever Do Is Bring Me Down". The song also credited Tejano accordionist Flaco Jiménez, who has no other notable chart entries despite a sizeable discography. The Mavericks were also one-hit wonders in the UK with the #4 hit "Dance the Night Away" two years later.
  • Shane McAnally (no relation to Mac McAnally) had his only top 40 hit as a singer with "Are Your Eyes Still Blue" in 1999. After going away for several years, he resurfaced as a prominent Nashville songwriter and producer in The New '10s, working with artists such as Kacey Musgraves, Sam Hunt, and Old Dominion.
  • C.W. McCall — in real life, an advertising executive by the name of William Fries — recorded a series of spoken-word songs about trucking and life on the road. None were more famous than "Convoy." The CB-jargon laced song about rebellious truck drivers frustrated with paying tolls and various other restrictions topped both the country and pop charts in January 1976. Even though he did have one other top 5 country hit (the sentimental "Roses for Mama" a year later) and the now-obscure song "Wolf Creek Pass" crack the top 40 a year earlier, McCall is forever known for "Convoy." After retiring from music, McCall served under his real name as the mayor of Ouray, Colorado.
  • Brian McComas is known entirely for his late-2003 hit "99.9% Sure (I've Never Been Here Before)", but a label restructure killed his first album while also keeping his second one in the vaults.
  • Richie McDonald had several hits as the lead singer of Lonestar, but on his own, his only hit was as an Advertised Extra on Mindy McCready's 1996 hit "Maybe He'll Notice Her Now".
  • Pake McEntire, the oldest brother of country superstar Reba McEntire, had only one hit, with 1986's "Savin' My Love for You".
  • Mark McGuinn had a dark-horse hit in 2001 with "Mrs. Steven Rudy", but was unable to follow up strongly due to being on a very small independent label that closed up soon afterward. However, he also wrote Lonestar's 2002 hit "Unusually Unusual".
  • Roger McGuinn (no relation) and Chris Hillman are best known as members of The Byrds, with Hillman having also been a member of the Flying Burrito Brothers and the Desert Rose Band, among others. But on their own, McGuinn and Hillman only had one hit: their cover of Bob Dylan's "You Ain't Going Nowhere" (previously recorded by the Byrds as well), with an uncredited backing from the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. This rendition hit #6 in 1989. McGuinn was also a one-hit wonder on the Mainstream Rock charts with "King of the Hill" in 1991.
  • Although heartland rock has been a major influence on country, John Mellencamp only had one major hit at country radio, as a guest vocalist on Travis Tritt's 2004 hit "What Say You". Mellencamp previously scraped the lower regions of the chart with his 1989 song "Jackie Brown", and released "Our Country" to the format in 2007 after it was popularized in Chevrolet commercials, but the latter only notched a single week at #39. Obviously, Mellencamp remains anything but a one-hit wonder in pop and rock.
  • Ken Mellons, "Jukebox Junkie". Mellons' tribute to the jukebox hit #8 in 1994. He had two songs that very barely made the top 40, and after that, nothing.
  • Ned Miller has his only claim to fame with "From a Jack to a King". Issued in 1957, it didn't chart the first time around, but it became a massive crossover upon rerelease five years later. While Ned had a few other chart hits, most of them were long since forgotten. Contemporary audiences may know it better from Ricky Van Shelton's cover in 1988.
  • Priscilla Mitchell had a #1 hit as a duet vocalist on Roy Drusky's "Yes, Mr. Peters" in 1965 but never saw Top 40 otherwise. She was married to the far more popular country singer Jerry Reed from 1959 until his 2008 death.
  • Shane Minor had a lone Top 20 hit in 1999 with "Slave to the Habit", a very rare outside cut from Toby Keith. None of his other songs went anywhere, and his lone album didn't even chart. He has been more popular as a songwriter.
  • Robert Mitchum had a very successful acting career, but as a singer, his only major chart hit was "Little Old Wine Drinker Me" in 1967.
  • William Michael Morgan had a big hit in late 2016 with "I Met a Girl", which hit #2 on the country airplay charts. His follow-up "Missing" went nowhere and he disappeared very quickly afterwards.
  • Jason Mraz is not a one-hit wonder at pop, but his only country chart entry is a duet vocal on Hunter Hayes' 2013 release "Everybody's Got Somebody but Me". He also co-wrote Zac Brown Band's "Jump Right In" earlier in the year.
  • While Michael Martin Murphey has a large catalog of hits, his son Ryan Murphey had exactly one, accompanying his father on the 1988 release "Talkin' to the Wrong Man", which hit #4.
  • Jim Mundy hit the charts with his debut single "The River's Too Wide", later recorded by Olivia Newton-John. Nothing else took off, but his song "I'm Knee Deep in Loving You" was later Covered Up by Dave & Sugar.
  • Kacey Musgraves has had only one major country radio hit: her debut release, "Merry Go Round". While "Follow Your Arrow" was a popular download and even won a Song of the Year award from the Country Music Association, this was in spite of near-total rejection from country radio. Musgraves has had more hits as a songwriter, including Miranda Lambert's Top 5 hit "Mama's Broken Heart" and a few songs from the TV series Nashville. Despite the lack of interest in her music from country radio, Musgraves has become one of the most critically acclaimed and popular country artists of the 2010s with pop and indie rock audiences. None of the singles from her 2018 album Golden Hour were major hits on country radio, but the album garnered critical acclaim and the Grammy for Album of the Year.
  • N Sync are obviously not a one-hit wonder at pop, but at country, their only hit was backing Alabama on a cover of the former's "God Must Have Spent a Little More Time on You", which hit #3.
  • Tim O'Brien sang duet vocals on Kathy Mattea's "The Battle Hymn of Love", which reached #9 in 1990. The song is O'Brien's only chart entry, likely due to bluegrass being his main genre.
  • Mark O'Connor is a noted bluegrass musician and classical composer. His only radio hit came in 1991 with a cover of Carl Perkins' "Restless" which featured Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs, and Steve Wariner contributing on both vocals and guitar. O'Connor himself is not a singer, but he was credited as the lead artist due to it coming from one of his albums, and he contributes prominently on fiddle.
  • Kenny O'Dell was a one-hit wonder in pop music in 1967 with "Beautiful People", and again in country music with "Let's Shake Hands and Come Out Lovin'" eleven years later. He was more successful as a songwriter, including "Mama He's Crazy" by The Judds, "Behind Closed Doors" by Charlie Rich, and "Lizzie and the Rainman" by Tanya Tucker.
  • The O'Kanes, a duo consisting of Jamie O'Hara and Kieran Kane, had multiple top 10 hits but are known only for "Can't Stop My Heart from Loving You", which topped the charts in 1987. Both members had multiple songwriting credits before, during, and after their tenure, and Kane had several low-charting singles before the duo's foundation. After they split up, Kane became a bluegrass artist and co-founded the Dead Reckoning Records label, while O'Hara largely continued to focus on songwriting.
  • Old Crow Medicine Show are one of the most revered acts on the Americana music scene, but "Wagon Wheel" is likely the only song of theirs casual audiences are familiar with. The song never made any Billboard chart, but was certified platinum by the RIAA. Most people know Darius Rucker's cover instead of Old Crow's version, but they're still generally known as the original performers of the song. What people might not know is that the tune is based on an unfinished Bob Dylan song from the early 1970s, and Dylan is even credited as a co-writer.
  • Orville Couch had a #5 hit in 1962 with "Hello Trouble" and was never heard from again. The song was Covered Up in 1989 by the aforementioned Desert Rose Band, who had many other hits.
  • James Otto's "Just Got Started Lovin' You" was a #1 smash and the biggest country hit of 2008, but nothing before or after made much noise on the charts. As with many other country one-hit wonders, he was more successful as a songwriter.
  • Buck Owens was certainly not a one-hit wonder on the country charts, but his only visit to the Billboard Top 40 was with "I've Got a Tiger by the Tail", which peaked at #25 in 1965.
  • Stella Parton, a sister of the very popular Dolly Parton, had only one Top 10 hit with "I Want to Hold You in My Dreams Tonight" in 1972.
  • Eric Paslay had his only hit in late 2013-early 2014 with "Friday Night", a song that was written by him but originally performed by Lady Antebellum. He also hit Top 20 with "Song About a Girl" and "She Don't Love You", but neither is as remembered, and his second album got stuck in Development Hell.
  • Minnie Pearl, the Southern comedienne known for her colorful flower hat with the $1.98 price tag and her appearances on Hee Haw, had several recording credits to her name. But her only hit was the #10 "Giddyup Go - Answer", an Answer Song to Red Sovine's sentimental trucking song "Giddyup Go".
  • Danielle Peck had her only hit in 2006 with "Findin' a Good Man". Her second album was only released to digital retailers due to poor single performance.
  • Perfect Stranger had "You Have the Right to Remain Silent" in 1995. Curb Records picked up the song after a small indie label managed to get it into the top 40. It managed a decent crossover (#4 country, #61 pop), but the band never even hit the country top 40 again, and a second album was delayed for many years.
  • Charlie Phillips had his only chart hit in 1962 with "I Guess I'll Never Learn". He also wrote the pop standard "Sugartime", made famous by the McGuire Sisters.
  • Ray Pillow (yes, that's really his name) is known for "I'll Take the Dog", his #9 duet with Jean Shepard, and nothing else. He later founded the independent Sycamore Records label, and worked in the A&R department of Capitol Records Nashville.
  • Pinmonkey had a hit in 2002 with "Barbed Wire and Roses", but followups withered, the drummer quit, and a second major-label album never materalized.
  • Bobby Pinson had his only hit with "Don't Ask Me How I Know" in 2005. After nothing else took off, he quit singing and focused on songwriting, landing several hits for Sugarland and Toby Keith.
  • Pirates of the Mississippi had a #15 hit in 1991 with "Feed Jake", one of only five singles of theirs that even hit Top 40. The song became quite famous at the time for having a Gay Aesop, an extreme rarity in the usually-conservative genre. After they broke up in 1996, lead singer Bill McCorvey wrote Montgomery Gentry's 1999 hit "Lonely and Gone".
  • Anita Pointer. As a member of the R&B group The Pointer Sisters, she had several hits on the pop and R&B charts. But independently, her only hit was as a duet partner on Earl Thomas Conley's "Too Many Times", which hit #2 in 1986.
  • Rachel Proctor, despite writing several songs for other artists, put out only one album, which contained only one hit: "Me and Emily" in 2004.
  • Jeanne Pruett is known almost exclusively for her 1973 hit "Satin Sheets", which was also a pop crossover. Although she had a couple more Top 10 entries, they've been forgotten.
  • RaeLynn had a hit in 2015 with "God Made Girls" after becoming a quarter-finalist on The Voice three years earlier. Despite the song's success, it was only ever released on a digital EP, and none of the followups went anywhere. While she did release a full album in 2017, its singles fared poorly. She was also one of many featured vocalists on "Boys 'Round Here", listed below.
  • Jon Randall is somewhat famous as a bluegrass singer-songwriter and occasional record producer, but his only top 40 hit as a singer was a duet vocal on then-wife Lorrie Morgan's "By My Side" in 1996.
  • Mike Reid, formerly of the Cincinnati Bengals, had a number one hit in 1991 with "Walk on Faith." Although he had previously reached number 2 duetting with Ronnie Milsap on "Old Folks," he never reached the top 10 again on his own. However, he had a huge catalog of hits that he wrote for other artists throughout The '80s and early 90's, primarily for Milsap.
  • The Remingtons. Comprising Richard Mainegra and Rick Yancey, formerly of also-one hit wonder group Cymarron (see their entry at "Soft Rock"), and Jimmy Griffin of the successful band Bread, they were the first act signed to the now-defunct BNA Records (which later had success with Lonestar and Kenny Chesney). They hit Top 10 right out of the gate with "A Long Time Ago" in late 1991-early 1992, and nothing else took off. Denny Henson (of Dan Fogelberg's backing band) replaced Yancey on their second and final album, which completely flopped. Griffin and Yancey had later work in other projects, but Mainegra and Henson seemed to completely disappear afterward.
  • Lionel Richie has a huge catalog of R&B and pop hits, but his only major success at country was "Deep River Woman", which featured guest vocals from Alabama and got to #10 in 1986. "Stuck on You" had gotten some country radio airplay two years prior, but it only got to #24 there despite doing much better on other formats.
  • Ricochet is often thought of as a one-hit wonder for their 1996 chart-topper "Daddy's Money"; although two other songs hit Top 10, and two more hit Top 20, none are remembered today. Quite possibly their only other claim to fame is that their rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" (from a 1996 NASCAR promotional album) made them not only the first country act to chart a rendition of that songnote , but also one of only a few country acts to chart an a cappella songnote .
  • Jeannie C. Riley hit #1 on the country and pop charts in 1968 with "Harper Valley P.T.A.," and today it remains her only Top 40 song on the pop charts. At country, however, she had several more Top 10 hits, but none are well remembered.
  • Julie Roberts (not to be confused with multi-hit wonder actress Julia Roberts) had her only hit in 2004 with "Break Down Here", but never saw Top 40 again, despite the album selling gold. Interestingly, she competed on The Voice in 2013 but failed to make a team.
  • Kenny Rogers is by no means a one-hit wonder. But several of his duet partners have been:
    • Sheena Easton is very popular in her native Scotland, and has had several pop hits in the US. But her only country success was as a duet partner on Rogers' cover of Bob Seger's "We've Got Tonight".
    • Kim Carnes is not a one-hit wonder on the pop charts, but her only Top 40 visit to the country charts was as a duet partner on Rogers' "Don't Fall in Love with a Dreamer". A later duet, "What About Me?" (which also featured James Ingram) was a big crossover but only got to #70 on the country charts.
  • Tim Rushlow was originally the lead singer for Little Texas from 1988 to 1997, singing lead on all but one of their single releases in that timespan. When the band broke up, he tried to go solo in 2000 on Atlantic Records, but just as his song "She Misses Him" reached #8, Atlantic Records closed its Nashville division. An indie label picked up the album and issued two more singles, but they went nowhere. He became a one-hit wonder a second time as frontman of the six-piece band Rushlow, which had a Top 20 hit in 2003 with "I Can't Be Your Friend" before a label restructure killed their momentum. Tim Rushlow released two singles with bandmate and cousin Doni Harris as Rushlow Harris in 2006, but neither reached Top 40 and the two broke up. As for the other members of Rushlow? Tully Kennedy, Kurt Allison, and Rich Redmond joined Jason Aldean's road band (which, along with David Fanning, performs double duty as the Record Producer team New Voice Entertainment), while Billy Welch joined Jake Owen's road band.
  • Johnny Russell is somewhat well known for his songwriting (including Buck Owens' "Act Naturally" and George Strait's "Let's Fall to Pieces Together"), but as a singer, his only hit was "Rednecks, White Socks, and Blue Ribbon Beer", which hit #4 in 1973.
  • Rock singer Leon Russell is yet another artist who can claim a #1 country hit but nothing else that came even close on that chart, either as himself or as "Hank Wilson", the pseudonym under which he releases most of his country music work. In 1978, Russell and Willie Nelson had a #1 with a cover of "Heartbreak Hotel". (Russell has also had two top 40 pop hits, neither of which was Heartbreak Hotel.)
  • John Wesley Ryles is almost exclusively known for his 1968 debut "Kay", which hit #9. Although he had one higher-charting song ("Once in a Lifetime Thing" in 1977), it has been forgotten. "Kay" was also his only crossover, nicking the bottom of the Hot 100 and the Australian charts. Ryles continued to record until the late 1980s, and has largely worked as a session vocalist ever since.
  • Lady Antebellum has had several country music hits, along with the massive crossovers that were "Need You Now" and "Just a Kiss" as the front-runners of their many trips to the Top 40 of the Hot 100. However, group member Hillary Scott qualifies twice in her own right: first in 2010, she was a featured vocalist on Christian musician Dave Barnes' #9 AC hit "Christmas Tonight". Then in 2016, she recorded a gospel album with her sister and parents (including her mother, the aforementioned Linda Davis) as The Scott Family. This album produced that entity's only hit in "Thy Will", which topped the Christian charts.
  • Sunday Sharpe had a hit in 1974 with "I'm Having Your Baby", her gender-flipped version of Paul Anka's "You're Having My Baby", and was never heard from again.
  • Canadian First Nations singer Crystal Shawanda was one-and-done in the States with her 2008 release "You Can Let Go". Unlike most other Canadian artists who only have one hit stateside, she didn't fare any better on the Canadian charts, although she has continued to record.
  • Blake Shelton is not himself an example, but he has repeatedly collaborated with artists who qualify:
    • His 2013 Massive Multiplayer Crossover "Boys 'Round Here" credited itself as "featuring Pistol Annies and Friends". Pistol Annies was a side project consisting of country superstar Miranda Lambert (Shelton's wife from 2010-15) plus Ashley Monroe (see below) and Angaleena Presley, which recorded two successful albums but had no other real hits.note  Meanwhile, the "and friends" comprised the songwriters (Rhett Akins, Dallas Davidsonnote , and Craig Wiseman), plus producer Scott Hendricks and The Voice contestant RaeLynnnote . Every "friend" on the song is therefore a one-hit wonder save for Akins (who had two hits of his own in 1995-96 before focusing more on songwriting) and RaeLynn, who is listed above.
    • Gwen Sebastian was already active as an independently-signed singer before she became a contestant on The Voice, on which Shelton is a judge. Her placement on that show got her a touring gig as one of his backing vocalists, and in 2014, she was an Advertised Extra on his #1 hit "My Eyes". This exposure didn't boost her career any, and she has never gotten past #58 otherwise.
    • Ashley Monroe herself is probably the poster child for Attention Deficit Creator Disorder in country music; in addition to the two Pistol Annies albums, she's done three solo albums, some work with the songwriting project Ten Out of Tenn, and co-written #1 hits for Miranda Lambert and Jason Aldean. Despite her prolificacy, her duet with Shelton on his 2014 hit "Lonely Tonight" is her only real hit as a singer; she was also a duet vocalist on Train's "Bruises" two years prior, but it was far less successful.
  • Rockin' Sidney was one of the top musicians of zydeco, a creole R&B-blues fusion genre. "My Toot Toot" was the only song of his to ever become a major hit, reaching top 20 on the country charts in 1985.
  • Schuyler, Knoblock, and Overstreet, or S-K-O for short, was a trio consisting of songwriters Thom Schuyler, J. Fred Knoblock, and Paul Overstreet. They had a #1 hit in 1986 with "Baby's Got a New Baby". While two other singles hit Top 10 (one of which was as S-K-B following Overstreet's departure and replacement with Craig Bickhardt), both were quickly forgotten. Knoblock had two Top 10 country hits before the group's foundation (one of which was the aforementioned duet with Susan Anton) and a crossover pop smash with "Why Not Me", while Overstreet had nine Top 10 hits (of which two went to #1) between 1987 and 1992. All four members also had varying degrees of songwriting success before and after the trio's short life, with Overstreet also being the most successful in that regard.
  • Earl Scott had a #8 hit in 1962 with "Then a Tear Fell", but was never heard from again. His son John Batdorf was also a one-hit wonder in the pop band Silver.
  • Bob Seger is a very famous rock artist, but at country, his only hit was a cover of Rodney Crowell's "Shame on the Moon" in 1982.
  • Jessica Simpson has had multiple pop hits, but only one country hit with 2008's "Come On Over".
  • Another big name in the field of truck-driving country is Red Simpson, who hit #4 with "I'm a Truck" in 1972. He only charted eight times total, and most of his singles didn't even make Top 40. However, his song "The Highway Patrol" is somewhat well known despite only peaking at #39.
  • Margie Singleton had her only hit in 1964 as a duet vocalist on the far more successful Faron Young's "Keeping Up with the Joneses".
  • Canaan Smith, a former The Amazing Race contestant, scored a #1 hit in 2015 with "Love You Like That" and vanished afterwards.
  • Sammi Smith (not to be confused with modern-day pop/R&B singer Sam Smith, who is not a one hit wonder) is known only for her 1971 #1 hit "Help Me Make It Through the Night", written by the aforementioned Kris Kristofferson. She had a few hits that scraped the bottom of the top 10 but only "Help Me" is still remembered. On pop, it is played perfectly straight, as "Help Me" hit #8 and she never made it past #77 afterwards.
  • The Stanley Brothers had their only hit in 1960 with "How Far to Little Rock". Ralph Stanley would later be a one-hit wonder in 2006 with his (uncredited) duet vocals on Josh Turner's hit "Me and God". Despite their lack of chart success, Ralph Stanley is a well known name in bluegrass.
  • Kenny Starr had only one hit: a #2 cover of David Geddes' "The Blind Man in the Bleachers" in 1975.
  • Steel Magnolia, the Season 2 winners of CMT's Can You Duet. They had a Top 5 hit with their debut single "Keep On Lovin' You" (not to be confused with the REO Speedwagon song) in 2009, but Executive Meddling delayed their album's release while also blunting the momentum of any other singles. They broke up about a year after their fourth and final single (literally, as they were boyfriend and girlfriend). Joshua Scott Jones went solo, and Meghan Linsey was later runner-up on Season 8 of The Voice.
  • Keith Stegall, although he had a handful of hits as a songwriter in The '80s, had only one major hit on his own as a singer with the 1985 release "Pretty Lady". When his well had run dry in both songwriting and singing, he became a Record Producer, and outside a one-time return to singing in 1996 with the album Passages and a handful of further songwriting credits, he has largely been a producer ever since. Most notably, Stegall produced all but one of Alan Jackson's albums.
  • Tommy Shane Steiner had a #2 hit in 2001 with "What If She's an Angel" but never saw Top 40 again and never released a second album.
  • In the early 1990s, Restless Heart lead singer Larry Stewart departed for a solo career. He hit Top 5 with "Alright Already" in 1993, but had no successful followups despite putting out four major-label albums, and he ultimately rejoined Restless Heart for good in 2003.
  • Doug Supernaw is known almost entirely for his 1993 chart-topper "I Don't Call Him Daddy", a Cover of an obscure Kenny Rogers cut. While he also had Top 5 hits with "Reno" and "Not Enough Hours in the Night", both songs are largely forgotten, with "Reno" in particular being known more for the negative reception the song got in Reno, Nevada than for the song itself.
  • Billy Swan hit big in 1974 with his debut release "I Can Help", a #1 smash at pop and country which also scored him a hit internationally. Nothing else he put out made a dent, although he continued to chart as late as 1987.
  • Sunny Sweeney had a #10 hit with "From a Table Away" but never saw higher than lower 30's after that.
  • The Swon Brothers, finalists on Season 4 of The Voice, had a hit with their debut release "Later On" but were never heard from again. They've had songs from the show chart from digital sales alone, including the top 20 cover "Danny's Song", but none of them got airplay.
  • While country-pop singer Sylvia (surname Kirby; not to be confused with soul singer Sylvia Robinson, who is mentioned in the Rhythm and Blues subpage) had multiple Top 10 country hits and two #1's, she is almost exclusively known for the second of those, "Nobody", in 1982. "Nobody" was the only one of her singles to achieve significant crossover. She retired at the end of The '80s and became a life coach, although she sometimes comes out of retirement to tour with her boyfriend, songwriter Bobby Tomberlin.
  • A Thousand Horses had a #1 hit with "Smoke" in 2015 due to sponsored airplay from iHeartMedia's "On the Verge" program (which promotes singles from up-and-coming artists), but radio wasn't interested in the followups.
  • Billy Thunderkloud & the Chieftones, a band composed of First Nations musicians from Canada, had a hit in 1975 with "What Time of Day" (which featured uncredited children's vocals from the Franklin Road Academy) but never hit with anything else.
  • Cyndi Thomson had a big #1 hit in 2001 with "What I Really Meant to Say", but soon quit her recording contract due to fear of Follow Up Failure. She later wrote Gary Allan's 2005 hit "Life Ain't Always Beautiful".
  • Josh Thompson hit #15 with "Way Out Here", also his only gold single. While his other singles peaked in the same region, they have all been forgotten. Thompson's second album for Columbia Records was stuck in Development Hell due to underperforming singles, but it was released as a pair of digital-only EPs after he had another album on Broken Bow Records. He's also had a few hits as a songwriter.
  • Trent Tomlinson is known almost entirely for his 2006 ballad "One Wing in the Fire", which hit #11. He never put out a second album due to a combination of single underperformance and label closure, although he also wrote hits for Parmalee and Brett Young many years later.
  • Tompall & the Glaser Brothers are known almost entirely for their #2 hit "Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)" in 1981. The group had been around since The '60s, but during a hiatus in The '70s, Tompall Glaser departed for a solo career, where he hit with "Put Another Log on the Fire (The Male Chauvinist National Anthem)" in 1975. After the group broke up again in 1982, Jim Glaser had his only solo hit with "You're Gettin' to Me Again", which topped the charts in 1984. (The third member, Chuck Glaser, charted only one solo single, but it didn't make the top 40.)
  • The Tractors had a debut album that went double-platinum entirely off its lone top 40 hit, the #11 "Baby Likes to Rock It". The song is referenced in Stephen King's Desperation, which is set in a part of the country that would have radios blaring random country songs like that.
  • Trick Pony had eight chart entries, but the only one that was a hit was the #4 "On a Night Like This" in 2001. After their third album in 2005, lead singer Heidi Newfield quit, and eventually became a one-hit wonder in her own right with the 2008 release "Johnny & June". While Newfield later rejoined her former band in The New '10s, nothing seems to have come of the reunion.
  • Bonnie Tyler is known for several big hits in the 1980s, such as "Total Eclipse of the Heart" and "Holding Out for a Hero". But back in The '70s, she was a country singer, and had her only chart success there with the #10 "It's a Heartache".
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd and .38 Special are not one-hit wonders by any means. But the side-project duo of the former's Johnny Van Zant and the latter's Donnie Van Zant (both brothers of Skynyrd's former lead singer, Ronnie Van Zant), creatively called Van Zant, are. The two had some modest success on rock radio early on, but on country were one and done with the Top 10 "Help Somebody".
  • Jerry Wallace had a long chart history spanning from 1958 to 1980, including the Top 10 pop hit "Primrose Lane" in 1959, but the only song for which most people seem to remember him is "If You Leave Me Tonight I'll Cry" in 1972. It was his only #1 hit, and its popularity was bolstered by being featured in the Night Gallery episode "The Tune in Dan's Cafe".
  • Aaron Watson had been popular in his native Texas since the late 1990s, but had only one major radio airplay hit with the #10 "Outta Style" in 2017.
  • Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell are known almost exclusively for the instrumental "Dueling Banjos", which was a #5 country, #2 Hot 100, and #1 AC hit due to the popular scene in Deliverance featuring the song.
  • Billy Edd Wheeler was one of the few artists on the country charts to have a top 10 single and no other top 40 hits. His 1964 song "Ode to the Little Brown Shack Out Back" reached third place on the charts, but his second-highest peaking single just missed the top 50. He was more successful as a songwriter, including "Jackson" by Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, and "Coward of the County" by Kenny Rogers.
  • Drake White had a hit in late 2015-early 2016 with "Livin' the Dream", but the followup stalled out and he was never heard from again.
  • While country-bluegrass group The Whites had several hits in the first half of The '80s, group member Sharon White had only one independently: 1987's "Love Can't Ever Get Better Than This", a duet with her longtime husband, Ricky Skaggs (who is not a one-hit wonder).
  • Chuck Wicks had a top 5 hit with "Stealing Cinderella", but nothing else connected with listeners. He didn't even get a second album before the label dropped him. Wicks was later a finalist on Dancing with the Stars.
  • John & Audrey Wiggins released "Has Anybody Seen Amy" in 1994. Despite releasing a second album in 1997, they never had another hit and disbanded. John later had some popularity as a songwriter, including #1 hits for Joe Nichols and Blake Shelton.
  • Harlow Wilcox and the Oakies had their only hit in 1969 with the instrumental "Groovy Grubworm". Although it did not crack top 40 of the country charts, it hit #30 on the Hot 100 and even spent a week at #1 on the RPM country music charts in Canada. No chart saw anything else from Wilcox.
  • Wild Rose, a very rare all-female band in the genre, had a hit in 1989 with "Breakin' New Ground", but a series of label mergers cut them off quickly. Group member Wanda Vick became a prominent session musician, and drummer Nancy Given is the ex-wife of Diamond Rio drummer Brian Prout.
  • Canadian family group The Wilkinsons had a #3 hit in 1998 with "26 Cents" but all followups failed to make an impact stateside. However, they had more chart success in Canada.
  • Don Williams is clearly not a one hit wonder on the country charts (with 17 #1 singles), but his only Top-40 hit on the Hot 100 was 1980's "I Believe in You".
  • Hank Williams, Jr. is by no means an example, but some of his collaborations qualify:
    • His late 1986 chart-topping cover of his father's "Mind Your Own Business" featured several guest vocalists. Of these, Reba McEntire and Willie Nelson are clearly not one-hit wonders in any genre. However, it was the only time that popular rock singer Tom Petty saw the country charts, and it was also the only credit anywhere for evangelist Reverend Ike.
    • 1988's "Young Country", which went to #2, was a Massive Multiplayer Crossover featuring Butch Baker, Steve Earle, Highway 101, Dana McVicker, Marty Stuart, Keith Whitley, and T. Graham Brown. While all of the other named acts had several hits, Dana McVicker and Butch Baker never saw the top 40 otherwise. However, McVicker sang backing vocals for Travis Tritt for several years.
    • Williams' son, Hank Williams III, had just one entry on the country charts. 2001's "I Don't Know", from his debut solo album Risin' Outlaw, made it to #50. Hank III now hates that album and hasn't played that song in years, to the point where his current fans may not even know it exists. Although he's remained popular, the punk-influenced Alternative Country style he adopted on subsequent albums hasn't been particularly friendly to country radio.
  • Leona Williams. On her own, she released a long string of singles between 1968 and 1986. Almost none even charted, and the few that did failed to make Top 40. But in 1978, she paired up with Merle Haggard to record the CB radio-themed "The Bull and the Beaver", which went to #8 on the country charts and became her only Top 40 hit.
  • Tex Williams is not a one-hit wonder on the country chart, but his 1947 #1 hit "Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette)" was his only success on pop radio.
  • The Willis Brothers recorded eleven albums for Starday Records, but had only one hit with the truck-driving song "Give Me Forty Acres (To Turn This Rig Around)" in 1964.
  • Norro Wilson had only one hit with 1970's "Do It to Someone You Love", which was never even put on an album. He quit singing in the late 70s and became more famous as a Record Producer.
  • Stephanie Winslow had one top 10 hit with a cover of Fleetwood Mac's "Say You Love Me" in 1979. The only other song of hers that came close to being a hit was her #14 remake of Roy Orbison's "Crying".
  • Lee Ann Womack had several hits on the country charts between 1997 and 2009, but the only song by which most people outside the country demographic would remember her is her 2000 smash "I Hope You Dance", which also topped the AC charts and went to #14 on the Hot 100. Except for the AC remix, it gave full chart credit to a counterpoint sung by Sons of the Desert, who already qualify in their own right with their 1997 Top 10 country hit "Whatever Comes First". They were also featured in a prominent call and response on Ty Herndon's 1998 #1 hit "It Must Be Love", but unlike on Womack's song, were not credited.
  • Charlie Worsham, formerly of the obscure band KingBilly, had a hit with "Could It Be" but was never heard from again.
  • The Wreckers was a one-off duo consisting of Michelle Branch and Jessica Harp, are known almost entirely for their 2006 chart-topping debut "Leave the Pieces". While they did hit top 10 with "My, Oh My", it failed to leave much of an impact, and their third single only got to #33. Both members were also guest vocalists on Santana's "I'm Feeling You" a year prior, but they were credited as themselves and not as The Wreckers. Branch returned to her solo career and Harp tried to record solo material as well, but neither made much of an impact.
  • Chely Wright's only major hit was 1999's "Single White Female", a #1 country hit from her fourth studio album. Her previous album had a #14 hit with "Shut Up and Drive", and she would later hit #11 with "Female"'s followup "It Was", but "Single White Female" still remains the only song by which most would know her. "The Bumper of My SUV" in 2005 got some buzz, but this was more for its highly polemic flagwaving lyrics and the fact that members of her fan club had placed radio requests while posing as friends or family of military members. And, in fact, the way most people know her is from her coming out of the closet as a lesbian in 2010...which makes her one hit, a love song about getting a guy to notice her through newspaper personal ads, a "Funny Aneurysm" Moment.
  • Johnnie Wright had several hits with his brother-in-law Jack Anglin as the duo Johnnie & Jack, most notably with a rendition of "(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely". After Anglin died in a car accident, Wright forged out on his own and had his only major hit in 1965 with the war protest song "Hello Vietnam". Wright's only other claim to fame is being the husband of Kitty Wells, best known for being the first female to have a #1 hit on the country charts.
    • Wright and Wells's daughter, Ruby Wright, was also a one-hit wonder with her 1964 release "Dern Ya", an Answer Song to Roger Miller's "Dang Me".
  • Michelle Wright (no relation to either of the above two). In the U.S., her only hit was 1992's "Take It Like a Man" at #10, although she also scraped the bottom of the charts a few other times. She has been far more popular in her native Canada, with a long string of hits dating from 1987 (including "New Fool at an Old Game", which was Covered Up by Reba McEntire in the US, and a rendition of "Safe in the Arms of Love" released concurrently with Martina McBride's version in 1995 which ended up outpeaking the latter in Canada).
  • Female pianist Del Wood had a top 5 hit in 1951 on both the pop and country charts with her novelty take on "Down Yonder". She never returned to either chart afterwards.
  • Yankee Grey had a Top 10 hit in late 1999 with "All Things Considered", but a label closure and the departure of their lead vocalist blunted any further chances of success.
  • James and Michael Younger hit in 1982 with "Nothing but the Radio On", but never saw Top 40 again after that.

Alternative Title(s): One Hit Wonder Country

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