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Demonic Spiders / First-Person Shooter

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Make sure you've got plenty of ammo and med-kits before you take on these Demonic Spiders.

Games with their own pages:


  • In Killing Floor, Fleshpounds are the strongest enemies in the game besides the boss. They have spinning maces for hands, and can activate a "rage mode" after taking damage in which they run incredibly fast and kill in 1-2 hits, all while having the highest health of any normal enemy. While the game has the mercy of holding off on spawning them until the final waves, it often spawns 2 or 3 of them relatively close to you, which have a nasty habit of coming around corners and mauling you. That roar that signals their ragemode will haunt your dreams. They get even worse in the Objective maps, where now they spawn from the second wave, far before anyone will have any decent weapons to take care of them with and where the objectives themselves make you a sitting duck for them (slowed movement from carrying objects or being forced to stand in one place for obscene lengths of time, etc.).
    • Though it's not quite as fearsome as the Fleshpound, the Scrake will pretty much absorb the squad's firepower with casual disregard, but when the Scrake gets badly damaged, it will suddenly be consumed by rage and charge with chainsaw buzzing toward the hapless survivors. Inexplicably, it can also shrug off explosions that would've felled a Fleshpound, causing situations where the brief reprieve brought by a detonated pipebomb is shattered by a royally pissed-off Scrake. Granted, they can be stunlocked by berserkers, but that leaves the berserker vulnerable to being surrounded by foes.
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    • For a bunch of emaciated girls, Sirens have puzzling resilience to damage, but that isn't the most annoying part about them. Their screams cause obscene amounts of damage, ignore equipped body armor, destroy any explosives in flight, and mess with the screen interface so badly it's like the virtual equivalent of having cataracts. Even worse, if you're within range, they never stop screaming. Getting killed by a Siren while dealing with thornier threats such as Scrakes or Fleshpounds is impossibly frustrating.
    • Husks have the third highest HP value amongst the non-boss Specimens, and are one of the few enemies with access to ranged firepower. In this case, firepower translates to flying bolts of flame that explode violently and leaves its targets sizzling. To make matters worse, Husks have extraordinary aim, and can sometimes appear in duos or trios, leading to scenes where a wounded survivor is desperately trying to run away from a fusillade of fire, only to get sauteed by a well-placed shot moments away from safety. On the higher difficulties they can basically make you feel like you're playing a Bullet Hell game - like Sirens, the shots will never stop coming until you kill them.
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    • Gorefasts show up in the very first wave, and as such might seem like lowly cannon fodder. Turn up the difficulty however and they'll become more like a blade-wielding Sonic the Hedgehog; their increased speed and damage means that they'll catch up to you in seconds and either ruin your body armor with a few slashes, or for the players without any armor left, they'll gut you faster than you can say "gorefast". They're also one of the most common enemies which means you'll have to face these annoyingly lethal guys often.
  • Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire on the N64 was a great game, but it was killed by one simple enemy: the Wampas. Fortunately, you're only forced to deal with a few of them.
  • Due to its unforgiving gameplay and lack of saves, nearly anything in the marine portion of the original Alien vs. Predator game was a contender for this category. Extra special mention goes to facehuggers, which were nearly impossible to see or hear and only had to make a successful touch attack against your knees to kill you. Hitting a tiny and swift object at an acute angle is very difficult. Doing it in the dark while being attacked by bigger enemies is beyond frustrating. It didn't help that for a good portion of the game you weren't given a suitable weapon for the job - and trying to kill facehuggers with the pulse rifle would result in a lot of rounds being uselessly expended against the floor. Things got noticeably easier once you were given the flamethrower.
  • Left 4 Dead:
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    • One could say the survivors themselves are demonic spiders in VS mode, for the bots anyway. Some can keep shoving you, almost Cherry Tapping you to death while you sit there unable to do anything since each shove is a knock back. And then there's their godlike accuracy with the guns. If you want to see survivor AI "hax" skills, observe one in first person mode while you are a spectator. If the bot knows there is a special infected somewhere, their crosshairs will practically lock onto it, even if the zombie is very far away or behind something that a human player cannot see through.
    • Hunters are opportunistic little bastards known for their ability to pin down a survivor, not letting up until either it or the victim is dead. That usually isn't a problem when it's AI-controlled, as it tends to pounce survivors in a group that's not distracted, which makes it an easy kill, and even on Versus, if you don't give it a chance to pounce productively. However, on higher difficulties, its normal claw attack, which is double that of a common Infected, can hurt quite a bit. And when they're standing, a behavior they adopt frequently in Advanced and Expert, they don't emit their telltale growl. Mix one up with a horde, and you can have serious problems even if you're a competent player.
    • Smokers also have the annoying habit of attacking from places where they're impossible to see; the only way to find them is to look at where the tongue is coming from. And when the other Survivors are going to be breaking the damn tongue about .05 seconds after you see it (if you're lucky), you've gotta be fast to spot where the attack came from. It doesn't help that the tongue left behind disappears in seconds.
    • The Jockey in the sequel. Its damage per second output is rather low, but it has the ability to control your movements. They can and will steer you backwards in the map to force your team to go back and save you, move you into Spitter acid, steer you into any fires you created, and even move you towards any nearby Witches.
    • The last thing you want is a Charger coming at you like a runaway bus. It's not simply its charge that's painful, but its knock back can throw you and the other survivors off the edge in high places, which may result in you being incapacitated out of reach of other survivors, or in case of water or very high places, you get an instant death.
    • Spitters aren't so bad on their own, since the acid spit is pretty easy to escape before it does much damage. But if they attack alongside a horde, or worse still, a different special infected, it's almost guaranteed to deal some pretty nasty damage: you probably won't be able to get out of the puddle before it's evaporated, and have a huge chunk of your health lost. It's even worse in sections where you have to run from the horde, because the puddle can easily cut off escape routes.
  • In the Call of Duty series, on the higher difficulty settings, any German with any kind of automatic weapon becomes a demonic spider. Most commonly they carry StG44 assault rifles, which fire quickly enough that if they catch you at close range for even a second, you die. It's even worse because of the difficulty you have in returning fire, as getting shot turns the screen red, throws off your aim, and jerks your vision around wildly, giving the goddamned Germans enough time to finish you off. And, if you don't move up fast enough after killing them all, they respawn.
    • United Offensive featured an even more terrifyingly-powerful class of enemies. Remember the might of the M1 Garand you were able to sail through most of the American missions with? The Germans have something just as good now. Worse, they have five times as many of them, and they're all pointed at you. Be prepared for a lot of cheap deaths in two shots, even on low difficulties.
    • The guard dogs in Call of Duty 4 are extremely fast and have a One-Hit Kill attack that is effectively unavoidable if you don't shoot the dog before it jumps on you. If you're too distracted by their support to kill them in time, you're forced to make a timed press of the Melee Attack button to snap the bastard's neck. Problem is, the time window you have is extremely short, to the point where you'll only get it right by predicting it after a lot of practice, because reacting to it once you actually see it means it's too late. They will very rarely grab your allies, too, and Captain Price, at least, is capable of shooting an attack dog off of himself after it has latched on. The only upside is that later games made the timing a little more forgiving.
      • Then there's the human equivalent in World at War: The Japanese Banzai charge, in which a soldier will charge at you with his bayonet, and you have to use a carefully timed button press to block his bayonet and stick your own knife in his throat. Fortunately, the timing of the button press for them is much more forgiving than for the dogs in CoD4.
      • In a similar respect, the 7 kills without dying reward on World at War in Multiplayer was a pack of guard dogs. On the normal mode they're not too much of a problem, but on Hardcore difficulty they're demonic hell hounds of doom. They WILL sneak up on you, you WILL miss them with your gun, they WILL kill you with one bite and the guy who called them WILL cackle maniacally as his kill count skyrockets.
    • World at War brings something new to those who play for achievements: grenade spam. Take the full-auto bastards mentioned above, add guys carrying bolt-action rifles who can peg you through soft cover without benefit of line of sight, and four guys who think it'll be funny to drop two grenades in your lap and one in each direction through which you can escape cover while the rest are just waiting for you to run.
    • Can't forget Modern Warfare 2's Juggernauts and ghillie snipers. Juggernauts charge and unleash a hail of bullets while soaking up yours, and ghillie snipers are bastards who always know exactly where you are, even when being stealthy, get headshots with ease, and are practically invisible until they move. Fortunately, both are exclusive to Spec Ops mode, which you can tackle in co-op.
    • In the Call of Duty: Black Ops zombie level Ascension, you are at a Russian space facility. Instead of having the usual demon dogs appear every few rounds, you get space monkeys. Tiny, difficult to hit, ammo wasting monkeys that come in swarms and blur your vision when you hit them. Oh, did I mention that if they jump on the machine you bought your perk from, you lose it? And that they specifically go after these machines? On the bright side, though, if no monkeys steal your perks, you get a powerup that grants every player a random perk. Sweet.
    • Also in Black Ops are the riot guards at Vorkuta, who can just wade through entire magazines of AK fire thanks to their bulletproof vests - they're essentially a singleplayer version of the Modern Warfare Juggernaut (the wiki counts them as such). They have one-hit-kill shotguns (which are fortunately more lethal against them) and, if they reach you, will melee you for another One-Hit Kill. Explosive weapons, miniguns, and shotguns will usually do the trick, but damn if they're not annoying.
  • The Bloodsuckers from S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl are mutated humans; tall, hunched-over and naked, with mottled green skin and a bunch of tentacles for a mouth. They're very fast and strong, make creepy deep breathing sounds, have a devastating melee claw attack, and can turn invisible. They're still detectable, of course, but it's tricky, especially if the lighting is poor and one is facing them in an underground area. Finally, these Bloodsuckers are insanely resilient; you can empty two or three magazines of intermediate-power rifle rounds into one and he'll just keep coming. A shotgun can take a Bloodsucker out quickly, but that weapon is one of the least tactically flexible weapons in the game.
    • The expansion, Clear Sky, makes it worse: they're also invincible while invisible— and their invisibility is total, meaning you'll probably end up shooting wildly towards the creepy deep breathing sounds, waiting for it to materialise right up in your face as it tries to circle behind you. They're more aggressive and damaging too, just to rub it in. And finally, in Call of Pripyat, while they lose their "invincibility when invisible" ability in that game, they gain an actual "blood suck" ability they can use when they get behind you, paralyzing you and draining a portion of your health. And while they feed on your helpless character, you can hear them make sucking sounds, thus finally living up to their name.
    • Call of Pripyat's Burers are an interesting case; if fought traditionally, they are almost invincible. They have a shield that kicks in immediately after receiving damage (meaning you need to pack as much damage as possible in one attack), can cut half of your health down in one attack that also makes you drop your weapon and can psychically throw crates at you without even seeing you. However, if you drop your weapon, take out your knife, charge at them screaming like a maniac and stab it in the face repeatedly until it dies, you can kill one without even getting hurt, turning one of the most powerful enemies in the game into a low-level mook.
    • Controllers also count. Their attacks make it nearly impossible to aim (that is supposed to imitate psychic powers). They are also reasonably tough. The best tactic against the seems to be throwing grenades from behind the corner. That is, if you can find said corner fast enough. Like the Burer, Controllers are most vulnerable to being charged and shot/knifed point blank in the face.
    • The X-18 Lab (located under Dark Valley) in Shadow of Chernobyl has its own type of monster called the Poltergeist, which telekinetically toss different objects (barrels, wooden crates, etc.) at you. While alive, they look like flying electrical discharge. You might not even realize that they can be killed, that they are not just anomalies. And then you meet the ones that can shoot one-hit-kill fireballs at you.
    • Chimeras in Call of Pripyat. They have a very damaging pounce attack and a melee attack that can pretty much One-Hit Kill you even on the easiest difficulty, particularly if you are not wearing an Exoskeleton. Also, they can absorb massive amounts of punishment, only being shy of the Pseudogiant (see below) as the toughest mutant in the game.
    • Pseudogiants soak up ammo, can inflict a One-Hit Kill, and have a stomp attack that stuns and damages you.
    • Special mention goes to every single human enemy in the game thanks to the Rocket-Tag Gameplay and realistic bullet physics. It's not uncommon to get jumped and have your brains blown out in a milisecond during gunfights - or get blown up by homing frag grenades.
    • Snorks are basically gas mask wielding monkeys that that are infuriatingly hard to hit, can do insane damage with their leaping attacks, and often come in groups that will rip you to shreds in a matter of seconds.
  • Half-Life has its own fair share of dangerous enemies, in particular the marines. Imagine someone back when Half-Life first came out, fighting enemies with relatively simplistic AI, and then suddenly running into the marines, who could (and would) utilize cover and flush you out of hiding with grenades. Add in the part where they're incredibly tough, always fire faster than you (and often more accurately), and usually come in groups of three or more, and you've got a frustrating chain of quicksaving and quickloading at almost every single corner until you get the crossbow and the tau cannon MUCH later in the game.
    • The expansion pack Opposing Force adds several nasty ones. Shock Troopers in particular are fast moving, smart, and come armed with shock roaches and spore grenades, neither of which you want to mess around with. On higher difficulties, Pit Drones become these as well, being fast, tough little bastards that whittle away your armor with ranged attacks and circle in to kill you with melee attacks.
    • Black Mesa brings this Up to Eleven. The HECU Marines have an alerted reaction time of one tenth of a second before they start firing, which they do very accurately with fully automatic weapons, can seemingly track you while behind cover, and can take a lot of abuse. They have medics too.
    • Half-Life 2: Episode Two gives the Antlion Worker/Acid Antlion. Not only do they constantly leap around making them difficult to hit (and often landing so that they're just hidden behind something), they also have a rather nasty acid-spitting attack, which can take a good chunk of health away. Not only this, but upon the death the buggers explode, which also hurts you if you happen to get caught in it! A direct spray from an Antlion can outright kill you even at full health on Hard. Oh, and they momentarily drop your health even lower than the actual outcome because of the acid's poisonous effects, which are similar to the poison headcrab's attack (weaker, but without the same restoration from the injected antidote). Good luck at the mines.
    • Hunters in Half-Life 2: Episode Two are pure Boss in Mook Clothing if one isn't aware of their crippling weakness to things hurled by the Gravity Gun, but even then they are still plenty deadly, especially at close range (and they just happen to almost always be encountered in a confined space). This becomes most apparent when they serve as escorts to Striders at the end of the game, one or two ramming and firing at the player while concentrating their own fire on a third.
  • In Command & Conquer: Renegade, snipers and enemies with rocket launchers can often kill you in a few shots before you figure out where they are, or even that someone is shooting you.
    • Rocket-users on the Commando difficulty will unerringly fire their rockets at you the second you enter their line of sight, and almost invariably kill you in one hit. They are the most dangerous in close quarters (which rather begs the question why they don't also blow themselves up in the process), as they don't give you any time to dodge their shots. Coupled with the tight quarters meaning they can run right up behind you without you knowing they're there, and your only warning that the rocket trooper is there is when you hear the bang-whoosh sound of a launcher going off and then fall over dead a split-second later. Fortunately they are not particularly tough and the Laser Chaingun chews them up quite fairly thanks to its long range, but they're still incredibly cheap. The Snipers generally have the decency to miss and not do all that much damage when they do hit (compared to rocket troopers, at least).
    • Black Hand Stealth Troopers are almost as bad. Unlike most enemies, who will open fire the moment they see you, it is not uncommon for a Stealth Trooper to hold fire and follow you until you're alone and not expecting an attack, and then leap out of nowhere and drill you with a dozen laser bolts. Once the Stealth Troopers start appearing, you are never safe.
    • Flamethrower troopers are more annoying but can be terribly dangerous if they catch you off guard. Unlike most enemies, they have fire-retardant suits, which means that flamethrowers not only don't do much appreciable damage, but that they will not stunlock them like they do everything else. This is bad enough because your flamethrower is one of the most useful weapons in the game, but later on you'll be relying heavily on the laser weapons, which also stunlock enemies by setting them on fire. Flamethrower troopers will run right through laser fire to burn you down.
    • Tiberium-based enemies by themselves are not bad. However, because Tiberium weapons heal them, they have a tendency to shoot each other (or themselves) to heal damage. And late-game Tiberium-based soldiers will be intermixed with regular soldiers (if not completely replacing them at parts), which will make any effort to use Tiberium weapons, which should be among the best weapons in the game, a case of rapidly juggling guns to fit the situation.
  • Halo:
    • Halo 2 had the Jackal Snipers. Not only could they get a head shot (an instant kill on Heroic and Legendary) from 300 hundred yards away while facing the wrong way, but they come in huge numbers, so even if you can out-snipe one (hard enough in itself) there are usually a bunch more about to insta-kill you. And they can ricochet their beams off walls directly into you. "Sniper Alley" in the second level has at least eight (enough so that on harder difficulties there's virtually no chance the marines following you will survive, even if you can get past them), but what really takes the cake is an open area in the third level that has fourteen snipers all hiding behind things waiting to kill you when your head is turned.

      Luckily, Bungie heard the complaints and toned down their cheapness in Halo 3: they're easier to spot because they basically wear flashlights on their helmets and they can't shoot before they're directly aimed at you. Even the ones armed with the less-lethal carbines are still quite a threat, though. In Halo: Reach, Bungie cut the beam rifle entirely, with snipers instead using the Focus Rifle (which won't kill you by itself unless you don't know how to move) or the Carbine-Expy Needle Rifle. While they go back to using the incredibly lethal beam rifles from Halo 4 onward, they at least still keep the helmet flashlights.
    • The Flood have made many gamers throw their controllers in frustration:
      • Flood Ranged Pure Forms in Halo 3, especially on Cortana. They have incredible aim, prefer ceilings and high walls, and are nearly impossible to hit due to Master Chief's visor resetting to 1x zoom whenever he gets hit.
      • Rocket-launcher-wielding Flood Combat Forms from Halo: Combat Evolved were the bane of gamers everywhere. At its conception, weapons like the rocket launcher were designed so that ammo was sparse to balance the sheer power of the weapon, but the AI enemies have nothing to fear from limits that don't apply to them. This alone would be bad enough, if it weren't for the fact these rocket-carrying enemies are crazy enough to use rockets at point-blank range. Halo 2 is even worse, since the rocket can now home onto vehicles - including your own.
      • Halo 2 also has Combat Forms using human sniper rifles. They're just as broken as the Jackal snipers— maybe more-so. The differences: a) they appear in darkened levels so you can't see them until they've fired at you, and b) the hypothetically best weapons to engage them with (sniper weapons) are the same weapons that are notoriously ineffective against Flood.
      • Shotgun Combat Forms spell instant death as well.
      • Really, almost any form of Flood is a demonic spider on Legendary. Flood combat forms in the second and third games jump on you from random corners of the room, make short work of your allies, have enhanced AI thanks to the Gravemind, and their melee attacks can be instant death. Even the lowly Infection Forms can occasionally be this, since they kill you instantly if they even touch you while your shields are down in the second and third games.
    • Halo 2's version of the jetpack-equipped Ranger Elites are quite cheap and deadly in pairs or more, which most often occur on Legendary.
    • On Legendary, the Drones' rapid plasma pistols and swarm tactics will mow you down in seconds; they come in especially big swarms in Halo 3 and Halo 3: ODST (the latter of which also has shielded Drones). If you happen to be in a vehicle, especially a Chopper, you can't disembark if a Drone gets on board, allowing it to single-handedly beat you to death. This is coupled with the rest of the swarm simultaneously shooting at you from the air. A particularly egregious That One Level is the "Off The Rock, Through The Bush, Nothing But Jackal (read: trouble)" chapter/sublevel of Halo 2's "Delta Halo", where you face both several waves of Drones and a dozen well-camouflaged Jackal Snipers, with few hiding places (especially with their propensity to flank you).
    • Stealth-capable Elites; in Halo: Combat Evolved, although they lack shields, they are nearly impossible to see if they are carrying a ranged weapon (as opposed to a sword, which gives them away), and are quite fast. Even though the energy sword-equipped ones are easy to spot, their weapons are still a one-hit-KO, and they close extremely quickly. In Halo 2, although they can be seen easier, they now have shields, are still fast and evasive, and still can't be tracked with homing weapons such as the plasma pistol. 2's Spec-Ops Elites, although rare, can also voluntarily use stealth camo to hide in corners and ambush the player.
      • Halo: Reach upped the ante with the SpecOps Elites; although they can be be killed with one round from a Sniper Rifle on Heroic difficulty or below, they have a tendency to dance around—and don't even think about putting on Grenade Spam— er, the Catch Skull (or any other Gold skull, for that matter) or you'll never get a hit in edgewise from all the dodging you'll be doing.
      • From Halo 4 onward, all Stealth Elites are now also Zealots. To make things worse, their active camouflage is now so good that even the ones with the one-hit-kill swords are nearly impossible to spot before they're right on top of you.
    • Halo 3 has Brute Stalkers, their equivalent of stealth Elites. They're a lot easier to spot in Halo 3: ODST though, thanks to VISR mode.
    • Normal Grunts are Goddamned Bats at worst, but don't underestimate their more elite brethren:
      • Ultra Grunts, the Elite Mooks of the Grunt ranks, are a definite threat, particularly on Legendary. They most frequently wield needlers and sometimes Fuel Rod Guns, and throw grenades far more often than the other types, at long distances with lethal accuracy. It's also common (again on Legendary) for Ultras to kill you by Cherry Tapping en masse, like on Halo 2's "Gravemind" and several Halo 3 levels. Halo: Reach makes them even more of a pain by requiring two headshots to kill them.
      • Games from Halo 3 onward also have Suicide Grunts, who'll blow you up with them if they get too close.
      • With the Thunderstorm Skull used, all Grunts are Ultra Grunts. This can make them very dangerous. With other skulls enabled, Suicide Grunts are more common. With both these skulls activated, it is not uncommon to be swarmed with three or more Suicide Ultras while being pelted with an endless hail of grenades by the other Grunts.
      • There's also Fuel Rod Grunts from Reach onward, who can be hard to distinguish from their lesser Grunt brethren, which means they can easily sneak up on you and spam one-hit-kill explosive shots at you on Heroic and above; say goodbye to your killstreak.
      • Don't be fooled by their goofy drivers; Grunt-driven Ghosts, introduced in Halo 3, are nearly as deadly as those piloted by Elites and Brutes.
      • Halo 5: Guardians Firefight mode has Grunt Bodyguards, who come equipped with rechargeable energy shields.
    • Banshees are the bane of vehicle combat in Halo 2's Legendary campaign. They sneak in behind you and blast your tank into molten slag, and you don't know they're attacking until it's too late, and they can take 2 or 3 tank shells before falling.
    • Halo 3's Brute Choppers on Legendary are really cheap too; they can kill you and your vehicle instantly by ramming, and their shots quickly tear (read: chop) your teammates to shreds. You pretty much don't stand a chance using the 'Hog against them. Best to jack that Wraith in the canyon.
    • Hunters were a joke in Halo: Combat Evolved, since they're slow, fire shots that are easily avoided by jumping around and throwing their aim off, are easily avoidable in melee range, and, if you had a pistol, could be instantly killed by shooting their weak spot in the back or the neck. Then they gradually get tougher and tougher in each subsequent installment; they can't be one-shot killed anymore, and can simply swing their shield backwards at you if you try to dodge behind them. Not only that, but you almost always fight more than one at a time (often while fighting off other Covenant forces), and if you're playing solo (or trying to take one on by yourself in multiplayer/co-op), it's quite a challenge to hit their weak points since they cover up from the front and don't give you much time to shoot them in the back; there's a reason why players like to save at least some of their explosives and heavy weapon ammo for Hunters.
      • In Halo: Reach, the Hunters have gotten a massive durability upgrade (being able to eat rockets for breakfast), and can both run almost as fast as you do and One-Hit Kill you even on lower difficulties. You really do have to inflict massive damage to fight them effectively, although even just in Heroic they can take multiple shotgun blasts to the back, which is pretty challenging if you don't have anything to occupy their attention but you. While a Plasma Grenade can make things easier by removing their back armor, getting the stick down is near-suicidal in and of itself.
      • However, that's nothing compared to Hunters in Halo 5: Guardians; not only are they are even tougher, stronger, and faster than ever before, but their melee attacks have been made almost completely undodgeable (making any close combat against them suicidal), their assault cannons can switch to rapid-fire mode, and they can knock away grenades with their shields. In fact, unless you have plenty of explosives and/or heavy weapons on hand, you will need your entire fireteam to take them down, since it's now almost impossible to beat them by yourself.
    • As noted above, Halo: Reach amps up nearly all of the above examples to eleven, but another special mention goes to Elite Generals, who often wield homing plasma grenade launchers, (though at least they're reasonably dodgeable).
    • Halo 4 adds the Promethean Knights, who come in various types wielding various weapons. Even the baseline models, wielding Suppressors or Lightrifles, are lethally accurate, come with powerful shields that will recharge very quickly if you give them the opportunity, and are all too happy to launch Pulse Grenades at you (often to flush you out of cover when you try to give your shields a chance to recharge after the pounding they take from the Knights' other attacks, forcing you right back out so they can keep pounding on you). Then there are the specialized variants - Battlewagons, who carry Scattershots and are apt to rush you and blast you at their most lethal range, and also have a jumping lunge attack of significant speed & range that ends with them stabbing downward with their hardlight blades, either killing you or de-shielding and wounding you for an immediate follow-up kill-shot with their Scattershots; Lancers, who carry Binary Rifles that can one-shot you on anything other than Easy mode and have a Desperation Attack where they Teleport Spam up to you and slash at you with their forearm-mounted blades, which on Heroic or Legendary will almost certainly kill you; and Commanders, who carry Incineration Cannons which will vaporize you if they hit, no questions asked, even on Easy/Normal. To make the Knights even worse, they often come with Watcher support, providing them with invincible shields and even resurrection unless you kill the Watchers first...which can be damn tough when the Knights are filling you full of holes as you try to gun the agile little flyers down. While Halo 5: Guardians removed the rechargeable shields and Watcher revives, got rid of the Lancer variant, and added additional weak spots, the game otherwise upgraded the Knights to full Boss in Mook Clothing status.
  • From the Wolfenstein series:
    • The original Wolfenstein 3D had the mutants. For starters, they don't have an alert sound so they can easily ambush you; in addition, they fire their pistols faster than an Officer and will keep firing at you mercilessly. Secondly, there is no delay for their attack animation, making it possible to open a door and get hit by their attack potentially instantly. Thankfully, they only show up in Episode 2 (and the secret level of Episode 6) in the original game.
    • Return to Castle Wolfenstein has two big examples: the "Loper," a half-body monster which can jump across entire rooms while spewing electricity in your face (and probably avoiding your attack), and the "Proto-Soldat," which not only needs insane quantities of bullets to kill, but can also assure instant death if carrying a rocket launcher (the upgraded Übersoldat version is even worse; think the same thing, but magnified 2x in every respect).
    • Meanwhile, Wolfenstein has the Rocket Troopers, jetpack-equipped Nazis who often pop up out of nowhere and start bombarding you with incredibly powerful homing missiles. It's often difficult to strike back at them, since they not only stay far away from you at all times, but also have the ability to quickly dart back and forth through the air to dodge your gunfire. The Despoiled can also prove troublesome, since they can appear from anywhere as long as Elite Guards (who create them) are present, and are very tough to get a bead on, since they'll constantly hurl energy blasts at you whenever you're within their line of sight.
  • Trigens in Far Cry. The primate types are fast, usually attack in groups, and are capable of killing you in only two hits, even if you have 100% health AND armor. They are the easiest to deal with, being easy to detect by sound and having relatively low health. But then you have Trigen engineered from humans: one type jumps around like a flea on meth and can pick you off from the other side of the map; other type is permanently cloaked and almost impossible to detect without the night/thermal vision goggles you probably haven't even considered using inside buildings; and finally, the Fatboys, gigantic mutants as tough as they're big, toting rocket launchers 9 out of 10 times you encounter them, in a game where damage from explosives usually means instant death. And they're remarkably accurate with them. You better start saving your flashbangs after the sun first sets...
  • Doom 3 , The Tentacled Zombie Commandos. They are very fast, have long range and deal a great amount of damage, and tend to show up in very dark areas, so you don't know they're onto you until it's too late.
    • The Chaingunner Commandos are even worse. Their gun deals A LOT of hurt, it disrupts your aiming, and is more accurate than your own. The Commando itself rarely flinches, and is tough enough to take a rocket to the face and ask for seconds. Get ready to hurt when you see three together.
    • The Pinky Demons can take quite a bit of punishment for the first time one appears, and disrupt your aim when they attack, potentially trapping you in a Cycle of Hurting. To make it worse, you usually fight them in tight hallways that are barely wide enough for the monster to fit in, so no dodging for you.
    • The Cherubs. Those things are terrifying. As if what they are isn't scary enough, they can leap long distances, chew through your health, and are usually found in close quarters and cramped hallways. The only hint you get that they're near is their creepy gurgling baby talk.
    • Trites are literally demonic spiders. Oh, and Ticks too! And guess what? Both are a head in height, two heads in radius, 200% annoyance! Thought you were safe? They can crawl out of tiny gaps and ducts, usually BEHIND YOU and swarming FAST. Their having low health however makes them slightly less painful to deal with.
      • Vagary. A spider boss that hurls projectiles with telekinesis. But is easy to dispatch with a Plasma Gun.
    • Imps are faster, smarter and can bitchslap your face off IN SECONDS. Did I tell you they have the habit of appearing unannounced most of the time? Have fun.
  • Doom II has the Revenant, which, while having only 300 hitpoints, runs very quickly, and possesses two deadly attacks — a homing missile that does immense damage and in open areas requires some know-how to dodge, and a punch that can kill you in three hits at 100% health. They tend to come in larger numbers than other heavyweight demons, as well. Worse when Game Mods are taken into account, where apparently everyone in the world who has ever made one has a hard-on for Revenants and will place ridiculous amounts of them everywhere.
    • The Arch-Vile is really a Boss in Mook Clothing. While it is indeed dangerous, it is also mercifully rare. The Arch-Vile is the fastest monster in the game, takes a ton of damage to kill, has the lowest pain chance (meaning it almost never flinches from being attacked) has an undodgeable line-of-sight flame attack that takes off 90% of your health, resurrects dead monsters, and other monsters won't retaliate if he hits them. Demonic indeed, since if there is more than one in a room littered with dead monsters, you're in for a very nasty fight. The flame attack is a pain, but if you can get behind cover and out of the Arch-Vile's sight before the attack finishes, you won't take damage. Otherwise, your only option is to kill him before he can let loose. While you're taking cover, the Arch-Vile will be resurrecting minions. Really, you're screwed either way. .wad makers LOVE putting these guys in open-air areas with little cover to be found.
    • Chaingunners, also known as Heavy Weapon Dudes. Even a single one can grievously injure you if it starts pumping you full of lead before you notice it. And once they start shooting at you, they don't stop until you move away from their line of fire, make them flinch with fire of your own, or bleed out from all the holes they've put into you. They can harm you at a very long range to boot. It doesn't help that level creators love to put them into watchtowers or hard-to-see windows. A bunch of HWD's up close will kill you. The Plutonia Experiment makes this even more fun by introducing squads of them helped by an invisible Arch-Vile, which resurrects them from behind a fake wall. In practice, this means you're facing an indestructible array of deadly turrets.
    • On higher difficulties, any enemy with a hitscan weapon can easily be promoted from Goddamned Bat to Demonic Spider. Getting hurt is a luxury you can't afford much of on high difficulties, and these enemies possess the only attacks that are instantaneous, can only be dodged through sheer luck, and can hit you from all but the most extreme distances. The official expansions even have huge rooms with hitscan enemies standing a mile away. The high resolution of modern source ports makes it so that you can see and aim at these guys, but they appear as only a single moving pixel on the original low-res DOS engine, and yet they can still see and hit you with impeccable accuracy.
    • The Realm667 Beastiary for ZDoom (as well as a stand-alone mod, Scoredoom) has a more than plenty of these, tougher baron, and other miniboss variants, and bosses that make the Cyberdemon and Spider Mastermind look wimpy in comparison. To know if each of these enemies is one of these (by Doom engine standards), they have to have two or more of the following criteria (listed below) for them to qualify:
      • Throw hard-to-dodge homing projectiles that, like the revenant rocket, deals a large amount of damage.
      • Can throw/shoot a single projectile which can cause splash damage and can kill you in one direct hit.
      • Can shoot bunches of projectiles in a tight, tough-to-avoid spread pattern.
      • Can turn invulnerable at any time (in one case, every time after the particular enemy flinches), bonus points if said enemy deflects projectiles while invulnerable. (heaven help you if you fire homing projectiles at it during that time.)
      • In the case of hitscan enemies, can deal just as much damage (or even more) than the standard chaingunner, and won't stop firing until you leave their line of sight.
      • Conversely, hitscan enemies that can deal major damage with one shot, especially if up close. (for example, the super shotgun zombies from Skulltag)
      • Moves very fast and/or strafes a lot, making it hard to hit (particularly if combined with another of the above characteristics, promoting them from merely a Goddamned Bat).
      • Can detonate in your face for massive damage.
      • Has any projectiles that can penetrate the player (attacks of this type deal multiple rapid hits as they pass through you). Bonus points if those home in on you wraithverge-style.
      • Are quick to get off their attacks with almost no warning, particularly when they have any of the above nasty attack types.
      • In the cases concerning melee-type enemies, can quickly hit/charge at you repeatedly (specifically if the latter kind can home in on you), ripping off large amounts of your health if you're not fast enough to shake them off.
      • Immediately retaliates against you if you attack it during infighting, and/or is slow to retaliate against other enemies in addition to one or more of the other characteristics above.
    • On Nightmare difficulty, Demons and Spectres. They move and attack at least twice as fast, making them the absolute fastest enemies in the games. Remember those sweet times you could easily mow them down, Leatherface style? Better forget about that and pull out the plasma gun.
    • Brutal Doom really goes to town with this trope and makes everything demonic spiders. Every enemy attack damages twice as hard as before, they shoot faster, many shoot more bullets and some have new attacks. The lowly grunts may possibly be the only exception, as their fairly ineffectual firepower and really pitiful health keeps them firmly in Goddamned Bats territory; however, even the grunts immediately above them - that is, the shotgun dudes - represent a significant threat, especially when they surprise you from behind and pump a full shotgun blast in your clavicles before you can figure out what's going on. And these are the weakest enemies. It's a good thing your weapons are upgraded to match... but your health still isn't. Welcome to Hell, Marine...
    • Aeons of Death essentially has 75% of its bestiary as these or just plain annoying. There are very few enemies that are pretty much useless. On top of that, the cyberdemon and spider mastermind-class bosses usually can either very easily one-shot you, or quickly drain your health. Know the possibility of getting an arsenal and your health levels upgraded to match along with the artifacts to use? You'll need definitely need those.
    • A custom megawad, Valiant, has a small number of these replacing some of the enemies.
      • Pyro knights, which replace Hell Knights. While they have as much health as the standard Hell Knight, they shoot out fast fireballs that hit hard as well.
      • Suicide Bombers are somewhat rare among former human enemies, but they will blow up in your face for massive damage, and are rather quick on their feet. They don't take much damage, thankfully.
      • Brains are a secondary cacodemon, but they are a bit quicker to fire, and deal just as much damage per shot as the standard arachnotron. They also have a chance of spawning once an arachnotron dies.
      • Super Mancubi rarely show up, but they make the regular mancubi look wimpy with spamming around twice the amount of fireballs. They replace the barons of hell.
      • Cybruisers, only showing up towards the end of episode 4, and throughout episode 5, essentially are small cyberdemons that fire one rocket, which is no less deadly. They are also immune to splash damage. They have just as much health as pyro knights.
  • In Marathon, the lookers have low health, are small, hard to hit, and explode in the faces of players who don't notice them, dealing heavy damage. Did I mention there are invisible variants which are nearly impossible to see?
    • Invisible S'pht Compilers, especially the Major variation, which is almost literally invisible and has homing projectiles. The Wasps also struck fear in the heart of many players, being hard to hit, coming in swarms from multiple directions, and bombarding the player with spit gobs.
    • A Game Mod, Marathon: Evil, has two examples:
      • Devlins, large monsters with huge talons who hit you with a rapid-fire melee attack. They are extremely fast and can absorb a lot of ammo before going down. You usually encounter them in cramped tunnels and dark spaces, which when coupled with their dark character sprites makes them nearly impossible to see before they're right on top of you. The worst thing, however, is that you enounter the majority of them early in the game, when your arsenal is small and your ammo pitifully low.
      • Cyborg Drones, similar to the Pfhor's defense drones and just as hard to hit, but with more powerful and deadly fire blasters. And the green ones are Action Bombs that silently sneak up on you and explode in your face, worse than the Lookers.
    • The tank-treaded Cyborgs have a ton of health, and explode when killed, which is bad enough, but the truly demonic ones are the version with homing bouncing grenades. The bouncing bombs deal significant damage, travel fast and are extremely hard to dodge, especially if you're caught unawares. Particularly common in EVIL.
    • Much of the bestiary of the Nintendo Hard Game Mod Marathon RED consists of demonic spiders.
    • The Enforcers from the original Trilogy were quite dangerous, but could be dealt with as long as you either had cover and were quick about diving back behind it, or kept strafing. Not so with Rubicon's Enforcers, who are equipped with Skeaarnen Rifles that fire guided bolts of plasma that drop your shields in seconds—and if you invade their personal space, they'll unleash an even more powerful burst of it that will likely splatter you both. Their rough human counterparts, the MaserBoBs, make up for their lack of melee attacks with their perfectly-accurate, super-powered Masers and their incredible range of sight. If they can see you—and they're often placed in such ways that you won't immediately see them—you're dead.
  • Most of the enemies in Soldier of Fortune II become Demonic Spiders on the higher two difficulty levels. They have near-perfect accuracy even at long distances while your guns are screwed over with prodigious recoil, take cover in near-impossible to see or hit locations, made worse by shoddy collision detection, never seem to miss with their One-Hit Kill grenades, and apparently have x-ray vision, as they can see you through underbrush, smoke and fog, and sometimes even behind hills or walls. Worst examples occur in the Colombia (jungle camouflage, which you can't hide in), Hong Kong (fast enemies that attack in groups, deadly accuracy and all), and Kamchatka (lots of fog, yet again nowhere to hide) missions.
    • In the first Soldier of Fortune, Unfair difficulty has a much more sensitive PADD meter, resulting in larger groups of randomly "teleporting in" enemies when you make just a smidgen too much noise. Then when fighting that group, you tend to make even more noise, causing even more enemies to spawn, getting you stuck in a vicious cycle until you die. Not to mention that the enemies are smarter as well.
      • The outdoor level of the Siberia mission has heavy fog, which effectively turns the snipers, tanks, and gun turrets into demonic spiders on the harder difficulties. As with Soldier of Fortune II, the soldiers seem to have infrared vision, although they have no visible enhancements. Doesn't help that they have armor-piercing bullets(the snipers were Nerfed in the second game). At one point you face a group of multiple snipers in the pea soup with nowhere to hide, which tends to be a Luck-Based Mission.
  • Red Faction Guerilla's EDF. Coming in infinite amount of Humvees, APCs, and Tanks, they won't even stop coming until your alert is down to yellow. Oh, and instead of just coming out of their car before swarming you, they RUN YOU OVER while shooting you with their turrets, then come out and swarm you! The only good news is that if you have an Arc Welder, their strength becomes their weakness and they end up getting slaughtered as you hijack their strongest vehicles and turn their weapons on them.
    • Masako's elite mercenaries in the first game tend to soak up more damage than your average soldier, have godlike accuracy, and are often armed with the Rail Driver, which can kill you in one hit, and have a scope that lets them see through walls. Have fun.
  • FEAR: The Assassins, aka ninjas or watchers (after the level they first appear in), at least on the Hard and Extreme difficulties. Like most ninja-type enemies, they are very fast and jump all over the place, making them very hard to track. Even worse, they have stealth camouflage, are almost completely silent, hide out in dark places, and have a lethal melee attack that can easily kill you before you can react. If you thought the stealth Elites in Halo 2 were bad...
    • Goes double in Project Origin. Also in that game, the Replica Snipers, which One-Hit Kill with headshots, and Abominations.
      • They are much easier to see, having the nearly transparent moving shape aspect replaced with a big rainbow bloom and they appear in areas with much more space and better lighting. The most vexing part about dealing with them is making sure that you don't waste too much ammunition.
      • Ditto the first game's Replica Snipers, who are armed the Type 7 Particle Rifle, which ignores armor and can potentially One-Hit Kill the player. Fortunately, they only appear in one level. Many are hard to spot due to the bad lighting.
    • Scarecrows in Perseus Mandate. Aside from giving you one of the most shocking character deaths in the series, they lie in wait where and when you least expect them, and most of the time you're low on health because of other enemies. When you recover from the scare of being pulled into the earth by one, it's probably too late.
    • In FEAR3, the Phase Troopers are tough, have an accurate gun which makes quite a mark, and spawn a lot of mooks. However, you normally don't have to take them head on; they bring the gameplay to a halt and are content to camp away from the action and just summon enemies. Once the supply of mooks dries up, they die.
    • Extraction Point has two examples which might be the worst of the worst. The first are these heavily armored elite Replica soldiers with these huge shields that soak up bullets. They have a lot of health. Their fronts are protected by these huge shields. Their miniguns can reduce you from full health and armor to dead in less than a second. It is fortunate, therefor, that there are only three in the game.
      • Another Extraction Point example is the Shades. Did you like the Replica Assassins? Well now have them as permanently invisible supernatural phantoms that whisper and growl. Get ready to face quite a few swarms of these things in the underground section of Perseus Mandate. At least they aren't nearly as acrobatic as the Assassins, keeping to the ground during non-scripted events, and their glowing red eyes give their positions away in the dark.
  • The old-school Macintosh First-Person Shooter Sensory Overload had the dreaded "shadow ninjas", which were invisible to radar, resided in dark rooms, were extremely fast, and threw deadly shurikens with deadly accuracy.
    • And there were the machine-gun-wielding Elite Mooks and the security droids in the later levels.
  • In System Shock 2, there are the huge, nearly-invisible, poisonous god-damned biohazard spiders from hell itself. There is a fan-made patch which removes them for the arachnophobics who seriously could not proceed past that point, but at least a few players installed it just to remove the absolute hatred factor. At least they make a very distinct chittering sound that alerts you to their presence and you normally encounter them in areas where have plenty room to backpedal away from them while shooting at them or smacking them with a wrench.
    • Cyborg assassins are extremely quiet, throw very fast projectiles at you, are very mobile and can take a bit of punishment. Unlike the spiders, you can end up with several shuriken buried in your spine before you know they're there.
    • From the original: Cyborg Enforcers. Armed with hard-hitting and very accurate fast-firing guns and a lot tougher than they look. SHODAN loves filling up the later levels with them. The only enemy that hits harder are Security-2 bots, but they're vulnerable to EMP weapons, to which the Enforcers are more resistant.
  • In Blood, there are the Choking Hands. They always appear suddenly and unexpected, are too small to be easily targeted, grab and choke you, essentially neutralizing you until you manage to shake them off (or die), and do a hell of damage when choking. As they choke you to death, your vision dims and eventually goes black, so you can't even run the hell away from other monsters effectively. And some versions of the game are glitched on the "removing" aspect, meaning you don't get to dislodge the damn things no matter how much you try the correct methodnote . If you can fight them without getting the heebie-jeebies, you have nerves of steel.
    • All the facehugger-type creatures in Blood II are candidates for this, as some versions of the manual didn't tell you how to remove them (and it's not obvious). If you don't know the technique to remove them, any encounter with a Bone Leech/Thief/Hand is fatalnote . At least they're slower than the original Choking Hands from the first game and make a lot of noise, so you can pinpoint their locations before you see themnote .
    • The more evolved Drudge forms. The Drudge Lord has a vicious variety of melee attacks (the most powerful of them, a scissor-like slash with both claws, being almost instantaneous) and a three-fireball burst at range that hits HARD (each is basically a shot from your own Napalm Launcher). It normally has to stand still to perform this, but a glitch may make them slide towards you while firing them, even around corners. And there's absolutely no weapon in the game that can make them flinch before they launch at least the first time. The Drudge Priest, its evolved form, also throws these fireballs, but only one at a time and from much farther, so you can dodge. What you can't dodge is its streak of three nasty hitscan lightning bolts if you get too close. Oh, and the Priest also spits out Bone Leeches whenever it feels like it. At least the Priest's rare.
  • Seems that the Quake series love these. (Quake II has its own page):
    • Quake I featured the hated Spawn enemies, purple blobs of hyperactive goo that bounced around in an infuriatingly fast and random manner, buffeting you for visible chunks of damage in the process. Best of all, they would detonate when slain, easily gibbing the incautious player. They also made some of the Most Annoying Sounds in the game.
    • Just as the manual says, the Fiends are organic buzzsaws, rife with pummeling (and slashing) power. They can take quite a beating and normally jump at you from long distances, which, considering you usually run around with low health, are often a one-hit kill. On top of that, in certain versions, mods and/or Source Ports, they are able to insta-kill you (regardless of health) if they land on top of you after they jump, adding to the threat.
    • The Vores, because of their deadly homing attacks which are very persistent in chasing you all over the map, particularly the two-Vore battle at the end of Episode II. Also because of the horrible high pitched screeching sounds they made.
    • Somewhat of a precursor to the Berserkers of later games, the Death Knights are fast, durable, and damaging Lightning Bruisers that tend to appear in close quarters, preventing you from using explosives.
    • Ogres become this on Nightmare difficulty, due to their rapid-fire Grenade Spam.
    • The Shambler, which is fast despite its huge size & can take a huge amount of damage. It also shrugs off explosives(they only do half their normal damage to it). Its melee attack can destroy you in few hits & its highly damaging lightning attack will always hit you...unless you happen to be behind something that prevents it from seeing you.
    • Scourge of Armagon introduces the Centroid, a nailguns-for-claws scorpion creature that easily strafes away from projectiles such as nails and lasers, and makes one of the most annoying sounds in the game as long as it's alive and alert. It has quite a bit of health, too, so the Marco Polo game you'll play with the shotgun against it will last a while. And that is if it doesn't get close enough to use its stinger, which is extremely powerful, causing up to 90 damage with a single hit. Thankfully, it's easy to listen to its location and stay away for long enough to kill it.
    • Berserkers in Quake IV. Faster, tougher, and more damaging than their Q2 counterparts, tend to spawn behind you, get up in your face quickly precluding the use of explosives, and on Harder Than Hard difficulty, where they can One-Hit Kill you and Gameplay Ally Immortality is removed on certain characters, they make certain Escort Missions a royal pain.
    • The Heavy Hovertanks from Quake IV. Made of Iron, hard to hit in spite of their massive size (they can be damn fast), and possess extremely damaging weaponry.
  • Given its reputation for frequently delving into Nintendo Hard territory, the Serious Sam serious is bound to have these:
    • The Kleer Skeleton is undoubtedly the franchise's quintessential Demonic Spider. They ambush in Mook numbers with un-mooklike health, taking multiple double-barrel shotgun shots to kill unless you fire point blank and enough abuse from tommy/minigun fire to distract you from all the other Kleers surrounding you. Their attacks include jumping at you with 100% accuracy and almost 100% speed, with enough distance to land well out of shotgun or flamethrower range, giving them ample time to make another barely strafeable jump (IF their buddies aren't chainjumping at you), and a flying ball-and-chain projectile that gives you two things to dodge, often straight into the other. And God help you if you try to focus on anything other than them. In casual encounters they are sure to shave off HP from all but the most experienced players, and when combined with large numbers and tight quarters create a Bullet Hell/Cycle of Hurting hybrid where the is player into borderline luck-of-the-draw turning and strafing using whatever rapid fire weapon is available (god help you if you don't have one), praying whatever movements (s)he makes will slow down the inevitable health drain from 360 degrees of light-speed attacks enough to survive. At least, with Quake 1, Fiends weren't as common as they were.
    • The third attack of the Final Boss in Serious Sam II launches bomber planes which are hard to hit and which will carpet bomb the player when not shot down.
    • Arachnoids in Serious Sam 3: BFE become a major threat in higher difficulties. Unlike arachnoids in Serious Sam I, they tend to move sideways a lot, making them harder to hit with rockets. They also don't flinch as much as the ones in the first installment.
    • The Aurigan Cave Demons of BFE take just about everything bad about Kleer skeletons and turn it Up to Eleven - they're nearly impossible to see from long range, both from the darkness and that they actively hide from you, they can lunge at you from far further than a Kleer can, and they do it from behind, fast enough that they're almost impossible to dodge. And, unless you have lightning-quick reflexes, they'll have jumped back and hidden themselves again before you even realize what direction they came from. The only saving grave is that there's only a small handful of areas they actually show up in (one of which you don't technically have to go through, and which you can spam with C4 packs from a nearby ammo crate if you want to get rid of them easily).
  • Medal of Honor:
  • Pretty much every enemy in Rainbow Six: Vegas. They have an instant death radius where if you encounter them at near point blank range, they will headshot you first. Their Demonic Spider status is more prominent in the terrorist hunts, where you are placed in open-ended maps with lots of tight quarters (Instant Death Radius galore). In terrorist hunts, the enemies spawn as you go and their first instruction is often to move to the player, which leads to enemies pouring through doorways with little sense of self-preservation. This is made worse by the inconvenient locations of the spawn triggers where enemies may easily surround you and even come from areas you just cleared. Forget using a standard loadout, you pretty much need two machine guns because you can't spare the time to reload while you're being overwhelmed with bad guys with lightning reflexes.
    • This is made slightly less chaotic for those with keen eyesight. Whenever more terrorists spawn, there will be a very slight skip/lag in the game, short enough to be easily missed, but long enough to be noticed. When you spot this skip, get the hell outta there.
  • The Exploding Cultists from Clive Barker's Jericho. Fast, possess highly damaging close-range attacks... and, as their name suggests, they like to explode. Preferably while they're close to as many members of the Jericho Squad as they can possibly get. They can be killed by shooting out all of the pustules on their body, but this is much easier said than done (especially when you have swarms of them to deal with). Thankfully, a much more effective way to deal with them is to use Church's Blood Ward spell against them, before running right up to them and give them a good, hefty slash with her sword. Of course, since they also explode upon death, it is recommended that you run like hell after doing this. Another effective way is to unleash Delgado's Kill It with Fire abilities upon them.
  • Clive Barker's Undying: $@#&% skeletons...
    • Not so bad when you realise that you can Dispell them to stop them getting back up (yeah that power actually has a good use).
  • Most enemies in the Alien: Resurrection FPS for the PlayStation, but worst of all are the facehuggers. They are really dodgy and hard to hit before they latch onto you, and if there isn't an Autodoc nearby, it's game over man, game over.
  • Operation Body Count has one big nuisance and one blatantly cheap enemy. The nuisance is the sewer slime monster, which can come dangerously close to 1-hit-killing you on Hard Difficulty (and takes out around half your health on Easy) in addition to covering up part of the screen, including the map. The cheap-as-hell game-breaking enemy? The shock drones. Sure, you can one-shot them, but they can kill you in under half a second without you knowing they're there until after you're dead. ON EASY. WITH FULL HEALTH AND ARMOR. You can all-but-expect them to be one-hit-killers on HARD!
  • Crysis has a particularly godawful version in the attack helicopters that show up after a few levels. They have near instant kill weapons, are invincible to anything other than two direct rocket hits, and, worst of all, if they see you no matter what you do they always know exactly where you are making them completely unavoidable once you are spotted. This sometimes persists even after reloading a save game. Always carry a full rocket launcher just in case you are spotted by one of these bastards.
    • The best part about knowing exactly where you are? Basically, if you're not in stealth mode, you're being shot into tiny little pieces. You could be under a thick canopy of trees, about 300 meters away, but they'll know exactly where you are. To make matters worse, if you stay still for too long (say, behind a sturdy tree or rock), they have a tendency to start spamming missiles over the area. Also, they're not invulnerable to bullets, but they do take a lot of punishment to take out. Certainly takes longer to kill one than one to kill you.
    • The sequel has the Ceph Heavies taking up the spider mantle. They are huge and slow, but that's about their only downsides. They are almost immune to bullets, taking multiple rockets to the face and entire mags from chainguns in stride, while tossing their own rockets and chaingun rounds at you, which you will not shrug off anywhere near so easily. The only thing that makes them manageable is if you sneak up behind them and toss two packs of C4 onto their backs. That is, if they don't release an EMP burst that drains your energy and disables your cloak first. And if you can survive long enough to get out of the blast radius, because they will notice you once you throw the explosives. And if you have C4.
  • Will Rock has its share of annoying monsters, including:
    • Minotaurs: they're not very tough, but are fast, throw axes at you and if killed they'll spawn two smaller Blood Minotaurs with the same abilities. A special gun is required to prevent this.
    • Centaurs: really fast, hard to hit, move erratically, take a lot of damage and can send you flying if they hit you. Oh, and they can still attack you from far away with their tridents.
    • Orthuses: They're quite fast, they can and will maul you and they have the habit of spitting acid and fireballs non-stop at you even while running.
    • Cyclops: They have a lot of HP and their spit attack is a pain in the ass and hard to dodge.
  • Call of Juarez has a cave full of spiders in a late episode. It it dark. They are camoflaged. They move erratically, with pauses, leaps, and freely scuttle up and down the walls in their path. Your only weapon at this point is a whip, which inflicts no area damage, has a mediocre rate of fire, and poor range. They seem to be large enough that collision detection won't let you pass over them easily (no Goomba Stomp for you), so trying to run through, say, this little lot will result in you being surrounded and nibbled to death a few hitpoints at a time while they dodge your attacks. Wake them up, then backtrack and jump over a chasm? They'll jump it too, or follow the wall or ceiling around. Oh, and they make scuttly (and, bizzarely, hissing) noises.
  • Painkiller has a few, although on any difficulty besides Trauma mode they're rarely a huge problem if you conserve your Freezer ammo. Throughout the series we have:
    • The first game had the following especially-painful enemies in alphabetical order:
      • Hell Bikers, particularly the chaingunner and nailgunner variants, tend to be very accurate with their fire, and they can quickly destroy your health.
      • Maso Commandos have flamethrower/grenade launchers that can deal immense amounts of damage and requiring continuous attacking in order to die— and they literally LAUGH at you when you fail to kill them.
      • Skulls can they use Hell Bikers as meat shields as well as dish out a crapton of damage with their shotguns and light their heads on fire, making them temporarily invincible.
      • Finally, Templars have shields that block all attacks except lightning and explosions, and their bolts can be difficult to dodge, especially in the "Babel" level where they each fire THREE bolts at once and appear in swarms.
    • Battle out of Hell had several contenders as well:
      • Bossmen had dual cannon weapons that can hit you from one side of the room for a ton of damage, with the cannonballs being very tough to dodge. Bonus points goes to the later versions who are much tougher and can't be frozen.
      • Voodoo Priests have an unavoidable voodoo attack will drain your health and armor quickly, even if they don't see you.
    • The much-maligned Overdose, of course, had its share of nasty foes, not counting the ones that were already in the original Painkiller and Battle out of Hell:
      • Chopper Women move very quickly and can quickly shred your health should they reach you.
      • Devil Monks come in larger numbers than in the first game, only in two levels; the ones with the staves can either poison (red) or slow you down (blue) if you get too close. And they WILL flank you if you're slowed down enough by the ones with the blue staves.
      • Electricians shoot giant lasers that can hit you from across the map. In the words of LPer Null Set, and have a melee attack that can stun you and take off a lot of health.
      • Leper Monks can bounce you around a lot, leaving you at the mercy of other monsters.
      • Masters would be merely lesser contenders if they didn't have a quick slash attack and teleport about.
      • Rocketeers leap around like ninjas, shoot instant-hit bullets, and deal nasty damage with their rocket blasts if you get too close.
      • And finally, Tentacles move about underground then try to sprout up from underneath you, and can hurt you with their slap attacks before the animation plays out.
  • Compies in Turok 2 are small and hard to shoot, and they come in swarms. Getting swarmed often means Death By A Thousand Cuts. The Purr-linn Juggernauts are Made of Iron, have hard-to-hit weak points, surprisingly fast for their size, and have a beam-shooting BFS that also generates ground shockwaves. The Lair of the Blind Ones has literal spiders. The Mantid Hive has the Drones, who are airborne, have supreme dodging skills, often attack in pairs or more, and fire highly-damaging plasma cannons. The Lords of the Flesh in the Oblivion Portals are also extremely fast, frequently block your shots, and have beam cannons similar to the Mantids.
    • Turok 2 has a large number of Demonic Spiders, but the Blind Ones archers probably take the cake. They have long-range crossbows that are far more accurate than anything that's blind has a right to be and is easily one of the highest damaging attacks in the game. The arrows are also surprisingly quiet, though still audible. The archers' only real downside is that the Blind Ones' breathing is quite loud and can alert you to their presence, though the short draw distance of the N64 can cause you to be attacked from where you can't see them.
    • Manuguera bugs in the remake have the honour of being Demonic Spiders and Goddamn Bats. They fly, attack in huge swarms, are small, fast and hard to hit and just happen to have an acid spit attack that can kill you in three hits.
  • Duke Nukem 3D:
    • Octabrains are frequently encountered in groups underwater, often near Protozoid Slimer eggs, can take a lot more punishment than normal enemies, and have a deadly psychic energy blast.
    • Protozoid Slimers, which constantly jump between ceiling and floor, and block off the entire screen if they latch onto you. In the normal game, you have to shoot it off your face. Normally this is done by reflex, so not much of a hassle, but since the enemies present usually require you to be carrying the RPG, and the projectile explodes in contact with the Protozoid, well... At least you can kick them with the Atomic Edition installed, which makes cutting through infested air vents a breeze. It doesn't detract any from their creepy factor, tough.
    • Sentry Drones, which are highly agile and evasive, attack by explosive ramming, and usually come in groups.
    • Assault Commanders. Airborne, Made of Iron, usually appear at distance making them hard to hit, and attack in groups with deadly rapid-fire rockets.
    • Protector Drones, possibly the most dangerous Mook in the game. Extremely fast, can take a beating, and are armed with deadly claws and a Shrink Ray. And worse, the Final Boss has an infinite supply of them.
    • The War of Attrition mod can potentially make any enemy into one of these, barraging you to death in an eyeblink with chaingun fire or unrelenting waves of plasma bolts while taking absurd amounts of damage to put down. At times, your only hope is to either use a room-clearing Nuke, or keep throwing upgraded Pipe Bombs to stun-lock them until they die.
  • The Harder Than Hard Insane difficulty in the Descent series turns most of the enemies, particularly those which are already Goddamned Bats, into Demonic Spiders, for example the Internal Tactical Droids are now very swift and nigh-impossible to hit, quickly draining your health with their near-perfectly accurate vulcan cannons. And the Red Spiders in the first game, especially with their ability to split into smaller spiders.
    • Class 1 Drillers in the first game. These guys will quickly shred you to bits with their vulcan cannons. Plasma Drillers too. And Missile Hulks, especially the homing type. Both appear in great frequency after the first seven levels, and launch Macross Missile Massacres on the higher difficulties.
      • Fusion Hulks, Class 1 Drillers, and several other robots (such as bosses that fire Smart Missiles) use weapon data designed for the player, instead of using robot-specific weapons which have scaled-down damage and velocity for lower difficulty levels. This makes them disproportionately more dangerous at easier difficulties, since their weapon shots are just as quick and hard-hitting as they would be on Insane. The Fusion Hulk is a big offender in particular, as its attack will take off half the player's shields in one hit.
      • Cloaked Hulks. Same as brown hulks, but with stealth camouflage. Stealth Drillers too.
      • On any difficulty the following are: Class 1 drillers, Cloaked Drillers, Fusion Hulks, and Heavy Drillers. On anything higher than Trainee, Medium Hulks in general, Spider Drones, and Missile Platform Robots. Hotshot, a few bots join the list. Ace and Insane? Pick a bot, it can bring 200 shields down in no time.
    • Second game: Lou Guards (a slightly Nerfed expy of the first game's Red Hulk), Diamond Claws (similar to the Goddamned Lifters, but with returning homing plasma), Seekers, Red Hornets (especially in swarms), Spiders and their Spawns, BPER Bots, Seekers and Boarsheads (Heavy Drillers on steroids with Smart Missiles).
      • The Vertigo Expansion Pack brings back the Missile Hulks and Drillers from D1, as well as introducing the Class 2 Heavy Driller, the Sniper NG, the MAX, armed with the same Homing Flash Missiles as That One Boss from the main game, and the SPIKE, which has the deadly undodgeable Omega Cannon.
  • Star Wars: Republic Commando has Super Battle Droids that usually require concentrated fire from your whole squad to kill. This wouldn't be so bad if 1.) You didn't fight so god damn many, and 2.) they didn't have Mook Makers. Surprisingly, knifing them to death is the most ammo-efficient way to get rid of them (as crazy as it sounds to attack a large robot with a knife instead of a laser blaster). Two or more and you use EMP grenades to take them out quick.
    • Spider Droids are also humongous pain in the ass.
      • At least Spiders are usually treated as bosses. (I say "usually" because there's that stretch at the end where you have to fight two in a row with only Scorch helping you. And before that, while you still have your entire team, you have to fight one and a Magnaguard simultaneously.) SB Ds are everywhere. Even droidekas, the official in-universe Demonic Spiders, are way easier to take down than these things. Incidentally, when we say they're durable, we mean they can take literally hundreds of shots from your rifle.
    • Geonosians also count at times, especially when they ambush you. They're ridiculously fast, their weapons can kill you in moments, and they can take several shots before dying. And then there are the Elites...
    • And honorable mention goes to the Magnaguards. They're not nearly so bad, because you only have to fight like nine of them total, but compared to canon, they are godlike. They're much sturdier than Supers, they can fly, they have cloaking devices, and they can launch homing missiles at you.
  • Jedi Outcast has the Shadow Troopers, lightsabre-equipped Storm Troopers with saber-resistant armour who hop around with incredible speed and agility, are immune to just about any Force attack, and can perform just about every attack you can, but better. Dealing with more than one is damn near impossible. And no, Force Speed does not help; they just counter it with their own.
    • Jedi Outcast and Jedi Academy'' feature AT-STs. Sometimes you have added firepower (a walker of your own, or a gun emplacement) to take them out, but when you don't, your options are: (a) spend a few minutes throwing your saber at it (for some reason you can't just throw it at the legs to disable the thing in a single strike, and if you get too close, it steps on you and kills you); (b) shoot at it with the guns that you never use after you get the saber, until you run out of ammo (long before it dies), leaving you to spam the repeater's alt fire for quite a bit; or (c) play tennis with its blaster cannons where one mishap can kill you (and it STILL takes a decent amount of time). As it stands, they are arguably harder then the actual bosses in either game.
    • The Dark Troopers in the original game are Demonic Spiders for two different reasons; the Phase 1 for deflecting projectile weapons and forcing the player to use explosives, and the Phase 2 for having the ability to fly and shoot at the player with the equivalent of the best gun in the game, as well as taking quite a bit of damage (The Phase 3 Dark Trooper is the final boss).
  • Breakdown. The basic(!) enemies of this game are human soldiers with ludicrously accurate machine guns. Of course, given that the Applied Phlebotinum present in the game leads you to A God Am I territory, you might think that they eventually cease to be Demonic Spiders. Oh how wrong you are. In gangs, they can cut you down in seconds. The actual MONSTROUS enemies are worse. Base-form T'lan are immune to bullets, incredibly strong and like to knock you down—and it only gets worse from there. The heavyweight contender for the Demonic Spiders title in this game are Stealth T'lan. Fast, invisible and they generally travel in gangs of two to four. In well-lit areas, you can see them well enough to divide and conquer. In darker areas, the net effect is something like being descended upon by naked, radioactive Freddy Kruegers who always knock you down, outpace you by default and can only be reliably tracked by their Audible Sharpness.
  • BioShock:
    • In BioShock, if you access a certain Power To The People machine in Fort Frolic, the standard (already demonic) Spider Splicers are replaced by plaster-covered ones, which are always running on full alert, and make absolutely no sound when moving on the ground or attacking, which will cost you a chunk of health every time you're not paying full attention to the game (i.e. spinning around madly trying to cover every possible attack angle). There's a reason most gamers consider said machine an unnecessary hassle more than anything.
    • While the scarcity and significance of Big Daddies make it clear that they're going to be tougher than the usual encounter, the Bouncer variety end up taking this factor so far Up to Eleven that they might as well be the Demonic Spiders of Giant Mooks. In addition to their ungodly HP count, they unleash strings of combo attacks that a) are at an almost lightning speed unbecoming of their heaviness, b) stun and/or slow the player into inability to dodge the next attack and momentarily disable attacks of any kind and c) remove an entire medkit's worth of health. Fighting them in a remotely convention is virtually impossible—the MP guzzling Electro Bolt stuns them for about a 1/20th of the usual duration and deals barely a pixel's worth of damage, even in water!note  The ammunition types designed for use against them (armor-piercing and electric) are so rare and expensive that it's basically a waste to use them all up on them. The only practical way to deal with them is to set traps and run using Proximity Mines and Trap Bolts (both of which you won't be able to use until much later in the game after encountering many of these things) and/or wear them down by hypnotizing them and enraging surrounding enemies.
    • The so-called "Heavy Hitter" enemy types in BioShock Infinite are explicitly designed to be this.
      • The most obvious would be Handymen, the game's closest analog to Big Daddies. While you only encounter a handful (no pun intended) throughout the entire game, they're more than tough enough to make up for it. They have a tendency to pop up out of nowhere, and manage to jump around uncannily fast for their size, with a strong focus on keeping you cornered and cutting off methods of escape— up to and including electrifying nearby Sky Lines. Besides that, their electric attacks hit hard from both close and long range, and their constant movement makes it difficult to zero in on their vulnerable hearts. They also make the ground shake as they move around, which makes it difficult to draw a proper bead on them because of the shaking screen and by extension shaking target reticule. Aside from the first encounter with one, they're rarely alone either, and the presence of lesser enemies serves to both distract you and provide the Handyman with ammunition to throw at you. Also, like the Big Daddies above, they are inexplicably immune to the usual rule of electric attacks being strong against mechanical foes; Shock Jockey barely slows them down.
      • Motorized Patriots are far more common than Handymen, and arguably much more aggravating for it. Their lack of self-preservation instincts means that they'll keep coming at you no matter how much damage they take, forcing you to either constantly back away or spam Shock Jockey to briefly stun them. The gears on their back are their weak point, but their uncanny turning speed makes it tough to get behind them, and standing in their line of sight for more than a couple of seconds invites a maelstrom of lead. Despite their bulky apperance, Patriots are quick on their feet, so trying to get some distance between you and them to use your Sniper Rifle or RPG is difficult unless you have Elizabeth divine you a distraction. Worse yet, if they have freinds, they'll suppress you while a Mook flanks and ends you. Trying to get any breathing room when faced with multiple Patriots is a challenge.
      • Both the Founders and the Vox Populi have Beasts, aptly-named shock troopers with incredibly thick armour who usually spawn on fast-moving gunships and attack from afar with either an RPG or Volley Gun. So, on top of showering you with explosives, they require a great deal of effort just to get close to (though the Charge and Undertow Vigors make it much easier later in the game), and once you do, their heavy armour allows them to not only tank through your attacks, but continue firing their own weapon without having to worry about splash damage. It is possible to take them out in two hits by blowing off their helmets and following up with a headshot, but good luck doing that while you're getting hammered with rockets/grenades. Possession is a surefire way to take them out, as they will blow themselves up after it wears off, but the high Salts cost and their aforementioned tendency to spawn across the battlefield from where you are limits the situations in which Possession can be applied.
      • And last but not least, there are the Firemen. The first heavy hitter unit you encounter in the entire game, Firemen have much higher health totals than the average enemy that make them a pain to take down, but the main thing that makes them demonic is their spamtastic use of the Devil's Kiss Vigor (read: exploding fireballs of death) that they hurl with frightening accuracy, can be thrown in an arc that makes any cover shorter than head height completely useless (if the Fireman has the high ground on you this is even moreso), and explode over a wide area and takes out a big chunk of shields and health in the process. By themselves they aren't too much to handle, but like all the others listed above (perhaps you're noticing a pattern here?) they often arrive with entourages that will pin you down with gunfire and make it that much harder to avoid the fireballs.
  • Sauerbraten's various single-player campaigns have literal demonic spiders. They toss grenades at you that take out most of your health if you aren't wearing armor. If you see one, run far away. But as Sauerbraten is intended as an engine and the FPS bundled with it is just a demonstration, it's open-source, so you can "fix" the bug yourself with a little tinkering.
  • Pathways into Darkness has Ghasts, a suped-up version of the Zombies that cause earthquakes from off-screen, Oozes, who appear in large numbers and are major bullet sponges, the spider-like Skitters, who swarm you from all sides and later have a poisonous Palette Swap, and Greater Nightmares, who shoot nearly-undodgeable homing projectiles and can only be killed with armor-piercing ammo.
  • In Team Fortress 2, Engineers, mainly because of their sentry, which has absurd power, range, and firing speed, and can be leveled up to become even worse. At level 3, it's nearly impossible to take one on at front, because of its extreme firing speed and damage. Plus, if an Engineer has a constant supply of metal, the sentries will be nearly constantly healed and resupplied. Once an Engineer is firmly entrenched, very little can defeat him and his sentry. Last note, Engineers love to group together, forming a huge nest of sentries and buildings, healing and repairing together. In short, shoot the engineer first. Fortunately, the Engineer on his own is weak, but certain unlocks (the Frontier Justice) allow him to deal far more damage if his sentry is killed. The release of the wrangler has allowed the Engineer to take control of his sentry, which not only eliminates the sentry's original limitation of near-sightedness, but ALSO limits the amount of damage the turret can take by 1/3. Combine this with Engie camps repairing the wrangled turret and the occasional pyro providing anti-spy support, and you have an invincible rotary gun of sheer death.
    • Spies wielding the "Dr. Enforcicle" combo are nightmarish. Normally, Spies have to be stealthy because their health is low; Pyros can ignite them, revealing their cloak or disguise; and their weak revolver is supposed to be a last-resort weapon. The Enforcer can two-shot most classes in close range. The Spy-cicle enables the Spy to become immune to fire for two seconds upon taking fire damage with the weapon out, at the loss of the weapon for a mere 15 seconds. And the Dead Ringer allows the Spy to fake his death for a short time, taking reduced damage during the time. Final verdict? Powerful weapon that allows the Spy to kill most classes in two hits, temporary immunity to his main weakness, and if you finally catch him, he fakes his death with damage resistance stacked on.
    • Just about any class can become this, though there seems to be more hate for pyros, demomen, snipers, spies, and particularly good scouts. As those are, in order, bringers of flaming mayhem, massed explosions, gray matter splatter, instant death from behind, and obnoxious agility with firepower, respectively, their spider-potential is not hard to grasp.
    • Pyros get a special mention due to their ability to sneak into a cluster of team mates and destroy everything even after having been killed. They're particularly the Demonic Spiders for spies, at least two of them roaming around skychecking renders being any effective as a spy a near impossibility. They're also the reason it isn't wise to build sentries around tight corners...
    • In addition to Pyros, a particularly savvy engineer may have a Heavy with a Huo Long Heater protecting his nest. Take the Heavy's already vast amount of health and firepower, add a dispenser replenishing his ammo, then add the gun's ability to surround him with fire revealing any spy that comes close: Demonic Spider supreme.
    • If the enemy team has a skilled Scout player, you will know what fear is. They move like the wind, flanking and double-jumping like mad in order to deliver point-blank Scattergun shots that will two-shot all but the sturdiest of classes. Try to get away from one? There is no escaping from a Scout. They will chase with the same absurdly powerful Scattergun until you die. Thought you were far enough to avoid the Scattergun? Then they'll bring out their pistol and snipe you to death with it. The only surefire counter to a skilled Scout is a sentry gun... and it so happens that they can become invincible and distract a sentry for eight seconds, long enough to let other players destroy it.
    • Mann vs Machine has the Sentry Busters, as losing sentry gun cover for any period of time can mean defeat. These bombs on legs will seek out the most effective sentry on your team, make a beeline for it while tanking a surprisingly high amount of damage, and blow itself up next to it, taking out anything and anyone who happens to be somewhat close. Once it reaches your buildings, the only option you have is to pick up your sentry and haul it out of range in the second it takes to arm itself, and if your timing is off it'll kill you and wreck your sentry. Luckily, you get a warning when one's about to show up.
      • If your Engineers are paying attention, can keep a level head, and know how to counter Sentry Bustersnote , the Busters quickly become Goddamn Bats. This really doesn't make them any better, just less likely to cause a Total Party Kill.
    • Several varieties of Giant Mooks and Elite Mooks are nightmarish to fight — primarily Steel Gauntlets, Giant Rapid-fire Demomen, and both versions of the Giant Scout. Steel Gauntlets have loads of ranged damage resistance and 900 health (that's triple the average Heavy's health) and will not resist ganging up on players, making attempts to melee them end horribly. Giant Rapid-fire Demomen have one thing they do absurdly well: Grenade Spam, firing so much grenades nonstop that it's almost impossible to ambush one without them turning around and blasting you into smitheroons, and they seem to prioritize sentries. Giant Scouts are fast, and while Major League Scouts are slightly slower they spam stun-balls; letting them get away with the bomb ensures that you're headed towards a swift loss. The worst part? They are immune to the speed penalty that the bomb gives to the bots, meaning that if you want to slow down a Giant Scout with the bomb, you better have Jarate or Mad Milknote . Rounds with two or more of these kinds at once are brick-wall difficult.
    • Engie bots completely disobey just about every restriction engineers typically have, making them an annoyance at best, and a demonic spider at worst. They can spawn into random spots on the map with level 3 sentries and teleporters, do not have the metal restriction human-controlled engies have, and both themselves and their buildings have much more health than a normal engineer does. An engie bot's building that's under construction automatically regenerates health, making them damage sponges, and their teleporters have no recharge time, meaning waves of robots at a time can come out almost instantly, all of them with five seconds of invulnerability. A single engie bot teleporting in can screw up an advanced defense, forcing the team to devote one or two damage classes to get rid of it before robots can spawn behind them. The worst part is that several engie bots can teleport in at once, giving the robots huge amounts of area denial with multiple level 3 sentries.
  • Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter has rocket-launcher- and automatic-grenade-turret-weilding tangos in a few missions. They can see you from distances where you can only see them with a sniper rifle, they fire instantly when you enter their viewing cone, they have perfect accuracy, and it's essentially impossible to notice the explosive coming unless you're looking right at it - and naturally you die in one hit. Be prepared to step around a corner and randomly explode dozens of times until you finally spot the bastard— and be damned sure your idiotic squadmates don't wander through the enemy's targeting area.
    • There are also a pair of machine gun turrets about a block apart on the same street in one level. They have big metal plates around the barrel so you can't shoot the gunner, they apparently have binocular vision and unlimited range, and they cover each other. Only coming around the right corners with perfect timing gives you a split second to shoot the gunner in the back before he swivels towards you.
  • Borderlands has several of these. The larger versions of the skags (especially those with an elemental affinity) can keep ramming you for good damage, sending you flying back several feet as their lesser brethren gang up on you. The spiderants are just as bad; the beetle versions can curl up and roll into you, sending you flying while the larger ones rarely turn around for you to hit their backsides for massive damage. The elemental spiderants are even worse since they can create a shockwave attack constantly if you get too close and use a long range attack if you are too far away from them. Running them over with a vehicle is usually the easiest way to kill them but the larger spiderants will damage your shields if you run over too many of them. Enemy turrets are difficult to approach as they will shred you to pieces, have high defense, and can shoot either bullets or rockets at you. The Eridians towards the end of the game come in two flavors; one that moves and attacks fast, making it hard to hit them, and one that can hover high in the air while attacking you with a long range beam attack, forcing you to use either a weapon with a scope or Mordecai's Bloodwing pet just to be able to deal consistent damage to the bastards.
    • The Zombie Island of Dr. Ned DLC has its own flavor of demonic spiders. First there are the defilers that vomit on you, doing high damage, blinding you, and slowing you down, leaving you open to attack from other zombies. Then there are the suicide zombies that throw an Explosive Barrel at you, doing high damage and causing massive knockback. Oh, and they also explode when killed. The Tankenstein is practically the worst of the bunch since he is Made of Iron, has the explosive barrels like the suicide zombies but isn't limited to one, and attacks with other zombies.
    • The Secret Armory of General Knoxx DLC also introduces new demonic spiders. Badass Lance Troopers have powerful guns and have a really freaking huge shield that makes attacking them a chore unless you go for headshots or are a Hunter with the Trespass skill. Badass shock/chemical/pyro troopers are Made of Iron, have an elemental affinity, and their backpacks tend to explode even after you've killed them, which can put you into cripple status. Then there are the Omega Assassins that move as fast as the Eridians or even faster, attack in groups, and their movement makes it difficult to hit them, similar to the assassins fought in Half-Life.
    • The Claptrap's New Robot Revolution DLC to continue on with the game's cheap enemies. The Kamikaze Claptraps approach you and explode, usually crippling you instantly. By themselves they are of little trouble, but they also tend to blend in with the group of the non-suicide Claptrap enemies and come out in full force when you do the Boss Rush portion of the final mission, including during the battle with the Final Boss.
    • The sequel also has a number of these. Constructor bots are basically large mobile weapon platforms which are able to shoot powerful laser beams, heat-seeking rockets which are impossible to avoid unless you're hiding under something (and sometimes not even then), and even fire a NUCLEAR BOMBARDMENT at you. They are also surprisingly mobile, as they're able to use their boosters to jump large distances in order to reach you. Oh, and while they're doing all that, they'll also be constantly constructing other robots which will chase after you.
      • Assassins can render Constructors laughably easy. An assassin that has invested in the Sniper skill tree can easily have constant 35% bonus to critical hit damage, with another 40% added to that if they look down sights or through a scope for 2-3 seconds, and can stack 6% more onto THAT with every critical hit they get, with every critical hit adding 6% more critical damage. Combine this with the fact the Constructors tend to remain motionless once you're in range, and their critical hit location is a glowing red light on their face that doesn't move, Assassins can deconstruct the Constructor so fast that party members can be left wondering what the hell happened. Constructors are still difficult solo, because of the Loader baddies they constantly spawn, but with a party taking care of those, even the Super Badass Constructor isn't terribly difficult.
    • Turned Up to Eleven with the badass variety.
      • Or the Super Badasses frequently encountered in True Vault Hunter Mode. The Super Badass Maniacs in particular can kill you in two hits, run much faster than you, flail around too much to be able to hit critically reliably, and have an unreasonable amount of health.
    • Rabid Stalkers and Rabid Skags. The term lightning bruiser doesn't do them justice.
      • Even the typical Stalkers are a menace. In the first playthrough, they're more Goddamned Bats than Demonic Spiders. But on the second playthrough, they still cloak themselves whenever they have their shields up, they still run in packs, the still spaz around far too much to be able to critically hit, or even easily hit in general, depending on your weapon, but now they do a silly amount of damage, and most varieties are tough as nails.
      • Except the Nitro ones, they do barely anything.
      • The Wildlife Exploitation Preserve is FILLED with both skags and stalkers. And it ends with That One Boss. In True Vault Hunter Mode, it is total hell, with one often facing Super Badass Fire Skags and Super Badass Corrosive Skags at the same time, before facing a boss in an arena that is frequently filled with Skags, including Super Badasses at times.
    • EXP Loaders, especially since they tend to blend in with the other robot enemies.
    • Ultimate Vault Hunter Mode will make you cry or rage when you face these enemies again.
    • There are also the Loot Midgets, which are somewhere between this and Goddamned Bats. They aren't too tough, but you almost always run into them in the midst of a firefight, or after you've just been through one. It's a huge pain ducking behind cover and opening a chest in an effort to get more ammo, only for a midget to pop out and blast you in the head with a shotgun.
    • Threshers are large tentacled worms that have a tendency to make your life hell when they show up. They can attack from a distance, move underground to keep you from damaging them and pop up right next to you, and many of them have elemental properties that cause extra damage. And then there are Wormhole Threshers, that generate fields that pull you close to them, causing damage and making it very difficult to fight. Badass Pyre Threshers go past this and into That One Boss, though.
    • The "Big Game Hunt" DLC has Witch Doctors. Aside from powering up other enemies, they have the ability to attack at range, heal themselves, and turn into magical tornadoes that are invincible against most types of damage. The worst are Vampire Witch Doctors, as their attacks drain your health and replenish their own, making it very difficult to cause enough damage to kill them.
    • The "Tiny Tina's Assault on Dragon Keep" DLC has archers and skeletons. Archers have pinpoint accuracy, a high rate of fire and a horrible damage output; most wear a helmet that has to be knocked off to allow you access to their critical hitbox. Skeletons are fast-moving and have small hitboxes due to being, well, skeletons. Skeleton archers are just cruel, and you meet them in the very first fight of the DLC.
    • Kraggons are skag-like rock monsters in Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel! that are endemic to Elpis. They tend to show up in groups of 3 to 8 small Kraggon Pebbles with a handful of larger Kraggons leading the pack. They break apart into smaller ones when damaged enough, and the largest ones break into other large varieties, potentially resulting in a gigantic swarm of them surrounding you. They also seem to level with the player, as they give the same sort of trouble regardless of how powerful you get.
  • The shield-equipped Ravagers in Resistance 2 will run directly in your face with their quasi-impenetrable force-fields (which damage you on contact), and are usually escorted by some mooks hiding behind said shield. Your only chance is to back up and wait for them to lower the shield... except they have a nasty habit of showing up right when the terrain prevents you from retreating.
    • The Widowmakers from the first game, which get bonus points for looking like demonic spiders. They also vomit up explosive balls literally everywhere and are tough as hell, basically requiring the tertiary fire from the L209 LAARK (hold down the secondary fire to pause the rocket, then hold down the primary fire to release a barrage of mini-rockets from the main shell) or a literal tank (which only shows up in one level) to take down. Not to mention that getting the rocket near the Widowmaker requires you to break cover, putting you in the path of the aforementioned exploding vomit balls. Which they vomit uncontrollably as part of their death sequence. And god help you if more than one shows up.
  • In Brink. enemy medics can be very hard when they come in pairs. Put one down, he gets revived. attack the other, same thing.
    • And let's not forget the fact that a Medic at Rank 5 has the ability to revive themselves (granted that they have the perk for it) if they're incapacitated. Fun!
  • SWAT members with the tazer in Payday The Heist will be your absolute nightmare. While you can easily see one thanks to their armor being colored yellow, dealing with them is a different matter. Their stun gun will give you a seizure, rendering you unable to move and causes your character to fire their gun randomly, which will waste your ammo. The tazer enemy can stop shocking you, but it will typically choose to chain stun you over and over again until you're knocked down. This gets a lot worse if there are more cops with the tazer since they can unload all their bullets into you as you're being stunned.
    • Snipers are very difficult to deal with. They usually have the height advantage, making it difficult to aim at them. A single well placed shot from a sniper can fully drain your armor meter even if it's full and you usually will have to expose yourself out in the open for a second just to get a shot at the sniper. The only clue that shows a sniper's location is the bullet trace they leave behind with each shot.
    • Cloakers are no stronger than the average SWAT enemy, but they move insanely fast, can use a bit of pakour to reach you, and blend in heavily with smoke and other enemies. What makes Cloakers dangerous is they can knock you down in a single strike no matter how much health and armor you have left. Cloakers are capable of wiping out the whole team and on harder difficulties, they're known to travel in groups.
    • In a hectic firefight, the absolute last thing you want to see is a Bulldozer marching towards you ready to serve you a plate of hot death. These guys are quite bulky, and can be picked out in a crowd. The problem with this is that these guys are stupidly well-armoured. If you hit them anywhere other than their heads, you may as well have not shot them at all. Compounding the issue is the shotguns they carry. One shot is enough to tear away your shields, even on Easy. Another shot will put your health into the red. One more shot and... well, you see where this is going. A team of ill-prepared heisters won't last a few moments against these guys. And if more than one is in the same area, well woe betide you.
  • Later updates to Payday 2 introduced a new type of enemy: the SWAT Van Turrets. Think of an Engineer's Sentry Guns but on the beefiest crack you can think of. Perhaps their only upside to players is that they don't move. Other than that, get ready for pain if one of these is rolled out. Like a Bulldozer, unless you hit them in the point that their beam is being projected, you'll do practically no damage to them. Despite this, it still has a lot of health. A Bulldozer will have 5,500 health on Overkill difficulty. How much do Van Turrets have? 500,000. It can take what it dishes as well, with it spitting a damn near endless stream of bullets at you. Just one of these things is enough to force players to give up weapon slots for low-ammo sniper rifles and rocket launchers.
  • GoldenEye (1997) has a couple demonic spiders:
    • The ceiling-mounted machine guns. If you so much as wander in their line of sight, they'll start shooting you at a blindingly fast rate of fire. Their bullets deal quite a bit of damage and they're sometimes hard to see.
    • The mooks that appear when the alarm goes off in the Bunker levels. They're literally Made of Iron and can kill you in mere seconds if they're given the chance.
  • Perfect Dark Zero has the female Elite Mooks, who typically appear in groups after an alarm is triggered, wear armored helmets preventing easy headshots, are much more nimble than their male comrades, and wield armor-piercing HandCannons that will kill Jo in as little as two hits. Also lethal are the goons with Magsec 4's, especially dual wielders, who are much more accurate with the pistols than the player.
  • The most dangerous and frustrating enemies you'll face in Metro 2033 are not the creepy-ass Lurkers, the elusive Demons, or the tough-as-nails Librarians, oh no. That honor goes to the human enemies, particularly the soldiers. These guys are unbelievably accurate with their guns, hard to put down before they can respond to your fire, and have a reaction time far faster than that of any living humannote .
    • Last Light makes basic Nosalises (essentially The Goomba of the previous game) into this, on account of their typical swarming tactics and blinding speed being combined with a newfound ability to "combo" with their various swipes and bites, potentially dealing out massive damage in just a couple of seconds. In missions like "Bandits" and "Undercity", you can rapidly find yourself with at least 3 Nosalises up in your grille at once before they proceed to corner and maul you.
  • Unreal has Skaarj troopers. While Skaarj warriors can only fire their relatively weak built-in energy-bolt attack or try to claw your face off, the troopers use the same weapons as you do. They aren't limited to the weak ones, either - you can find them with rocket launchers or even sniper rifles. They'll also use an indestructible shield when you target them with hitscan weapons.
    • Unreal came out in a time when FPS games had historically given players a world full of Goddamned Bats and a few Demonic Spiders every now and then, and completely turned the concept around. This was in great part a consequence of Unreal's highly-advanced graphics mated to the weakness of the first-generation 3D accelerators of the time; with enemies so beautifully detailed and polygon-rich, fighting more than a couple at a time was sure to bring any computer of the time to its knees. Thus, in order to provide a challenge to the player, most enemies were made much tougher and more dangerous than usual, and as a result most of Unreal's enemies would classify as Demonic Spiders if dropped in the world of any other game of its era.
  • In Operation Flashpoint, tanks in infantry missions. Especially when you are alone. A T-80 takes about seven RPG rounds to destroy, while you can carry a maximum of three at once. Do the math. Even if its crew was ignorant of your presence at first, after the first shot they will hunt you down with an astonishing knowledge of your position. Once the gunner has you in the crosshair of his machine gun, you are dead. The T-72 is just a bit less tough since you can destroy it with just three RPG rounds, but it can find and kill you with the same deadly efficiency.
  • The Blake Stone series has the STAR Troopers, who are severely roided-up versions of Wolfenstein's already borderline Demonic Spider SS guards. Their Rapid Assault Weapons have longer effective range than your own, they move much faster than Wolfenstein's SS, and on hard difficulty they have four times the health (425 health, compared to 100 for a Wolfenstein SS, and your weapons are mostly identical to Wolfenstein's). And sometimes, when you shoot them a few times, they fake their own deaths only to get back up a while later and attack. Their yell when they see you is also terrifying; they scream "STOP!" at the absolute top of their lungs and with a sharpness and suddenness that would put a drill instructor to shame. It will make you jump, every time.
  • Deus Ex has MJ12 Commandos, who are about twice as resiliant regular Mooks, are resistant to the Flamethrower and Plasma Rifle, and have dual machine guns and rocket launchers which do crazy amounts of damage, enough to kill you in about 2 seconds.
    • Deus Ex: Invisible War has Armored Templars, who have insane amounts of health, come in large groups, explode when killed or knocked out, and wield Rocket Launchers, Mag Rails, and Flamethrowers. They have a weak point, but it is the size of a pebble and on their backs, and good luck trying to get them to turn around. They are even worse on a Pacifist Run, as they are immune to flashbombs, boltcaster darts, and gas grenades, and if you knock them out with the baton, they will self destruct in your face, killing both you and the Templar. Cloak is pretty much your only option to get past these guys on a no-kill run.
      • Are you playing in Realistic difficulty? Then you will learn to watch out for the grenades on enemies' belts. They will use them, and a single concussion grenade from a lowly Mook will easily One-Hit Kill you.
    • In both games, the transgenics will mess you up if you let them. Greasels spit poison that does a hefty amount of damage over time, while karkians will chew your legs off in very short order. Both are also more durable than the average human enemy to boot.
    • Deus Ex: Nihilum has the XVA Enforcers, brutish troopers armed with LM Gs that can one shot kill you across a room.
  • Dead Island has enemies such as Thugs, Suiciders and armed humans that given the melee focus are a pain. A special mention however has to go to the Infected. They are zombie bullshit fast and Zerg Rush to beat you down, faster than you can fight back or run. Other enemies can be dealt with if using proper tactics, with these guys there is not much you can do except hope you can kill them before they kill you, especially if there is not somewhere handy you can retreat to.
    • The way to deal with these guys is to use kung-fu. Jump kick them; they fall down, then you shoot them or stomp on their face. This will negate their speed and will give one time to deal with either them or other zombies.
    • A Butcher on the other hand is essentially a Infected on super steroids. Just as fast, hit harder, and very hard to kill unless you use a legendary weapon or a special effect kicks in.
    • Dead Island: Riptide goes From Bad to Worse with special infected that take an age to take down. Standard for Thugs, but a Infected that can shrug off multiple fury modes would make a real kuru zombie outbreak almost palatable.
  • The first two Aliens vs. Predator games have facehuggers. They're tiny, move quickly, have excellent camouflage, will jump at you when they're in range and there is exactly one weapon that deals efficiently with them - the flamethrower, which you aren't usually running around with. As if that wasn't enough, they make an awful scratching sound that'll have most players jump on their chairs and ineffectually spray the entire room with bullets out of pure instinct. What makes them Demonic Spiders rather than Goddamned Bats? Well, if they so much as touch you it's time to reload your previous savegame...
  • Nosferatu: The Wrath of Malachi:
    • The scythe-wielding gypsies have long range, take of loads of health with each hit, and take ages to kill if you don't have a gun (since you encounter them before you have a chance to get one...)
    • The gun-wielders are much worse. They don't move and spend most of their time reloading, but their shots are incredibly powerful, and they're often hidden in awkward positions and are almost always found along with other enemies to distract you while they blast your brains out.
    • The Lesser Vampires have a lot of health and hit pretty hard, and they're CONSTANTLY moving and hopping around like an rabbit gymnast on a sugar high. What's more, they have a tendency to fall over as if dead and then get back up, so you can never be sure when you've killed them.
    • Demons might just be the very worst. They're frighteningly fast and hit like trucks, and can take a ridiculous amounts of punishment. Dealing with just one is bad enough, but when you reach the Main Castle you start encountering them constantly.
  • Destiny:
    • The Vanilla version has a few examples: The Cabal Phalanx has a huge invulnerable shield with only the tips of his feet and one hand showing, meaning you either have to aim for one of those points then headshot him with he lowers his guard, or attack from behind; The Cabal Colossus and Hive Ogre both soak bullets like a sponge and have ridiculously heavy firepower; The Vex Hobgoblin takes a couple of hits before shielding for a couple of seconds, wasting your time and ammo and damaging you if you're too close; Stealth Vandals tend to attack in packs, either sneaking up and engaging in combat before you know they're there, or hanging back and sniping with unerringly accurate fire. Other than this, any enemy with an elemental shield could become this if you don't have the right weapon.
    • The Taken King turns this up to eleven with virtually every Taken enemy that appears, being corrupted ghostly versions of the regular enemies - some of the worst are:
      • Taken Fallen Captains - fire a ball of darkness, often with only 5-10 seconds apart, that blinds the player for a few seconds, in addition to teleporting and being shielded.
      • Taken Cabal Psions - unless killed quickly, split into full health versions of themselves.
      • Taken Fallen Vandals - create an force bubble that is invulnerable from outside, and heals all enemies standing inside rapidly. Two or three of these will constantly put up bubbles as soon as they come under fire.
      • Taken Vex Goblins - possibly the most egregious offenders, they're as common as Goddamned Bats, and project a beam to another enemy that makes them entirely invulnerable until the projector is killed. They do this to each other, to elite enemies, and even to end of level bosses; they tend to appear in groups of four or more, and they prefer to use the ability from behind deep cover. As some boss encounters are on a timer, having these appear as well can make the encounter unwinnable.
  • The End Times: Vermintide: As quite a few of the Skaven units are similar to the Infected from Left 4 Dead and its sequel, there's no surprise that there will be a good amount that can cause grief:
    • Stormvermin Patrols. Stormvermin are already Elite Mooks with a good amount of health, wear armor that protects against most attacks that don't hit the head, block attacks often, and deal a great deal of damage (6 hits and you're down). Each Stormvermin Patrol consists of around 4-6 of these depending on difficulty, which can easily overwhelm a character in no time. The best way to deal with a patrol is to avoid their detection... or throw a grenade or two at the lot.
    • Packmasters act like the Jockey by grabbing and pulling a character away from the group, making them suffer continuous damage along the way before it decides to hang them and leave them to die, forcing the rest of the group to chase it and kill it. Unlike the Jockey, they're much faster when pulling characters away.
    • Gutter Runners are very fast and can incapacitate a character by jumping on them and stabbing away like the Hunter for great damage. If they're damaged during this period and survive, however, they Smoke Out and turn invisible for a short while... allowing them to do it again.
    • Ratling Gunners. Once they appear, they take a short while as their Ratling Gun spins up, then they fire away at a single hero dealing incredible amounts of damage over a short period of time and can tear most heroes down from full to critical health before its gun jams. It's easy to avoid if there's cover, but if the area you're in is wide and flat? Get ready to be in for a world of hurt. Also, they're Heavily Armored Mooks, requiring the heroes to attack their head or with Armor Piercing Attacks if they want to do any good damage.
  • The original Shadow Warrior has the suicide mooks. They take quite a bit of damage and will explode if killed by anything that doesn't gib them on the spot, so the otherwise very powerful katana is useless. And to top it off, once they do that they release their souls, ghostly floating enemies who do a fair bit of damage, move fast and are irritatingly difficult to track down due to their tendency to cloak.
    • The powered-up basic mooks count as well. The basic ones only have a Uzi and shuriken, but the later-level versions have rocket launchers, and the cloaking ones use a sort of ricocheting flame attack that'll one-shot you if you're standing in the wrong spot.
    • The necromancers in the remake could count as this. Introduced in Chapter 5, they keep on summoning mooks until they're dealt with, which means you're constantly under attack from all sides and they take a ton of hits to go down. To make things worse, they have a habit of periodically creating magic barriers around themselves, making them impossible to touch until the barriers disappear.

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