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  • Accidental Aesop:
    • Pointed out by one review. You start in a wonderful world. After some time, you look back and realize you have destroyed a large patch of nature and terraformed ground just to make that mega-building of yours. What you once fell in love with is now gone because of your megalomania.
      • Some private servers have a "minimal interference" policy specifically to avoid this. (Underground caves are usually fair game, though.)
      • This one can also be interpreted in the exact opposite direction, though, if you start with a patch of empty, barren desert and painstakingly rework it into a lush, fertile farmland.
      • Also note that you can easily plant new trees, so you can actually act on this aesop. With enough bone meal, you can create a forest overnight.
      • Many players have found quite a different one through years of play and paranoia: The only safe forest is a razed one.
    • The highly efficient animal farms of Minecraft might seem implausible in real life, but real-world industrial farms actually do mistreat their livestock in a similar way. While it's definitely not to the extent of Minecraft (eg: cramming 100 baby chickens into a square meter of space and roasting them in the same chamber they grow up in), Minecraft farms end up paralleling common practices real-world industrial farms employ: packing livestock in as little space as possible, giving them the bare minimum to survive, and slaughtering them as soon as possible.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • This fanart of the Ghast.
      "Mysterious traveler, why do you ignite when I greet you?"
    • While mostly thought of as outright Jerkasses who exist only to frustrate the crap out of you, Creepers have sometimes been interpreted as sad, lonely little Woobies who only want a hug and just happen to explode with happiness when they approach you.
    • Then there's the view that Creepers' aggression is entirely justified.
    • Creepers are just spoiled brats who don't want to share their world with Steve? and adopt the "If I can't have it, nobody can" behaviour by blowing up everything around them and trying to kill Steve? in the process.
    • Justified with Steve or Alex since everything he/she does is based on you, so whether he/she is The Hero, an Anti-Hero or a Villain Protagonist is up to you.
    • Is the Ender Dragon actually evil, or is it just doing its job by protecting the egg? To the Ender Dragon, Steve? could be a villain, focused on stealing the egg, which rightfully belongs to the Ender Dragon.
    • Are villagers nice, innocent, people, or are they Jerkass conmen who swindle you out of your emeralds? Some will charge you more for the same stuff, and for no reason.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: The recipe book notifications introduced in the 1.12 update. While it's a boon for newbie players, seasoned players tend to get annoyed very fast at how often you'll be notified how to craft X item that you memorized by heart long, long before the system was introduced. Worse yet, the crafting recipe list is saved by world, so you get the notifications on every save.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Although Minecraft is popular in most places, the game isn't enjoyed much anymore in China, due to Executive Meddling causing the game to become filled with microtransactions.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
    • The Ender Dragon used to be this. By the time you were able to reach The End, you'd likely be more than strong enough to beat it. Diamond armor nullified almost all the damage the boss could deal, the crystals that healed it were easy enough to destroy (especially if you brought a bow and either enough arrows to waste some or the Infinity enchantment), and the boss itself wasn't terribly difficult to dodge. In fact, the bigger threat was the absolutely massive army of Endermen that wandered around the field, which you'd spend half of the fight trying to avoid pissing off accidentally. The biggest annoyance while fighting it was getting it to sit still long enough for a decent hit. Apparently, the "diamond armor negating Ender Dragon damage" was a bug. Some players actually considered the armor to be irrelevant — a pumpkin and a bow was all they took to fight the dragon. After the revamp, it was taken out of this territory and became far more difficult — some of the crystals are protected by iron bar cages that have to be climbed and then mined away, the dragon now has a Breath Weapon that coats an area in Dragon's Breath, which lingers for a long time and does pretty harsh damage, and it becomes immune to arrows whenever it perches.
    • A better example is the Elder Guardian; while it does curse you with mining fatigue as soon as you enter the temple's area, the guardian itself is pretty simple to fight, so long as you have good equipment.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • When Dinnerbone unveiled splash potions having lingering clouds, the PvP enthusiasts started complaining about potion-centered PvP being ruined. However, it was found that this was actually a design for a new throwable "lingering" type potion.
    • Jeb reintroduced the concept of armor protection being dictated by durability. After complaints and discoveries of full diamond suits being worse than leather at half durability, Jeb reverted the change. He also says it's due to finding that it prevented individual armor values being an attribute.
    • When Parrots were first introduced, they were tamed via cookies, which were clearly chocolate chip. There was an uproar on Reddit over the fact that chocolate is poisonous to parrots, and if any younger players tried to mimic the game, they could seriously hurt or even kill their pet parrots. Mojang heard the complaints and not only changed the mechanics so that parrots were tamed with seeds instead, but made it so that any attempt to feed a parrot a cookie would instantly kill it, possibly as a form of damage control to demonstrate to younger players what would really happen if they fed their parrot a cookie. They also added a splash message reading "Don't feed chocolate to parrots!" to drive the message home.
    • The announcement of the "Update Aquatic" for 1.13. After a string of updates considered lackluster by the fanbase, leading to accusations that Mojang is being lazy with new content, 1.13 promises a wide variety of ocean-related content: coral, ocean plants, dolphins, icebergs, shipwrecks, and more. Given how often new content is requested for oceans because Atlantis Is Boring, it almost feels like Pandering to the Base.
    • Played with in regards to the voting system implemented for Minecon Live. A lot of players didn't like the 1.13 mob vote, predominantly because all four ideas were interesting but in the end only one would end up in the game (which ended up being the Phantom). Because of this, the next vote in the update after 1.13 for a biome overhaul determined which biome gets updated first rather than eliminating all the other choices. Unfortunately, this only applied to that particular biome voting contest, as the the next mob vote during Minecon 2020 did not say what would happen to the losing mobs before, or after the Glow Squid was chosen, leaving the fates of the Moobloom and Iceologer uncertain.
      • The unpopularity of the first mob vote was aknowledged in the official recap of the 2020 livestream.
        “You were given the opportunity to vote for the next mob that we add to Minecraft! Again! Because apparently, nobody learned their lesson after the Phantom!”
    • The original enchanting system required you to burn up to 30 experience levels just to roll the dice for a random enchantment that wasn't even sure to be all that good. The 1.8 update completely overhauled it; now you get a preview of what the enchantment might be, and while you still need to have up to 30 levels, you'll only actually spend one to three.
    • The overhauled combat of 1.9 was... controversial, to the say the least, not helped by the fact that Bedrock Edition retains the old combat. As of this writing, the developers are testing another overhaul of the combat system for all versions of the game that significantly speeds up attacks while still being more skill-based than pre-1.9. The changes have seen a warm reception, and the developers are responding to criticisms of the new system, such as allowing auto-attacks to be toggled off.
    • During the snapshots which introduced bees and honey-related items such as the Honey Block, players were disappointed upon actual introduction that they also stuck to Slime Blocks instead of the expectations that they would work seperately. In response, the next snapshot did just that.
    • The 1.16 snapshots reintroduced the redstone cross when redstone is placed on the ground by itself, replacing the redstone dot. While a welcome change for the redstone-inclined, people who used the dot for decorative purposes were not amused. A later snapshot provided the ability to change it between the cross and the dot by right-clicking it.
    • After several updates that had nothing to do with caves, the upcoming and much-requested "Caves and Cliffs" update announced at Minecraft Live 2020 includes grand additions to the underground such as much larger and more expansive cave systems among other things to ease gameplay:
      • The Lightning Rod item attracts and absorbs lightning, which is perfect for those who have combustible roofs who don't want their houses or other structures burning down due to being struck by lightning.
      • To help ease the small inventory space outside of post-game Shulker Boxes, Bundles allow players to mix multiple assorted stacks up to at least 64 items per bundle normally.
  • Broken Base:
    • The 1.9 combat update. While it did introduce many well-received features, other features and changes were very controversial and remain so to this very day.
      • The attack recharge mechanic, which rendered spam-attacking ineffective, as attacking during the cooldown will reduce the damage output. As the previous versions of Minecraft simply involved the same damage output even when spam-clicking, this was controversial to many people. On one hand, it was seen as adding depth and challenge to the combat system, allowing combat to become more of a skill-based mechanic. On the other hand, it was seen as not only complicated to new players, but players used to the old system would have difficulties of utilizing this mechanic. This had remained a contentious issue to this day, and although Mojang has tried to ease the issue with the new combat snapshots, some say that a full rollback of the combat system is needed.
      • To a lesser extent, the Enchanted Golden Apple nerf, which reduced its effects and removed the ability to craft it. While some say it's a welcome change from the Regeneration V to Regeneration II (itself being reduced to 20 seconds), some also say that it ruins the effort to harvest resources required. The fact that it cannot be crafted in any way became an issue, as some say it would negate the use of gold even more, while others say it makes it more valuable.
  • Catharsis Factor: Play the regular mode and plant a ton of dynamite all over the place and make yourself a safe spot high up in the map, just floating there, with a block of dynamite ready to fall upon hitting it, and save the map. Load it in survival mode and wait for a few mobs to form, then hit the dynamite to turn on the timer and make it fall to the earth. The explosion can be so big that even maximum fog won't save you from the lag, but the resulting aftermath? Worth it.
  • Creator Worship: Notch, creator of Minecraft, was once revered as a physical god, to the point of having temples built in-game to him. Nowadays, however, most fans (and even the current developers) don't look upon him kindly after he sold Minecraft, and started to say some... controversial things on social media.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • It is game where you can literally do anything you want in the world and build anything you want. However, most players, when they start to build a home, they tend to make a basic square house with one or two floors since it's simple and suits the basic needs such as having a place to sleep, store items, smelt stuff, and craft new items. Other players will make more elaborate homes with more complex mechanisms, such as using pistons to make hidden doors or using certain blocks and items to make a makeshift chair, though these methods are more for show than for practicality. And others will just hollow out the hill closest to spawn and put in a door. Some people just take wherever the hell they just got the resources to start their house, and make a hole in the ground. For survival mode, many players will make simple, square-shaped homes, which provide for basic needs with a low resource cost. Fancy structures are often reserved for creative mode, where resources aren't an issue.
    • Expect to see a lot of baked potatoes consumed as the average player's primary or only food source. The harvest is decently plentiful (one matured crop can provide up to 3 potatoes), they're fairly simple and low effort to prepare, and the baked potatoes themselves are pretty good on saturation and hunger restored. The one problem is obtaining the first potato, but zombies and villages aren't especially rare. Many other foods aren't as effective (seaweed), have low crop yields (bread), or take a lot of effort to prepare (meat, mushroom stew).
    • Iron tools and iron armor will be the most common items used by the majority of the players since iron-based items last quite a while and iron swords are pretty strong. Diamond items are better in durability and power, but their rarity and the high probability of losing your items in lava make diamond items more of a trophy than a tool. Netherite items, since ancient debris is even rarer than diamonds, and the process of making said items is much more demanding, are even more likely to be stored away (though netherite's immunity to lava makes it somewhat more practical, at least). Leather armor and golden tools and armor are too weak to be of any use as well. Since iron is quite common in caves, players will be using iron for everything.
    • Many multiplayer servers offer different types of play, but the majority of the servers are usually either clan wars, survival with griefing allowed, or servers in creative mode where players build large structures or pixel art.
    • The Mindcrack Server guys demonstrate this Trope very clearly with their Ultra Hardcore (UHC) PVP series. In the beginning, the competitors always went looking for a full set of Iron Armour and a bow and arrows before going hunting for prey; if they could find any diamonds, it was a great bonus, but too rare to be counted upon. As the series evolved and became more refined, certain (ever more convoluted) tactics became a necessity; for example, prior to Etho's Lab's pioneering of getting one during a Free-For-All match, an Enchanting Table was an expensive and tricky luxury even in the team games. Nowadays, it's virtually mandatory if you want to make it to the top 5, let alone win the series. In the same vein, virtually no one risks 'hunting' for other Players in the first 3 or 4 episodes despite the advantage of surprise, and going to the Nether is usually seen as far, far too risky despite the rewards it offers.
      • The Player with the biggest pack of friendly Wolves (and isn't accidentally killed by them first) usually wins; players have been known to spend whole episodes and wasting numerous hearts worth of health trying to harvest enough bones to recruit them, sometimes when they'd be better off conserving their limited resources and investing the energy into more practical advantages.
  • Crazy Awesome: The modding community in general. Special mention goes to More Creeps and Weirdos, Mr. Dirtman, the Mutant pack, and OreSpawn.
  • Creepy Awesome: Creepers, the horrible kamikaze shrubs, are quite popular with the fanbase precisely because they're paranoia-inducing abominations.
  • Creepy Cute: Creepers. They look like screaming zombie cacti, but they're pretty much the game's mascot. You can even buy Creeper plushies that go "SSSSSSSSSSSS" when you squeeze them.
  • Moment of Awesome: Has its own page.
  • Dancing Bear: Though not developed by one man any more, the game allows each player to become their own "one-man/woman development team" in-game, due to the absolutely huge game world note  and seemingly infinite building possibilities boggles the mind, to say the least.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • The Creeper, an altogether too clever exploding phallic bush monster that can demolish all but the strongest structures with ease. They're walking plants that are completely silent until they get close enough to you to start making fuse-burning noises and then explode, dealing massive damage and destroying anything (or anyone) nearby. Perhaps worst of all, unlike all other early-game monsters, they are not undead, so they don't burn up outdoors after sunrise. Despite (or maybe because of) their destructive tendencies, they're seen as an icon of the game; more dangerous monsters exist, but Creepers are the most notorious because they're so common and yet so stealthy and destructive. A Creeper's only weakness is their fear of the terrible Demonic Housecats. Creepers refuse to get near them except to get away from large groups of them.
    • In a game where most mobs use melee attacks, the skeletons break that mold and become the most evil mob in the Overworld. They fire arrows with nigh-perfect accuracy, and will strafe around to avoid your own attacks. On harder difficulties, they will start firing much faster as you close in, which locks down any attempts at rushing them with a sword in water or if they're on a higher level than you. If you don't have your own bow or a shield, well, good luck. They only target players, but will shoot another mob if it gets in the way; this can lead to amusing skeleton vs. skeleton battles, or the considerably less amusing situation of a creeper suddenly hurtling through the air towards you, propelled by the arrow's momentum. Fortunately, wolves have since become this for them in 1.8, actively attacking them enough to make them retreat.
    • The Witch is another mob who breaks the "melee damage only" rule, and to a much greater extent than the Skeleton. The Witch has all kinds of tricks up its sleeve which it'll use under certain conditions; it can drink certain potions to No-Sell fire and water damage, throw slowness potions at players to keep them from fleeing, drink speed potions to chase the player down (or occasionally flee itself), heal wounds by drinking potions of healing, throw poison potions at players to weaken their health, or even throw weakness potions to flat-out lower a player's damage output. What makes all of this worse is that splash potions of harming ignore any protection provided by armor, so a Witch kills a fully-armed player just as quickly as it kills an unarmed one.
    • Baby Zombies. They're faster than anything else, have as much health as a regular zombie, they're hard to hit because they're so tiny and are short enough to be protected by the hitbox of tall grass, they can climb ladders, and they often come in packs. To infuriate even more, before the 1.7 update, a bug prevented them from dropping items or giving experience (thankfully this was fixed), and before the 1.13 update (mind you, this was five years after their introduction) they also didn't burn in sunlight due to another bug.
    • The Drowned, introduced with 1.13. At first glance, they aren't much more difficult than Zombies to fight, but there's a 15% chance they may spawn with a Trident. If they do, they gain a very painful ranged weapon to use against you and have infinite ammo for it, effectively mandating the use of a shield or your own ranged weapon, the latter of which may not even be an option since you'll usually be fighting them underwater. It becomes that much worse when you realize that much like Zombies, Drowned can also spawn as babies. On top of this, if a zombie is submerged underwater for a period of time, it will transform into a Drowned, though thankfully it will never spawn with a trident if this happens.
    • Cave Spiders, being a literal form of this trope. They have every ability regular spiders do but are five times worse. The rare and fairly localized Cave Spider lacks the biggest weakness of normal spiders, their large size, and are poisonous. Thankfully, they only spawn from spawners found in abandoned mineshafts, and the poison can't kill you, but it can leave you weakened for other mobs to finish you off.
    • The Nether has Blazes, the Nether's answer to skeletons (though it has those, too). Blazes are tough, can fly, and rapidly shoot fireballs which deal reasonable damage while lighting you and the surroundings on fire... in an environment in which it is almost impossible to have some way to extinguish yourself. Worse still, they spawn in groups from Spawners in Nether Fortresses, so it's fairly likely that several will attack you at once. A potion of fire resistance can render them harmless, but the steps to brew some for yourself will require Blaze Rods that drop from them, so you can't easily access that option the first time you fight them. Fortunately, they are easily harmed and killed by, of all things, snowballs.
    • Ghasts tend to repeatedly cross the line between Demonic Spiders and Goddamned Bats, depending on your experience, but for less experienced players they certainly fall into the former. They only appear in the Nether, but they will make your time there constantly dangerous, especially when you're traversing wide open spaces that are perfect for them to spawn in. They can fly and will usually float out of range of your swords, usually making them only vulnerable to arrows. They also constantly shoot fireballs at extremely long range that explode on contact, causing major damage if you're unarmored, leaving holes and fires in the netherrack, and potentially wrecking any shelter you're trying to build. Also, they don't follow you, so you can't lure them into traps, and will just keep shooting at you as long as you have a line of sight to it. If your render distance is a little short, you can have instances of a Ghast attacking you from outside your sight range. Fortunately, you can One-Hit Kill the Ghast if you can deflect one of its fireballs back into it.
    • When traversing the Crimson Forests in the Nether, you don't have to worry about Ghasts due to ample cover. Instead, the threat is Hoglins. These aggressive beasts can take a beating, and hit pretty hard through diamond or Netherite armor, and have a knockback effect that can be deadly if engaged near a cliff. One Hoglin on its own isn't too difficult if you keep your distance (and have the assistance of nearby Piglins), but when they show up in packs of three or more (and they almost always do) you are prone to dying very quickly if you get cornered. Any nearby Piglins, who'd normally help hunt a Hoglin, will not engage while outnumbered. Also, if you try to engage them in melee, you may be prone to Hitbox Dissonance due to their rectangular model. The one saving grace is Warped Fungus, which Hoglins cannot stand and will actively avoid.
    • Wither Skeletons are practically an uber-zombie. They come with swords and can keep pace with the player at walking speed, in addition to having high health and attack. But their real danger comes from their special "Wither" effect, which is like poison but can actually kill you, though it mercifully hits slower and wears off faster. And you have to make a living hunting these things to obtain Wither Skeleton Heads, the only way to summon the Wither... but those items drop at an incredibly low rate even with maximum Looting enchantments. Which means you'll have to deal with a lot of them. Fortunately, they are half a block taller than you, so you can just fill the fortresses they spawn in with two block tall walkways and smack them from the other side.
    • The Endermen used to be pushovers. Now, they're an absolute nightmare. Zombies, skeletons, and spiders become easy to take care of once you have some decent iron armor, a sword, and a bow, and even creepers can be sniped with impunity if you catch them at a distance. But you're not going to dispatch an Enderman with anything other than grit and determination. They will ignore you most of the time, but if you attack or even just look at them, they'll set out after you, and they won't stop until one of you are killed. Their attacks deal decent damage and they move at an alarming pace once provoked. Even worse, they can teleport, making them immune to arrows, hard to hit with swords, and very likely to outpace you if you start running away. Most of their danger can be nullified by ordinary water, though. They are damaged by water and instantly teleport away to avoid it, but even hiding in a river or lake won't stop them from camping near the bank, waiting to punch you if you try to escape.
    • Accidentally hit a Villager? RUN. For you have just angered an Iron Golem. Iron Golems have the highest non-boss HP in the game, being literally more than double that of the Enderman, and it hits more than twice as hard as one (enough to potentially kill you in one hit). Making matters worse, it is immune to knockback, and its attacks will knock you 3 blocks away and 3 blocks up on hit. Your only weakness to exploit? It's slow.
    • Vindicators. They're fast enough to close the distance between you after an unenchanted hit before you can hit again and can kill an iron-armored player in two or three hits. Their axes can also temporarily disable your shield, complicating matters further. Initially only found in exceedingly rare Woodland Mansions, the Village and Pillage update now allows them to spawn in village raids. In packs.
    • Even though they cannot spawn naturally, Illusioners certainly seem to fit the bill very well if made to spawn via other means, such as commands or mob spawners. They can inflict the Blindness effect — limiting your vision to a few blocks around you and blackening everything else, create fake copies that you can't attack, and are another mob that can shoot arrows from afar — better hope you brought your shield. All these combined could make them borderline impossible for the player to attack, let alone kill, especially if other mobs are nearby. They were nerfed ever so slightly in 17w17a, as now the regional difficulty has to be above 3 for them to be able to inflict Blindness (so they'll never do it on Easy, where the regional difficulty caps at 1.5).
    • Village and Pillage introduces yet another Illager variant known as the Pillager. Armed with crossbows, they combine the pinpoint accuracy of skeletons with the speed of vindicators. And of course, they can also spawn as a part of Illager Patrols and Raids, so you're bound to cross paths with at least a few. Not only that, but should they spawn as part of a raid, their crossbows will always be enchanted.
    • Also introduced in Village and Pillage is a behemoth of a beast called the Ravager. They have the same amount of health as an Iron Golem and can go toe-to-toe with one. They move quickly for their size, are resistant to Knock Back, hurt almost twice as much as an Enderman while giving considerable knockback, and they also have a Mighty Roar that causes damage as well as huge amounts of knockback. Fortunately, they only appear in Illager raids on the second wave onward, and also provide the player with a guaranteed saddle upon death.
  • Disappointing Last Level: The game's ending has earned some criticism. Minecraft is a brilliant sandbox of a game until the very last bit in The End realm. After spending ages exploring, digging, building, crafting, and generally soaking up a colossal and oddly beautiful world, you drop through a portal and find yourself in a small, ugly, simplistic world where your only goal is to kill an ultra-tough boss. And then you read a confusing, scrolling-text prose poem. At this point, you've already explored the overworld (plains, mountains, oceans, caves, etc.) and the Nether (lots of fire and lava in a hellish world), but The End is just very plain looking; you're on a big floating landmass of what looks like the moon, towers made out of obsidian with a crystal on top of them are dotted across the island, a huge dragon is trying to kill you by flying into you so you go flying off the island and into the void, and the realm is filled with Endermen. To make matters worse, the dragon heals itself by flying near one of the crystals, which you will usually need to build a makeshift tower just to reach it within range of your bow or sword and it explodes when destroyed. At the same time, you might fall off your tower if the dragon pushes you off. Beating the dragon nets you 20,000 EXP and a very slow scrolling ending message that is a total Mind Screw. This might be the first game to deliberately invoke Disappointing Last Level. Fortunately, 1.9 introduced End Cities with unique loot to give The End more to offer after you've defeated the dragon.
  • Difficulty Spike: The moment you enter the Nether is where the game takes its gloves off. Hostile mobs are almost everywhere every time, there's frequent lava flows that threaten your safety, the Netherrack burns forever if ignited by the Ghasts' explosive fireballs, and one wrong step while mining can send you plummeting into the lava sea. Maps outright don't work, and attempting to sleep to set up a convenient respawn point only gets you blown up. It's why this place was called "hell" in earlier builds. But there's reason to go there, as the Nether is home to several rare materials, and setting up a Portal Network can facilitate transport across the overworld.
  • Discredited Meme: The infamous Creepypasta "Herobrine" has been deemed not-scary and way overused by many creepypasta community members, and, in spite of Notch's recurring mentions of the ghostly NPC (including an explicit statement that it's fake, which may have also contributed to the popularity downfall), Notch's ex-wife ezchili made this tweet regarding the character's overbearing prominence, a statement with which a good amount of members of both communities seem to agree.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Considering the lack of characterization of any of the mobs, with most of their personality being relegated to Alternate Character Interpretation. Best example would be the Creepers, who are nothing more than Demonic Spiders in the game itself, but the fandom frequently treats them like Tragic Monsters, thinking they're suicidal because they explode or that their exploding is a result of happiness. There is no evidence of this in the game at all. As far as we know, they explode and blow up your stuff because the game tells them to.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: For a game without traditional characters, Minecraft has a lot of popular, well-liked mobs.
    • For a failed pig model and something that ruins your work easily, the Creeper is most likely the most well-known Mob and arguably the face of Minecraft (often literally).
    • On a similar note, Pigs are quite well recognized, thanks to being the game's first passive mob and for its cute, yet dimwitted design.
    • Wolves (more specifically, dogs) are also very well-liked for their loyalty and for being Badass Adorables. This has gotten to the point that one of the most requested features for the game is dog armour.
    • The Enderman, a mob that became popular straight from its reveal thanks to its cool, intriguing powers in a game with enemies that are otherwise fairly basic (save for the aforementioned Creeper and maybe the Ghast), and for being possibly based upon the Herobrine myth. In fact, the Enderman potentially has the most mods based around it out of any single thing in the vanilla game.
    • The Illagers got a lot of attention since their inclusion for their backstories and interesting hierarchy. Besides the Witch, they're also the first intelligent, aggressive mobs, making them stand out among the undead and mindless monsters the players have to fight. Among them, the Vindicators are especially popular.
    • Out of the newer passive mobs, Pandas are among the most popular, due to being Ridiculously Cute Critters and to the surprising amount of work put into their varying personalities (even though they don't do an awful lot).
    • Since their reveal, Bees got an unexpected amount of love from the community (and even outside of it) for being Ridiculously Cute Critters, as well as for being the source of honey blocks, an addition which the redstone community has found dozens of uses for.
    • From the Nether update, the Strider was adored practically from day one thanks to its incredibly strange Ugly Cute design, its many endearing quirks, and for being the first official way to cross lava lakes, opening up the door for increased exploration in the Nether (and being the first breedable passive mob in the Nether doesn't hurt either).
    • During Minecraft Live 2020, the upcoming Caves and Cliffs update was revealed, and with it the Warden. Thanks to its eldritch, genuinely menacing design, blindness and unique sound-based traits, Warden fanart and speculation flooded the Minecraft subreddits mere hours after the mob's reveal.
    • Despite being removed after a month of being in the game and only existing in the game's infancy (2009-2010), Rana still gets fanart to this day for being a cute Chibi-esque girl in a frog-themed outfit.
  • Everyone Is Jesus in Purgatory: Notch has clearly stated before that the only reason zombies used to drop feathers is that they only dropped feathers before chickens were implemented, and there had to be a source of feathers, and he didn't know what zombies should drop, so he just rolled with the idea of them dropping feathers. This hasn't stopped fans, however, from coming up with random theories on why they dropped feathers, like chickens being a common sacrifice in voodoo rituals.
  • Fandom Rivalry: Since 2017, a huge rivalry has started with Fortnite, generally due to Fortnite eclipsing Minecraft as the most popular game on the Internet, which ironically enough, may have contributed to Minecraft's revival in popularity in 2019. Which is funny given that fans of popular internet games that were eclipsed by Minecraft often gave Minecraft the same treatment.
  • Fanon: Stuff despawns because creepers steal it, at least according to the Filk Songs. This became Hilarious in Hindsight when a new mob was added in beta 1.8 that steals stuff. Granted, Endermen can't steal anything that could despawn, but still... And the 1.4 update took it up a notch by letting Zombies pick up dropped items.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
  • Faux Symbolism: The alternate realms (Nether, former Sky Dimension, and End) have been interpreted as Hell, Heaven, and Purgatory/Limbo, respectively.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: One of the first splashes that were added in Indev in 2010 was "Notch <3 ez!" They divorced in 2012. It wasn't until 2015 when this splash was removed.
  • Funny Moments: This too.

    G-L 
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Giving the player the ability to fly in Survival Mode is a common addition in the many mods of the game. What most mod makers fail to realize is that in the vanilla game, flight is restricted to Creative Mode for a reason. On paper, flight would simply make navigation easier, when in reality it makes everything easier: combat, construction, movement, mining, you name it. Anything even remotely challenging in the game is broken in half by this ability. If a mod allows access to flight in Survival Mode, whether it's through an item and/or ability, then regardless if it's nerfed to oblivion or difficult to get, there's no reason not to try and obtain it as early as possible and no reason not to use it once acquired.
    • Version 1.9 introduced the Elytra, a very rare non-renewable item that allows flight without mods or cheating; with a set of Firework Rockets to start and prolong your flight, you can cover a lot of ground easily and reach distant places like Woodland Mansions. However, this is only obtainable in The End after defeating the Ender Dragon, and can only be repaired with Phantom Membranes or the rare Mending enchantment. Depending on what you use the Elytra for, it can border on Bragging Rights Reward.
    • Shields, after their buff in version 1.11. Obtaining/repairing one is very easy to accomplish in the early game, as all you need are some wood and one iron ingot. A player blocking with a shield will No-Sell nearly any attack, from arrows to melee attacks to even explosions. This turns Skeletons and Creepers, who are otherwise Demonic Spiders, into utter jokes since they won't be able to deal any damage with their special abilities. While your shield's raised, though, your movement slows to a crawl and you're still vulnerable to attacks from other directions, but you'll generally be well-protected while waiting for your weapon to cool down. Axes can temporarily disable the shield, but the only mobs that wield them regularly are Vindicators and Piglin Brutes, which are not easily encountered during normal exploration.
    • In multiplayer worlds, the Fire Aspect enchantment for swords, which when coupled with diamond armor and a diamond sword, makes it unbelievably easy to kill any player in PvP matches. The Flame enchantment for bows is similar, if not deadlier due to the bow's potential for even higher damage than a sword thanks to the Power enchantment.
    • The Mending enchantment is by far the most valuable enchantment in the game. It gives the ability to automatically heal your equipment with EXP, meaning that it will never break as long as you hold it in your hand while picking up EXP periodically, a trivially easy task with something like a sword or pickaxe. This is why it's also a very rare enchantment, being one of the few which cannot be acquired from the enchantment table, but it flies into game-breaker territory if one finds a villager who trades for an enchanted Mending book, which basically means you now have an endless supply of Mending. This is even easier as of the Village and Pillage update; you can take an unemployed Villager, give him a Lectern to turn him into a Librarian, and he'll have a chance to be selling a Mending book. If he's not, as long as you haven't traded with him, you can destroy the Lectern to make him unemployed again, then repeat the process until the Random Number God answers your prayers.
    • Fishing essentially nets you unlimited resources as long as you can make enough replacement fishing rods. It starts off slow as you get a lot of fish and junk, but at least the fish makes for good food supplies and can be used to tame cats to keep Creepers and Phantoms away. When you enchant a rod with Luck of the Sea, you'll start pulling up more treasures, including enchanted Books, enchanted Bows, and even other enchanted rods that can be fused with your existing one to optimize your yield. The enchanted equipment may even come with the coveted Mending enchantment to let you fish indefinitely!
    • In PvP servers, by far the most overpowered Potion available is Strength II, which allows someone with an unenchanted Diamond Sword to two-shot players in full Iron Armor if the hits land correctly. If the Nether is in play, expect people to rush to make them ASAP, because the increased power allows a single person to kill multiple opponents at once and take all their stuff, immediately shifting the power differential in their favor. It doesn't hurt that the brewing ingredient for Strength (Blaze Powder) is derived from the main component of Brewing Stands (Blaze Rods) to begin with.
    • Setting up a villager trading hall is extremely worth it. Although you have to put up with wrangling villager AI and the costs of curing Zombie Villagers, villagers have some very worthwhile trades. Farmers can be traded melons and pumpkins, two crops that are easy to farm en masse, for a large amount of emeralds, and when maxed out they sell Golden Carrots, the single best food item in the game. Librarians can trade enchanted books which, with some job resetting, can not only not you the aforementioned Mending enchantment, but enchantment levels way above what you can get from an enchanting table. Clerics give you a use for rotten flesh, as well as provide an infinite source of Redstone, Glow Stone, and Ender Pearls without needing to set up a Witch and Enderman farm, respectively. Armorers, Toolsmiths, and Weaponsmiths sell diamond, enchanted armor, tools, and weapons at higher levels. And this isn't going into the fact that trading nets you a metric ton of EXP if you do a bunch in a row, not only letting you have an easy way to repair tools with mending but also lets you average around 50 or so levels on any given playthrough, giving you plenty of room to reroll enchantments off your Enchanting Table.
  • Gameplay Derailment: The game had people come up with creative ways to farm for drops by mobs, but once skeletons and zombies were able to spawn in with their equipment being a rare drop, players focused more on mob traps to score the rare items without having to bother to hunt for the materials to create the same items. A few patches adjusted the rare drop mechanic where now all dropped equipment by mobs will be heavily worn down. Needless to say, the popularity of resource farms went right back up after the nerf. Due to the simplistic way Minecraft implements many of its core features, disabling or removing farms is nearly impossible.
  • Gateway Series: This game has gotten a lot of people into indie games.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: It seems that New Hampshire loves Minecraft enough to make it the most torrented game there relative to the US national average.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • The Zombie Pigmen in the Nether are relatively passive and actually sort of cute despite their Body Horror, until you inadvertently harm one of them (for instance, with a stray arrow from your projectile spam at a Ghast). Then they begin to swarm you and attempt to beat you to death with swords from all directions. Oh, and if they kill you? Good luck getting your stuff back from the damn army of pigs camping around (and in some cases, even wearing) it.
    • If you don't particularly care about dying or have the armor to negate their threat, Creepers become this. It's mostly due to the fact that their only attack creates a crater in your lawn that you now have to go back on and patch up so it doesn't look like an eyesore/war zone.
    • Giant spiders pounce, crawl through 1-block-high passages, and typically spawn in groups. Now with glowing red eyes! Mercifully, they mellow out and become passive in the sunlight, unless they're already after your blood. They can also climb walls. The Horse Update (1.6.1) gives spiders a random chance to spawn with a status buff like boosted speed or health regeneration, making them even more annoying.
    • For more experienced players, Ghasts are downgraded to this from Demonic Spiders. They aren't a huge threat, but the fact that they fly out of range of your conventional weapons means they take a long time to kill, and they blow huge holes in the environment and set it on fire, making the Nether even more of a pain to navigate. You know it's bad when there's a song about how they ruin trips to the Nether.
    • When you have armor (or a shield), skeleton archers downgrade from demonic to mere pests. Their arrows become far less damaging, though with a bit of knockback that can throw you into lava at inopportune moments. But when you know where they're coming from, dealing with them becomes a matter of patience by blocking their arrows.
    • With the 1.6 update, zombies have a chance to spawn more zombies if attacked, and get stronger when attacked.
    • Ironically not the case with the game's actual bats, which are non-hostile and will generally try to avoid you. Though they will make annoying squeaking sounds and get in the way of your pickaxe...
    • Husks, desert-dwelling zombie-like creatures capable of inflicting hunger on you if they hit you, forcing you to waste food in order to offset the dent on the hunger meter that you take. They are also immune to sunlight unlike normal zombies, making them a pain in the neck to deal with if you're watching over a village in a desert biome. Also like normal zombies, they can sometimes spawn as babies.
    • Like many Airborne Mooks, Phantoms are quite a pain in the rear. They spawn in groups, fly out of reach most of the time, meaning that you either need a bow or some very good timing with melee to hit them before they hit you. Fortunately, they only appear if you haven't slept for days, meaning that you need to go out of the way to encounter them, but groups will spawn with increasingly larger frequency the longer you stay sleep-deprived. If you do have cats around you, they are forced to keep their distance so you have peace of mind at night.
    • Baby Hoglins are just as aggressive as the adults, and are smaller so they can fit into tighter spaces and are harder to hit. However, they're not as damaging, and a single swipe of your sword can send them scurrying. Just don't be to aggressive with pursuing them, as they are accompanied by adults.
    • Even in Creative mode, Slimes are definitely this if you choose to play in a Superflat world (they're pretty rare otherwise). When you kill medium or large sized ones, they split, which isn't helped by the fact that they're annoyingly common to begin with, since the Y-coordinates in Superflat mode are very low (and they spawn regardless of the light level). If you're in a village, they trample your crops because they get around by hopping. And because they're so common (and easy to kill), their loot wastes inventory space.
    • Magma Cubes, the Nether counterpart of the Slimes are even worse. They have all the same Asteroids Monster abilities as their cousins, but because of the Nether's environment, there's a high risk of them knocking you into lava.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Like Dwarf Fortress, the strange interactions of Minecraft's world create a lot of these: Swimming up waterfalls? Teleportation via minecarts? Sand-on-torch floodgates? Glitch after glitch has been discovered, explored, and developed by the massive Minecraftian community, before being turned into yet another incredible, important, and intriguing tool for future players. They've started fixing them now, much to the dismay of players who can now drown in a small waterfall.
    • Mobs used to be unable to see through glass, treating it as a solid object until they could 'see' you at least once, following which they would be able to detect you through any block.
    • A (now patched) glitch let you duplicate items by storing an item inside a chest, then closing the chest while still dragging the item, causing a dupe item to drop in front of you. Although the duped item would disappear if the player attempted to use or stack it, it could still be used to craft, making mass production of iron or diamonds a reality.
    • Another glitch allowed players to speed up minecarts by placing another on a separate track and running past each other. The booster cart glitch, which allowed minecarts to speed up considerably, had an entire subway system founded on it. Again, the creators recognized that this bug was much more popular than the legitimate Powered Minecarts, which led to the official introduction of Powered Rails before the glitch was removed. Notch, one of the game developers, didn't get rid of them in a timely fashion, but added in a replacement feature (powered rails) that works without any glitches, albeit differently. He then proceeded to remove the glitch boosters in the next patch, along with boat elevators and rapid-ascent water ladders, to the dismay of the community. In an attempt to make powered minecarts work again, the glitch (albeit weaker, but still useful) was reintroduced. Notch and Jeb just can't win.
    • Speaking of rails: a glitch — still unfixed as of 2016 — lets players build a contraption of pistons and switches that duplicates powered and activator rails by exploiting the rail mechanics. Make one on top of funnels, tape mouse button down, come back a half-hour later to stacks upon stacks of rails. As this doesn't work on normal rails, you can always tell if a server has players who know about the glitch by checking whether it contains entire railways made of nothing but inert activator rails. Others exploit this by doing away with powered-rail calculations altogether, and just make the whole damn network out of powered rails with redstone torches sprinkled liberally around.
    • If a multiplayer server is experiencing significant lag, you can see flying squids. More importantly, if it lags enough that it doesn't generate the terrain quickly enough, it can let you see underground. A split second is all it takes to see hidden mineshafts and structures.
    • Normally, sand and gravel blocks will be subject to gravity (the only two blocks in the game that are) and fall down if you remove the block supporting them. However, due to the way the game world is generated, you can end up with floating sand/gravel blocks. If you place a block next to one of these, the physics engine will recalculate the floating blocks, which can result in large areas of apparently solid land suddenly caving in and collapsing. If done right, you can use this to make pitfall traps, or just make cool floating structures that shouldn't be possible.
      • Placing sand/gravel on top of a 2-tall plant such as a rose bush or sunflower, then breaking the bottom of the plant allows one to create floating sand/gravel anywhere they wanted. This was amazing for traps; it was even reinstated intentionally after being fixed since it was so useful.
      • Prior to Beta 1.8, using "404" as a world generation seed would create a gravel patch in this manner; upon destroying one of the gravel blocks, the sand and gravel in a rather large area would spontaneously collapse and reveal a giant sinkhole from sea level to near-bedrock. Various players had thus participated in the "404 Challenge", which involved surviving in the sinkhole with (among other limitations) no torches.
    • While not strictly a glitch, the water physics in Minecraft are very peculiar and players have found all sorts of inventive ways to exploit this to their advantage. People frequently abuse the game's bizarre water mechanics for the sake of comedy. They just got more bizarre and water now resembles a gel-like substance in consistency. Place a good heap of TNT on an island and you can blow a hole in the ocean.
    • What else is good with water? Boats? The feature that's really hard to control and breaks into a smaller fraction of the pieces needed to make it at the drop of a hat? The annoying vehicle that glitches out and ejects you several blocks away from where you should be upon dismounting? Actually, they are pretty good. Mojang finally heard the pleas of the fanbase and started fixing boats in Minecraft 1.9. Now they are nowhere near as annoying. But one snapshot (specifically 16w04a) went so far as to accidentally make boats rideable on land — at the exact speed with which they would travel in water. That's right. As of that snapshot, Minecraft boats act almost exactly like Minecraft cars! However, this glitch was later fixed.
    • A glitch fixed in 13w47a allowed the player to duplicate any object they could place in a flowerpot, by destroying or moving the block below the flower pot. The use of redstone could turn this into dye factories or semi-automatic tree farms.
    • The now defunct "bury yourself in sand and see all the caves" bug. You can still bury yourself in TNT, as well as a few other blocks.
    • Multiplayer had Chunk Errors, now fixed.
    • In the alpha version of multiplayer, you could toss away your about-to-break tool and pick it back up to fully mend it (fixed in beta).
    • Burnable blocks set on fire sometimes never burn down, especially if boxed in when lit, allowing for eternal flames and always-lit fireplaces. This was fixed in Beta 1.3.
    • Sometimes after crashes, parts of old saves are left around, and you can come across parts of your old builds in a supposedly fresh world.
    • Fishing poles could be stacked, unlike any other item limited by durability. If you equipped and used a stack of fishing poles, they'd all lose durability at the same time. If you dropped one fishing pole on another, the resulting stack retained the latter's durability. This could be exploited for infinite fishing. The ability to stack them was removed in Beta 1.6, effectively removing the exploit.
    • Set your system time ahead by an hour while playing. You'll find yourself digging faster than the Flash on caffeine bullet time. This glitch was fixed in Beta 1.6.
    • The Duplication Glitch in 1.2.5. You could easily double the amount of resources on hand by this trick. Of course, it was patched soon after. Duplication was also possible in the PS Vita edition if you had a Playstation 3 as well. Namely, when you saved in the Vita edition, the world was saved, but your character placement and inventory weren't. By uploading your save and making your inventory on the 3 be a bunch of rare materials, you could then place them all in treasure chests on the Vita, save, then exit. When you reload the world, all the materials are both in the chest and your inventory!
    • The Far Lands, caused by traveling too far into the distance of an infinite map, in which you'll end up in strange geometric landscapes. Notch has stated that this is one he won't fix because he thinks it'd be cool to have a strange faraway land. Sadly, though, they didn't survive the Beta 1.8 update due to the rehaul of the map generator accidentally fixing the bug that created them.
    • There was one exploitable glitch that allowed players to climb ladders normally even if they were spaced every other block, thus allowing people to conserve building materials. The game's creators recognized how popular this practice was, so at the same time that the bug was fixed in Beta 1.5, the ladder resource cost was cut in half.
    • A bug involving pistons and redstone repeaters has the capability to produce infinite amounts of blocks. Including diamond blocks. See in action here. Fixed in the 1.7.3 patch.
    • Sometimes, when the game crashes, some blocks will be glitched in or out of existence.
    • An update to the Endermen improved their AI; specifically, if they come into contact with water, they would teleport away from it to avoid getting hurt. The glitch happens when it's raining, causing an Enderman to rapidly teleport around in an attempt to keep itself dry. Now, imagine being out during a rainstorm, and you see an Enderman for a split second out of the corner of your eye. You're almost certain it's around, you just don't know where it is. It could teleport into your line of sight, and then the real fun can start...
    • There is a bug that causes water and lava flow to transform redstone wire into obsidian blocks. The practical upshot is that you only need one lava source block (which cannot be replenished like water can) to create as much obsidian as you need, versus the traditional method of permanently turning the few lava source blocks you'll find into obsidian. There is still a resource cost in the form of redstone dust which is semi-finite, but is far more abundant than lava (a single block of redstone ore yields 4-5 redstone dust, which can be increased to up to 8 with Fortune III, each of which can be converted into obsidian, and it's easy to find enough redstone ore to make hundreds of blocks of obsidian rather than a few dozen which you would get from converting the few lava source blocks that you'd find). Plus, redstone is a level 2 trade from a Cleric villager; you can get 1-4 redstone dust for a single emerald, so if you can grow enough Farmer villager trading fodder to get a steady supply of emeralds, you can get pretty much an infinite amount of redstone to use for this bug.
    • The first 1.10 snapshot brought about some nice things, but perhaps one of the best things seen was Savanna villages spontaneously combusting.explanation 
    • Bedrock can actually be broken, with a bit of finagling. Doing so to breach a hole in the ceiling of the Nether gives you a wide, expansive, flat-grounded space that's perfect for building structures, establishing travel routes quickly, or setting up Pigman farms.
    • For consoles: it's possible to escape the Battle Mode lobby and explore the surrounding area. Turns out the structure is built on an elevated piece of land above a Superflat map. Travel far enough and you can find villages.
    • If you put a Nether Brick fence between two wooden fences, it won't connect to them, but mobs still can't get around them.note  This makes them a more convenient alternative to fence gates for farms/ranches since you can go in and out of them with ease without worrying about accidentally letting out any of your livestock.
    • As of Snapshot 18w10c, Slab + Sticky Piston + Water Bucket = Pushable/Pullable Water Source Block. Combined with the improved water mechanics, especially those of Magma Blocks and Soul Sand, this could've opened up a new (albeit rather dangerous and tricky, since flowing water washes off redstone) world of possibilities with redstone creations if it hadn't been fixed rather quickly, in 18w21a.
    • While swimming, you can move horizontally through one-block gaps. You can do this as long as you have water to swim in when you enter the gap — taking away the water allows you to essentially "crawl" through small spaces, which is actually fairly useful.
      • Eventually became an Ascended Glitch in the Java version as the "suffocation prevention" (as the official Wikia calls) when Henrik Kniberg, one of the programmers at Mojang, made a Tweet showcasing that a piston that pushes a block on top of the player's head will achieve the same effect as the bug above.
      • This can also be achieved with a trapdoor. Make a 2-block tall gap, place a trapdoor, open it, walk to it, and then close the trapdoor and you will achieve the same "crawl" effect.
    • Advanced Redstone on the Java version is built pretty much entirely on this trope.
      • Quasi-connectivity, which is the strange bug that redstone dust two blocks above a piston will power it, even though they may not be touching. The thing is, the piston wouldn't change its extended/retracted status until a directly adjacent block was updated, whether removed or modified. Thus led to the creation of Block Update Detectors, which were extremely useful for making invisible redstone inputs. The Observer block added later is, essentially, an official implementation of this feature.
      • Powering a sticky piston with a pulse that only lasts one tick causes it to push out whatever it's holding, but without retracting it. This feature is used predominantly to make flying machines and 1-bit memory circuits.
      • Redstone wire placed on transparent blocks such as top slabs or glass will transmit signals upwards, but not downards. This allows for easy and delay-less one-way signal transmission.
      • A weird bug involving feeding pistons a redstone input of duration less than 1 tick causes sugar cane, bamboo, and other certain types of plants to grow. Dubbed "zero ticking", it has been used to create machines that spew large quantities of farm materials, faster than any reasonable glitchless solution.
  • Good Bad Translation: You have the option of translating the text into almost any language. The languages are named only in that language (Spanish is Espanol, etc.) and only in that language's alphabet. The languages are listed in alphabetical order of said names. This is where the problem comes in. The Hebrew word for Hebrew transliterates as "Ivrit." However, Hebrew is listed under "H" in the list, and it instead says "Anglit," which, besides not starting with "H," is the Hebrew word for English.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • One of the random splash messages in the main menu could display "Absolutely dragon free!" Around the pre-release 6 of Minecraft Beta 1.9, the Ender Dragon was introduced. This has since been changed to read "Kind of dragon free!"
    • After beetroot was introduced to the Pocket Edition, a picture of Jeb in-game in the PC version was found, but it turned out to be fake. A fan asked if beetroot was ever going to be in PC, and Jeb said it wouldn't. And then, a few years later, beetroot was confirmed for the Combat Update, contradicting what Jeb had said before.
    • The 2011 April Fools update involved locked chests that, when clicked on, would invite the player to go to the "Minecraft Store", which "sold" various joke items and would greet you with a screaming velociraptor if you clicked "Proceed to checkout". There are now several actual Minecraft Stores, one selling the actual game, one selling DLC for the Bedrock and Legacy Console editions, and one selling The Merch.
    • On April 25 2015, Captain Sparklez released a music video Find The Pieces which featured living Pigmen as the main antagonists. Four years later, the game was updated to include "Piglin" mobs, which look strikingly similar to the Pigmen, even down to the ears.
    • Later on, JT Music released the music video Mob Rap Part 6, which featured illagers attacking a village at one point in the song, before the actual implementation of illager patrols and raids in Village and Pillage.
    Illager: It would be a shame if it all got pillaged!
    Villager: Oh no! Illagers are taking my village!
    • Yogcast's "Screw The Nether" involves someone trying to move to the Nether and make a permanent settlement, only to find that it's not a great place to live. The Nether Update introduced enough resources, from substitutes for wood and cobblestone to a semi-reliable food source that isn't rotten flesh, to make a permanent base there viable enough to be a common Self-Imposed Challenge. Cue many players quoting the song.
    "I'm moving to the Nether!"
  • Hype Backlash: Being one of the most popular games ever let's played (especially by the Yogscast and Achievement Hunter) has turned some people off, while others think that "It's a lot of noise made over glorified LEGO."
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks!:
    • After Notch received an interview in a popular PC magazine and was plugged on the Team Fortress 2 blog, some people called the demise of the game. The cries of "Notch is a sellout!" became even more common among fans once he announced Minecraft would come to the Xbox 360, which happened because of the game's huge success. Even more so when the game was ported to 8th Generation platforms.
    • With all the popular Minecraft let's players on YouTube, it's not uncommon to see at least three or more million view Minecraft videos in the related videos section. This, however, has made some gamers absolutely sick of seeing or hearing about the game entirely; especially from the Nintendo community.
    • While it never really had a target age group to begin with, Minecraft in the early days of Indev, Alpha, and Beta was relatively obscure and was mostly played by college students and computer geeks. Once it became a household name and was released on almost every game console available, it became really popular with very young children and a handful of the original players were annoyed by this. A part of it being that they find the younger players to be annoying or immature, while others are annoyed about the general public pegging Minecraft as a "kiddie game".
    • This has subsided during Minecraft's Popularity Polynomial, with the previous generation of players having grown up and had started to play the game again.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: In some unholy fusion with They Changed It, Now It Sucks!, after every major patch, people complain They Changed It, Now It Sucks! about things that did not actually change. For instance, after the Halloween update, someone made a thread complaining that creepers no longer drop gunpowder when they explode (they never did).
  • Junk Rare:
    • Many of the rare drops from mobs:
      • Wither Skeletons have a 8.5% chance to drop... a stone sword, at a point of the game where the player has likely moved on to iron equipment at minimum. Subverted if you're trying to save up your iron for a beacon, in which case it's a godsend.
      • Zombies have an exceedingly low chance to drop iron ingots (2.5%), and while iron is good, it's far easier and faster to mine for it.
      • Any mob that spawns with armor or weapons equipped has a chance to drop it note , but even if you do get the randomly dropped armor, chances are it's gold or leather, and in incredibly poor condition too. Somewhat downplayed with the introduction of the anvil; if you're lucky enough to get decent weapons/armor from mobs, you can simply repair it. Later versions also added the ability to smelt gold and iron equipment into their respective nuggets, giving a bit more use to those drops.
    • Plenty of it when it comes to late-game fishing as well:
      • Clownfish. You have a 1.7% chance of getting one via fishing and a 2% chance of a Guardian dropping one when killed, making it the rarest fish, but it's also the most useless; Fish and Salmon restore more hunger points when eaten raw (two for both) than Clownfish (one), and unlike the former two, Clownfish can't be cooked to increase how much it fills you up. There's also no potion that uses it, unlike the Pufferfish (Potions of Water Breathing). The best thing you can do with them is feed them to cats to tame/breed them so you can keep the more useful fish for yourself. No longer the case in Update Aquatic, where they're no longer "rare" and can be easily obtained by killing tropical fish.
      • Enchanted books are among the best things you can get while fishing. If it's a good enchantment. Commonly disliked enchantments are especially bad here, when getting them is pretty easy but getting the one you want takes a long time because you can't tell which one is coming and the pool of possible enchantments to get is way larger than that of say, a sword. So instead of getting the Sharpness III you want, you're getting Bane of Arthropods (which nobody uses, in the distinct non-abundance of bug-type hostiles note ), more enchantments specific to fishing rods, and books which literally have the word "Curse" in their name. Doubly frustrating when hunting for Treasure Enchantments (especially the game breaking Mending), which can only be gotten from fishing unless you get lucky with pre-generated Chests or Librarian Villagers; you'll be getting a lot of enchantments you've probably long since gotten from an enchantment table before you fish up even one Mending book. Slightly mitigated with the introduction of the Grindstone, which allows you to disenchant useless books in exchange for experience and a now-blank book that you can use as you wish. However, the Grindstone doesn't remove Curse enchantments, so unless that Curse of Vanishing book comes with enough good enchantments for you to think it's worth it, you'll likely still toss it into the lava pit.
      • Saddles become this very quickly, when you've been fishing for long enough that the amount of saddles far exceeds the amount of horses you'll ever have at any one time. The wiki defines them as being part of the "treasure" category, meaning they'll become even more common if you have Luck of the Sea on your fishing rod.
      • Lily Pads have a similar issue to saddles. They can be placed on top of water to allow you to walk on it, making them helpful in farms so you don't always fall into the water blocks as you're harvesting your crops. However, you only need so many, and their main perk was made obsolete in the Aquatic Update; you can now do the same thing with any slab placed in the water source block. Like Saddles, they're considered Treasure items when fishing, making them more common with Luck of the Sea.
    • Cocoa beans. You find them from either jungles or dungeons, both of which are fairly rare (and, before jungles were introduced, they couldn't be farmed either). They only have two uses: dyeing things and making cookies. However, after hunger was implemented, cookies became an incredibly bad source of food. All food was made stackable note  and to add insult to injury, cookies have one of the worst saturation values in the game; that stack of 64 cookies will go away incredibly fast. They almost had another use in early 1.12 snapshots where cookies were used to tame parrots, but after Mojang realized this could have bad repercussions in the real world (as chocolate chip cookies can be poisonous to any pet birds the young target audience might have), cookies were changed to actually insta-kill parrots, which are now tamed with seeds. Even for their primary use as a dye, it's not that good, as other shades of brown can be acquired very easily (logs and planks will fill your building needs, and leather already comes colored brown by default). Thus, for such a rare item, cocoa beans have very few applications. The Village and Pillage update might have alleviated this slightly, as cocoa beans can be tossed into a Composter to be turned into bonemeal with a decent 65% efficiency.Explanation  Everything that compares to or beats that is either a more useful crop, something you can't farm that you normally wouldn't go out of your way to gather a bunch of, or a crafted/cooked food item that you wouldn't want to waste like that.
    • Chainmail Armor cannot be crafted, only obtained through villagers or rare mob drops. As cool as it looks, it's only slightly better than Gold Armor, having a whopping one more armor point than it. By the time you obtain Chainmail, you've likely moved on to Iron Armor at the minimum. Sure, it receives better enchantments than Iron or Diamond, but it's still not worth the effort of seeking it out. Later versions allow you to smelt chainmail armor into iron nuggets, making it slightly useful when dropped from a mob, but still not worth spending emeralds to obtain.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: A rare version that isn't attributed to the game itself, but most of Minecraft's playerbase came about during it's boom in Game Mods, being that a good few singular mods actually contain more content than the vanilla game itself.
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    M-R 
  • Memetic Badass: Steve, the player character. Beating animals to death with his bare hands. Fitting cubic tons of material into his pockets. Swimming up waterfalls. Going for days without sleep. Yes, truly an average day in the life. Alex can also be this for being as powerful as Steve.
  • Memetic Loser: Videos on the official Minecraft Youtube channel tend to portray Jeb in a comedically negative light.
  • Memetic Molester:
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Wake up on an island. Punch trees. Get wood. Explanation 
    • Creepers-
      • Don't want to kill you, they just want to be held.
      • Creepers also happen to go oink. Explanation 
      • That's a nice everything you have there. Be a sssssssshame if something happened to it... Explanation 
      • See man wake up on island. Ruin his life.
      • AWW MAN Explanation 
      • I'm Mining Explanation 
    • Everything related to Rana. Explanation 
    • Thomas the Sheep. Explanation 
    • From the game over screen: Game Over! Score: &e0 Explanation 
    • Herobrine Explanation 
    • Testificle: A mutation based on the odd placeholder name of the villagers in Minecraft, "TESTIFICATE." Cue people misreading it as "testicle" and running with it.
    • A YouTube meme related to Minecraft goes like this: after a person shows off their amazing superstructure...
    • "You broke the rules!"
    • In-universe: One of the title screen splash messages says "Absolutely no memes!"
    • Rule #1: Don't dig straight down. Rule #2: Don't dig straight up. Explanation 
    • "Minecraft Youtubers" Explanation 
    • MINEEEEEEEEEE DIIIIIIIIIIIMOOOOOONDS Explanation 
    • Grotesque Steve/Creepy Steve Explanation 
    • Well, anything about Grandayy.
      • Speaking of Grandayy, Note blocksExplanation 
      • Changing the sounds of the (most common) mobs with memes, including Will Smith's voice clip from the 2018 Youtube Rewind.
      • Recreating the new Sonic Movie trailer in Minecraft.
      • Crafting a working Air-pods.
      • Inserting PewDiePie into Minecraft.
      • ...and many more.
    • Cursed Minecraft Explanation 
    • Who made this game? Explanation 
    • Fortnite Bad, Minecraft Good Explanation 
    • (events of video here) in Minecraft Explanation 
    • Cave update Explanation 
    • The snow is snowier than before. Explanation 
    • Wholesome Parrots Dancing became a meme for its sugary randomness.
    • Prior to version 1.0.0, the player would make a deep masculine "Oof!" sound when taking damage.note  Fans like adding this sound to videos of people being injured in some capacity, often with the standard HUD added in post.
    • "So, I did some mining off camera..."note 
    • Broken cobblestone generatorsnote 
    • Aether Portals of Disappointmentnote 
    • Steve for Smash.Explanation 
      • Steve broke the Internet. Explanation 
    • "hey shitass" Explanation 
    • Jeb's board game collection.Explanation 
  • Misattributed Song: A lot of people tend to confuse the song “Sweden” from the game’s soundtrack with Erik Satie’s “Gymnopedie No. 1” or outright think the latter is part of the soundtrack, which isn’t a surprise considering they’re both similar-sounding, melancholic piano pieces. However, it’s such a common misconception that nearly every video of “Gymnopedie No. 1” on YouTube has a handful of comments referencing the game.
  • Misblamed: Minecraft is widely known as Notch's creation. He did a lot of things to the game, but hasn't gotten involved with the game at all after the game went gold in 2011. Despite Jeb taking charge of the game in late 2011 and Notch stepping down, many people still think Notch runs the game and still praise or hate Notch for everything that has been changed in the game that Notch had no part of, blaming him if there's a change they don't like.
  • Moe:
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The pickup sound, especially hearing it in rapid succession. You've just mined out all that clay and step into the pit to pick it up — pop pop poppoppoppoppoppopopopopop!
    • If you're hunting for food, the sound of a nearby chicken, or especially a cow or a pig, becomes this.
    • The sound of wolves barking, if you have bones to tame them with or they're tamed wolves that are yours. So you're minding you own business and somewhere you hear a loud "Bark!" from afar. Much squee ensues.
    • The comforting meow of the cats, especially if it's nighttime and there are Creepers in the vicinity.
    • If Shhh is not created by creeper, but instead is created when the water meets still lava and obsidian starts forming.
    • The sound of a creeper dying.
    • When fighting The Wither, it's their dying breath that is the cue for players to stop, give themselves a pat on the back, and go make themselves a Beacon sandwich.
    • The sound of a Nether Portal. It sounds a lot like the TARDIS. Of course, it stops being such once you actually enter.
    • You're just mining away when you suddenly hear multiple cries of one kind of mob. There must be a dungeon nearby! Time to find ya some mossy cobblestone, saddles, cocoa beans, and music discs!
    • You're in a cave and weak, and are waiting in a hole in the wall. Suddenly you hear the sound of zombies and skeletons burning in the sun. Bliss.
    • If you're an avid collector, the chorus of your completed set of passive mobs, especially if it includes dogs and cats.
    • You returned from being AFK to your mob farm born from a spawner, you strike the weakened crowd of skeletons or zombies with your Sweeping Edge III sword. The continuous dinglinglinglinglinglingling of thousands of EXP fills your ears.
  • My Real Daddy: Many consider Jeb to be the real "daddy" of Minecraft after Notch left Mojang, due to the sheer amount of content added under Jeb's direction massively outstripping what Notch did and/or the inflammatory comments Notch has made on social media after his retirement.
  • Narm:
    • The high-pitched noises that the baby zombies or husks make.
    • The Pillagers' raid horn. It's supposed to be ominous and frightening, but many of their calls sound like somebody farted into a megaphone.
  • Narm Charm: The chicken jockeys look like they're supposed to be childish, but they work well — they don't take fall damage, because the chickens just float down, and the baby zombies can attack surprisingly well.
  • Nightmare Retardant:
    • Spider jockeys can climb walls and shoot you, and seem terrifying at first. Then the skeleton shoots its spidery steed by accident and you get to see a mob fight bitterly with itself, its common enemy (you) all but forgotten.
    • One of the best antidotes to all the (copious) Nightmare Fuel in Minecraft is Creative Mode. Not only are you indestructible and capable of flight, but all the normally hostile mobs become neutral. You can use special eggs to spawn a bunch of Creepers all around you, and they'll just wander peacefully around and occasionally stop to look at you quizzically. Also, you can look directly at Endermen and they won't be fazed at all.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Minecraft is pretty much a Trope Codifier for Wide Open Sandbox tropes — but many concept(s) that fans love to credit Minecraft as "inventing" were old news by the time Minecraft was even in Alpha — namely Second Life, Furcadia, and Garry's Mod. This has led to some amusing bits where fans accuse precursors of ripping off Minecraft.
    • And speaking of Minecraft, the whole "3D world made up of cubes" thing was done by the freeware title Infiniminer first. Minecraft is largely believed to have copied the world format from that game.
    • Considering how popular the game is with young children, virtually anything with a pixelated look to it (usually a game from the 80s or 90s or anything based on that) will be compared to Minecraft despite the thing being around since before they were even born.
  • Pandering to the Base: Updates from around the 1.5 full release era saw many changes that were designed for mapmakers (with many of them from Vechs' input). For example, custom spawner data, command blocks, and custom mob stacks were all implemented features that a completely vanilla game would never see.
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • Imagine digging underground when you suddenly hear the sounds of an unseen enemy waiting for you to dig towards them. Or perhaps the silent Creeper is waiting somewhere by your house for you to step outside.
    • When underground deep enough, you have no idea whether the monster sounds you hear are actually nearby creatures or just the creepy ambient noises.
    • Not to mention that you always hear monsters before you see them. You know there's something waiting to kill you, but WHERE IS IT? And if you built you house right over a cave, you'll have to listen to the monsters as you go about your daily activities.
      • The one exception to this rule is, of course, the Creeper. By the time you hear the hissing noise signalling that it's about to blow, it's already too late to run.
      • And then sometimes you do see one coming. Standing on a high ledge. Watching you. Somewhere in the world, a Creeper is plotting your death.
      • Parrots are intended to reduce the fuel by mimicking the sounds of mobs, including the aforementioned Creeper, so you might be able to detect their presence before anything bad happens. However, they'll also sometimes imitate the sounds of mobs that aren't present, so that might ramp up the fuel for situations that don't call for it whatsoever.
      • So you decide to go home, turn in for the night, but..."You may not rest now, there are monsters nearby." There are monsters near your house, maybe trying to break in if they saw you before you got inside, and you probably can't see them from within your house.
    • There's no way to tell the footsteps of harmless pigs and your own character from Skeletons. Until you hear the "oink" or "burrr" outside, and laugh because it's another creature you spend your day slaughtering. But then again, Creepers oink.
    • An update included a glitch, the current cause for which is unknown, that causes random pain noises within tunnels for no apparent reason. Even on peaceful. Very creepy.
    • Even creepier, Notch had his music developer, C418, make sounds for creepy ambiance when you're underground. They can all startle you, but the 10th one, known by some as the "banshee call", has been known to even force players out of caves.
    • CRAP IS THAT A CREEPER!? Wait, no, it's just a cactus. HOLY SHIT A SKELETON! Never mind, just a sheep...
    • Even if it's a hoax, the idea of Herobrine is pretty unsettling. Basically, he's a silent human entity with completely white eyes who randomly walks around the world. It would make you pretty paranoid about going exploring, especially at night. Especially if he's watching you.
      • Worse, the official changelog says "removed Herobrine"... several times.
    • The Endermen. They're pitch black, so you'll have a hard time spotting them at night but the worst part is that if you look directly at them, they'll attack you the moment you're looking away. One of them could be hiding behind the next corner. You won't know until you look...but if you look at it, it will attack you. And they can teleport, so the moment you try to kill one it will be somewhere else, and you don't know where. You could step outside, look around for a moment, then walk back inside, and have no idea you triggered an attack by one until it teleports beside you inside your own home and starts tearing you to ribbons.
      • Made even worse for Doctor Who fans because of their similarities to the Weeping Angels in how they act...
      • Worst as of the 1.9 Pre-release, Endermen don't burn in sunlight anymore, however they make an effort to avoid it by teleporting randomly. With that, there's the paranoia that they can teleport right into your reticule.
    • Speaking of Weeping Angels, someone modded them into the game.
    • Ghasts, whose cries are always heard at the same volume no matter how far away they are. Ghast noises carry an extremely long distance, leading to situations where you can clearly hear a Ghast nearby, but you can't see it and have no idea which direction it's in. The player has no idea upon hearing the sound whether the Ghast is in another cavern or right behind them. Pair that with the fact that they can detect and shoot at you from outside your render distance if you're playing with the Short or Tiny render distance and they certainly qualify as this.
    • The Wither is made of this. The idea of an inescapable, highly murderous flying monster that may as well be the Grim Reaper is terrifying. Fortunately, at this point the only way it will spawn is if the player makes a conscious effort to make it spawn. Still, suppose you're playing on a server and a griefer gets their hands on the materials needed to spawn it... although this could be nullified by a server admin killing it, then checking the logs for the first person to die and make an educated guess.
    • On certain Survival Mode servers with PvP enabled, you might have to go at it alone. You'll never know exactly when a bandit wearing diamond armor who's been preying on others will jump you, kill you instantly, and steal the resources you're starting out with.
    • Silverfish hide out in ordinary-looking stone blocks in Extreme Hills biomes and Strongholds. The only clue you have if the block you're mining is hiding one is if it breaks slower with a pickaxe or faster with something else. Every time you mine a stone block in Extreme Hills or any variant of it, you're basically playing Russian Roulette if you're not paying attention.
    • Haven't slept for a few days and venturing out into the night or a Thunderstorm? Better keep watch on the sky to check for your safety, otherwise you might not have much warning time to react before you hear the horrible screech of a Phantom right before the foul creature bites into you.
    • Elder Guardians keep you from simply digging through the mazelike corridors of ocean monuments by inflicting you with Mining Fatigue, a status effect that slows your mining and attack speed. The effect is heralded by a ghostly image of an Elder Guardian appearing on your screen, accompanied by a terrifying chiming sound. Keep in mind that this can happen whenever you are anywhere within a 50 block radius of an Elder Guardian, meaning that you may get assaulted by the Jump Scare outside an ocean monument, including while passing over one on a boat, travelling on nearby islands, or unwittingly mining beneath one.
    • Illager patrols. They randomly spawn on the map, consist of Vindicators and Pillagers, and can appear anywhere, regardless if there's a Pillager outpost or Woodland Mansion nearby. Meaning there's no knowing when you might run into one, and if you're unprepared, good luck fighting them off. Even if you are prepared, killing the captain will cause you to get a bad omen, which will force you to deal with a raid the next time you enter a village, or if you happen to set up your base in a village, immediately after killing the Captain.
    • Survival multiplayer servers can be this. Every time you log off, you're leaving your base and all your hard-earned resources defenseless. If anyone finds it while you're away, you might log back on to a burning wreck. And with X-ray mods and texture packs out there, nowhere is ever truly safe...
  • Player Punch: Hardcore Mode, which is Survival except that upon dying, your entire world is deleted. How is this implemented? The game doesn't delete the world for you — instead, you have to press the "Delete World" button yourself.
  • Popularity Polynomial: The game was fairly well-liked when it first came out, then it completely blew up in popularity in the early-mid 2010s. Practically every YouTube gaming channel had at least one video centered around playing the game. But by 2016, the game lost quite a few of its fans due to It's Popular, Now It Sucks! reactions, the game's popularity leading to a lot of younger players getting interested in it, which ruined the game in some fans' eyes. However, due to other games getting similar attention, as well as the fact that said younger players had grown up, some players ended up looking back at the game fondly, and by 2019 it seems to have actually usurped Fortnite's crown as the year's most popular game. It helps that most of the updates after 1.9 were more well-recieved.
  • Porting Disaster: The game is quite broken on the Vita. Aside from suffering from a highly limited world size, before the first patch, the game would randomly create a "Crashed" duplicate save. But what takes the cake is that the auto-save system will corrupt the save file if the game is closed incorrectly, as the Vita uses a different way to close games.
  • Quicksand Box: Many people give up after finding that the game has has no plot. After The End was added, this took a strange turn as the plot seemed meaningless to many people. While there's also a lot of user created maps that have their own stories, a casual player tends to not look for such maps.
  • Recurring Fanon Character:
    • Herobrine began as a Creepypasta fan character, but soon rose in popularity to become one of the most recognizable villainous icons of the game, despite never actually being in it. Countless fanfictions, mods, music videos, parodies, fan books, and the like have featured Herobrine as a recurring villain. Additionally, Herobrine became something akin to Ascended Fanon when Mojang included references to the character in the game, such as adding "Removed Herobrine" to patch notes, referencing him in the console edition trivia facts, and even sneaking him into some promotional material for Minecon 2011.
    • Entity 303, also referred to as "The New Herobrine", was another popular Creepypasta fan villain that was meant to be regarded as even more powerful and evil than its predecessor. While Entity 303 never reached the same popularity as Herobrine, it was still featured prominently in fanfictions, videos, and mods.
    • Humanized versions of the Minecraft mobs, usually portrayed as scantily clad Animesque girls, have become quite popular in fanart, music videos, and mods, especially the Creeper, who is portrayed as a small, cute blonde girl in a green hoodie and leggings.

    S-Z 
  • Scapegoat Creator: Notch, creator of Minecraft, gets blamed for nearly any change that fandom hates. Notch had stepped down from the game back in November 2011 and had let Jeb take over, yet people will still praise or hate Notch for anything that changes in the game.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Mining. Let's be honest, nobody wants to spend hours on end branch mining just to find the five diamonds to progress onto a diamond pickaxe and enchanting table. What really takes the cake is that, unlike other resource-collecting mechanics, mining for resources is near impossible to automate without mods.
    • The hunger system when it was introduced in beta 1.8. Before this, food instantly restored your health. Once hunger was introduced, food no longer were instant heals (Potions of Healing covered that), but instead, food takes about 1.6 seconds to fully consume and they restore hunger points instead. Keeping your hunger full gives slow health regeneration but letting the meter fall too low prevents you from sprinting and letting it go fully empty will damage you and even outright kill you if playing on Hard difficulty. What makes it worse is doing too much physical stuff (running, mining, etc) will make you hungry more quickly and every piece of food has different amount of saturation, which determines how full you stay until the hunger meter starts to drop again. Naturally, you aren't told of this.
    • On Xbox 360, those tutorial captions that always seem to show up when you're underwater, being shot at by a skeleton, or having a Creeper run at you. You also can't jump or swim up until you respond. Not that big of a deal, until you get into 2 block deep water or drop into a hole.
    • 1.8 added a way to get mob heads. Unfortunately, the only way to get them is to have the mob (zombie, skeleton, or creeper) be killed by a charged creeper. This entails waiting for a thunderstorm, hoping for a creeper to get struck by lightning, staying at a distance where the creeper neither kills you or despawns, bringing a mob to the creeper, and then not dying when the creeper explodes, which is very difficult, especially on Hard or Hardcore mode. Needless to say, not many people were happy with the unnecessary difficulty in obtaining a trophy.
    • Repairs with anvils. Repairing any one item on an anvil (say, your diamond sword with Sharpness V, Fire Aspect II and Knockback II) gets much more expensive in terms of experience, and even more expensive when you want to rename it. At a certain limit (39 levels of experience, to be exact), the anvil will decide that an item costs too much experience to repair and refuse to let you fix it.
    • The combat revamp in 1.9. While it makes facing monsters more challenging and fun, nearly everyone agrees that it ruins PvP combat and turns the originally fast-paced duels into slow games of waiting for your opponent to drop their shield. If you join a PvP oriented server (minigames, factions, etc) don't be surprised if they abolish the new system by making all swords have a million points in attack speed.
    • A lot of the bigger servers rely heavily on commands, but not all of them use the same commands. Okay, so you would type in /help so you'd know what you can and can't do, right? Well, some servers don't give /help permissions to visitors. That's right, you need commands to play on the server, but you're not allowed to know what they are!
    • Building with stairs will make even the most experienced builder groan. Sure, they can add a lot of character to a building (especially when used in making a roof), but they're incredibly fickle and hard to place in the correct position. Half the time, you'll have a sideways-facing stair when you wanted it to face forward.
    • Harvesting pumpkins or melons while holding pets can be quite the juggle. Since they won't leave your side, the danger of them getting crushed by a pumpkin or melon is very real and telling them to sit can impair their usefulness if the player forgets to undo it. One must wonder why they didn't do anything to fix that yet, like having the produce push them out of the way instead.
    • Raids. Take everything that makes Wandering Traders so bad and add an event onto it. The way it works involves killing a group of wandering illigers; mobs that can pop up at any time around the player. They all wield crossbows, which makes them long ranged attackers. Although only hostile if you get close to them, if you don't want to do a raid, you'll have to put up with them wandering around, trampling crops and making it impossible to sleep in your bed while they're around. If you do kill them, you get afflicted with the 'bad omen' status, that last for about two in game hours (which the game doesn't tell you about) meaning that you'll have to steer clear of villages until then if you don't want to deal with a raid. And it doesn't have to be an actual village to trigger it; simply being close to three or so villagers is enough to cause one. If you have a villager breeder set up close to your base, you either have to spend the time as far away from your base as possible, or kiss your base goodbye thanks to raids having several mobs that destroy blocks. Combine this with several mobs being Demonic Spidersnote  and you have a very tedious, very annoying event from start to finish. Fortunately, if you know about the Bad Omen (it is visible in your inventory like other effects), it can be cured by drinking milk like any other effect.
    • The revised world generation can make gathering certain resources incredibly tedious. In the old days of the game, biomes could appear next to one another without much throught, meaning snow biomes could be located right up against desert biomes and other such silliness. The devs ultimately revised it so it now takes into account adjecent biomes into consideration when generating the land. While it's certainly realistic, it also means that you'll often end up with two repeating biomes stretching onward for miles. Worst still, the world generation seems to greatly favor warmer biomes as oppose to cooler ones, making it so that ending up with "desert-savanna wastelands" that go onwards for tens of thousands of blocks, often stretching far beyond oceans frustratingly common.
    • Some villagers can spawn as Nitwits, meaning they can't obtain a job and will never provide any trades. They're just as common as other villagers, thus causing them to take up space that could have been taken by useful villagers.
    • Parrots like to drop off of a player's shoulder for a ton of reasons, including falling off a block. Given the game's terrain, this can cause a ton of annoyance while transporting them.
    • While Llamas can be outfitted with chests and grouped up to make a caravan, they can only be controlled by Leads. This practice is tedious at best, and they become obsolete altogether once Shulker Boxes enter the picture.
    • Most of the Wandering Trader's trades, which are decided at random, are rip-offs that primarily ask for emeralds in exchange for plants you can easily find around the overworld. He might, however, carry uncommon items like Nautilus Shells or Blue Ice.
  • Scrappy Weapon: Golden Swords, which are only as strong as a Wooden Sword and breaks down twice as fast. While Golden Swords compensate their weaknesses by having higher chances of getting stronger enhancements, wasting rare gold resources for a weapon that won't last is a dumb move.
    • Mitigated as of 1.16 since golden equipment - often with great enchantments - is now very common to get from chest loot in various Nether and Nether-related structures. There's still no reason to craft golden weapons though.
    • Scrappy armor, but whatever. Leather armor is fragile and doesn't provide much protection. In a normal playthrough, by the time you have the necessary leather to craft a full set, let alone have the means to repairing or replacing it, you already have a full set of iron armor and several more iron ingots for further crafting.
    • Similarly, chainmail armor, except you can't even craft it. You need to buy it from villagers or wait for it to Randomly Drop from Skeletons or Zombies (where it's damaged). Chainmail armor has the same durability as iron but less protection. It's completely pointless since by the time you can get your hands on a full set it's virtually guaranteed you have a full set of iron armor.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge:
    • Since Minecraft has very little in the way of plot, but much in way of personal freedom, many players attempt to liven up the experience by arbitrary limitations and try to beat the game like that. This can be anything from "can't use the crafting table", "never leave the underground after the first day", or "only allowed to use wooden tools".
    • You can power a beacon using a pyramid of ore/gem storage blocks of any type, with the easiest generally being iron blocks, but if you want, you can choose to power it with diamond, emerald, gold, or (most impressively) netherite blocks. Note that you need 128 blocks to construct a fully-powered pyramid (amounting to 1152 gemstones or ingots), and if you choose to do netherite, this is compounded by the fact you need to mine 4 ancient debris (and use 4 gold ingots), which only spawn on average of 1-2 per chunk in the Nether, just to make one netherite ingot. This is even lampshaded in the changelog for the snapshot that allowed for a netherite pyramid.
    • The Nether update has seen a rise in players starting their journeys in the Nether and trying to survive long enough to make it out; the resources introduced in that update turning it from a suicide mission to "theoretically possible, but good luck".
  • Sequel Displacement:
    • The old Minecraft Classic — the one where there's an unlimited number of blocks, simple shading, no monsters or items, and no day/night cycle — seems to suffer from it when compared to the regular Minecraft. The comments on this video show that some people aren't even aware of Classic:
      Why do the blocks destroy so easily???
      how do you break the blocks so fast and how do you do the unlimited block thing
    • The "unlimited blocks" (and easy block destruction) function in Minecraft Classic now appears in a mode of regular Minecraft called Creative Mode, which may further push Minecraft Classic into obscurity.
    • It doesn't help that Mojang's been deliberately doing everything, short of deleting the game, to dissuade people from playing Classic (removing links to the game, removing sound and music, removing the ability for premium users to save levels online). Ironically, this would be reversed years later, with Mojang re-releasing an old version of Classic to celebrate the game's 10th anniversary.
  • Signature Song: While a lot of Minecraft's songs have their fair share in the spotlight, Stal is perhaps the most popular. Mostly due to how associated it is with YouTuber Jschlatt. Go to any video related to Stal in some way, there will be a comment about Jschlatt.
  • Silent Majority: In the eyes of most people, Minecraft is generally seen as having a gradual rise to popularity throughout 2010, a meteoric rise from 2011 to 2013, a gradual decline from 2014 to 2015 until dying around 2016 (and then being eclipsed by games such as Fortnite) but then receiving a massive revival in 2019. However, even in the game's "dark ages" from 2016 to mid-2018, the game was exceedingly popular, to the point that even in 2018, generally considered the "year of Fortnite", Minecraft actually still eclipsed ''Fortnite'' in YouTube growth.
  • So Bad, It Was Better: There have always been bugs of all kinds, the most infamous ones being lighting and world generation bugs. As much as they sucked, fans came to grin and snark alike when they came across them — until they slowly began to be fixed. A lot of people were nostalgic about the loss of these hilarious Epic Fail bugs. So much, that some of them were put back in the game due to popular demand.
  • So Bad, It's Good:
    • The Creeper, one of the most iconic characters, was actually a miserable failure from the coder's part to create the 3D model of a pig. Its distorted shape and downright terrifying face, as well as the fact that it sneaks onto you with a SSSS sound followed by your death — and probably a heart attack — make it one of the most original and frightening enemies in modern gaming history.
    • A bug that most veteran alpha/beta players know about definitely qualifies for this: creepers and such nodding their heads rapidly while they look at your dead body lying on the floor.
    • Minecraft in a nutshell.
  • Special Effects Failure: The 1.8 release introduced rotating block textures. While it's known for looking... okay with default textures, it really looks odd with some popular, more detailed and higher resolution resource packs, such as Sphax Pure BDCraft and DokuCraft. Unfortunately, the option to turn this feature off was removed in the 1.9 snapshots.
  • Spoiled by the Format: In general, Let's Plays that have a Final Death gimmick (such as Hardcore runs) and haven't been updated for some time can fall victim to this. If you're familiar with the game and see that the latest episode is at a point far from the game's end, it's a fair bet that things aren't going to go well for the player.
  • "Stop Having Fun" Guys:
    • Some forum-ites will look down on you for playing on Peaceful difficulty, and that's nothing on what they'll say about using inventory editors to get free building supplies.
    • On the opposite end of the spectrum, there are those who will flame you half to death if you prefer spending time building instead of cave-diving and hunting mobs.
    • There are also people who simply hate newcomers, accusing them of being late adopters and blaming them for Minecraft changing too much.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: If you play in Creative Mode on the Peaceful setting, it's just you and a whole wide world to explore. Want to built a giant castle that reaches to the sky? The Normandy from Mass Effect? Kami's Lookout? You've got an infinite supply of tools you can use to build all three of them and an infinity more. No worries about enemies, no worries about supplies running out. Just you and your imagination.
    • Also, Cats. Not only is their meowing extremely adorable, but they also scare away creepers. Put a few cats around your precious builds, and you will no longer have to worry about them getting ruined by those green griefers.
      • As of 1.14, Cats also keep Phantoms away, seemingly turning this into a literal example!
    • Tamed wolves appear to have permanent Puppy-Dog Eyes, and taking out food in front of them causes them to tilt their heads and whine at you. They can also be helpful in alleviating the game's ever-present Paranoia Fuel; bring a few with you when you go mining and you don't have to worry about the monsters as much. They'll even autonomously go after nearby skeletons, making it less likely for you to get a surprise arrow in the noggin.
    • C418's soundtracks of the game saw some emotionally beautiful songs like "Sweden" and "Mice on Venus".
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: The Friendly Wither in the (removed) April Fool's Minecraft 2.0 invokes this deliberately and ironically, considering the horrifying qualities of the normal Wither. It is pink, has a ridiculous smiling expression, and grows the heads on the left and right when fed with sugar. As it passes over grass, it has the effects of Bone Meal, growing grass and flowers everywhere. Its building recipe? A flower pot on a pink wool block, and a (now-removed) Rose in the flower pot.
  • That One Achievement:
    • "On a Rail." The goal: "travel 1,000 meters by minecart from your starting point". It requires obscene amounts of materials, and it has to be 1000 blocks away on a straight line. It's not that hard, but the engineering and resources required are insane. One minecart costs 5 Iron Ingots. 16 meters worth of minecart tracks is 6 Iron Ingots. That's 378 Iron Ingots, right there. If you find abandoned mine shafts, however, the abandoned tracks can be collected for no cost. Of course, the carts won't travel forever, so you'll need boosters. That's 6 Gold Ingots and one Redstone for 6 rails. Then there's the items needed to activate the rails, which is more resources. And after all of that, you have to build the whole track, which involves lots of excavation, clearing, placing, and testing the whole thing to make sure it actually works. But on the bright side, as long as the track is still active, it'll work if the achievement happens to be cleared. Thankfully, in the Xbox 360 version, the distance requirement is halved. PC players can build in Creative mode. What really hurts, though, is that every minor game update tends to wipe your achievements. Hope you saved that world with the 1000 meter track.
    • "Sniper Duel" is tough since it requires you to kill a skeleton with an arrow from a 50 meter distance. Unlike arrows in other games, Minecraft's arrows follow the laws of gravity where the arrow is pulled down by gravity as it travels. Arrows lose altitude as they travel and it's tricky to aim accordingly due to the skeleton never staying still. You'll have to snipe from a ledge or mountain to compensate for the gravity, but it's still tough to do since skeletons don't stand still and you can burn through all of your arrows trying to hit a far target.
    • 1.12 replaced achievements with advancements. "On a Rail" is no longer available, but instead gave us "How Did We Get Here?", which requires having all 20 status effects that can be legitimately acquired in survival at the same time. The worst part is that requires having Mining Fatigue and Levitation at the same time: those two status effects are only inflicted by a mob who only lives at the bottom of the ocean and a mob who only lives in a floating island in the middle of nowhere, respectively. And then you'd have to be inflicted with Wither at the same time, which requires a mob which is found nowhere near the two aforementioned mobs, or another mob who is summonable but destroys everything close, including those two aforementioned mobs. Even then, you'll also need to spend lots of resources in building beacons and brewing potions.
    • The advancement system also gave us "Serious Dedication", which would be more a Goddamned Achievement if that trope existed, but anyway. You must waste two diamonds on a diamond hoe, something you would never think of crafting if it wasn't because of the advancement. And that's not the end: you must use it until it runs out of durability, which will require a lot of time (it has 1562 uses) unless you till every single dirt block you see (1562 blocks being much more than you'd till in a normal, or even somewhat large, farm) or use it to hit mobs (which drains durability faster, but hoes are very weak in combat). The advancement has since been changed to creating a Netherite Hoe, which doesn't involve extensive hoe usage but instead requires you to expend an incredibly rare Netherite Ingot on a Diamond Hoe — getting Netherite Ingots will involve extensive excavation of the bowels of the Nether, as you'll need four of the very rare Ancient Debris to make one.
  • That One Level:
    • When you light up a new cave, only to discover a fall into water, or worse: Lava yawning below a series of unlit caves that suddenly begin to rain hordes of nasty beasties down onto your head, then you'll understand.
    • A less random case would be The Nether, a molten wasteland that's difficult to navigate due to containing a literal sea of lava, a handful of powerful mobs, and titanic clusters of Netherrack that make it difficult to find Nether Fortresses, which contain mobs that drop items necessary to progress.
    • Speaking of the Nether, 1.16 introduces new biomes that exist there, one of which is called the Soul Sand Valley. Navigating them for the first time without dying is much more difficult than it looks, as countless Ghasts and Skeletons reside there, and are guaranteed to be firing at you as you slowly try to avoid their attacks on the Soul Sand you're trekking across. The Basalt Deltas are also a hassle to get through; there’s lots of lava near surface level, and plenty of Magma Cubes eager to knock you into it.
    • Ocean Monuments are filled to the brim with spiky laser-shooting fish, with one variant that inflicts Mining Fatigue, a status ailment that makes it impossible to break blocks, thus forcing you to go through it normally rather than just mine your way through it. On top of that, they're exceedingly frustrating to navigate due to their maze-like structure, and require preparation for underwater combat and maneuvering so that you don't die from the fish or from drowning. The only "treasure" you'll get from them are eight gold blocks, a bunch of sponges, and any prismarine blocks you mine on the way out. Many players tend to avoid them altogether because they're just not worth the effort.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • Rabbits are much harder to breed than any other passive mob in the game with the possible exception of turtles. Breeding a mob temporarily causes it to ignore the luring effects of its breeding food, as does going out of their luring range. Not only do rabbits run away at breakneck speed from players not holding dandelions or carrots, but they also have a slightly smaller lure radius than other passive mobs, who tend to just stand around or walk about aimlessly. In order to get all varieties of rabbits, you'll need to go to a multitude of biomes, many of which are co-inhabited by rabbits and wolves, who like attacking rabbits. Whipping out your sword to deal with the wolves before they kill your rabbits leaves them scurrying about, and then you have to slowly lure them back to you. Thankfully, most of these problems can be eased by attaching the rabbits to leads, or putting the carrot or dandelion in your offhand slot so you can use your active slot to fight.
    • Obtaining Turtle Shells. These are made from 5 Scutes, you only get one when a baby turtle grows into an adult, and turtles are one of the hardest passive mobs to breed since it's more complicated than "just feed two turtles sea grass and a baby turtle appears". They have to return to their home beach to lay eggs that need to be protected for a few nights. Just about any player or larger mob merely standing on said eggs will cause them to break one by one, and zombies will actively seek them out and stomp on them. The eggs hatch only at night into baby turtles that need to be protected by various mobs that will target them on purpose. Finally, when they grow up and drop the scute, chances are that it'll be dropped somewhere in the wide open ocean they swim out to making things akin to finding a needle in a haystack. Most of this can be alleviated if you have the resources to make a proper enclosure, but the time needed to obtain them will still be just as slow as a turtle's pace.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: The game goes through this every time something in the game changes. Every single update generates this to some capacity:
    • The bone meal item, which makes plants instantly grow, was nerfed so that you had to use several bone meal to get the plant to fully grow. People complained it was too much work and made farming tedious.
    • Mobs were also reprogrammed to (mostly) stay off mine cart tracks so that players that are riding in a mine cart would not suddenly stop because of a sheep blocking the way. People then complained about how the rails were now overpowered because it acted as monster repellent while ignoring the fact that crafting rails is more expensive than just using blocks of dirt for barricades.
    • The fan base also complained loudly when the sun and the moon were changed from squares to circles (admittedly, curves don't look very great when you only have a dozen pixels to work with). Mojang switched them back to squares shortly after.
    • The additions of potions and enchantments caused complaints from people who felt Minecraft was becoming too much like an RPG.
    • In a rather preemptive example, the announcement of 1.9 removing blocking with a sword as well as not allowing weapons in the off-hand to be swung had some people already denouncing the update as a dud.
    • With the weapon power timing mechanic and the old armor mechanic (durability = protection) being reintroduced, but reworked, many are saying that it makes PvE for those used to the old combat system unnecessarily difficult and/or slow. How difficult? Some have reported that, at full diamond gear, they very nearly get killed by five unarmed mobs.
    • Plenty of fans were disappointed when the Killer Rabbit was no longer allowed to spawn naturally.
    • 1.12, or the "World of Color" Update was largely seen as a good update for those who liked building, as the new Glazed Terracotta and Concrete blocks gave more color and texture variety. However, one change that hasn't been completely accepted is the pallete changes to the pre-existing Stained Clay (renamed to Terracotta) and Wool, as some were used to the duller color pallete used by them. Specifically, Wool has been used in many medieval builds to make tapestry, flags and tents, with the new pallete causing previously reasonable castles and villages, in the eyes of the builders, to now look like carnivals.
    • In one of the most acute examples, snapshot 17w45a drastically simplified the model for the Horse mob, ostensibly to make it more visually consistent with the rest of the game, and the backlash was immediate and intense. The model was tweaked in the following snapshot. However it should be noted that the offending snapshot was leading into the 1.13 update, which at the time was labelled a "technical" update with no new features. So it wasn't just about the Horse, it was about the fans' dissatisfaction with the slow rate of new features being added, despite the high volume of suggestions on /r/minecraftsuggestions, and instead of Mojang focusing on fixing what was actually broken, they attempted to fix something that wasn't broken at all.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!:
    • Some people would think that Roblox is a ripoff of Minecraft, but Roblox came before MC.
    • While on the subject, almost any game that involves mining blocks and moving them around is going to get slammed with this, the most blatant being FortressCraft. Terraria also gets accused of being a Minecraft clone.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: The Wandering Trader's concept is actually quite useful, since he could give the player items like melon or pumpkin seeds or rare blocks that aren't guaranteed to be found in the Overworld within the playthrough. However, his behaviour comes across as obnoxious rather than endearing and the times where he shows up are way too frequent and at complete random. Some may tolerate him better if his role was closer to the merchants from Terraria or he was trading with Villagers as well, much like in his own character trailer. Heck, he does actually spawn in villages in Bedrock Edition, although even then he still only trades with the player.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • For some players, creepers. Deformed pig model that's green and aptly-named, but is absolutely adorable and quite charming at the best of times. Even though it likes blowing up your stuff.
    • The Iron Golem mainly due to how it offers kid villagers a red rose.
    • From the Nether Update, Striders have wispy hair and no stereotypical cute features, but the way they waddle around and shiver when they get cold is cute is its own way.
    • Almost any mob is bound to be this, due to the simplistic style of the game. Made even more so in Creative Mode, where Hostile Mobs aren't likely to attack you, meaning you can look at Endermen, who are probably getting a block, with impunity and bask in how surprisingly cute they look.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • The Rabbits fall into this for some. Their hopping animation is a lot more fluent compared to the other blocky creatures' stiff movements. It doesn't help that they tend to stare at the player while they are hopping away from them.
    • The Minecraft player characters themselves, for some people.
  • Unconventional Learning Experience: The game is basically a treatise on the location and allocation of natural resources disguised as a video game. Learning how to use redstone is a good way to learn boolean algebra.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: The procedural generated dimensions of the 2020 April Fools update can actually have some incredibly breathtaking results, leading to some wishing for their proper implementation as a lasting feature.
  • Unwinnable by Insanity:
    • It's possible to find a 2-blocks deep hole in the (indestructible) Bedrock, and jump in with nothing in your inventory. Be sure that the area around you is also lit up and sealed off so that it will be impossible for any mobs to enter into the hole and kill you/aid in your escape. Rage Quit. After Beta 1.8 added a hunger meter, it became possible to starve to death note , taking this out of Unwinnable territory... but 1.0 added Hardcore mode, which puts it right back in.
    • You can also make a pool of lava in your original spawn point (the one not set with beds) and die; you will respawn on the lava, and die again, ad infinitum. Or build a hollow cube of Obsidian around it, then turn "Keep Inventory" off and/or throw away your diamond pick. note 
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: A lot of first time players tend to mistake the Ender Dragon as a male (who is confirmed female as she lays an egg), considering she doesn't have any Tertiary Sexual Characteristics.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?:
    • While Minecraft is an all-ages game, it was originally notorious for the number of preteen players, which was responsible for the fandom's reputation for obnoxious behavior. While this notoriety seems to have generally contributed to the game's decline in popularity from 2015 to 2018, it eventually retired by the time of the game's revival in 2019, likely due to the preteens in question maturing.
    • Several Let's Play videos fall into this territory. Minecraft itself is an all-ages game, but the commentary on it is generally unsuitable for kids for several LP groups such as the Minecraft series made by the Yogscast or Achievement Hunter. The creations and skin system also fall into this to an extent, as you can build anything or have your character appear as pretty much anything.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: The mushroom island biome. It features giant mushroom trees and mooshrooms, which are red cows covered in mushrooms. When sheared, they give up to five red mushrooms, covert to a normal cow, and, if milked with a wooden bowl, give mushroom soup. (If milked with an iron bucket, they give... milk.) [Insert obligatory remark about hallucinatory mushrooms here].
  • Win Back the Crowd: The 1.13 "Update Aquatic" is this, as after a lengthy period with few new features added (the 1.12 "World of Color" update was seen as particularly lackluster), 1.13 brought radical enhancements to gameplay, including longtime fan-demanded mobs like fish, dolphins, and turtles. New variants of doors and trapdoors were added as well as the ability to place item frames on floors and ceilings, and a "debug stick" that can cycle blocks through different blockstates, greatly enhancing creative freedom for builders.
  • The Woobie:
    • The passive mobs. Exist only to be shot down by the player character for freebie resources, most of which can't be easily acquired any other way. Sheep got a break in beta 1.7, which lets you harmlessly shear them for wool instead, and pigs got a break in beta 1.8 when the other animals gained food drops — but chickens got it worse, as in addition to now being edible, they became the only source of feathers, which no longer drop from zombies.
    • The Villagers. They were always this once they were hunted down by Zombies, being unable to defend themselves. It got even worse once the "Village & Pillage" update rolled around, showing them to be relatively normal people living normal lives and having their own worries about the survival of their village and the job market. Now they are raided by the Illagers in broad daylight and the game makes an effort to show them emote; they now express fear through sweating as they are still mostly unable to defend themselves. While they can be real jerks sometimes, most players agree that protecting the Villagers actually makes sense now, especially since they now reward the player if they do so.

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