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Film / The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
aka: The Fellowship Of The Ring

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The first film of The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring arrived to critical acclaim in December 2001. It was followed by The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers in 2002 and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 2003.

Frodo Baggins found the One Ring from his uncle Bilbo during his 111th birthday and learned of it's origins as the remnants of Sauron, the Dark Lord who died in the Second Age. Frodo, Samwise Gamgee, Peregrin Took and Merry Brandybuck were tasked by Gandalf the Grey to go to the Prancing Pony to meet a Man named Strider or Aragorn. At Rivendell, the six met Gimli, Boromir and Legolas as they became the Fellowship of the Ring as they prepare a journey towards Mordor.

Previews: Trailer #1, Trailer #2.


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The film provides examples of:

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     A through C 
  • 1-Dimensional Thinking: The Nazgûl at the Fords of Bruinen. Instead of just riding back into the forest, they ride downstream where the wave is certain to catch them... because the water has distorted all sense of direction for them (hence why they were reluctant to cross in the first place).
  • Action Film, Quiet Drama Scene:
    • The heartwarming and peaceful scenes of The Shire (especially in the Director's Cut), filled with laughter, friendship and happy children (what a warrior lays down his life to protect) is what makes us actually care whether or not Frodo and the Fellowship defeat the Lord of the Rings or not.
  • Adapted Out:
    • Tom Bombadil and his wife Goldberry, together with the Hobbits' entire "Old Forest" adventure.
    • Glorfindel's role of rescuing Frodo from the Nazgûl and bringing him to Rivendell is given to Arwen.
    • The Scouring of the Shire is absent from the films' canon, instead shown as a Bad Future.
  • Adaptation Explanation Extrication:
    • Tom Bombadil is cut from the film, along with the scene with where he rescues the hobbits from the Barrow-wights and takes their enchanted daggers which Merry uses to slay the Witch-king. Here, he uses an Elven dagger gifted by Galadriel which is never truly hinted or explained whether it's effective against the Witch-king of Angmar unless it's enchanted in a similar way with the books counterpart. Then again, it's a gift of Galadriel.
    • Gandalf stops at Rohan in the first book before going to Rivendell, attempting to warn Theoden about Saruman's Face–Heel Turn - but Grima Wormtongue has already started poisoning his mind. This is eliminated from the film, so it's not explained how Gandalf is so up-to-date on what's been happening in Rohan.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job:
    • Boromir in is described as having dark hair. For the movies they gave him light brown, bordering on blond.note 
    • The elves of Lothlórien are shown to be uniformly blonde, though only elves with particularly strong Vanyar ancestry, such as Galadriel, have blonde hair in the books.
  • Age Cut: Averted when Elrond talks to Gandalf about an incident thousands of years in the past. We cut to a shot of Elrond in the past and he looks exactly the same, since elves are immortal.
  • Agony of the Feet: Averted when the other hobbits make a fire on Weathertop (inadvertently drawing the Nazgûl to them) and Frodo panics when he sees it and tries to put it out with his foot. Hobbits are stated to have tough soles in the book — basically their feet are their shoes, and they have a lot more fur on them than depicted in the film.
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: "Second Breakfast" is a real thing in some European cultures, including England, which The Shire is based on. In real life, second breakfast is more of a mid-morning snack than a full meal (though given Hobbit culture, for them it probably is a full meal). "Elevenses" is real too, again more of a snack.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: The goblins have the party surrounded in the mines of Moria — until the Balrog makes its first appearance. They run for it. So does everyone else.
  • Animal Espionage: Saruman has crows that serve as spies, and one scene has The Fellowship take cover when a flock of crows fly overhead before we see them report in back at Isengard.
  • Arrow Cam: Features another "point of view" arrow shot.
  • Ash Face: Merry and Pippin, after setting off a firework at Bilbo's birthday party.
  • Award-Bait Song: The films gave us two stellar Tear Jerker examples: "May It Be" and "In Dreams". "May it Be" was nominated for an Oscar.
  • Badass Boast: "I am a servant of the Secret Fire, wielder of the flame of Anor. The dark fire will not avail you, flame of Udûn! Go back to the shadow... YOU SHALL NOT PASS!"
  • Bad Future: The Scouring of the Shire from the books is turned into this in the film. Frodo is invited to look into the Mirror of Galadriel. He is shown a vision of the Shire being destroyed, orcs slaughtering other hobbits, the four (Merry, Pippin, Frodo and Sam) chained and forced to walk, being whipped by orcs. Galadriel tells Frodo that this is what will happen should he fail in his quest to destroy the Ring.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: Frodo is badly stabbed on Weathertop, Boromir catches several arrows in his chest.
  • Behind the Black: Gimli claims he has "eyes like a hawk" but doesn't notice the squadron of elves with their arrows pointed at him.
  • Being Watched: Celeborn warns the Fellowship that they're being hunted by Orcs before leaving Lothlorien.
  • Big Badass Battle Sequence: The battle between the Last Alliance and Mordor in the prologue certainly counts. The Battle at Amon Hen is much smaller in scale, pitting the Fellowship against a small army of Uruk-hai, but it's still an extremely impressive action sequence.
  • Big "NO!": The film has two:
    • Gimli has a Big "NO!" when he discovers the tomb of Balin, which dissolves into mournful blubbering.
    • Frodo also has one when Gandalf appears to die.
  • Black Knight: Sauron from the intro of the opening wears a huge suit of armor, roars monstrously, and swings a gigantic mace everywhere, sending scores of soldiers flying with each blow. He is modeled after his former master Morgoth from Silmarillion, and the books (or at least the appendix) did mention him taking part in this particular battle personally, so at least it's fairly justified.
  • Black Speech: Gandalf uses it to dramatic effect in Imladris, complete with Empathic Environment. It also appears to cause elves such as Elrond and Legolas physical pain, as both wince at its usage.
  • Blade on a Stick: Elf King Gil-Galad's spear in the prologue.
  • Blood from the Mouth: When Aragorn is fighting Lurtz, the orc headbutts him in the face and his mouth is bleeding afterward.
  • Bow and Sword, in Accord:
    • Aragorn uses both bow and sword, but he usually uses the bow only to open battle, staying in melee once it opens.
    • The Uruk-hai captain (Lurtz) at the end also employs a bow/sword combo.
  • Buffy Speak: Pippin during the creation of the Fellowship: "You need people of intelligence in this kind of mission... quest... thing."
  • Butterfly of Transformation: The white moth that brings giant eagles to the rescue when Gandalf is imprisoned at Orthanc.
  • Combat Tentacles: The Watcher in the Water, which wasn't clearly described in the book, is shown as a giant squid-like monster when it attacks the Company.
  • Come with Me If You Want to Live: Aragorn gets introduced this way in Bree, as a wilderness expert who can outrun the Nazgûl. More so in the film, since they set out that very morning after they outwit the Nazgûl ambush. In the film, Aragorn fits the trope to a T:
    Frodo: Where are you taking us?
    Aragorn: Into the wild.
    Merry: How do we know this Strider is a friend of Gandalf?
    Frodo: We have no choice but to trust him.
  • Comically Missing the Point:
    • While on Weathertop, being chased by the Nazgûl, Frodo goes to sleep, only to wake up to the other hobbits cooking food.
      Frodo: What are you doing?! [meaning, Why are you lighting a fire when we have demonic ghosts chasing us?!]
      Merry: Tomatoes, sausages, and nice, crispy bacon.
  • Courtly Love: Gimli, almost immediately after seeing Galadriel. When she is bestowing gifts on the fellowship prior to their departure, all he requests is a strand of her golden hair. She gives him three.
  • Creative Closing Credits: They contain the names of every single member of the Tolkien fan club in the special edition.
  • Creator Cameo: The prologue has cameos by senior prosthetics supervisor Gino Acevedo and prosthetics technicians Rich Mayberry and Xander Forterie as three of the seven Dwarf Lords who receive Rings of Power; concept artists John Howe and Alan Lee play two of the Nine Kings; Weta production worker Ben Britton and pre-viz storyboard shader Jason Secto play elves fighting in the Last Alliance.
  • Cruel to Be Kind: After their narrow escape from the Mines of Moria, most of the Fellowship is extremely distraught at the loss of Gandalf and stop just outside the exit to mourn. However, Aragorn orders Boromir to get them on their feet and continue the journey, answering protests of not giving them a moment by noting that by nightfall, the whole local area will be crawling with Orcs fully intent on killing them or worse, and the Fellowship must get to safety before dusk.
  • Cut Apart: The movie has closeups of sleeping hobbits mixed with Ringwraiths surrounding the beds. When the stabbing begins, we discover the beds are empty and the hobbits in another room.

     D through I 
  • Daylight Horror: The Ringwraiths are frightening at night. They prove to be just as frightening when they chase Arwen and a sickly Frodo across a bright green field in the middle of the day.
  • Death Is Such an Odd Thing: Orlando Bloom said in the commentaries for the extended edition that this is what he was trying for, when the camera had its closeup on his face in the One-Woman Wail montage after Gandalf fell: he was coming to grips with what death was, as an elf whose only experience with it previously had been seeing enemies die in battle.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: How the Fellowship kills the cave troll in Moria.
  • Digital Head Swap: One of the techniques used to create the proper scale for the Hobbits.
  • Dug Too Deep: According to Saruman, the Dwarves of Moria did this, unleashing the Balrog.
  • The Dulcinea Effect: Gimli goes from describing Galadriel as a wicked sorceress to pledging himself as her Knight in Shining Armor within days of meeting her.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Inverted. Rohan appears briefly in the first book, establishing that the nation will enter the plot in the second.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: The designs of Gollum and the Eye of Sauron aren't as polished as in the next two films.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Quite a few.
    • Sam telling Frodo the promise he made to Gandalf in the beginning. ("Don't you lose him, Samwise Gamgee!")
    • Merry and Pippin's mischief at Bilbo's birthday party.
    • Boromir instantly suggesting the Ring be turned over to Gondor to use against Sauron.
    • Legolas defending Aragorn against Boromir.
    • Gimli grabbing an axe and attempting to destroy the Ring right at the council.
    • Saruman chastising Gandalf for consorting with Hobbits.
    • Lurtz chokes the first orc he sees within seconds of his birth.
    • Gandalf arriving in Hobbiton for Bilbo's birthday party. All the children are excited to see him, while the adults look on disapprovingly (for the most part, one Hobbit laughs at a miniature fireworks display only to frown when his wife appears.)
    • The first glimpse of the Lady Galadriel (other than the flash of her eyes that Frodo sees when he hears her voice in his mind) is her descending the stairs in Caras Galadhon with Celeborn in a blinding, majestic aura of white light. 'The Lady of Light', indeed!
  • Evil Sounds Deep: The Uruk-Hai captain Lurtz has a very deep voice, as do other orcs, when they're not...
  • Evil Tower of Ominousness: The (original) Dark Tower, Barad-dûr. It's actually depicted as under construction; the completed tower itself is first seen at the end of the film, from the Seat of Amon Hen.
  • Fanfare: The fellowship theme.
  • Fatal Fireworks: There's a comedic, non-fatal example: at Bilbo's birthday party, Pippin and Merry steal and launch one of Gandalf's firework rockets, ending up with an Ash Face.
  • Final Speech: While Boromir had some last dying words in the book, they really spice it up in the film, especially with Boromir's last line to Aragorn: "My brother, my captain, my king".
  • Fire-Forged Friends: Gimli and Legolas probably count as Trope Codifiers. They openly hate each other at their first meeting (Gimli: "Never trust an elf!"), but by the end of the film, they are inseparable.
    Gimli: Never thought I'd die fighting side by side with an Elf.
    Legolas: What about side by side with a friend?
    Gimli: ...aye. I could do that.
  • Foe-Tossing Charge: Sauron during the prologue, to get to Isildur.
  • Forced Perspective:
    • Used to great effect to help the average-height actors playing hobbits and dwarves seem to-scale with their man and elf co-stars.
    • Used in reverse in one shot from: While climbing Caradhras, Frodo falls and drops the Ring. There is a shot of the Ring lying in the snow in the foreground. The filmmakers used a larger model of the Ring in this shot to make it seem closer, while still in-focus.
  • Foreshadowing: In an Extended-Version-only scene, Frodo and Sam see a group of Wood-Elves on their way to the Grey Havens while they're leaving the Shire. The final film ends with Frodo going to the Grey Havens and leaving Middle-Earth with the rest of the elves.
  • Forgot About His Powers:
    • Sometimes Gandalf uses his magic powers, and sometimes he doesn't. He does when battling Saruman, or when facing the Balrog, or when he scares off the Nazgûl that are chasing Faramir's men on the road to Minas Tirith. But at other times he seems to forget he's a wizard and is content simply to whack bad guys with his staff, most notably when he's fighting in hand-to-hand combat in the siege of Minas Tirith or in the final battle at the gate to Mordor. Ian McKellen even asked this question once.
      McKellen: Why don't I zap them?
      Jackson: (thinking quickly) ...ah, you see, the staff is out of batteries and the local alchemy shop is closed for the war.
  • Forgot to Mind Their Head: This was a hazard both in and out of universe:
    • During the scene where Gandalf visits Bilbo in his hobbit hole, Gandalf, stooping, accidentally backs into a chandelier (as part of the script). His actor Ian McKellen then promptly turns and accidentally smacks his head on the roof, an (unscripted) accident so funny that they left it in.
    • In the gag reel, this happens also to the crew. Everyone's sitting inside the hobbit hole listening to directions, then when the meeting ends they all stand up and hit their heads on the roof. Then everyone falls to the floor.
  • Frying Pan of Doom: Sam uses his cooking gear to whack some goblins in Moria.
    Sam: I think I'm getting the hang of this.
  • Giant Wall of Watery Doom: When Arwen conjures up the Bruinen river against the Black Riders (invoking a Mass "Oh, Crap!" out of them, but they can't outrun it). For added awesomeness, the waves are horse-shaped.
  • God Save Us from the Queen!: "In place of a Dark Lord you would have a QUEEN! Not dark but beautiful and terrible as the dawn! Treacherous as the sea! Stronger than the foundations of the Earth! All shall love me, and despair!"
  • Hollywood Drowning: Averted. Sam's near-drowning occurs without much flailing or noise. Frodo knows he's drowning because he knows Sam can't swim.
  • Homage Shot:
    • Peter Jackson shot one bit at Bilbo's birthday party ("Proudfeet!") as an exact copy of a shot in Ralph Bakshi's animated Lord of the Rings. Jackson even helpfully points this out in the commentary. A circle-round shot of the four hobbits at Weathertop is also lifted from the original, although the camera moves much faster and Aragorn is absent. Same goes for the four hobbits hiding under a root by the wayside with the Nazgûl leaning in above them.
    • Not exactly an homage shot, but the Nazgûl attacking the Hobbits' room at the Prancing Pony was drawn from Bakshi's film. In the books, it's explicitly stated by Aragorn that they would not have openly attacked the inn in this manner, and that their assailants were instead Men of Bree under their influence.
  • Hope Spot: Probably the cruelest one in film history is when Gandalf sends Balrog off the bridge and begins turning back...only for the tips of its whip to catch Gandalf by the foot and leave him dangling off the side of the bridge.
  • Horns of Villainy: The Balrog wasn't clearly described in the novels, but it's given large ram-like horns, giving it a beast-like appearance.
  • Hostile Weather: The snowstorm on Caradhras. The movie clearly shows that Saruman is behind it too, while in the book it's left vague.
  • Ironic Echo: Gandalf finds a record of Isildur's journal, accounting the finding of the One Ring.
    Isildur: "I will risk no harm to the Ring. It is precious to me."
    • Averted in some dubs where they change Gollum's my precious but miss this echo.
  • It Has Been an Honor: Boromir's last words to Aragorn.
    "I would have followed you, my brother... my captain... my king."
  • It May Help You on Your Quest: Galadriel's gifts. All of them. Even moreso in the book, where she gives Sam a box of dirt with a mallorn nut in it. It helps.

     J through P 
  • Kill It with Fire: Strider uses this method to drive off the Nazgûl at Weathertop, with a Throwing Your Torch Always Works finisher.
  • Kill the Lights:
    • When Gandalf intimidates Bilbo to convince him to leave the Ring behind, the room darkens and his voice gains a menacing reverberation. He also seems to grow, though he may simply be standing up from a slouch.
      "Bilbo Baggins, do not take me for some conjurer of cheap tricks!"
    • A similar effect happens during the Council of Elrond when Gandalf breaks up the squabble by reciting the ring couplet in Black Speech, though as this scene is outside, the darkening is less noticeable.
  • Kubrick Stare: Foreshadowed when Isildur (in flashback) gave Elrond exactly the same stare, in exactly the same circumstances. One of the powers of the One Ring is to cause Kubrick Stares.
  • Legend Fades to Myth: According to Galadriel's prologue, this is why things came to be as they were at the end of the Third Age: people forgot about past threats, and grew complacent. Sauron exploited that.
  • Literal Disarming: Aragorn does this to Lurtz, followed by stabbing him through the chest and finally decapitating him. Lurtz didn't die until that last one.
  • Manly Tears:
    • Boromir's Final Speech:
      I would have gone with you to the end, my brother...my captain...my king.
    • Galadriel's intense gaze reduces Boromir to tears, most likely because he knows that she knows that he will eventually betray the Fellowship.
  • Meaningful Echo: The tune from "Concerning Hobbits" (the piece that plays as the Shire is introduced) appears at the end of the movie in "The Breaking of the Fellowship".
  • Miracle Food: Elven lembas bread (which got more emphasis in the original book) is featured in a scene from the Extended Edition DVD. Legolas explains to the hobbits Merry and Pippin that a single bite of lembas can fill a grown man's stomach for a day. As soon as Legolas leaves:
    Merry: How many did you eat?
    Pippin: Four. [groans]
  • Nightmare Face: When Bilbo wants to take a look at the One Ring. Holy crap!
  • Noodle Incident: The "incident with the dragon" is this to anyone who hasn't read the books.
  • Not-So-Omniscient Council of Bickering: The Council of Elrond dissolves into a lot of vicious arguing, causing Frodo to make his heroic choice.
  • Oh, Crap!: The film features many examples.
    • A great one in the prologue battle when Sauron makes his appearance on the battlefield. These mighty Dúnedain have just mopped the floor with the Orcs and are about to declare their victory... then all of a sudden a black-armored giant with a very big mace strides into their midst...
    • Frodo in the first film, when he realizes that the two words Sauron's forces got from Gollum (Shire and Baggins) means that they know where the One Ring is and are coming to take it.
    • When Arwen summons a tidal wave to beat the Nazgûl. Granted, they don't have faces, but their behavior is enough to convey it.
    • In Moria:
      • Gandalf's reaction to hear Goblin drums beating, as the denizens of Moria have realised there are intruders in their home.
      • Boromir's deadpan "They have a cave troll." Spoken in an almost Graham Chapman voice.
      • Legolas gets a pretty good Oh Crap look when he realizes there's a Balrog down there. The Moria Goblins are also similarly terrified.
    • Elrond has an Oh Crap reaction to the fact that Saruman is breeding an Orc army of his own. An army that can move in sunlight.
    • Aragorn and Legolas are busy fighting the Uruk-Hai on Amon Hen, when suddenly they hear the Horn of Gondor being blown frantically. "Boromir!!!"
  • Offscreen Teleportation: Gandalf manages to move from Bilbo's party to Bag End before Bilbo himself gets there, even though he is seen sitting in the audience while Bilbo is running home, made invisible by the Ring. All without crossing paths with him, either. He is a wizard, but not even the most powerful beings in Middle-Earth can manage actual teleportation.
  • Opening Monologue: Galadriel's now iconic opening monologue of the film, describing the forging of the Rings Of Power, the Battle of the Last Alliance, Sauron's downfall and the One Ring being lost and forgotten, basically laying the groundwork for the beginning of the main story. The page quote at the top is just part of it. She speaks some Elvish (Sindarin) at the beginning of the monologue.
    "(I amar prestar aen.) The world is changed. (Han matho ne nen.) I feel it in the water. (Han mathon ned cae.) I feel it in the earth. (A han noston ned gwilith.) I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it."
  • Phosphor-Essence: Galadriel glows with a bluish-white light when she explains how powerful and terrible she would become were she to accept the Ring.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: The removal of Tom Bombadil.
  • The Precarious Ledge: The Fellowships must traverse a narrow ledge at The Pass of Caradhras through the snow, even as Saruman tries to bring them down with his foul chanting.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: "You! Shall Not! Pass!". Then the bridge practically broke in half.
  • Pull Yourself Down the Spear: When Aragorn stabs Lurtz in the stomach, the Uruk-hai responds by pulling the sword inwards, snarling at Aragorn, possibly to get close enough to hurt him. Aragorn pulls the sword out and chops off Lurtz's head.
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     Q through Z 
  • Radial Ass Kicking: The Balrog chases them off before the fight actually happens but in the Mines of Moria, the Fellowship finds itself completely surrounded by a really absurd number of goblins.
  • Reality Ensues: After Boromir falls after taking a number of arrows to the torso, Merry and Pippin draw their swords and charge in a Roaring Rampage of Revenge... and promptly get picked up off the ground and slung over their captor's backs like a sack of potatoes.
  • Reality Has No Subtitles: Depending on the circumstances, non-Common dialogue may or may not be subtitled. A notable example is Elrond shouting orders to his troops at the battle on Mount Doom.
  • Redemption Equals Death: Boromir's famous death scene in happened right after he attacked Frodo, tried to take the ring from him, and cursed him along with "all the halflings". What was he doing during his death scene? Defending two of these "Halflings" with his life.
  • Reports of My Death Were Greatly Exaggerated: Sauron is Not Really Dead.
  • Ridiculously Difficult Route: Passing over (Caradhras)/under (Moria) the Misty Mountains was this trope for the Fellowship.
  • Rule of Symbolism: Christian symbolism is carried over from the books, although in a very discreet manner:
    • When the Fellowship parts from Lothlorien, a white-clad Galadriel makes a blessing gesture, looking much like Catholic statues of Virgin Mary.
    • Jackson bows to Tolkien with subtle grace: the film opens in total darkness, and the voice of Cate Blanchett begins to speak... in Elvish. Because with Tolkien the languages came first, and then the people who spoke them, and their stories. In the beginning was the word...
  • Run or Die: The goblin horde in Moria, but especially the Balrog.
  • Scare Chord:
    • When Gandalf almost touches the One Ring and senses Sauron in it.
    • When Bilbo sees the Ring around Frodo's neck in Rivendell.
  • Scared of What's Behind You: In Moria, Gimli thinks that the Fellowship is scaring off the orcs, naturally it's the Balrog that they're really reacting to.
  • Scary Impractical Armor: Sauron, and a few other bad guys, wear some pretty intense armor.
  • Scenery Gorn: The film is made of Scenery Porn during the "good times" parts, and Scenery Gorn during the "struggling times" parts. The best example is probably the view of the ruination of the Shire in the Mirror of Galadrielnote . As Sam and Frodo say in the books, seeing your own home devastated when you remember it being pleasant is far more horrifying than some anonymous landscape that you never knew before it was ruined.
  • Shout-Out:
    • To the Ralph Bakshi animated Lord Of The Rings (the Nazgûl emerging from the tree as the four Hobbits hide in the roots), Shaka Zulu (the pre-Battle Of Helms Deep build-up), Gladiator (Aragorn's dazed horse ride to Helm's Deep; Frodo being carried by the Eagles), and possibly The Wheel of Time; "History became legend. Legend became myth"
    • During the duel between Aragorn and Lurtz, Aragorn stabs Lurtz through the leg with his dagger, and it gets stuck there until Lurtz pulls it out and tosses it back at him. A similar scene happens in Friday the 13th Part III, when Chris attacks Jason with a knife.
  • Solemn Ending Theme: "May It Be''.
  • Stealth Pun:
    • At the Prancing Pony, Merry comes back to the Hobbits' table looking pleased with himself, carrying a mug of ale that dwarfs (*ahem*) the others'. "This, my friend," he tells Pippin, "is a pint." "They come in pints?" asks a bewildered Pippin, before adding, "I'm getting one." What were the Hobbits drinking up to that point? Half-pints.
    • Gimli's cousin, Balin, calls Moria, a dwarven mine and his (Balin's) own kingdom, a mine. A mine, get it?
  • Steel Mill: Saruman runs one at the basement of Isengard. The scene was filmed in a real foundry, using real steelworkers using Orc costumes.
  • Stern Chase: The Nazgûl. "They will never stop hunting you."
  • Take a Moment to Catch Your Death: After he watches the Balrog fall through the pit of Khazad-dûm, Gandalf turns away from the lip of the broken bridge. Unfortunately, the Balrog manages to lasso Gandalf's foot as it falls, pulling Gandalf until he is dangling from the lip by his weak grasp. Certain that any attempt to recover would hinder the Fellowship, he bids them to escape the mine and lets go.
  • Taking You with Me: There are quite a few examples of this trope in the film:
    • In the prologue, we see Sauron explode once the Ring is severed from his hand. Though this may be subverted as the affected scores of Men and Elves were more likely blown off of their feet than killed.
    • The Balrog pulls Gandalf down the dark chasm with its fiery whip as it falls.
    • Boromir takes down many Uruk-Hai as he is being pierced by Lurtz' arrows.
  • The Team: The Fellowship of the Ring, which was formed for the purpose of destroying the One Ring by going into the deepest parts of Mordor and casting it into the volcanic fires of Mount Doom, where it was originally forged.
  • Technicolor Death: Although it's right in the prologue rather than the end of the movie, death for Sauron basically means becoming the exploding man.
  • Telepathy: Galadriel, Elrond and Gandalf are shown communicating telepathically with each other. Galadriel also speaks to Frodo in his mind in Lothlórien and at various points in his journey to Mordor.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: "They have a cave troll.”
  • Throwing Your Shield Always Works: Lurtz throws his shield at Aragorn during the skirmish at Amon Hen, pinning him to a tree. Aragorn gets free of the shield just in time to dodge another attack.
  • Tightrope Walking: Legolas goes running along a chain to attack the cave troll.
  • Title Drop:
    • "You shall be the Fellowship of the Ring."
    • The names of chapters from The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings are brought up on occasion.
      • On entering Hobbiton, Gandalf is delighted to see preparations underway for A Long-Expected Party.
      • When Lobelia Sackville-Baggins comes knocking on the front door of Bag End, Bilbo whispers to Gandalf "I am not at home!".
      • Gandalf whispers Riddles in the Dark, as he wonders if that chapter of The Hobbit might not be entirely true.
      • "There is only one Lord of the Ring, only one who can bend it to his will. And he does not share power!"
      • When the hobbits fall on each other after being pursued by Farmer Maggot "A shortcut to what ?" "Mushrooms!"
  • Tragic Hero: Boromir, whose desire to protect his people at all costs makes him easy prey for the power of the Ring.
  • Untouchable Until Tagged: Boromir was on a rip roaring Orc slaying binge until a single arrow hits him, which was enough to get him mobbed and killed, although it took another couple of arrows to full incapacitate him.
  • Vertigo Effect: Used by Peter Jackson when Frodo senses the arrival of the Black Rider in the Shire.
  • Voice of the Legion: Galadriel gets a bit of this when she goes off on a tangent while being tempted by the Ring.
  • Wait Here: At Weathertop, Aragorn says he's going to have a look around and for the hobbits to "stay here." Naturally it doesn't work out exactly as planned.
  • Weapon Twirling: Boromir twirls his sword a few times while waiting for the goblin horde to break into Balin's Tomb in Moria.
  • We Can Rule Together: Saruman tries this on Gandalf. It doesn't work.
  • Wrongfully Attributed: The now famous line, "A wizard is never late, nor is he early, he arrives precisely when he means to," was first uttered here. Somehow, however, the line keeps being referenced as a genuine quote from the books by casual fans of the 'verse.
  • You Shall Not Pass!: The Trope Namer, since Gandalf actually says "You cannot pass" in the book. He says both in the film, but the long, more meme-inducing one was "shall not."

Alternative Title(s): The Fellowship Of The Ring

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