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Just another day in Reveria.
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An expansive 3DS RPG made by Level5, better known for creating Professor Layton, with Nobuo Uematsu contributing to the music. It mixes together elements of the Slice of Life and Role-Playing Game genres in a Wide Open Sandbox that opens little by little via progression of a storyline. The day you start your new job, you befriend a talking butterfly who seems very curious about your world, where falling meteorites known as Doom Stones are a regular occurrence. After one of them strikes your roof, you end up investigating and finding out that the end is near. The only solution to this is for the world's entire population to band together. Unfortunately, the three kingdoms are not on best terms with each other and The Powers That Be seem to have decided that you are the one that will resolve the issue.

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You may be looking for Mabinogi: Fantasy Life, in which case you're better off going here.


Fantasy Life provides examples of:

  • A God I Am Not: Divinus. He doesn't ask for worship and insists that he isn't actually a god, apparently on the grounds that as powerful as he is, he isn't actually omnipotent.
  • A Home Owner Is You: There are a number of houses in Reveria that you can purchase. They exist mostly so that you have somewhere to display all the furniture you eventually end up making, as well as allowing you to fast travel to them at any point.
  • Absurdly High Level Cap: The level cap is 100 without the DLC and 200 with it, which is more than enough to complete even the game's most difficult challenges, most of which can be dealt with before even reaching level 50. Level Grinding can at least help with the highest-level challenges, which tend to involve defeating gold-crown enemies multiple times — it may be possible to beat the Napdragon at level 2, but having more room for error, and wearing down its massive HP faster, makes related challenges go a lot smoother.
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  • Action Commands: A part of most Lives in some way: combat Lives require you to time your button presses properly to extend your combos further, Woodcutter and Miner require you do the same to perform full-powered normal (pick)axe swings, Angler allows you to do a decent amount of damage to a fish right away if you press A right when it bites along with matching the directions shown on screen to prevent the fish from escaping and the crafting jobs all share a similar minigame that require you to either quickly press A in a constant rhythm, hold down A and release it at a proper time or press A when a moving marker is at a right position.
  • Actually, That's My Assistant: The miner tutorial quest involves someone assuming that the player is Duglas (the master of miners).
  • All in a Row: Bountys and NPC allies will follow the player in such a way.
  • Ambadassador: The player is required to be this in the Port Puerto, Al Maajik and Elderwood chapters of the main story.
  • Ancient Grome: Origin Island in the DLC. Though it also has shrine maidens, and they worship the same goddess as people in Reveria do.
  • An Adventurer Is You: The Job System in this game gives you access to twelve classes you can switch between at your leisure: four combat classes (Paladin, Mercenary, Hunter, Wizard), five crafting classes (Blacksmith, Chef, Carpenter, Alchemist, Tailor), and three resource-gathering classes (Angler, Woodcutter, Miner).
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes: The reward for reaching Hero rank in a certain life is a special outfit for that life. Those outfits, however, are some of the best armor sets in the game and you get them for free, so it's not exactly a lousy reward.
  • And Your Reward Is Interior Decorating: Some wallpapers and floor covers can be obtained via conversations with certain characters after the chapter involving them. Master rank will earn you a trophy that doesn't do much besides looking nice.
  • Animal Eye Spy: If you play a mage, you eventually discover that Jynx is this for the principal of the Al Maajik magic school.
  • Another Dimension: The Starlight Garden and Origin Island each exist in their own dimensions separate from Reveria. The Starlight Garden also holds a number of magical trees which are said to contain even more alternate universes, and which are all tended by Divinus.
  • "Arabian Nights" Days: Al Maajik.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: You can only take up to two NPC or player allies and hold three bounties (which is also the maximum number that can exist in the game at a time).
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: Magnificus, when trying to think of reasons to lead an assault on Damien/Daemon, lists some normally heinous acts before ending with "drinking milk straight from the container". In the EU version, the minor "crime" is insomnia.
  • As You Know: Justified thanks to Flutter. You play as a resident of the game world (albeit a young one,) who should know most of what is learned, but she is clueless and thus asks questions for the player.
  • Bad Liar: Basically anyone among the blacksmiths that knows or has guessed that Steele is the Legendary Ironsmith. They have the biggest trouble in the world not treating the names as interchangeable in presence of the player.
  • Background Music Override:
    • There is one night theme for towns and one night theme for overworld areas that plays over whatever background music that plays during the day.
    • A special theme plays whenever you engage with a high-level enemy that overrides any regular background music.
  • Bad Moon Rising: A red cross appears on the moon at some point and turns out to be a sign of impeding doom.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: Once the main story is over, the conversation of some of the characters that were involved in it will be along the lines of "I'm bored, I wish something would happen.". If you get the DLC, these pieces of dialogues will turn into this trope.
  • Bears Are Bad News: Played straight with the regular-sized bears you can fight, but averted with the Great Spirit who lives in the Elderwood.
  • The Beastmaster: The player, if he/she owns pets and brings them along in combat.
  • Beef Gate: Some areas are not restricted by story progression, but by high-level enemies or gathering points instead, so you can wait until you're sufficiently leveled to tackle the area or try to sneak your way through it.
  • BFS: The weapon of choice for Mercenaries.
  • Bird Run: This is how your character dashes.
  • Boss-Only Level: The Void, which is just a big room that spawns a Bonus Boss and a few mooks each time you enter.
  • Bragging Rights Reward:
    • In the non-DLC game, the highest rank, legend, gives you one of the best possible tools or weapons for the job while all the challenges related to it are completed. This is however averted for the combat and gathering classes: the later challenges for crafting classes frequently require items that are either very hard or impossible to get without changing classes. For example, the legend wizard will get to use that staff because the tailor needs a mix and match set of at least 10 light and shadow manas that only drop from wraiths (and only have an about 50% chance to be in the drops or bounty).
    • With the DLC, reaching God/Creator rank in every life will allow you to remove the Life restrictions on your equipment. This is quite the game breaker, but then again you've also completed most of what the game has to offer.
  • Bread, Eggs, Breaded Eggs: From the intro:
    "A hero may forge legendary weapons, wield an epic blade, or brew magical potions. The choices are many... Perhaps this hero will sew. Or saw. Perhaps the hero will sew and saw while on a seesaw."
  • Call a Rabbit a "Smeerp"
    • The tutorials themselves note that "life" is a fancy word for vocation.
    • Sheep are called Cashmere, and the dire chickens are called Razorbeak.
    • In the DLC, the Dungeon Dagger is actually a jitte.
  • Call to Agriculture: Averted in that an earlier version was going to have a farmer job.
  • Cap: In addition to your level maxing out at 100/200 (with and without DLC), your base stats max out at 50/100 and your skills max out at 15/20. You can get up to 448 stat points from just leveling and an additional 100 from special candy you can make with God-ranked Cook and Alchemist, which is enough to max out 5 out of the 6 base stats, although you can unlock the ability to easily redistribute your stat points on demand. Finally, the maximum amount of damage you can do per hit is 999, although you can do more than that with your combat-based Life special skills.
  • Carnivore Confusion:
    • The Cook job uses meat, yet you run into talking chickens, sheep and cows.
    • Some of the Vendor Trash insects are butterflies.
  • Cassandra Truth: In the mercenary tutorial, Jude mentions Bard and Cervantes telling him about their trips in various places, including "islands in the sky". He then goes on to say that they probably made up some of their stories.
  • Cast Herd: The masters and colleagues of different jobs never interact with each other despite sometimes being close neighbors or hanging around in the same places, making the player the only one moving between different groups. Also, with the exception of Mustang and one of the cooks seen hanging around with Olivia in a cutscene, none of the job colleagues or masters have any interaction with the main story characters. This was probably done to keep the different job-related stories separate and let them happen in whichever order the player wishes. It's easier to list the exceptions:
    • One of the paladins is a failed blacksmith and getting closer to him and unlocking him as an ally is done via the blacksmith life.
    • The carpenter master's little sister and one of the tailors are friends.
  • Character Customization: You can choose your character's appearance and Life, and you can freely distribute stats with each level up.
  • Charged Attack: Rank up enough in a combat or gathering life and you eventually gain the ability to charge up your strong attack to deal more damage or unleash a special skill: rank it up more and you get a second charge which does even more damage but consumes more SP. Their main advantage in gathering lives is that while you're in progress of charging and/or using them, the target can't recover their HP, which comes in handy for Anglers when battling with boss fish that start struggling so much at low HP that you can't deplete the rest of it fast enough the normal way, since unlike with trees and ores, you can't quickly back out, restore your SP and continue what you were doing without losing the fish.
  • Chest Monster: Mimics in the Ancient Ruins.
  • Child Mage: Nox, your first potential travel companion among the mages, is still a child. His sister Hazel isn't that much older either, being a teenager at the oldest.
  • Chosen One: Subtly implied with the player character. He or she is chosen by Yuelia to help them save the world, but it's hinted that there might be more special about them than just that. Namely, most people in Reveria are only capable of pursuing one single life and take an entire lifetime to get anywhere in it at all, while the player is capable of quickly becoming a Legend (or a God if you have the DLC) in every life; the only other person to ever come close to this accomplishment was Gladstone and even he only managed to make Legend as Paladin and Master rank in every other life.
  • Closest Thing We Got: All tutorial quests consist of making the player learn the basics, then have to do something harder. Sometimes, the harder thing is all but stated to be something the most experienced member of the guild (which can mean your master's mentor) should really be taking care of. In these cases, the right person happens to be busy or hard to find, so the job gets given to the player, who literally just got started.
  • Collection Sidequest: Many of the "Other Requests." Completing them is one of the more reliable ways to earn Dosh throughout the game.
  • Connected All Along: Noelia and a handful of Port Puerto citizens that you may or may not run into once you've gained access to the town.
  • Convection Schmonvection: Stand as close to lava as you want — it won't affect you one bit.
  • Cultural Translation: The US and EU versions have subtly different translations: a lot of the minor dialogue is different as are a number of names, and the DLC-exclusive job rank is called Creator in the US and God in EU.
  • Cursed with Awesome: King Erik of Castele was cursed to appear as a child by his rival, the Dark Sultan of Al Majiik. Despite the cursemaker's intentions, looking like a child never affected his followers' ability to take him seriously, plus it means he doesn't age anymore and he's become even more popular with all the palace ladies constantly doting on him and telling him how cute he is.
  • Dark Is Not Evil:
    • The Dark Sultan, Daemon, and his father, the former Dark Sultan are both actually very nice people despite their titles and the latter's sinister appearance.
    • Also, Noelia! She's a specialist in dark magic and a bit of an Aloof Big Sister to Yuelia, but she actually does care about the world and is fighting just as hard to save it as Yuelia.
  • Day-Old Legend: The Flavor Text of plenty of items makes no sense if you made them yourself. Lampshaded with a scarecrow that can only be obtained via making it yourself as a carpenter, that inexplicably already has bite marks.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: You can carry multiple stacks of 99 Life Cures, which you can use to come back to life at half health whenever you die. There's no limit to how many times you can do this in any given battle and considering how much money you'll end up making when you sell items you end up making to rank up your lives, affording them is trivial at best. The only reason you'd ever want to load your save or quit the battle instead of endlessly spamming your Life Cures would be if your stats are too low to inflict anything but Scratch Damage on whatever you're fighting.
  • Deity of Human Origin: Celestia was originally human, and became a goddess when she married Divinus. When this is revealed, it's noted to be the reverse of Yuelia's situation.
  • Department of Redundancy Department: One of the paladin NPCs is Dragonslayer, the Slayer of Dragons.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: The bounty clerk is flabbergasted if you bring in a dragon bounty.
  • Difficulty Spike: Origin Island's enemies hit a whole lot harder than most main game enemies, meaning you're better off not fighting them if you don't have at least 1 high-ranked combat-based Life available.
  • Downloadable Content: Origin Island, an expansion which adds a post-main game area to explore, and adds some extra customization items as well.
  • Dressed to Plunder: The pirates.
  • Dub Name Change: Even the English-speaking countries have different names for many characters. Every single Punny Name getting a Cultural Translation in different European countries only makes things worse.
  • Dummied Out: The Paladin skill Cast-Iron Shield seems to be some variant of this: the game gives you a message stating you learned it when you reach the Adept rank but it's not listed anywhere in the ingame movelist for the job, there's no tutorial message that tells you what it does and the Japanese wiki for the game also seems to state that it doesn't exist.
  • Education Mama: Demona is one, but can't be blamed since her son is supposed to run a kingdom after all.
  • Emoticon: The Leafes in Deep Elderwood punctuate their sentences with them.
  • Escalating War: King Erik of Castele and the former Dark Sultan of Al Maajik are engaged in an ongoing exchange of magic-based practical jokes. It's why the former looks like a little kid. Before the game their prank war got so bad it nearly led to an actual war, but fortunately the player and the new Dark Sultan Damien manage to cool it off before it comes to that.
  • Escort Mission: The bounty-worthy monsters and items can turn into this. The best thing to do if you really need to cash it in is to grab it, then backtrack to the nearest counter while avoiding or outrunning all the enemies you can.
  • Evil Is Petty: Pierre and Butch before their Heel–Face Turn, due mostly to being Ineffectual Sympathetic Villains. At the beginning of the game the two are bullying Butterfly and if the player tries to save her they grab you and rob you. They'll take any dosh you have, but since it's unlikely the player does have any dosh yet (as they would have just started the game at this point) Pierre and Butch will take your items, which at this point likely only consists of the piece of candy Pam gave you. If the player already ate the candy Pierre and Butch will steal the wrapper which doesn't even technically exist as an item in the game and therefore is literally worth nothing.
  • Exposition Fairy: Flutter, a talking butterfly, is the player's companion and voice. Unlike most examples, she's clueless about the world and her asking about how everything works is what clues the player in. She's actually Yuelia, one of the daughters of Reveria's creator.
  • Expy: King Erik is a ruling monarch cursed to take on a childlike form by a dark force, which seems suspiciously familiar to Midna from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. When you meet the person who cursed him they even call it the "Regal Imp", possibly as a direct Shout-Out to Imp Midna.
  • Family Business: It's not rare to have at least two job colleagues that are related.
  • Fashion Designer: Being a tailor is one of the Player Character's job options.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: Each of the three big cities has one of these as its primary hat: Castele is Fighter (with the order of Paladins), Al Maajik is Mage (with its wizards and alchemists), and Port Puerto is Thief (with the pirates). Averted with the actual Lives, though.
  • Finishing Move: The charged and special moves in resource-gathering Lives are meant to be used this way: if you do enough damage to the resource with the attack that reduces its HP to 0, "Excellent!" pops up and you get an additional resource drop.
  • First Town: Castele.
  • Fixed Damage Attack: The damage-dealing bombs.
  • Flat-Earth Atheist: Aurora. When working on fixing the Goddess Airship, she mentions how unusually well kept the parts are and suggests that it could be magic before immediately following it up with "not that I believe in that sort of thing." This is coming from a person who works in the same building as an alchemist, who lives in a world where "wizard" is a legitimate career option and where zombies and spirit beasts roam around just outside of town. Heck, the person she's saying this to is a magical talking butterfly.
  • Floating Continent: Levitania / Terra Nimbus. It's the homeland of the Plushlings and used to be a gigantic Doom Stone until the goddess Celestia purified it.
  • Foil: Al Maajik, which is set up as the Evil Counterpart to Castele, except as it turns out not actually evil. Al Maajik has a lot of magic, most of it of the dark variety, whereas most Castelians are physical attackers like paladins and mercenaries, while the royal family specialize in light magic. Castele's King Erik has the body of a child and is implied to have been somewhat small in stature even before being cursed, while the former Dark Sultan is enormous and imposing. The head of the Al Maajik guard, Odin, is silent and stoic, while the head of the Castelian paladins, Mustang, is outspoken and prideful. Castele is the most lush and verdant kingdom, while Al Maajik is mostly a sandy wasteland. The list goes on.
  • Forgotten Anniversary: What caused the first Ancient Disaster on Origin Island.
  • Fountain of Youth: The former Dark Sultan turned King Erik into a child as part of their ongoing Escalating War. Though Erik doesn't actually mind it, because women find him absolutely adorable.
  • Fourth Date Marriage: At the end of the story, Pierre wants to have one with Leilah. It becomes his wish.
  • Friendship Denial: The dynamic between Damien/Daemon and Odin involves this. The player and Flutter are nominally Damien/Daemon's very first friends, yet he dismissed Odin before he had to start an initiation ritual that would involve him living alone in the Ancient Ruins for a year. Odin, on the other hand, refuses to make friends with anyone from fear of feelings getting in the way of his duty, yet decides to stay by his side after getting basically told "you're no longer obligated to protect me, go live your own life" twice. Yes, bodyguard and teenage royalty, nothing more, nothing less.
  • Frothy Mugs of Water: Barley Juice, served in taverns, makes drinkers hiccup and raises the luck stat. Think about it for a minute.
    • Any subtlety about this is thrown out the window when the player meets Crankshaft.
    • The fortune teller is quite obviously drunk when you see her outside The Crown at night.
    • Origin Island introduces Hermit's Drink, a "strange drink that can make fairies appear." Made with Hot Spring Water, Port Rice and Sweet Potato, the illustration shows a tokkuri and ochoko implying it's a cross between sake and shochu.
  • Game Favoured Gender:
    • Females have a disproportionately large number of gender-exclusive equipment, including endgame gear that's far superior to its male-exclusive counterparts due to its ability to stay in Super Mode far longer than normal. Annoyingly enough, while you can eventually change the appearance of your character as much as you want, you can't change your gender.
    • Some pieces of dialogue seem to have been written under the assumption that the player character would be male. For example, one of the woodcutters claims to have trouble speaking with women (this obviously becomes an Informed Flaw if you're playing as female) and the mercenary Master song is all about the narrator getting a girlfriend. There also the fact that when Laura gets locked into her room to be kept away from an increasingly aggressive Napdragon, Erik's official excuse is basically that she shouldn't be out adventuring because she's a girl. Ophelia thankfully gives him an earfull about that excuse.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Cases show up a few times in the story.
    • At some point, your landlord needs a carpenter to repair your roof while you go somewhere else, which may feel strange if you happen to be a carpenter at that point. There is also short periods during which you are somewhat working against Mustang and the other paladins, which may feel like mild treason if you're playing one.
    • Whenever you go to a new location, or meet a new person in the main story, the game acts as if you have never been there before or met the person in question, even though it is easily possible to, say, meet the Princess free-roamingly before you meet her "for the first time" in the story.
    • You will always meet Damien/Daemon the day before his 15th birthday.
    • The means of transportation that take you to Levitania and later the Starlight Garden can't take more than one person in addition to the pilot when used in the story, but will accept your full party of three with no problem later on.
    • Plushlings falling off Levitania are spoken of, but it can't actually happen to the player or enemies.
    • The plots of the tutorial quests sometimes have an element that only makes sense if they happen before a certain point in the storyline.
    • The tutorials for the Blacksmith and Carpenter lives require you to go grab materials from Miner or Woodcutters. No matter what order you play them in, they'll never remember that you're already acquainted.
    • To prevent the player from Sequence Breaking the crafting Life-specific introductory quests with materials they most likely already possess (after all, since you can skip the said intro quests after the first one, it doesn't make much sense to want to start skipping it once you've already decided you want to do it), all of them use unique recipes and ingredients that you can't get or use outside of that quest and the second you finish making your new one-of-a-kind item, the game forces you to sell it to the person who asked for it.
    • The tutorial quests show colleagues do things that the player never gets to do even after outranking the colleague in question. For example Hazel summoning a practice dummy or Chic making ribbon out of wool.
  • Gameplay Automation: Once you successfully craft a stackable item in any of the crafting classes enough times, you can make up to 10 of them at the same time. Keep making more of them and you'll unlock Automatic mode that crafts the item automatically, but with a much lower chance of making extra copies or super versions of the item in case of consumable items and basically nonexistent chance of making higher quality items for equipment and furniture. If you make even more of the item, you unlock Auto+, which can make super quality consumables reliably and can probably manage a good quality piece of furniture or equipment, although it's unlikely you'll end up making that many of the latter.
  • Girls with Moustaches: Players of both sexes can sport facial hair.
  • Give Me Your Inventory Item: Some of the quests. People asking for a craftable item will usually ask for at least a quality version of the item to keep you from just buying from the store, if not something that is only obtainable via crafting.
  • Green Hill Zone: The Grassy Plains.
  • God Is Good: Divinus, Yuelia and Noelia's father. He's surprisingly down-to-earth and somewhat of a Bumbling Dad.
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: Lampshaded by Laura when she finds out the player got past the paladins guarding her room due to having a pie. That specific instance may however be justified since it seems like everyone that wasn't Erik was conspiring to get the player into Laura's room, to the point that Ophelia was the one who provided the pie.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Mount Snowpeak is a mishmash of settings, with one cave filled with lava, another filled with water, and the top of the mountain being covered in snow. Most of Al Maajik has an "Arabian Nights" Days atmosphere, but the palace and its immediate surroundings look more like a Bleak Level.
  • Happily Married: King Erik and queen Ophelia.
  • He Went That Way: Your first encounter with Princess Laura quickly turns into this.
  • Henpecked Husband: The former Dark Sultan. Divinus is one too. Though his wife isn't around much.
  • Hero of Another Story: Noelia and her gang in Port Puerto are this until the Levitania chapter.
  • Hidden Elf Village: The village in Elderwood. Eventually they stop forbidding outsiders from entering.
    • Origin Island in the DLC is a Hidden Elf Island. The inhabitants are forbidden to leave out of fear of causing an "Ancient Disaster" to return.
  • Honest Axe: Discussed. Elmie has pieces of dialogue that state that she's dealing with many people "accidentally" dropping their axes in ponds in hope of getting a gold axe. The Reveria version of the tale is also part of the song played when you become a master woodcutter.
  • Humanity Ensues: Needing one more wish to save Reveria, Yuelia makes a wish to live on Reveria as a human.
  • Hurricane of Puns:
    • Jinx the Master Wizard is a talking cat that speaks almost entirely and unironically in cat puns.
    • A lot of characters are quite prone to these. Notably, Flutter will do this when she's bored.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Food items can heal just as well as potions. You can scarf down as many food items as you want without any ill effects.
  • Ice Magic Is Water: Zig-zagged. The wizard's water magic is water magic in name only, consisting exclusively of different forms of ice. Fire magic, however, is strong against ice-based monsters and weak against water ones.
  • Improbable Age: The many teenage-looking shopkeepers and employees indicate that it's perfectly normal to be working at that age, and Pam's diary hints that the player may have actually started to work on the late side. Nox and Woody's sister are treated as children, but at least look a little older than generic children. One of the cooks has the "little girl from Port Puerto" model, yet works for a very rich man. To compare, the seller for the hunter secret shop is represented by the "little boy from Castele" model and tells the player that Fletcher only lets him use a slingshot.
  • I Never Told You My Name: Characters with an alter ego are quite bad about this when it comes to the player.
    • In the tutorial of the wizard life, Esmeralda even knocked down the fourth wall when she noticed the text box with her name on it, calling it 'convenient'.
  • Informed Flaw: Reveria is supposedly developing a huge problem with citizens choosing not to pursue a Life... despite the fact that nearly every adult NPC in the country either has one or is involved in exchanging goods relevant to one. Pierre and Butch are the only characters in the game who are officially unemployed. Some more specifically say that the crisis is specifically among younger people, but most generic NPCs that look teenage are shopkeepers.
  • In My Language, That Sounds Like...: In the ancient language of Origin Island "Reveria" apparently means something along the lines of "warm, snuggly toes." This becomes a source of some amusement to the Islanders.
  • In-Universe Game Clock: There's a day/night cycle in the game, and it affects where NPCs are and monster spawns.
  • Inexplicable Treasure Chests: They spawn randomly on the field and in dungeons roughly as often as other resources replenish themselves and may or may not be present in the locations they can spawn to. There's also dark purple chests that don't disappear when opened and appear in fixed locations, and hidden treasure chests that can be made to appear by walking around until a "?" pops over your head and pressing A.
  • Interface Spoiler: Between a bliss bonus that consists of extra items for travelling and Elderwood merchants and some life challenges, it's quite easy to know about Elderwood Village and Levitania before the story chapters involving them. The story's construction makes this quite easy because players that think Al Maajik is the last town will want to unlock its "extra items in stores" bonus (which makes Elderwood's equivalent visible) as soon they can due to assuming that there is no "next town" that will have the same items as standard stock. Similarly the bliss rewards for Life Ranks above master are hidden but there's always two blank spaces between each life on the list making it easy to guess there's two more levels.
  • An Interior Designer Is You: You can furnish your homes with furniture you make, buy, or find.
  • Interspecies Romance:
    • The former Dark Sultan and Demona. The latter's a human, the former's a... corpulent dark spirit... thing.
    • In the tailor tutorial quest, Spoolie (plushling) is implied to have a crush on Taylor (human).
    • Pierre falls in love with Leilah late in the story.
  • Item Crafting: Since items you make yourself are usually higher quality than their store-bought counterparts, you'll be doing a lot of this.
  • It's Up to You: The early events that lead the player to become Castele's de facto ambassador are mostly luck and Yuelia playing The Chooser of The One. In some job guilds, it also seems like whatever issue existed before the player's arrival would have never been resolved if the player had'nt shown up. In the two cases where the issue is the master feeling inadequate, that going away when you rank up enough is justified. One of the less justified cases is the wizard guild, where you're basically doing Colin's job while being lower ranked than him a few times.
  • Job System: The basic idea of Fantasy Life is taking the idea of a Job system and running with it. There's 12 "lives" that are broadly put into three categories.
    • Combat: These are along the lines of typical RPG "jobs" with an emphasis on different weapons. Includes Paladin (sword & shield), Mercenary (two handed sword), Hunter (bow & arrow) and Wizard (magic staff).
    • Gathering: Lives based around gathering raw materials. Includes Miner, Woodcutter and Fisher.
    • Crafting: Involves refining raw materials into usable and more valuable items. Includes Blacksmith, Tailor, Carpenter, Cook and Alchemist.
  • Justified Tutorial: You're a complete newbie to whichever job you choose, so getting training in the beginning makes complete sense.
  • Kicking Ass in All Her Finery: You can bring princess Laura and Olivia on a fight with you, but both are spending the day in a Pimped-Out Dress by the time they become available companions. However, the statement is Exact Words when it comes to Olivia as she can be found on her boat in her pirate outfit at night and Laura who can be found in the Castele market in her boy clothes at night. Female players can do this also once they get access to the princess dress.
  • Killer Rabbit: Several Mooks, including literal cases. There's a bounty target in the West Grassy Plains named "Killer Bunny".
  • King Incognito: A disguised Laura can be found in the Castele market every single night. Your first in-story encounter with her also occurs while she's in disguise.
  • King of All Cosmos: Divinus is basically what you'd get if you'd take Santa Claus, made him into a god, gave him an obsession with gardening and made him awkward and easily talked down by his creations.
  • Kleptomaniac Hero:
    • The best way to gain vegetables is to pick them straight from the the NPC farmer's patches. The game handwaves this by saying the farmers already picked all the crops worth selling and the ones left are for the taking.
    • You can also take logs off the woodcutter's cart and ore from the miners. You'll be told it's okay to take the wood if you become a carpenter.
  • Knife Nut: Those who stay away from the combat-type jobs can still use a dagger. When you start the DLC, you also gain additional dagger combos that can be useful if you have no other means of offense.
  • Land of One City: All towns are under the responsibility of a single authority figure that has no power over the other towns.
  • Last of His Kind:
    • The Gigaga you meet on Levitania / Terra Nimbus seems to be the last of his kind left. Turns out there's more of them living on Origin Island.
    • The two beavers living in Castele tell you that they, along with their brother in the Elderwood are the last beavers in Reveria.
    • Pino and Leilah seem to be the only half-human half-monster beings around. The only other human-looking residents of Elderwood village are Marimo (actual human, one of the carpenters) and Elmie who looks like an ordinary human if her preference for Power Floats over walking is ignored.
  • Lava is Boiling Kool-Aid: Not only are you able to walk near lava with no ill effects whatsoever, it also has different kinds of fish living in it that you can fish out with even the weakest and flimsiest rod in the game without any fear of its lure and line melting the second they touch it, and when the lure touches the surface, it causes ripples nearly identical to water.
  • Last Lousy Point: Some crafting classes require the player to max out its "general" ability to become a Legend, while gathering classes will require mining or chopping down 500 ores or trees, respectively. Completing all the other challenges has little chance to get the player anywhere close to that amount naturally, unless it's the side effect of very bad luck when it comes to getting the rare materials or they're ridiculously cheap and refuse to buy any materials from the material sellers. Gathering classes also have to get a number of rare materials to complete their challenges (only the ones gotten as normal material drops count, bounty rewards which are for the most part guaranteed don't), and if you have a low Luck Stat and/or the RNG is feeling spiteful, you can clean out an area of all of its resources several times and never get any of the said rare materials. The sole silver lining is that players with low luck will probably be closer to the quota than players with high luck by the time they get their hands on the rare materials. Finally, since some of the crafting challenges require you to learn a recipe that's also gotten from the person that gives you a challenge for it, finding the right NPC can be a pain in the ass.
  • Level Scaling: The potential combat companions will level up at the same time as the player, but can be a few levels behind (animals and early job allies), at the same level (includes Laura, Yuelia and Noelia) or a few levels higher (includes Odin, Olivia and post-master job allies).
  • Level Up Fill Up: Leveling up fully restores your HP and SP. It can come handy in a pinch.
  • Light Is Not Good: The Trial of Light in Origin Island's Goddess Tower makes it clear that light is not the same thing as good. In fact, from the very first sign plaque in the dungeon...
    ''"Face the light, and see past its beauty. Bear witness to its cruel and fearsome alter ego..."
  • Limit Break: Each Life eventually gains access to a special skill that deals massive damage to a target or automatically completes some steps in crafting.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Each job comes with a master and a handful of colleagues. At least half of the latter will have a unique character design. There are 12 jobs. Throw in the main story characters and some background characters, and you get a huge number indeed.
  • Loads and Loads of Sidequests: Many sidequests are designed so they can only be undertaken under a specific job and the only difference between most of them and challenges is that the challenges work towards ranking up at your job.
  • Luck Stat: Affects critical hit rate, rare drop rate, and crafting quality.
  • Magic Is Mental: Magic Attack, Magic Defense, and Alchemy are all tied to the Intelligence stat.
  • Magikarp Power: Playing the game early on as a Wizard is noticeably harder than other classes, both because your main source of damage is heavily SP-dependent and because you need to kill elemental Wraiths to rank it up, most of which are difficult to kill until you're sufficiently high-leveled. Then again, once you rank them up enough, they're one of the best ranged damage dealers in the game, especially with their ridiculously powerful God/Creator mode.
  • Manchild: King Erik and the former Dark Sultan have this in common.
  • Man-Eating Plant: The walking, talking carrots, radishes and even ginger plants want nothing more than to kick your ass. They're among the weakest enemies in the game, though, so good luck to them.
  • Mass Monster Slaughter Sidequest: Many sidequests have you killing a certain number of a certain enemy.
  • Medium Awareness: A particular event involves a meeting between various characters, and during one Reveal after another the characters would say "EXCLAMATION POINTS!" in surprise, complete with the game's usual red "!" signs appearing on their heads. Later, the same characters also say "DOUBLE EXCLAMATION POINTS!!" and "Question marks?" with the appropriate punctuation marks appearing.
  • The Maze: The Ancient Ruins.
  • Miles Gloriosus: Magnificus, oh so very much. He's supposedly The Hero chosen by Castele to slay the new Dark Sultan Damien and he loves to talk about how great the battle will be; he even names the player his "lowly squire" so that they don't try to take the glory. Fortunately, he's far too cowardly to try to kill Damien or to get himself killed trying.
  • Mister Seahorse: Eggbert the egg-laying rooster. He lampshades it by claiming that it's a mysterious secret how he's able to do it.
  • Mood Whiplash: The Mercenary life song starts off as a slow-paced serious tune describing how the job is all about killing monsters for money, being lonely and having no obligations for anyone...before it speeds up and makes fun about how the above is overly serious and how the singer only wants a girlfriend.
  • Money for Nothing: If you're diligent in completing quests, killing monsters, and gathering and creating items, you'll eventually end up with more money and supplies than you'll ever need. At least there's the houses to purchase.
  • Mundane Made Awesome:
    • Each Life has a special skill that can be used when you fill up a gauge by performing the job's main activity; in case of item-creating Lives, this is some variation of an elaborate pose followed by Ridiculously Fast Construction and in case of resource-gathering Lives, this'll most likely involve some kind of elaborate acrobatics that most likely completes the task in a single use.
    • All gold-crown bounties have the same theme when you've engaged them. It's clearly written for the combat bounties, which makes it rather amusing when you're going for a gold-crown ore or tree, and the "epic battle" consists of you circling an inanimate object and plinking for the weak point. Also amusing when you're standing in one spot and reeling in a gold-crown fish.
  • Nature Spirit: All residents of Elderwood village have a degree of this, safe for the two that are part of the carpenter Cast Herd.
  • News Travels Fast: If you rank up in a job, all colleagues, including those outside Castele, will instantly know of it. This is sometimes justified by explicit mention of letters sent or pairs that are implied to have regular communication offscreen.
  • The Night That Never Ends: The result of Lunares' eclipse closing. Reveria is darkened for weeks until your adventure on Lunares is complete, and the game ends as the sun rises once more.
  • No Antagonist: As part of the main story, although some of the life missions for combat classes occasionally subvert this. Specifically, the Void acts as a true final boss lair for the Paladin, Mercenary and Hunter lives respectively, where the player is tasked to defeat the shadow variant of the type of boss monsters that have encountered up to that stage in the game. Either a Shadow Dragon, a Shadow Dinosaur, or a Shadow Big Beak respectively. Meanwhile Wizards are tasked with defeating Calamitus, a Shadow Wraith, which unlike other wraiths is believed to be inherently evil.
  • Non-Combat EXP: Life-related activities like woodcutting, carpentering or smithing will net you EXP.
  • Non Lethal Ko:
    • Getting 0 HP will only cause NPC allies to be out of commission for 60 seconds. Touching them will bring them back to half health immediately. If you loose your life, you have 30 seconds to choose between a life cure, going to your last save point or going to your house.
    • There is a blink-and-you'll-miss-it line given in the Mage class quests that handwaves all the killing you seem to do, stating that you're not actually slaying elemental spirits, you're merely pacifying them which causes them to disappear. Presumably, something similar could count for other monsters as well, and there are cases when characters and guards you "kill" in a story battle will be standing up alive and well as soon as the battle is over.
  • Organ Drops: The "loot" gained from animals is in this form. Most is pretty standard, such as meat, wool, hide, tails, etc.
  • Overnight Age-Up: An old lady in Al Maajik claims to actually be a teenager under a spell that made her older. Given that the earlier mentioned case of Fountain of Youth happened for certain, she may be telling the truth. The reason for which it happened is anyone's guess, however.
  • Pacifist Run: As explained in this article, the game carefully but quietly ensures that you can complete the story without once harming a living thing. You can also reach Master rank in every non-combat Life, though this is much harder and frequently requires completing higher-ranked challenges before you formally receive them.
  • The Paladin: A combat Life the player can choose, focused on defense by equipping sword-and-shield and offering vitality boosts. The paladins as a group are Castele's City Guards and generally aspire to the Knight in Shining Armor ideal. The Life Master, Paladin Mustang, fits the archetype... but the average nameless NPC paladin, while loyal and well-meaning, is rather hapless and easily cowed.
  • Palmtree Panic: Tortuga Archipelago, complete with actual palmtree enemies.
  • Pamphlet Shelf: The Castele and Al Maajik libraries.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: It's blindingly obvious that Steele is the Legendary Ironsmith. They share very characteristic facial hair and Steele's cap is easily recognizable as a rolled-up version of the Legendary Ironsmith's mask.
  • Parental Abandonment: Quite a few guild colleagues either have at least one parent missing or seem to have been Raised by Grandparents. The issue never comes up for most of them, but the few times someone turns out to be another character's parent or grandparent, not meeting or hearing about that person's other grandparent and/or parent(s) comes off as a little strange.
  • Physical God: Yuelia, Noelia, Celestia and Divinus
  • Power Up Letdown: The area of effect fire spell has a shorter range than its air and water counterparts (since it essentially functions as a magic-based flamethrower), making it completely useless as a means of hitting bosses multiple times from a safe distance. By comparison, the charged single-target fireball has better range, does about three times the damage of a single hit from its area of effect counterpart and uses less stamina. Its powered up version is somewhat better since its fire effect persists longer and allows you to move after you cast it but before the spell dissipates, allowing you to briefly stunlock enemies.
  • Pretty Freeloaders: After Yuelia decides to stay on Reveria, she's content to stay at your place in Castele instead of finding her own place to live. Though considering you need to talk to her to check your Bliss, and can invite her into your party (and she's pretty damn powerful too) you probably won't complain.
  • Princesses Prefer Pink: The princess dress happens to be one of the clothing items that comes out pink if dyed red.
  • Prophetic Names: Lampshaded with Gaites, one of the guards at Castele's, well, gate, who after introducing himself tells you that before you ask, yes, his name was a coincidence, and his parents had no idea he'd end up guarding gates for a living.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Your character's gender doesn't affect the gameplay or story, although some of the clothing and armor is gender-exclusive.
  • Purple Is Powerful: You get an eyeful of the color once you get near the Al Maajik palace.
  • Real-Time with Pause: Opening your inventory pauses the game. There, you can eat some mutton and a few carrots to restore your health, then change you equipment around completely.
  • Regenerating Health: The boss-level trees and ores are constantly getting a little of health back, so you can't take them down until you can grab a mana potion or two faster than it can get back to full health.
  • Regenerating Mana: Your SP slowly recharges over time, but SP potions exist if needed.
  • Reptiles Are Abhorrent: After bandit type enemies the second most common enemy type paladins are tasked with defeating is reptiles, specifically snake and dragon type enemies, most likely because of this trope.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: The Plushlings, who are basically living plush toys.
  • Rousseau Was Right: Seems to be the underlying message of the game. Nobody acts out of malice, and the worst characters in the game are a pair of hoodlums (not counting the bandit enemies), and even they go straight. Most problems are caused by misunderstandings, monsters (who all appear to have the intelligence of wild animals), and the Doom Stones.
  • Sand Is Water: You can't swim in it, but go ahead and throw out a fishing line, since there are fish living in it. The same goes for ''lava'', too.
  • Schizo Tech: It's a Standard Fantasy Setting with 19th century-style airships and early airplanes.
  • Script Breaking: Some lives have challenges consisting of gathering stuff that can also be bought at stores or dropped from enemies. If you start a life with an item you're supposed to gather sooner or later during that live's challenges already in your bag, the challenge involving it is considered completed. While it's a good way to boost the stat bonuses, you'll be stuck with the starter tools until you do a little Stat Grinding and miss out on some of the NPC dialogue associated with the rank(s) you skipped. And you can't pull the trick after starting the life in question.
  • Secret Keeper:
    • The Woodcutters take Elderwood village's existence for granted due to being able to see its natives.
    • It seems like half of the blacksmith guild is (badly) hiding that Steele is the Legendary Ironsmith from the other half, including the player.
  • Shaped Like Itself: The second town, Port Puerto. For those of you with rusty Spanish, puerto means "port" in English. It may be called this due to the English-speaking pirates and the bilingual townsfolk living in the same place.
  • Shout-Out:
    • In the English dub of the Mercenary tutorial: "And our survey says... EH-ERR! Wrong answer! ...But this isn't a quiz show."
    • Outside of town just outside the forest to the left is a roped off crater with a familiar shape for those who played Dragon Quest IX.
    • The names of three of the people living in the Castele castle: Mustang, Hughes and Erik. If it's not quite obvious, remember the thing about 'r' and 'l' being the same in phonetic Japanese transcriptions of foreign names. In this context, "Erik" would be quite close to say... "Elric".
    • In addition, the names of Pam's three sisters are Jo, Beth, and Amy. Now, if Pam was instead named Meg...
    • The North America password for the Angelic Costume is "I'm finished!" Also, the description for the shorts part of this outfit says they are comfy and easy to wear.
    • The North America password for the Snowman Decoration is "Wanna build me?".
    • There's also a very subtle Shout-Out to Dracula. One of the Cook's Meat recipes is Bandit Steak, a reference to the Robber Steak Jonathan Harker had for dinner at the beginning of the novel. Although Bandit Steak is different from Robber Steak (An actual steak with broccoli and Giant Tree Nuts compared to shish-ke-bab style beef, bacon and onion) any notion of pure coincidence is steaked down with the matching seasoning for the Bandit Steak: Red Peppercorns.
    • The North American translation gives a certain item the name of "Diabolical Box", a reference to a certain other Level-5 game.
    • A Majiknight named Luke asks the player to make him a new set of clothes for a job interview. The second item, a hat, is accompanied by a remark to the effect of "a true gentleman needs a good hat".
    • A member of the Order of Calumnus asks for pieces of a fossil. Completing the quest causes him to complain that fossils are for puzzle obsessed archaeologists.
    • After receiving a gift from a certain Life NPC for ranking up, the player can talk to him again to hear the following line: "Well, I didn't casually wander 'round people's homes opening chests and smashing their pots to find it!"
    • One of the craftable swords is called a Key Cutter. Its description notes that it is supposedly the key to the hearts of monsters, while wishing that it could open treasure chests.
  • Sidequest Sidestory: Job advancement becomes this in regards to the main story, as earning higher ranks will unlock new dialogue from colleagues that usually calls back to the tutorial quest and serves to introduce colleagues that live outside of Castele.
  • Silent Protagonist: While a voice can be picked for the player it will only be for battle cries while Flutter does most of the talking. It's lampshaded several times when characters say that you don't talk a lot.
  • Skill Point Reset: Late in the game you meet someone who can allow you to re-distribute your stat points for a price. With the DLC, you can buy an item that lets you do it in your room for free. Both of these are useful for finishing some of the harder challenges if you don't feel like grinding character levels to distribute more stats for the relevant stat, increasing the level of the skill itself or increasing the skills that allow you to make sufficiently powerful tools, weapons and/or armor needed for the challenge.
  • Sleep-Mode Size: Yuelia and Noelia's butterfly forms.
  • Sliding Scale Of Linearity VS Openness: Level 5, which is fitting considering they made the game. The game is a Wide Open Sandbox, but Opening the Sandbox requires progression of the story.
  • Socialization Bonus:
    • Tougher bosses are more easily taken down with some human partners.
    • Setting an item as your StreetPass gift lets anyone who befriends your NPC copy get that item after talking to them about five times. What the game doesn't think to mention is that if the item is stackable, the gift will be the entire stack — up to the cap of 99!
  • Spin Attack: In a similar vein to The Legend of Zelda, the Paladin's charge attack involves spinning one's sword, attacking enemies in all directions. They can also finish off their combo starting from a dash attack with one once you reach God/Creator rank.
    • This is an even bigger focus for the Mercenary, whose attacks involve either using a self-created tornado to carry them to the enemy, allowing them to hit the enemy multiple times, or spin around to shoot the tornado itself at the enemy.
  • Spiritual Successor:
  • Starter Equipment: On two levels. All players start the game with a default outfit and a dagger. Each job will give you a free uniform with better stats than the default clothes and a starting tool or weapon.
  • Stat Grinding: In addition to levels, you improve your various skills like archery, carpentry, and mining by using them.
  • Stationary Boss: The high-level materials for the gathering classes.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: If you walk around with a weapon drawn, your various followers, especially pets, won't hesitate to charge that massive dragon or bear, even if it could kill them in one hit. Keeping the weapon sheathed isn't that easy as the same button is needed to pick plants and one step can make a difference in the action undertaken.
  • Sundial Waypoint: Let's just say that it's a good idea to wait for nighttime to investigate the sunken ship.
  • Super Mode: Once you reach God/Creator, you can fill up your special gauge twice: when you use it at that point, crafting-based lives automatically finish whatever item they're working on with an automatic Great rank, combat-based lives gain a major powerup that lasts for a minute or so (Paladins gain total invincibility, Mercenaries deal double damage, Hunters always deal critical hits and Wizards deal triple damage and their spells cost no SP to cast) and Miner and Woodcutter do increased damage to their target and all of it counts as a weak point. The last 6 lives listed also have a regenerating special gauge for the duration of the powerup, guaranteeing that you can use their Limit Break at least twice before it runs out.
  • Surpassed the Teacher: Despite what the name would imply, "Master" rank isn't the highest you can go, that just means you've reached the same skill level as your boss. Reaching Hero and later, Legend means you've done this.
  • Surplus Damage Bonus: For Woodcutters and Miners, if you manage to deal enough overkill damage to a resource, you'll get more drops.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: The boy with the blue cap is Princess Laura.
  • Sword Beam: The Mercenary's "Shockwave" ability is a Charged Attack which launches one of these.
    • The Paladin's Limit Break attacks sends out a flurry of projectiles from your sword.
  • Take Your Time: Even when told to get somewhere as fast as possible, nothing is really keeping you from shopping before doing so. Sometimes subverted if you're early in the story as you eventually get vocation challenges that require going to a location that hasn't been unlocked yet. In-story, this becomes even more blatant once it turns out that the cross on Lunares that shows up relatively early in the story was supposed to be a signal from Divinus to his daughters meaning "come back home now if you don't want to be destroyed along with this world.".
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: They live in Port Puerto and are surprisingly chummy with the local aristocrats. The current governor and her brother are even the children of a pirate and an aristocrat.
  • Thriving Ghost Town: All qualify, but Elderwood village and the plushling settlement are the most blatant cases with a population that can be counted on two hands and facilities reduced to an inn and a single shop. Castele and Al Maajik avoid feeling like one via being subdivided into different sections and having many "just for show" buildings. Port Puerto is somewhere between the two, having the population of Castele and Al Maajik but an architecture that makes the lack of housing a little obvious.
  • Those Two Bad Guys: Pierre and Butch. Though they're not really that bad, and they even go straight late in the story.
  • Tragic Keepsake: This was Yuelia and Noelia's initial motivation to save Reveria and Celestia's ship respectively.
  • Total Eclipse of the Plot: It's a moon eclipse, but it gets completely obscured like what would happen in a sun eclipse. However justified given its actual nature.
  • 20 Bear Asses: Several requests have you collecting monster drops for people.
  • Underground Monkey: Many enemies are variants of each other. Combat classes will be especially prone to noticing this as the challenges basically consist in killing all the environmental variants of the same 5 or 6 enemies.
  • Unstable Equilibrium: Special skill gauges for crafting classes, that eventually let you automatically do great on a certain number of consecutive moves, fills up faster if you're already doing great at the minigame.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight:
    • Some battle companions will cause this. By the time the game is finished, options will include royalty and a type of creature whose mere existence is discovered over the course of the story.
    • The allies themselves can be guilty of this due to basically becoming Player Mooks when they tag along. You can for example bring crafting job colleagues that probably seldom leave their own town to Levitania, Elderwood village and the Starlight garden without eliciting a single reaction.
  • Useless Useful Stealth: In addition to the existence of the classic "you have to kill enemies to open that pathway" system and the combat class challenges, it can't be used while holding a bounty. To top it off, the attack zones of most monsters are so small that "just keep moving at normal speed until it leaves you alone" is a high success rate strategy unless you happen to be in a place with lots of bridges/narrow paths and small platforms.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: Some combat class challenges will be personal requests from colleagues that can also be recruited as allies and will strongly hint they'd like to be part of your party when you tackle them. Circumstances, however, may make you favor other allies or players as party members in the name of actually getting the job done. When you get high level enough to tackle the boss more or less on your own, you may find yourself doing a second run with the colleague that wanted to kill it just to make up for not taking them the first time.
  • Virtual Paper Doll: Almost everything you equip can be seen on your character.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: The Wraiths for the Wizards. They cannot be hurt while preparing some attacks, so bad timing and/or luck can make you waste lots of stamina on an attack that ends up doing no damage at all. They also start healing when they reach less than half HP, so it's perfectly possible to get mid-way through the fight and realize that the damage dealt isn't actually enough. If you have been playing solo or just with pets up to then, these will make you seriously look into cooperative play and/or NPC allies.
  • Warp Whistle: You can teleport to your home, your current master's home and the guild. The vacation houses are later added. And in the DLC, you can use this to get to Divinus' place as well.
  • Was Once a Man: The former Dark Sultan, perhaps as a result of his large dark magical power, no longer resembles a human and appears more as a floating dark shadowy spirit.
  • Weapon of Choice: While any class can use any weapon, the four combat classes have weapon types that they excel at: small swords and shields for Paladins, broadswords for Mercenaries, bows and arrows for Hunters, and staffs for Wizards.
  • We Buy Anything: There's no restrictions on what shopkeepers will buy from you. Go ahead and sell your weapons to the clothing shopkeeper.
  • We Cannot Go On Without You: You can revive NPC allies. If the player get knocked out, it has to use a life cure or end the battle even if the NPC allies are alive and well.
  • Weird Moon: Lunares is this by virtue of being both the moon AND the sun, with day and night being caused by it changing color and brightness. Furthermore, it's actually a hole in the sky, letting in light from another dimension with presumably its own day-night cycle. When the hole is closed, the entire world of Reveria goes dark.
  • What's Up, King Dude?:
    • King Erik invokes this trope by allowing all the common folk of Castele to walk into his royal court to chat with him. The guards do insist you at least dress decently, but in practice will accept something as simple as wearing a bowtie with your peasant rags.
    • The player becomes quick friends with both Olivia and Daemon/Damien by the time their respective chapters are finished. That makes the player free to come and go in their respective palaces. In addition, Olivia spends nights outside hers.
  • When Trees Attack: Some of the enemies in the Elderwood are living trees. There's also living palm trees in Tortuga Archipelgo.
  • World Tree: The Starlight Garden on Lunares has trees that each contain an entire universe, including Reveria's. And for some reason, the Goddess' ship that you use to get there is next to Reveria's tree in miniature form.
  • Wutai: A very mild case. Miguel's house in Al Maajik has tatami on the floor and scrolls with chinese-looking characters on the walls alternating with lit candles. Miguel and his adoptive granddaughter Melusine also use weapons resembling katanas. This is about as Japanese as the setting gets.
  • Year Outside, Hour Inside: The presumably short time spent in the Starlight Garden by the player and Yuelia was weeks long from Laura's point of view.
  • You ALL Look Familiar: A partial case. Strictly speaking, it's not hard at all to find several people with the same model, which will sometimes include knowing of a handful of people looking just like one of your job colleagues. However Castele, Port Puerto and Al Maajik each have their own set of "generic" adult and child designs. Finally, the job colleagues with unique designs, story characters and noteworthy citizens taken together make a total of at least 50 unique models scattered within the game.
  • You Can See Me?: The Leafes living outside Elderwood will have this reaction if you talk to them without any experience as a woodcutter.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Character hair can be one of many colors ranging from typical shades of brown and yellow to pink, green and indeed, blue.
  • You Shouldn't Know This Already: Thankfully averted when it comes to various job-specific challenges for combat and gathering jobs: as long as you're in the correct job and your stats are high enough, you can kill, mine, fish or cut down the toughest challenge-related enemy, mineral, fish or tree in the game right after you finish (or skip) the job introductory quest and it'll count as completed, possibly allowing you to advance multiple job ranks simultaneously: this comes especially handy when a challenge is normally only gotten from talking to an NPC but you don't feel like hunting down every job-related NPC to find out which one of them gives it to you. That being said, you still need to ultimately complete all the lower-ranked challenges eventually as well to be able to reach the maximum rank and you can't complete the missing crafting challenges without the recipes the said NPCs give to you.
  • Zip Mode: Eventually, you can take airships to various destinations, and you always have the ability to return to your house, guild house, or life master from the menu.
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